Downtown Moves Report-Draft_May22 | Ottawa | Street

Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Greenberg Consultants Inc. David S. McRobie Architects Inc. Vélo Québec

Interim Progress Report: May 22, 2012

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Contents 1 Introduction 2 Vision
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3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets 4 Street Demonstrations 5 Implementation
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Appendices

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1.1 Background & Study Purpose 1.2 Study Area & Study Context 1.3 Study Objectives 1.4 Study Process & Communications 1.5 Environmental Assessment Considerations

1 Introduction

This chapter explains the background, purpose, objectives, study area and study process of the Downtown Moves study.

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1.1 Background & Study Purpose

Downtown Moves is an urban design and transportation study that identifies ways to create vibrant, safe and accessible streets for pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders by restoring a balance among street users and by improving the streetscape environment. The study informs the City on how to best capitalize on the transformative opportunities presented by the implementation of the Ottawa Light Rail Transit (OLRT) project, and other major infrastructure projects in the downtown. The City’s overall aim is to make walking, cycling and transit be more comfortable and convenient by enhancing the environmental quality of the public realm with streetscape amenities and facilities, as well as allocating the appropriate balance of surface space with the network of street right-of-ways downtown. Downtown Moves also examines ways to seamlessly integrate the future LRT stations at street level and provides a framework to guide a wide range of planning and engineering projects proposed for the downtown. Detailed analysis of Downtown Ottawa’s policy framework and existing conditions is available in Appendix A and B of this report. The study builds upon the guidance provided in the City of Ottawa Official Plan, the recommendations in the 2004 Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy, the 2008 Transportation Master Plan, the City’s Pedestrian Plan and Cycling Plan, and a host of other studies and projects. Moreover, City Council understands that a prosperous efficient city is one that embraces walking, cycling, and transit use as priority modes. A more walkable, liveable and sustainable downtown will also be more economically competitive over the long term. This theme is echoed in the City’s Official Plan and in the guiding principles of Choosing Our Future, the long term plan for the Nation’s Capital.

Previous Related Studies in Immediate Context of the Study Area > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > > Choosing Our Future (City of Ottawa), 2012 Rideau Street Vision Statement and Guiding Principles (City of Ottawa), 2011 Rideau Street Urban Design Study (City of Ottawa), 2007 Downtown Ottawa Transit Tunnel (DOTT) (City of Ottawa), 2011 Ottawa Light Rail Transit (LRT) (City of Ottawa), Ongoing Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy (City of Ottawa), 2004 Mid-Centretown Community Design Plan (City of Ottawa), 2011 Escarpment District Community Design Plan (City of Ottawa) Pilot Laurier Ave Segregated Bicycle Lane (City of Ottawa), 2011 King Edward Avenue Lane Reduction Study (City of Ottawa), Construction nearing completion Municipal Parking Management Strategy (City of Ottawa), 2009 Integrated Street Furniture Program (ISFP) (City of Ottawa), Release of revised RFP RFP submission due date and RFP evaluations TBD by City of Ottawa. , Bronson Avenue Reconstruction (City of Ottawa), Scheduled to be rebuilt in 2011-2013 Ottawa Pedestrian Plan, as part of ‘Ottawa On the Move’ (City of Ottawa), 2009 Bayview/Somerset Area Secondary Study (City of Ottawa), 2005 Horizon 2067: The Plan for Canada’s Capital (NCC), Ongoing Capital Urban Lands Master Plan (NCC), Ongoing Canada’s Capital Core Area Sector Plan (NCC), 2005 Sparks Street Mall Vocation Study (NCC), Ongoing Urban Design Study: Sussex Drive, Rideau Street and Colonel By Drive (NCC), 2009

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1 Introduction

1.2 Study Area & Study Context

The primary Study Area is the Central Business District of the Central Area (north of Gloucester Street, between Bronson and the Rideau Canal), and including a portion of Rideau Street, the Rideau Centre, and the Ottawa Convention Centre. This area captures the three planned OLRT stations in Downtown Ottawa. The broader Study Context includes the surrounding areas of the downtown (MidCentretown, the Escarpment District, Rideau Street, the Parliamentary Precinct, as well as portions of the University of Ottawa, the Byward Market and LeBreton Flats). These areas have been the subject of many past, on-going and recently completed plans, projects, and strategies. The study limits are illustrated in Figure 1.
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Figure 1: Study Area and Study Context

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1.3 Study Objectives

The overall purpose of the study is to complete an open and consultative planning and design process that produces an integrated urban design and transportation strategy for the future of Downtown Ottawa’s street network, leveraging the opportunities to connect at the street level with the three proposed downtown LRT stations. The strategy pursues a spatial and functional balance among street users that is in keeping with the City’s desire for its streets to be highly coveted public spaces as well as effective mobility routes conducive to active transportation and transit as priority modes. The study promotes some provocative “moves” that the City can make in Downtown Ottawa. The key tasks are: > Study Area Conditions: To study the land use, urban design, transportation and environmental policies, conditions, projects, opportunities and constraints that will inform the range of integrated urban design and mobility solutions to be evaluated. > Discover Best Practices: To report on the body of knowledge associated with transforming the downtowns of other cities into more walking, cycling, and transit-oriented areas through integrated urban design and transportation solutions, highlighting those applicable to the Ottawa context. > Coordinate with Other Studies, Projects and Investigations: To identify other relevant projects and studies in the downtown and to draw together the proponents to dialogue, to explore common objectives, and to integrate activities where appropriate. > Propose Strategic Mobility and Design Framework: To re-imagine Downtown Ottawa’s network of connected streets, routes, buildings and public spaces that achieves a desirable urban character and a balance that favours walking, cycling and transit use, having regard for the future LRT stations and associated at-grade opportunities and changed transportation flows. This can be achieved through an evaluation of one-way to two-way

street conversion, opportunities to improve the quality and connectivity of sidewalks and the right-of-way in Downtown Ottawa, amongst others. > Recommend Design Solutions: To provide a suite of specific street design solutions that will enable the City to “build out” the recommended mobility network, including a recommended set of preferred projects and methods to implement. > Provide Implementation Strategy: To provide a strategic implementation framework that will be a road map for the City and stakeholders to follow towards the actual construction of the mobility network, as well as guiding associated activities of other agencies and the private sector including recommendations for subsequent designs or studies. > Provide Collaborative Study Process: To deliver the study products within an open and collaborative process that enables the understanding by, and endorsement of, elected officials, City staff, and a wide range of community, business and agency stakeholders.

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1 Introduction

1.4 Study Process & Communications

The overall work approach to this study is based on a philosophy of teamwork, involving City staff, the consulting team and stakeholders. It is also very important to maximize work productivity, encourage decision-making and tap into specialized expertise when needed. To this end, this study adopted a work structure that divided participants into three groups: Project Management Committee, Downtown Moves Working Group and the Downtown Moves Resource Team. This is used as the platform for broader public involvement.

that helped to guide the study, and included representation from Ward Councillors, key City branches, other government agencies such as the National Capital Commission (NCC) and Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO), area Business Improvement Areas (BIAs), Community Associations, special interest groups, land owners and other groups. Downtown Moves Resource Team The Downtown Moves Resource Team was formed to capture a broad group of potentially interested persons and to address the full range of technical matters and special interests pertaining to the study. Individuals from the Resource Team were provided the opportunity to comment on study initiatives and deliverables and to provide technical and/or unique knowledge and advice at key decision points throughout the study, as required by the Downtown Moves Working Group. The Team was not required to attend study meetings, but rather, formed a resource pool from which the Downtown Moves Working Group and study managers drew upon to help inform the study and work through issues that arose. Communications largely were through electronic means, including email circulation/review of study deliverables. The Team was also a medium for collecting and disseminating information and responses pertaining to study activities. Broader Public Involvement As part of the Downtown Moves study, a Mobility Summit took place on November 2-3, 2011. This event brought together national and international experts, community leaders, municipal staff and stakeholder agencies to listen and share their experiences. The Summit was successful in generating public enthusiasm, stimulating a constructive dialogue about Ottawa’s downtown streets, and gaining political and stakeholder support for the Study. Three public lectures by keynote speakers Gil Peñalosa (8-80 Cities), Andrew Wiley-Schwartz (New York City Department of Transportation), and Ken Greenberg (Greenberg Consultants Inc.) attracted more than 400 people who had the oppor-

Figure 2: Communication Structure

A Summary of Stakeholder Desires is available as part of Appendix B and a Stakeholder Input Summary is available in Appendix F. Project Management Committee The Project Management Committee (PMC) kept the City informed, addressed outstanding issues, made design decisions, discussed study strategy and monitored the scope of the work. This committee was composed of the City’s study project manager, other key City staff, and lead members of the consulting team. Downtown Moves Working Group The Downtown Moves Working Group assisted the City in advancing the study, providing input and solutions to issues. This group also relayed information back to their individual organizations and, conversely, brought questions/concerns from their organizations to the Working Group. This was the primary consultation group

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tunity to interact with the speakers, City staff and the project consulting team, and to learn more about the Downtown Moves study. In addition, a day-long workshop was attended by approximately 50 stakeholders from various City branches and government agencies, as well as business/community organizations and special interests. The participants worked collaboratively to discuss the study. The first Downtown Moves workshop was guided by three main questions: 1. How will the three downtown LRT stations change walking and cycling needs and priorities in the Study Area? 2. What are the opportunities to increase the balance and quality of public space available to pedestrians and cyclists in the Study Area? 3. What are the barriers to transforming Ottawa’s downtown streets and what is the best way to break through them? The prevailing theme expressed at the workshop is that there are many opportunities to re-balance the functionality of Ottawa’s downtown streets in favour of walking, cycling, and transit use, having regard for the opportunities that will be created by the planned Ottawa Light Rail Transit (LRT) project. Examples of opportunities suggested included allocating more (and better) space within the street right-of-way for use by pedestrians and cyclists, improving walking and cycling connectivity within the downtown area and to/from the planned LRT stations, and improving walking and cycling connectivity between downtown and adjacent areas such as Centretown and the Dalhousie Ward, the Escarpment District and LeBreton Flats, Rideau Street and the By-Ward Market, and Sandy Hill and the University of Ottawa. Participants who attended The Mobility Summit also expressed to the Downtown Moves project team their satisfaction with the public lectures as well as with the
Figure 3: First Downtown Moves Workshop

quality of the comments and observations presented by the various stakeholders during the workshop. The first Open House for the Downtown Moves study took place on January 18, 2012 at City Hall. Approximately 75 participants attended the event and had the opportunity to learn more about the study’s objectives, research completed to date, strategic directions and how to become involved. Thirteen illustrative panels highlighted information about the project. Then participants had the opportunity to engage with the Project Team and provide their comments on how to restore a balance among street users in Downtown Ottawa. On a large map of the Central Area, open house attendees identified where they worked and lived. Participants were a mix of residents and office workers – some were both – living and working in the Central Area.

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1 Introduction

On another map, participants located the best places and the most problematic places to walk, cycle and drive. Green spaces, Sparks Street, and open space and plazas where highlighted as good places. The problematic areas seemed to be at intersections and a great emphasis was placed on the transition areas into the downtown – the Albert/Slater and Bronson area on the west escarpment area, and the Sussex, Mackenzie and Rideau Street area. Finally on a large Map on the table, open house participants were asked to be more specific by placing “post-it” notes with their observations and comments on the map. The comments and their locations were captured on a map and list. The feedback and comments received during the Open House were analysed by the Project Team, shared with members of the Working Group and informed the Downtown Moves study. A second workshop was held on April 19, 2012. The objective of this workshop was to report to stakeholders on study progress, and to engage them in two activities. The first activity included small-group discussions on the distinguishing characteristics of the various streets in Downtown Ottawa. This discussion informed the project team when contemplating a “Plan of Downtown Streets”. The second activity involved a small-group design charrette, where stakeholders worked together to review and comment on the Project Team’s work-in-progress on the design of five streets. [Note: This Section will be updated as the study progresses]
Figure 4: Second Downtown Moves Workshop

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1.5 Environmental Assessment Considerations

One of the outcomes of the Downtown Moves study is to identify potential capital projects. Some of those projects may be subject to the 2011 Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (EA) process. Examples would include: > Streetscaping not part of another project (Schedule A+); > Construction of localized improvements (Schedule A); > Road side park (Schedule A); and, > Reconstruction or widening where the reconstructed road or other linear paved facilities (e.g. HOV lanes ) will not be for the same purpose, use, capacity or at the same location as the facility being reconstructed (e.g. additional lanes, continuous centre turn lane (Schedule B if <$2.4 m, Schedule C if >$2.4 m). The study has been undertaken as a “Master Plan” to address the initial phases of the Class EA process as defined in the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment as amended in 2011. In conducting the EA, two approaches were considered: Approach 1 – The Master Plan would be done at a broad level of assessment thereby requiring more detailed investigations at the project-specific level in order to fulfil the Municipal Class EA documentation requirements for the specific Schedule B and C projects identified within the Master Plan. No opportunities for Part II Order requests for either the Master Plan or individual projects. Approach 2 – The Master Plan document would be produced at the conclusion of phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class EA process where the level of investigation, consultation and documentation are sufficient to fulfil the requirements for Schedule B projects. Any Schedule C projects, however, would have to later fulfil Phases 3 and 4 prior to filing an ESR(s) for public review. The Master Plan itself is not subject to Part II Order request opportunities but the projects identified within them are. City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Given that the primary purpose of the Downtown Moves Study is to provide a strategy, design guidance, and general direction for future projects, the second approach was utilized. Appendix H provides an Evaluation of Street Network Alternative Solutions.

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1 Introduction

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City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

1 Introduction

2.1 Planning & Design Framework 2.2 Vision & Strategic Directions 2.3 Plan of Downtown Streets

2 Vision

This chapter provides the Vision and Strategic Directions that will guide the planning and design of Ottawa’s downtown streets and the buildings and public spaces along them. A Plan of Downtown Streets is provided.

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2.1 Planning & Design Framework

2.2 Vision & Strategic Directions

The framework that will guide the transformation of Downtown Ottawa’s streets and public spaces will include the components shown in Figure 5. The vision and strategic directions are presented in Section 2.2. A recommended street network is provided in Section 2.3, with design solutions provided in Chapter 3.

Vision Strategic Directions Plan of Downtown Streets Street Design Approach Street Functional Overlays Street Design Toolkit Street Demonstrations Implementation Strategy

Our downtown is about to undergo a transformation that will define a new identity and be the foundation for its prosperity for coming generations. The investment in Light Rail Transit will open and sustain a new pursuit of civic and national pride in the urban quality of our capital City. Our downtown streets will be re-oriented to favour and comfort pedestrians, cyclists and transit users, recognizing that all travellers end and start their trip on foot. With this healthy and active orientation, our streets themselves will begin to be praised as among our city’s most coveted public spaces that in turn spark investment and that are befitting of the highest quality of buildings and open spaces along them. The vision and strategic directions were built based on consultations with stakeholders as summarized in Appendix B.

Figure 5: Components of the design framework

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Strategic Directions
The Strategic Directions establish the Downtown Moves Study philosophy and guide the development and evaluation of all aspects of the Study.

Our Downtown Ottawa streets and public spaces will be:
Light Rail Transit Focused We will plan and design our downtown streets to integrate with and capitalize on the investment in light rail transit by maximizing the ease of mobility of pedestrians and cyclists moving to and from the downtown rapid transit stations as well as the quality of that experience. We will do this by paying extra attention to the pedestrian spaces and cycling facilities serving the station entrances and the sidewalks and crosswalks within proximity. Rebalanced & Equitable We will increase the amount and quality of space on downtown street right-of-ways that serve pedestrians, cyclists and transit users, recognizing the increasingly important role of these modes over time in accordance with current policy direction. We will do this by making decisions on street design, space allocation, and operation that address the needs of pedestrians (including transit riders) and cyclists as our first priority, followed by all other vehicles. The need for emergency service vehicles to move and serve downtown must always be considered. Efficient, Flexible & Affordable We will make the most efficient use of our narrow streets. We will do so by pursuing the flexible and resourceful use of the right-of-way (such as shared spaces) and by identifying and re-programming under-utilized space while having regard for time of day, seasons, and special event opportunities, and by delivering streets that are affordable to construct and maintain over their life-cycle. Capital Public Space We will consider our downtown streets as amongst our capital city’s most important public spaces. We will do so by pursuing a seamless integration of the municipal street environment and civic destinations with that of the Parliamentary Precinct, Confederation Boulevard, and federal attractions such as the National Arts Centre and the Rideau Canal, by having regard for the quality and consistency in the quality of streetscape experiences and physical materials along the interfaces. Other capital cities will look to Downtown Ottawa as an excellent demonstration of pedestrian and cycling priority districts.

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Animated & Captivating We will facilitate people to visit and linger along our downtown streets during weekdays and weekends, daytime and evenings, and in all seasons, by creating vibrant street life and opportunities for social and economic exchange. We will do so by enabling a diversity of at-grade oriented uses such as shops, cafes, and restaurants, and by creating visual interest through public art, excellent architecture, plantings, and streetscape embellishments. Our downtown will become a destination with a strong and identifiable sense of place and belonging. Connective & Continuous We will seek all opportunities to connect streets, pathways, building entrances, attractions, and open spaces within the downtown, as well as to and from adjacent communities such as the Parliamentary Precinct, Lebreton Flats, the Escarpment District, Chinatown, Little Italy, Centretown, Sandy Hill, Rideau Street, the ByWard Market, and Lowertown. We will do so by pursuing safe, convenient and continuous walking and cycling routes, throughblock connections, bike lane extensions, multi-use pathway connections, way-finding systems and key connecting public urban squares and green spaces.

Active & Healthy We will promote a healthy, active downtown lifestyle benefitting from walking and cycling on our downtown streets. We will do so by planning and designing streets that can provide infrastructure and amenities that support this activity, such as communication services, seats/benches, bike parking, shelters and comfort stations, drinking water, food choices, within the right-of-way or in buildings adjacent to it. Safe & Accessible We will ensure that our downtown streets and their connections to buildings and pathways will be safe and accessible to pedestrians and cyclists of all abilities, as well as motorists. We will do so by having regard for existing and emerging design codes and standards for safety and accessibility. Competitive & Catalyzing We will pursue a downtown where existing businesses and employers prosper and reinvest and where asset values are uplifted. We will do so by creating a street environment where consumers spend more time and money, and employees are satisfied with and proud of their place of work in Downtown Ottawa. At the same time, we will provide an adequate (but perhaps incrementally diminishing) supply of on-street parking, loading and taxi areas.

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Liveable We will ensure that, through the quality, comfort, convenience and safety of our streets and supporting land uses and services, our downtown will be a highly coveted “community” to live in. We will do so by creating wonderful downtown streets and an excellent transit system, and by encouraging that supporting services be provided for people of all ages and abilities, including shopping, social services, recreation and health care. Green, Sustainable & Enduring We will create green and enduring downtown streets at a high standard that advances our capital as a sustainable city on the world stage. We will do so by planting trees shrubs and groundcovers wherever there is an opportunity to grow and be cared for, by exploring innovative drainage and paving techniques, by using recycled and energy efficient materials, and by other measures that reduce the street’s life-cycle operating and maintenance requirements and reduce overall environmental footprint.

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2.3 Plan of Downtown Streets

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Plan of Streets

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Streets in Downtown Ottawa are not created equally, nor should they be. On first glance, from a distance, or to a visitor, there may appear to be a certain sameness to the city blocks forming the city core. The first impression is influenced by the abundance of relatively tall buildings that are the place of work for approximately 100,000 people, and the associated downtown activity involving pedestrians, cyclists, buses, and vehicles competing for space on busy streets. However, when peeling back the layers, it becomes apparent that there are many different character areas within the downtown. The analysis presented in Appendix A shows the variability and multiplicity of functions, characteristics, and conditions of downtown streets. This analysis builds on the City’s Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy which began to explore Downtown Ottawa at the street level. Furthermore, there are empty and underused spaces downtown that will be filled in with new buildings, changing the streetscape and adding further activity downtown. Once the OLRT project is running, development and street activity will further accelerate, and the function of some streets may change or be accentuated. With this in mind, it is useful to conceive of the streets downtown in regards their individual natures within a larger “family”. Figure 6 provides the “Plan of Downtown Streets” which is a master plan and the major structuring element for Downtown Moves. Moving forward, Downtown streets will fall into one of six (6) categories, as follows:

Ceremonial Street Ceremonial Streets provide access to uses and places of National importance and have the highest standard of streetscape design and amenity. They also act as connecting routes to, from and through the central area. They also include portions of Confederation Boulevard, which is the Capital’s official ceremonial route as designated in the NCC’s Plan for Canada’s Capital. The streets are characterized by distinctive street lighting, wide sidewalks, and customized streetscape finishes. Adjacent buildings are typically large institutions set well back from the roadway. Ceremonial Streets in Downtown Ottawa include Wellington, Elgin, MacKenzie, Sussex, and the north portion of Colonel By Drive. Wellington and Elgin have a special role in accommodating movement between the portions of Downtown Ottawa on both sides of the Rideau Canal, over the Plaza Bridge. Plaza Street Plaza Streets are primarily oriented to pedestrians, and take on the characteristics of pedestrian plazas. The streets have distinctive surfaces such as paving stones, and are constructed with amenities to provide for pleasing walking environments. Service vehicles can access the street for deliveries and emergencies. Buildings are street-facing with an active at-grade orientation, and with narrow occupancies that provide for interesting storefronts. In Downtown Ottawa, Sparks Street and William Street are Plaza Streets.

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Showcase Street Queen Street is will be Downtown Ottawa’s Showcase Street. This designation recognizes the new vocation of Queen Street that will occur on opening day of the OLRT project. The street will have enormous demands to carry pedestrians to the OLRT station entrances planned along it. This brings a corresponding opportunity and requirement for the street to have generous wide sidewalks with the highest level of service in Ottawa, and amenities to provide for safe, efficient, and comfortable walking. Over time, buildings will become more-street oriented with active uses at grade, benefitting from the new pedestrian economic opportunity. This planned function will be realized by showcasing the highest level of sustainable design, not only in wide sidewalks, but also in creative designs for parking and access, priority crosswalks, street tree planting, drainage, and materials. Main Street Main Streets will prosper in their historic role as providing access to shopping and services to downtown residents, workers, and visitors. These streets are characterized by wide sidewalks, some on-street parking, and street trees. Buildings are street-facing with an active at-grade orientation, and with narrow occupancies that provide for interesting storefronts. In Downtown Ottawa, Bank Street and Rideau Street are Main Streets. Rideau Street will have the added pedestrian-related opportunities arising from the OLRT station located along it. Elgin Street, further to the south, is also a Main Street.

Core Street Core Streets will provide access to the most intensive land uses in Downtown Ottawa. Accordingly, they will provide for high volumes of all modes of movements, acting as connecting routes to, from and through the central area. They also act as pedestrian connections to the Downtown West and Downtown East OLRT Stations. Streets will carry out a multi-modal, utilitarian function, however will provide for improved urban design conditions. Buildings will be oriented to the street as much as possible, recognizing the traditional office functions and large occupancies along-side these streets. East-west Core Streets include the east portions of Albert, Slater, Laurier, and Gloucester, as well as the MacKenzie Bridge and Daly Street. North-south Core Streets include the north portions of Lyon, Kent, O’Connor, Metcalfe and Nicholas. Albert and Slater Streets have an additional opportunity created by the OLRT project, where their bus-carrying function will be diminished on opening day and there will be an opportunity to reprogram their function for walking and cycling. Downtown Neighbourhood Street Downtown Neighbourhood Streets provide access to primarily residential land uses in the western portion of Downtown Ottawa. Here the streets play an important role in creating liveable neighbourhoods, and are expected to include green, living elements including grass and trees in the street right-of-way wherever possible. Buildings will have pedestrian and garage entrances that lead directly to the streets. All portions of East-west streets downtown are to be Downtown Neighbourhood Streets. North-south Downtown Neighbourhood Streets include Bronson Street, Percy Street, Bay Street, and the southern portion of Lyon Street.

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2 Vision

Street, building, and site design decisions in the future will be consistent with the planned function as set out on this Plan of Downtown Streets. It is recognized that certain blocks within portions of these street designations may take on characteristics of another street type within the family.

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City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

3.1 A New Street Design Approach 3.2 Street Functional Overlays 3.3 Street Design Toolkit

3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

This section will be modified as Demonstration Plans are prepared and “workshopped”

This chapter provides guidance on the process and details for planning and designing streets in Downtown Ottawa. A toolkit provides a summary of the elements that when combined, will achieve the vision of enhancing mobility and quality urban design along downtown streets. Tools are described with respect to built form, enhancing the environment for pedestrians, cyclists, transit users and drivers.
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3.1 A New Street Design Approach

The City of Ottawa is responsible for designing, constructing, operating, maintaining, and reconstructing its city streets within City-owned right-of-ways. It is also responsible for issuing development approvals under Ontario’s Planning Act for developments on abutting private land. When creating great streets in Downtown Ottawa, the care and diligence afforded to each activity is as important as the other. It is vitally important that the planning and design objectives for each are harmonized, and that there is a shared understanding of the objectives by the street designers (planners, engineers, landscape architects and architects) and decision-makers. In Downtown Ottawa, space available for City street-building and place-making is scarce. Many street right-of-ways are as narrow as 18m, making them amongst the

narrowest streets in Canada. A detailed street analysis is available in Appendix D. At the same time, there are many competing interests for horizontal space, including sidewalks, bus stops/shelters, landscaping, public art, bicycle parking, vendor boxes, street lights, fire hydrants, on-street parking, and travel lanes. Given the intensity of use and the increase in intensity that is envisioned with the investment on LRT downtown, decisions regarding the allocation of space are anticipated to become more complex. On this basis, a new approach and clear process for design decision-making is required for streets in Downtown Ottawa. The process will be as follows:

1. Refer to the Vision & Strategic Directions 2. Identify Street Type from the Plan of Downtown Streets 3. Prioritize Objectives based on Functional Overlays:
a. Urban Design & Open Space b. Pedestrian Routes c. Cycling Routes d. Transit Routes e. Access & Business

4. Prepare Test Scenarios Using Street Design Toolkit 5. Evaluate Using Strategic Directions & Criteria 6. Make Informed Decisions
Figure 7: Street Design Approach

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3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

This process can also be used to guide the planning and design of major adjacent urban developments in regards the interface of the building with the street. Step 1: Refer to the Vision and Strategic Directions For a street design exercise involving a street in Downtown Ottawa, the first step in the process will be to imbed the Downtown Moves vision and strategic directions within the terms of reference of the project. This will ensure that the street design team, including municipal asset management and infrastructure services staff are well informed of the special design framework applying to streets in Downtown Ottawa. Step 2: Identify Street Type from the Plan of Downtown Streets The second step will be to confirm the street type from the Plan of Downtown Streets. This will establish the street-specific vision for the street and help determine the relative importance of the strategic directions. Step 3: Prioritize Objectives Based on Functional Overlays This step will involve a careful analysis of the functional overlays (as presented in Section 3.2) applying to the street. This analysis will provide specific guidance on many details to be addressed, including the urban design focus and route priorities for pedestrians, cyclists, transit vehicles, and other vehicles requiring access. It is certain that there will be competing interests for space amongst the various stakeholders involved, including City branches, other agencies, and community/ business representatives. It is imperative that a “Street Design Working Group” be established to work together and pursue a shared value of importance of the various overlay components. Technical and public stakeholders will work together as a group towards this important goal. Step 4: Prepare Options Using Street Design Toolkit Once the functional objectives have been established, the street design team will proceed to prepare options for discussion. The options will demonstrate different ways to achieve the objectives, perhaps with greater emphasis put on one function

over another. This will enable stakeholders to see the street design challenges and help provide solutions to resolve the competition for space. Step 5: Evaluate Using Strategic Directions and Criteria Street functional design options will be evaluated against the Vision and Strategic Directions. Various criteria will be assigned to each Strategic Direction to enable this evaluation. It is important to note that some criteria will have a quantitative measure (such as level of service) whereas other criteria will have qualitative measures (such as quality of experience). Although evaluated on different scales, the two types of measures will be equally relevant. Recommendations on preferred functional designs will benefit from the technical evaluation however the more important aspect will be dialogue. Stakeholders with certain values will be given the opportunity to learn from others with differing values. In the end, the street design team will recommend a functional design considering the input provided, and will use the Vision and Strategic Directions to make final determinations where consensus cannot be reached. Step 6: Make Informed Decisions Following the study team’s recommendation on a preferred functional design, the project can proceed to detailed design. Since it is often the details of design that are required to answer design challenges, the Street Design Working Group will continue to guide the design process. In situations where there are divergent views on the preferred functional design, and where a decision is difficult for the team to make unilaterally, the decision will be taken to a committee of City Council to make. This decision will then provide a direction to advance to detailed design. Presentation to a Council committee will make reference to the Vision and Strategic Directions, and the Functional Overlays.

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3.2 Street Functional Overlays

Five Functional Overlays are provided to guide the planning and design of streets and adjacent developments in Downtown Ottawa. The overlays address the following components: 1. Urban Design & Open Space 2. Pedestrian Routes 3. Cycling Routes 4. Transit Routes 5. Access and Business These are presented as “overlays”. They are intended to be overlaid onto the Plan of Downtown Streets. This means that the objectives for each of the five components can be examined in isolation from another, recognizing that there may be inherent conflicts. For example, one overlay may lead the street designer to provide for the widest possible sidewalks, whereas another overlay may point to the need for a high degree of vehicle capacity/accessibility which in turn would consume space. The resolution of such a conflict may have a different result on a Main Street versus a Core Street, for example. The Street Design Approach (Section 3.1) would be used to reconcile these challenges. On each map, the priorities for each component are presented in a hierarchy, with the higher priority being listed first in the map legend. These overlays will be particularly useful in focusing stakeholder dialogue on the planned function of downtown streets or portions of them when they subject to street reconstruction or urban development projects.

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Urban Design/Public Space (Map 1)
Murray

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Portage York Dalhousie Mackenzie Sussex George

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Besserer Sparks
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Street Orientation 2
Street level ground floor with some activity, services. Windows and entrances facing street. Easily improved via renovation.

Street Orientation 3
Ground floor elevated. Windows and entrances facing street. Improvement requires more extensive renovation.

Street Orientation 4
Blank wall/facade facing street. No potential for improvement due to use.

Figure 8: Street Functional Overlay Map 1: Urban Design/Public Space

Street oriented ground floor activity, with shops, restaurants, services. Frequent windows and entrances.

3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

Functional Overlay Map 1: Urban Design

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Walking Routes (Map 2)
Murray

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Pedestrian 1 Pedestrian 2 Pedestrian 3 Pedestrian 4 Priority Pedestrian Crossing Mid-Block Connection (Interior) Mid-Block Connection (Exterior) OLRT Station Entrance

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Very high pedestrian volumes Pedestrianized street

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Figure 9: Street Functional Overlay Map 2: Walking Routes

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City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Functional Overlay Map 2: Walking Routes

3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

Cycling Routes (Map 3a)
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Segregated Bi-Directional Segregated One-Direction Dedicated (Painted) Other On-Street Cycling Routes Shared (Ped/Bike Space) O -Street Pathways

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Figure 10: Street Functional Overlay Map 3a: Cycling Routes - Study Area

3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

Functional Overlay Map 3a: Cycling Routes

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

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Portage

Cycling Routes (Map 3b)
xan Ale dra
St Andrew Guigues Parent St Patrick Murray Portage Clarence Sussex York Dalhousie Cumberland King Edward

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Figure 11: Street Functional Overlay Map 3b: Cycling Routes - Immediate Context Segregated One-Direction

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City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Rochester

Segregated Bi-Directional

Dedicated (Painted) Other On-Street Cycling Routes Shared (Ped/Bike Space) O -Street Pathways

Booth

Bell

Lebreton

Gilmour James Florence Gladstone McLeod Flora Arlington Catherine

Queensway

Segregated Bi-Directional Segregated One-Direction Dedicated (Painted) Other On-Street Cycling Routes Shared (Ped/Bike Space) O -Street Pathways

3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

Transit Routes (Map 4)
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OC Transpo Route Possible OC Transpo Route STO Route Major Bus Stop Zones OLRT Station Entrance Bus and LRT Interface Route OC Transpo Bus Stop STO Bus Stop 600m Radius from OLRT Station

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Figure 12: Street Functional Overlay Map 4: Transit Routes

3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

Functional Overlay Map 4: Transit Routes

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

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Access & Business (Map 5)
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Major Building Laybys Structured Parking Major Driveways Queensway Connecting Streets Perimeter Connectors Major Garage Entrances

Figure 13: Street Functional Overlay Map 5: Access & Business

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City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Functional Overlay Map 5: Access & Business

ert Alb

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3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

Daly


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3.3 Street Design Toolkit

A Street Design Toolkit is provided. The objective of this toolkit is to provide designers with a range of best practices and creative design solutions to assist in the planning and design of street reconstruction projects or adjacent urban developments.

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Pedestrians (P)
Improving the quality of the pedestrian experience is important to establishing a character and identity for Downtown Ottawa, and a step toward developing Downtown as a more vibrant and diverse destination and neighbourhood. Pedestrian Level of Service A sidewalk’s capacity to accommodate peak pedestrian volume is measured by transportation engineers in regards to its ‘level-of-service’ (LOS). The LOS rating is dependent on the available area per pedestrian, which is measured based on the volume of pedestrians per hour and the effective walkway width (or pedestrian clearway). Once the data is obtained, the LOS is rated on a scale of A-F, where A is the best scenario and F implies the sidewalk is over capacity (failure). This framework does not consider other conditions such as the presence of street trees or ground floor retail that contribute to a sidewalk’s appeal and resulting LOS. Figure 15 illustrates how the LOS of sidewalks varies as a function of the width and the peak hourly flow of pedestrians. For the purpose of determining LOS, the peak hourly flow of pedestrians is based on the busiest 15 minutes of the day. The thick black line on the graph shows the ideal walkway width relative to peak hourly flow. Where there peak hourly flow is 1,500 pedestrians or less per hour, LOS-A is recommended. Above a peak flow of 1,500 pedestrians per hour, LOS-B is considered acceptable. In extreme situations, with peak hourly flow exceeding 15,000 pedestrians per hour, the low end of LOS-C is considered acceptable. The above LOS categorization assumes that the pedestrian stream is composed of able-bodied, walking adults. The footprint and behaviour of a person using mobility assistance devices differs considerably from that of an able bodied person. A small number of people in mobility assistance devices should not have a major impact on traffic flow. However, should numbers increase considerably as the population ages, the LOS categories may need to be revised to allot a greater amount of space per person. “Platoon flow” is described as occurring when pedestrian-flow concentrates over
Figure 15: Relationship between Walkway Width and Pedestrian Volume. Source: New York State Department of Transportation, 2006.

Figure 14: Level of Service Descriptions. Source: Highway Capacity Manual, 2010.

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3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

short periods of time. Examples include pedestrians arriving via public transit and pedestrians controlled by traffic signals in short segments. Based on this context, the chart in Figure 16 helps determine the volume of pedestrians that a sidewalk can accommodate, the LOS rating of a sidewalk and the required width of the pedestrian clearway. More specific to corners and crosswalks, the LOS rating is determined by the following factors: volume of pedestrians, total area available per pedestrian, traffic volumes and traffic signal timing. Specific LOS for corners tends to be lower than that of the joining sidewalk. Although pedestrians are more tolerable to having less space at a corner due to standing idle, pedestrians will queue in the corner in large numbers before crossing the intersection. This means that if the LOS for a corner is desired to be equal to that of the sidewalk, the corner area must be greater in size to accommodate the anticipated number of pedestrians. It is important to note that corners do not need a specific shape to accommodate a higher LOS, only a larger area. Scenarios to illustrate LOS for sidewalks, corners and crosswalks available in Appendix C. In Downtown Ottawa, peak hour pedestrian flows in the vicinity of the three LRT stations are forecast to be in the range of 5,000 (source: City of Ottawa, OLRT Office). Using this LOS tool, it can be established that the clear or “effective” sidewalk width needs to be in the range of 6.0m wide to achieve an LOS C rating. Within a limited right-of-way, this will have obvious implications on the space available for cyclists and vehicles. Appendix E provides a visual analysis of pedestrian LOS ratios and their implications to sidewalks.

Figure 16: Level of Service Rate based on Sidewalk Width and Number of Pedestrians per Hour. Source: Data from Highway Capacity Manual, 2010, calibrated by Delcan, 2012.

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The foregoing method of establishing the pedestrian level of service focuses on sidewalk and crosswalk widths. Factors that make a sidewalk a vibrant and comfortable place for pedestrians must also be considered when evaluating current LOS, such as: Building Frontage: Street vitality depends on the activity on the ground floor. Active interfaces encourage pedestrian activity whereas blank walls are fatal to street life. Market Zone: Market zones exist between the edge of the pedestrian clearway and the property line and may consist of retail displays, outdoor cafes and/ or landscaping. These elements add life and purpose to the street and are a sign of a healthy streetscape. Sidewalk Materials: The use of patterned concrete, concrete pavers, or stone paving can enhance the quality of the pedestrian realm. Furnishing & Utility Zone: Amenities such as seating, planters, and trash receptacles create spaces for pedestrians to experience and enjoy the city - places to linger. Pedestrian Lighting: Pedestrian lighting elevates the status of pedestrians on the streets and contributes to the appeal of public spaces. Street Trees & Landscape: Street trees and other landscape elements add to the appeal and physical comfort of the public realm.

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P1 Comfortable Sidewalks & Crosswalks
Creating safe, beautiful and comfortable pedestrian zones is an essential part of improving the streets of Downtown Ottawa and accommodating the increased number of pedestrians moving to and from LRT stations. P1.1 Include on each side of the street in Downtown Ottawa: » Clear pedestrian travel route of a width that corresponds to anticipated pedestrian use (see Section P3), with minimum 2.0m; » Furnishings/streetscape/planting zone of 1.0 to 2.0m; and, » Options for frontage for cafes, retail display of 0.5 to 2.0m; Consider extra wide sidewalks a priority for streets with LRT stations, including Queen, Albert, O’Connor, Lyon Streets; and, In some cases, the sidewalk may not be the same width on each side of the street, for example Albert, Metcalfe, O’Connor, Kent and Bay Streets. P1.2 Extend pedestrian zone paving materials continuously to the building frontage, do not change materials at the property line, particularly where there is an arcade. Ensure pedestrian areas are barrier free and accessible in accordance with the 2005 Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). Establish maintenance standards for downtown
Montreal, QC Ottawa

Insert cross-section to illustrate sidewalk dimensions

Kitchener, ON

P1.3

P1.4

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Ottawa sidewalks and crosswalks that place them at the highest standard within the municipality, recognizing their strategic importance in providing mobility and access to downtown residences, businesses, and attractions. P1.5 Provide crosswalk widths that are scaled to the clear width of sidewalks at the approaches, typically in the range of 3m to 5m, but never less than 3m. Provide pedestrian priority at crosswalks through the use of distinctive crosswalk surfaces such as architecturally scored concrete or oversized, durable paving stones. Consider the use of pedestrian scrambles at crosswalks having the very high pedestrian movements and when there is a high propensity for diagonal crossings. Consider the use of raised “table top” intersections where the highest degree of pedestrian priority and protection is desired, such as in proximity to OLRT station entrances. Use mountable curbs to create a “flex space” space in the street with pedestrian priority for cafes and markets, but where vehicles are permitted during certain times, for example, for parking, loading, deliveries, food trucks, or other vendors. Establish a paving band to demarcate transition from flex space to sidewalk. Consider mountable curbs for

P1.6

Montreal, QC (Source ©?)

Montreal, QC

P1.7

Queen, Albert, Metcalfe, O’Connor and Kent Streets. P1.10 Permit temporary sidewalk extensions to provide a wider sidewalk during summer months. Consider sidewalk extensions for Queen and Albert Streets. P1.11 Set back buildings to create narrow pockets of public space and to create wider sidewalks in every opportunity. P1.12 Remove snow rather than store at the street edge.

P1.8

P1.9

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P2 Sustainable Planting
The Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy recommends additional landscape treatment on downtown streets. That Study states that at one time Ottawa’s downtown streets supported a lush canopy of street trees. Today, the narrow sidewalks, lack of street trees, narrow rights-of-ways and lack of active ground floor uses have created a harsh pedestrian environment. By re-balancing the space in the right-of-way, every opportunity to introduce sustainable planting in Downtown Ottawa must be considered. This will contribute to provide a better transition between the lush tree-line neighbourhoods of The Glebe and cultural landscape of Parliament Hill. P2.1 Line some of the streets of Downtown Ottawa with a diverse selection of resilient canopy tree species. These trees will contribute to the City’s urban forest. Minimum 15 cubic metres soil per tree, can be a shared volume. Structural soil cells or structural soils & structural sands can be used. Surfaces could be paved with subsurface connected soil trenches. Use a diverse selection of urban tolerant shrub species to complement certain areas of street tree plantings to become areas of more dense plantings. These plants will become the understorey canopy that sits underneath the urban forest. Minimum 3-5 cubic metres soil per shrub (depending on size), can be a shared volume, with a minimum 1.2 metres planting depth and with connected soil volumes at grade.
Ottawa Kitchener, ON

Montreal, QC

Ottawa

Kitchener, ON (Source ©)

P2.2

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P2.3

Where appropriate, complement woody plants (ie. trees, shrubs) with a hardy groundcover to tie in the aesthetics of a well-planted area, while providing a living/green barrier to pedestrian movement. Use a minimum 300mm planting depth with connected soil volumes at grade. Use only exposed open pit planting, often shared with larger trees and shrubs in exposed trenched soil matrices. Make pedestrian priority streets the focus for sustainable planting. Certain landscape species may be used on particular streets to enhance the identity of Downtown Ottawa.

P2.4

P2.5

King Edward Ave, Ottawa

Bloor St, Toronto, ON

Wellington St, Ottawa (1921)

Metcalfe St, Ottawa (late 19th c)

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P3 A Family of Light Standards, Furnishings & Amenities
Some of Ottawa’s downtown streets have good furniture and related amenities, such as displayed along Elgin and Bank Streets. However, most streets are visually cluttered, have too much variety in furnishings, poles, signs and light standards and do not conform to a standard. Examples include Albert and Slater Streets, with a surplus of news boxes, regulatory signs and sandwich boards that clutter the sidewalks and diminish pedestrian space. The City pursued, but did not complete, an Integrated Street Furniture Program (ISFP) in 2009 to improve the quality of the public realm through creation of a cohesive system of street furniture. Downtown Ottawa can benefit from the creation of its own family (or sub-family) of streetscape elements that will address the more urban context and narrow right-of-ways and help to make Downtown more imageable.
Ottawa

P3.1

Create a coordinated family of street furnishings, to include benches, transit shelters, litter/recycling receptacles, light standards, bollards and signage and wayfinding. Coordinate the street furnishings selections with wayfinding and signage systems. Design the street furnishings family to have a high a quality enduring and contemporary appeal, so that it can be consistently applied for years to come. Ensure that the design of the elements are compatible with those on Bank Street and Confederation

P3.2

P3.3

P3.4

Kitchener, ON

Ottawa

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Boulevard. P3.5 With a stark lack of colour in Downtown Ottawa, make colour an important consideration.

Photo

Photo

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P4 Clear Signage & Wayfinding
Wayfinding and signage is an important part of creating a strong identity, while improving pedestrian orientation and sense of the city. Recent coordinated city-wide wayfinding projects have been successfully implemented in cities like Glasgow and London in the UK. P4.1 Provide the signage and wayfinding system with its own strong identity. Design the signage and wayfinding system to complement the other street furnishings. Provide a directory of services/facilities on signage and wayfinding. Coordinate the system in Downtown Ottawa with a broad City-wide system. Design the system to be easily interpreted by international visitors, relying on symbols. Since the pedestrian realm in Downtown Ottawa is so limited, carefully site signage and wayfinding. Integrate the system with LRT signage and the existing NCC system. Coordinate with geo-referenced computer systems for navigation.

P4.2

Seattle, WA

Glasgow, UK

Cleveland, OH

P4.3

P4.4

P4.5

P4.6

London, UK

London, UK

P4.7

P4.8

Philadelphia, PA

Lakeview, MI

London, UK

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P5 Buildings that Create a Visually Stimulating Public Realm
The Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy recommends focusing on requirements for the articulation of facades at the lower levels of buildings with emphasis on the relationship of the building to the street at grade level. P5.1 Encourage building owners to modify their ground floor uses and facades to create more attractive frontages, as part of major interior renovation investments. Ensure tall buildings maintain pedestrian scale by having a podium with a step back to the tower. Articulate building facades in a way that creates an interesting wall to the public room of the street. Articulation can make use of differences of transparency, quality of materials, fenestration, vertical elements and doors to break down the scale of the building. Ensure ground floor uses of a building are active and front onto the street. Active uses include lobbies, retail and offices. Utility rooms, garbage and loading should be at the back of the building. Integrated space for outdoor cafes into the streetscape (allowing for the minimum sidewalk clearance). Outdoor cafes could be on temporary sidewalk extensions (in the parking lane) for the summer. Ensure new buildings create a mix and variety of high quality architecture.

P5.2

P5.3

Yonge St, Richmond Hill, ON

P5.4

P5.5

P5.6

King St E, Toronto

London, UK

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P5.7

Use corner sites (buildings with two frontages) as an urban design opportunity to frame the intersection, create landmark buildings, and create wider sidewalks. Make ground level floor heights a minimum of 4.5m for both commercial and residential buildings to allow flexibility for future use conversions. Retrofit the ground floor of existing buildings with active uses with a direct connection to the sidewalk. This is a particularly important consideration for pedestrian priority streets such as Queen, O’Connor and Albert Streets.

P5.8

Photo

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P6 Appealing Pedestrian Connections Along, Between & Through Buildings
There is a 30 year history of building arcades along building fronts in Downtown Ottawa. Figure 17 locates the intermittent existing arcades, as well as mid-block connections. P6.1 Retain provisions to obtain building arcades in Downtown Ottawa on private lands, but pursue them more rigorously as development proceeds. Continue to use arcades, or colonnaded and cantilevered building elements to provide weather protection and to augment sidewalk capacity. Figure 18 indicates the priority streets for arcades. Make arcades at least 2 storeys tall. Make arcades, or similar architectural elements, continuous and barrier free. The City of Ottawa’s policy for pedestrian easement in the central area requires that surface easements for the use of pedestrians have heights of 3.7m from the finished grade surface and 1.5-2.5m width from the rightof-way to the proposed building footprint (depending on building design). Carefully coordinate the design of arcades with streetscape planting to avoid conflicts. Favour cantilevered building arcades over colonnaded solutions, to pursue a wide, clear and unobstructed pedestrian clearway that better connects building facades to the curb edge.
Yorkville, Toronto Boston, MA

P6.2

P6.3 P6.4

P6.7

Make mid-block outdoor and indoor pedestrian connections well lit and signed as they offer a finer-grained pedestrian network. Use special surface materials and planting to identify the outdoor route.

P6.5

P6.6

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Figure 17: Pedestrian Connections

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P7 A Network of Publicly Accessible Open Spaces
The Central Business District of many cities can be bleak and harsh in any weather, with a lack of trees and green spaces amongst towers of glass. Downtown Ottawa is no exception. Although large public green spaces frame the edge of the Downtown area - Parliament Hill, Major’s Hill Park, Victoria Island and the banks of the Ottawa River and Rideau Canal - there is a deficiency of smaller urban open spaces. As mentioned in the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy, a network of small open spaces should be introduced before the area becomes fully built-out. That Study recommended that on vacant sites owned by private developers, the City should work to encourage developers to include urban open spaces in their development scenarios. This was successfully achieved at Minto Place, at the corner of Albert and Lyon Streets. Figure 18 locates existing park and open space and semi public open space in the study area. It also indicates the opportunity for new open space in Downtown Ottawa, and the priority sites for urban open space, as recommended in the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy. Creating a network of a diversity of types and sizes of open spaces adds legibility to the urban environment, improves pedestrian comfort and amenity, and adds to the livability of Downtown. Pocket parks and treed streets could provide welcome relief and respite in Downtown Ottawa. Quality open space will become increasingly important as Downtown Ottawa intensifies.

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Figure 18: Parks & Open Space Network

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P7.1

Use a network of small open spaces in the rightof-way and mid-block locations to assist in connecting the civic element of Downtown Ottawa with the capital landscape of the Confederation Boulevard and the Parliamentary Precinct. Include provisions in planning documents that enable new open spaces to be created downtown that can be integrated with streets and have a public or quasi-public function. Key locations for new open spaces are indicated on Figure 19. Design open spaces to be useable and appealing in all seasons with carefully located wind screens and shelters, appropriate landscape features, surface treatment and amenities. Ensure open spaces use high quality and durable materials. Ensure open spaces are publicly accessible with furnishings that are coordinated with Downtown Ottawa’s family of streetscape furnishings. Design open spaces to be barrier free. Ensure designs provide clear views through the open space, to enhance safety. Include elements in open spaces to activate the street edge, eg. outdoor cafe, fountains, public art. With so few open spaces in Downtown Ottawa, ensure they are designed to the highest standard.
Oakville, ON New York, NY

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P8 Public Art to Add Interest to Pedestrian Environments
Public Art can play a significant role in establishing the identity of Downtown Ottawa. As the capital of Canada, there is an exceptional opportunity for Ottawa to celebrate and showcase Canada’s art and culture in the public realm. Currently, Ottawa dedicates 1% of the construction costs of new public infrastructure (including streets) towards the creation of public art. The NCC has created a series of public art tours (StreetSmART) in proximity to Confederation Boulevard that allows users to scan QR codes mounted in front of the artwork with their smartphone to view/hear information about the work. As recommended in the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy, the City should develop a public art master plan or strategy. P8.1 Integrate public art with streetscape elements such as seating, waste receptacles, paving, and railings. Design pedestrian arcades and other building elements as public art. Consider public art to add special identity to the public realm, with particular attention to using light to animate public space at night, especially in winter months. Use public art to help brand Downtown Ottawa and market it in a way that residents and visitors can tour the area and get information on installations. Use public art to support key views and landmarks to create an identity for Downtown Ottawa.
Paris, FR Toronto, ON Ottawa Montreal, QC Toronto, ON

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P9 Clearly Identifiable Thresholds
Thresholds are important in creating a sense of arrival when entering Downtown Ottawa. Due to Ottawa’s unique relationship between the Parliamentary precinct and Downtown, thresholds should be established to distinguish the “Crown to Town” interface as well as serving as inviting gateways to join the boundaries between Downtown and adjacent neighbourhoods such as LeBreton, Centretown and ByWard Market (Figure 19). P9.1 Create thresholds by a combination of landscape, streetscape, and built form elements specific to each threshold location. Establish pedestrian priority at threshold sites, for example, by removing vehicular travel lanes or turn lanes. Use special and distinctive buildings at corners to help establish thresholds.
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San Diego, CA (Source ©)

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Cyclists (C)
Creating a safe, connected bicycle network is an important part of a balanced transportation network and integral to encouraging higher bicycle ridership. Ottawa has a large bicycle network, but the streets of Downtown Ottawa are poorly serving cyclists. A pilot project for segregated bike lanes on Laurier Avenue West is currently underway and has been very successful. While segregated bicycle lanes are becoming a popular strategy for improving cyclists’ sense of safety and protecting their right-of-way, there are many other options for bicycle facilities to be integrated on streets. When planning for bicycle facilities, it is very important to consider the relationship between type of facility, conflicts with intersections and signage.

C1 Typology of Bicycle Facilities
C1.1 Separated Facilities A separated facility is any on-street bicycle facility that is separated from the traffic lanes by means of a physical barrier. Separated facilities that are at the same grade as the roadway are separated by means of curbs, bollards, parked cars or a combination thereof. Alternatively, segregation can be achieved by raising the facility to an intermediate grade between those of the roadway and sidewalk or to the same grade as the sidewalk. Separated facilities at roadway grade are generally less expensive to construct because they can utilize the existing roadway surface and do not entail major changes to existing drainage systems. The construction of raised facilities entails creating a new surface for bicycles and may require curbside sewers to be moved inward to continue providing drainage for the roadway. Separated facilities can be either unidirectional or bidirectional. Both have similar characteristics in terms of limiting vehicle-bicycle interactions, cycling speed, and comfort. Ottawa currently has three separated bicycle facilities located on Laurier Avenue, Portage Bridge and Alexandra Bridge. Vehicle-Bicycle Interaction > High level of protection Cycling Speed > Moderate Comfort > Very high level of comfort for cyclists » Independent of the speed or volume of vehicular traffic > Improved level of comfort for pedestrians » Separation between the sidewalk and traffic lanes is increased At Intersections > Road markings indicate cycling route as it crosses intersection

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Unidirectional Other Names > Separated bicycle lane
parking lane bicycle lane min 0.5 m min 1.8 m sidewalk

> Bicycle track > On-road bicycle path (if at roadway grade)* > Raised bicycle-path (if between roadway and sidewalk grade)* > Sidewalk-level bicycle path (if at sidewalk grade)* * Vélo Québec nomenclature Best Application > Two-way arterials with high traffic volume or high traffic speed

2.1 to 2.5 m

Figure 20: Unidirectional laterally segregated facility with parking

» Creates fewer conflicts at intersections than a bidirectional segregated fcility Placement > placed directly adjacent to the sidewalk > parking lane can be placed between the facility and traffic lanes except the last 20 m before an intersection Width > Absolute minimum is 1.5 m > Recommended minimum is 1.8 m » Allows conventional bicycles to pass each other » Allows snow clearing with standard sidewalk equipment

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Figure 21: Unidirectional laterally segregated facility without parking

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> Current Danish standard is 2.5 m » Allows tricycles and cargo bicycles to pass each other > 0.5 m or wider buffer strip required if parking allowed in adjacent lane
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Figure 22: Unidirectional vertically separated facility with parking

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Figure 23: Unidirectional vertically separated facility without parking

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Bidirectional Other Names > On-road bicycle path (if at roadway grade)* > Raised bicycle-path (if between roadway and sidewalk grade)* > Sidewalk-level bicycle path (if at sidewalk grade)* > Separated active transportation path** * Vélo Québec nomenclature ** MTO nomenclature Best Application > One-way arterials with high traffic volume or high traffic speed » Not recommended on bidirectional streets due to larger number of potential conflict points at intersections (see Figure 24) » Acceptable on streets with widely spaced intersections and limited number of private entrances » Requires less space than a pair of unidirectional segregated facilities
parking lane bicycle lane min 0.5 m min 1.5 m bicycle lane min 1.5 m sidewalk

Figure 24: Possible bicycle-automobile conflicts at an intersection on a two-way street with a bidirectional segregated bicycle facility Source: Planning and Design for Pedestrians and Cyclists, Vélo Québec Association (2010)

Placement > Placed directly adjacent to the sidewalk > Parking lane can be placed between the facility and traffic lanes except the last 20 m before an intersection Width > Minimum required is 3.0 m (1.5 m per direction) > Opposite lane can be used to pass

Figure 25: Bidirectional laterally segregated facility with parking

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> 0.5 m or wider buffer strip required if parking allowed in adjacent lane

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Figure 26: Bidirectional laterally segregated facility without parking

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Figure 27: Bidirectional vertically segregated lane with parking

Figure 28: Bidirectional vertically segregated lane without parking

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C1.2 Car Free Streets A car free street is any street segment on which most motorized vehicle travel is prohibited. Exceptions may include emergency and delivery vehicles. A car free street may simply be a conventional street, consisting of a roadway and raised sidewalks, or may be a specially surfaced street, consisting of single surface with no differentiation between roadway and sidewalk. Sparks Street and one block of William Street (in the ByWard Market) are examples of car free streets in Ottawa. However, today none of those streets allow cycling. Vehicle-Bicycle Interaction > None Cycling Speed > Moderate Comfort > High level of comfort for cyclists > High level of comfort for pedestrians

C1.3 Bicycle Lanes A bicycle lane is any on-street bicycle facility that is separated from the traffic lanes by means of surface markings (lines and bicycle-chevrons) or a difference in surface material or colour. Standard bicycles lanes are unidirectional running in the same direction as the adjacent traffic lane. It is also possible to implement a bicycle lane running in the opposite direction (contraflow) in order to allow two-way bicycle travel on a one-way street. Bicycle lanes in Downtown Ottawa are found along Bay Street and on the Mackenzie King Bridge. Vehicle-Bicycle Interaction > Moderate level of protection Cycling Speed > Moderate Comfort > Moderate to high level of comfort for cyclists » Decreases as the speed or volume of vehicular traffic on the adjacent lane increases > Improved level of comfort for pedestrians » Separation between the sidewalk and traffic lanes is increased Other Names > None Best Application > Narrow downtown commercial streets

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Placement > Stretches across the public right-of-way Width > No specific minimum or maximum widths At Intersections > Road markings indicate cycling route as it crosses intersection
traffic lane bicycle lane 1.5 to 1.8 m parking lane 2.1 to 2.5 m sidewalk

Standard Bicycle Lane Other Names > Bike lane Best Application > Minor arterial or collector streets with moderate traffic volume and speed Placement > Can be placed directly adjacent to the curb or adjacent to a parking lane > Usually placed on the right side of a one-way street but can be placed on the left side to avoid conflicts with bus stops along major transit corridors Width > Minimum is 1.5 m » Passing possible through use of adjacent traffic lane > Recommended width is 1.8 m » Allows passing within the bicycle lane
Figure 29: Standard bicycle lane

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Contraflow Bicycle Lane Other Names > Counter-flow bike lane Best Application > Narrow, one-way residential streets with low traffic volume and speed » Used in combination with a standard bicycle lane or a shared lane to allow bidirectional bicycle travel Placement > Can be placed directly adjacent to the curb or adjacent to a parking lane Width > Minimum is 1.5 m » Passing possible through use of adjacent traffic lane > Recommended width is 1.8 m » Allows passing within the bicycle lane
Figure 30: Contraflow bicycle lane
sidewalk parking lane 2.1 to 2.5 m bicycle lane 1.5 to 1.8 m traffic lane

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C1.4 Shared Facilities A shared facility is any roadway or part thereof that is to be shared by bicycles and motor vehicles. Shared facilities are generally designated as bicycle routes and have signage and surface markings to direct bicycle traffic. Standard, designated shared lanes are standard width lanes intended to be shared any class of vehicle and bicycles. It is also possible to designate reserved bus lanes for use by bicycles. A more specialized type of shared roadway is the woonerf, on which pedestrians, cyclists, and vehicles share the same surface. Shared facilities are the most common bicycle facilities in Downtown Ottawa, currently present on Queen, Bank, Rideau and Wellington Streets. Vehicle-Bicycle Interaction > Do not provide any physical protection from vehicle encroachment into cyclists’ paths > Signage and bicycle-chevron surface markings can encourage motorists to keep their distance when following and passing cyclists Cycling Speed > Moderate to high on most > Low to moderate on woonerfs Level of Comfort > Low to moderate level of comfort for cyclists » Tends to be lower in lanes shared with buses or other heavy vehicles » Decreases as speed or volume of vehicular traffic in the shared lane increases » Can be improved through traffic calming measures

At Intersections > Road markings indicate cycling route as it crosses intersection

Woonerf Other Names > Shared space > Home space (UK) Best Application > Short segments of narrow residential streets with very low traffic volumes and speeds » Ideal for cul-de-sacs » Streets with no through traffic Placement > Pedestrians, bicycles, and automobiles share the same surface » Pedestrians have highest priority, followed by cyclists > Extensive traffic calming to force automobiles and cyclists to move slowly Width > Unobstructed travel area no wider than 3.5 m » Allows only one vehicle to pas at a time » Forces vehicles to move slowly

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Designated Shared Lane Other Names > Shared road > Designated bicycle route Best Application > Residential streets with low traffic volume and speeds » Can be combined with traffic calming measures to reduce vehicle speeds and increase cyclist comfort and safety Placement > Can be placed directly adjacent to the curb or adjacent to a parking lane > Same grade as roadway Width One-way Streets > Shared lane under 3.3 m is acceptable » Vehicles cannot pass bicycles » Vehicles and bicycles ride single file > Shared lane between 3.3 m and 4.5 m is not recommended » Insufficient clearance to safely pass bicycles » Vehicles may attempt to pass bicycles anyway > Shared lane between 4.5 and 5.0 m is recommended » Sufficient clearance for bicycle and vehicles to travel side-by-side » Vehicles can pass bicycles safely

> Shared lane over 5.0 m not recommended » Vehicles may attempt to fit in side-by-side, squeezing or blocking cyclists » May promote excessive vehicle speeds Two-way Streets > Shared lane between 3.3 m and 4.5 m recommended » Vehicles can encroach into adjacent to overtake cyclists > Shared lane between 4.5 and 5.0 m acceptable » Vehicles can overtake cyclists in the same lane > Shared lane over 5.0 m not recommended » May promote excessive vehicle speeds

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Designated Shared Bus Lane Other Names > Wide shared lane
shared lane 3.3 to 4.5 m parking lane 2.1 to 2.5 m sidewalk

Best Application > Best used on transit malls or reserved bus lanes » Traffic volume must not exceed 30 buses/hour Placement > Usually implemented in the curb lane Width > Recommended minimum is 4.5 m » Allows buses to pass bicycles within the lane > Narrower than 4.5 m is possible » Requires buses to encroach on adjacent lane to pass bicycles

Figure 31: Designated Shared Lane

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No Facility Other Names > None Best Application > Residential streets with low traffic volume and speeds
traffic lane wide shared lane min 4.5 m sidewalk

» Can be combined with traffic calming measures to reduce vehicle speeds and increase cyclist comfort and safety Placement > Any lane on any road except divided highways can be used by cyclists Width > Not applicable

Figure 32: Designated Shared Bus Lane

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C2 Parking and Related Amenities
It is essential to develop bicycle parking and related amenities to further encourage bicycle use. The facilities should address the distinct needs of cyclists accessing shops and services in Downtown Ottawa and those of commuting cyclists. C2.1 Convenient short-term bicycle parking should be available less than 15m, but no more 50m, from the cyclist’s destination. It should be placed along sidewalks or other highly visible public locations so that it can be easily found and to discourage theft. » Place post-and-ring type bicycle stands on sidewalks along the curb zone. Distribute them at regular intervals, cluster more post and ring racks at in front of buildings with services, and allow residents/ businesses to suggest additional locations; » Adapt street furniture, such as signposts and lampposts for use as bicycle parking (Figure 33); and, » Place bicycle parking in on-street automobile parking stalls where pedestrian traffic is high and sidewalk space is limited. This arrangement (Figure 34) can be removed during winter months. C2.2 Secure long-term parking should have: » Passive security measures, including: controlled-access sites, highly visible location and well-illuminated areas; » Active security measures, including: direct human surveillance and remote surveillance via cameras and motion detectors; » Convenient locations, preferably at street level, having access to a ramp or elevator if above or below grade, and located no more than 30 to 50m from the building entrance; » Weather protection; and,
Figure 35: Examples of public bicycle parking signage. Source: OFROU 2008. Figure 34: Bicycle stands in parking stalls. Source: Christopher DeWolf (left). Figure 33: Adapting street furniture for bicycle parking. Source: Cyclehoop Ltd.

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» Complementary amenities such as showers and change rooms for the benefit of longer-distance bicycle commuters if located in commercial and institutional buildings. It may also be useful to provide lockers for commuters to store bicycle clothing and other equipment. C2.3 The City of Ottawa Zoning By-law (2008-250, Part 4, Section 111) requires that off-street bicycle parking be provided based on the following: » One bicycle parking space for every 250 m2 of gross floor area for office and retail uses under 8,000 m2; » One bicycle parking space for every 500 m2 of gross floor area for libraries, municipal services, and retail uses over 8,000 m2 , including shopping centres; » Bicycle parking spaces should be located to provide convenient access to main entrances or well-used areas; » If 50 or more bicycle spaces are required, a minimum of 25% should have the following security features: be housed in a building or structure; be located in a secure area such as a supervised parking lot or enclosure with secure entrance; be bicycle lockers; and, » Motor vehicle parking requirement should be reduced by one motor vehicle parking space for every 13 m2 of gross floor area provided as shower rooms, change rooms, locker rooms and other similar facilities intended for the use of the bicyclists. As the Zoning By-law requirements only apply to new development in the Study Area, the following measures are recommended to increase longterm bicycle parking on private properties: » Develop exemplary long-term bicycle parking facilities at City-owned and occupied buildings;

» Work with federal building managers to develop bicycle parking for government employees; » Provide resources to help building owners/managers to implement appropriately designed and located bicycle parking; » Apply the updated bicycle parking requirement retroactively to all existing properties with grace period for compliance; and, » Provide a partial subsidy for additional bicycle parking. C2.4 Off-street, secure and long-term bicycle parking in the Study Area should be developed and accessible to the general public. Bicycle parking within public and private parking garages could be provided. It is essential that wayfinding signage be installed on streets in the vicinity of any indoor public bicycle parking to direct cyclists to these facilities (Figure 35). The location of secure, indoor public bicycle parking facilities should be indicated on bicycle maps. Another approach is to provide a dedicated bicycle parking facility, a socalled “bike station”, at one of the OLRT stations in Downtown Ottawa. There are three distinct clienteles who could benefit from the existence of such a facility: » Bicycle commuters without access to a private long-term parking facility; – employees in small buildings (e.g., on Sparks Street) – park bicycle for duration of workday » Outbound transit users; – residents of the study area and its environs

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– use bicycle to travel between home and transit – park bicycle for duration of workday » Inbound transit users; – employed in the study area and its environs – use bicycle to travel between transit and work – park bicycle overnight Given that sidewalk space is already limited and that the development of the OLRT will further increase pedestrian traffic, it is recommended that the bicycle station be developed off-street, preferably in a storefront close to an OLRT station head (Figure 36). It is recommended that the bicycle station should have the following features: » Electronically-controlled access; – for registered users only – entry means of dedicated electronic key or future smartcard transit pass – accessible 24/7 » Passive security features; – ample fenestration – bright illumination » Active security features; – camera surveillance City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets
Figure 37: Two-Tier Racks at Bicycle Stations. Sources: Tony Brock/Toronto Star (left) and BeyondDC (right). Figure 36: Integrated Bike Station into Downtown Building. Source: Momma Wheelie Biking Blog.

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– motion detectors » Two-tier bicycle racks (Figure 37) for optimal space usage; » Include complementary amenities; – lockers – power sockets for electrically-assisted bicycles – air pump – vending machine with inner tubes and other basic parts » Bathrooms; » Showers and change rooms (optional).

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Transit (T)

A fast and comprehensive transit network is a very important element to enable the efficient and continuous movement of large flows of people across downtown Ottawa. As Ottawa grows economically and physically, more demand is placed in the provision of transit systems.

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T1 Bus Transit
Buses will remain an important mode of transport in downtown Ottawa, even after the opening of the new LRT system in 2018. Local buses will continue to provide access to/from communities adjacent to downtown Ottawa (e.g. Lowertown, The Glebe), and from Gatineau. T1.1 Downtown streets must allow efficient movement of buses to support future growth and increased transit mode share objectives, balanced against the need to accommodate pedestrian, cycling, goods movement and automobile use. As Bank Street and Rideau/Wellington streets are identified in the City’s Transportation Master Plan as future Transit Priority Corridors, employ operational and physical measures to improve the speed and reliability of transit service along those streets.
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Figure 38: Sidewalk LOS for bus service

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T2 Connectivity with Downtown LRT Stations
Local bus routes within downtown Ottawa will provide connections with planned LRT stations to support transit access and mobility for residents and visitors within the downtown area and across whole city. The final location of the planned LRT stations and their entrances at street level may result in the need for transit priority measures on other streets to ensure strong connections between local and rapid transit services. T2.1 Where physical space is unavailable in the vicinity of LRT stations, provide “on-street” local transit connections, at curbside bus stops. Connections must be made as convenient and efficient as possible and walking distances minimized in order to accommodate large volumes of transit users and buses at key locations in downtown Ottawa. When possible, connect local bus stop and LRT station entrance on the same side of the street. Station entrances and connecting bus stops must be clearly identifiable and include appropriate way-finding to transit users. Sufficient curb space must be available at connecting bus stops to accommodate frequent local bus service operating on multiple routes. Sidewalk space at bus stops serving as connections to LRT Stations must be designed to allow efficient passenger flow and minimize conflicts between transit users and other pedestrians. Where possible, separate bus stops for unloading and loading of passengers. Provide sufficient sheltered waiting space and amenities for transit users connecting between LRT and local bus services to ensure a safe, convenient and comfortable experience, especially during off-peak hours.
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T3 Appealing Station Entrance Areas
LRT station entrances constructed as part of the planned OLRT project will instantly create new focal points for pedestrian activity in the downtown area. Design guidelines are being prepared as part of the OLRT project which will address technical requirements for station design elements, including station entrances and associated amenities. T3.1 Provide clear areas for passenger flow between station entrances and adjacent sidewalk areas to minimize conflicts with other sidewalk uses. Ensure station entrances are easily located through use of directional signage and pavement treatments. Provide a sheltered transition zone between street and station to allow waiting during inclement weather. Ensure amenities such as bicycle parking, retail kiosks, and benches are located in proximity to station entrances to support street-level activity and maintain casual surveillance through “eyes on the street”.

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T4 Bus Stop Zones & Amenities
Transit users are also pedestrians at each end of their trip, and the bus stop is where the transition between transit and walking is made. Bus stop location, spacing and design must be carefully considered in order to provide a comfortable and enjoyable transit experience which integrates into the streetscape. T4.1 Use bump-outs or “bus bulges” to provide bus priority at transit stops and to provide more space for transit stop amenities such as shelters, waste/ recycling receptacles, bicycle racks, and benches. Provide transit shelters and other amenities to provide protected waiting spaces for transit users, appropriate to the context. Where new development is proposed, investigate opportunities to integrate shelters and amenities through use of setbacks, overhangs, colonnades, etc. Provide recycling and waste receptacles in proximity to bus stops. Provide sufficient clear space along the curb at bus stops to allow efficient passenger flows and minimizing conflicts with other pedestrians.
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Vehicles (V)
A vibrant and economically successful downtown is supported by a cohesive and efficient road network that enables vehicle flow, provides well-located loading areas, has strategic on-street parking and offers access to off-street parking arrangements.

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3 Designing Downtown Ottawa Streets

V1 Level of Service Consideration
The Level of Service (LOS) of an intersection is a qualitative measure of capacity and operating conditions and is directly related to vehicle delay or volume-tocapacity (v/c) ratio. LOS is given a letter designation from A to F, with LOS A representing very good performance and LOS F representing very poor performance often indicative of extensive queuing and long delays. V1.1 According to the City of Ottawa Transportation Master Plan (TMP), the City will endeavor to maintain in the Central Area a maximum v/c ratio of 1.0 for mixed traffic at signalized intersections during weekday peak hours.

Photo

Photo

Photo

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V2 One–way vs. Two-way Considerations
There are no technical guidelines available regarding the provision of one-way versus two-way streets. The literature suggests that there are opportunities and constraints associated with each. The following considerations are appropriate for downtown Ottawa streets: V2.1 One-way streets generally promote efficient vehicle travel by accommodating heavy traffic volumes and improved opportunity for traffic signal coordination between intersections. Benefits associated with one-way streets include decreased congestion, associated reduction in air pollution, reduced time-delays for all modes, reduced pedestrian/cyclist conflicts with turning vehicles, increased safety at intersection crossings. Two-way streets generally promote increased accessibility to local destinations. Benefits associated with two-way streets include increased accessibility to local downtown businesses, desirable slower traffic speeds, safer and more comfortable street environment for pedestrians and cyclists. Consider and evaluate the interaction between the existing one-way street road network in downtown Ottawa with key elements of the regional transportation network, including the Highway 417 on- and off-ramps, access to the interprovincial Portage and Alexandra bridges and crossings over the Ottawa River.

Photo

V2.2

V2.3

V2.4

Photo

Photo

V2.5

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V3 Lane Requirements
According to the Geometric Design Guide for Canadian Roads published by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC), there is a hierarchy of urban roads that include local, collectors, arterials and freeways. Each type of street has specific lane requirements in order to meet its vocation. V3.1 Regarding traffic volumes, TAC suggests that local residential roads accommodate up to 1,000 vehicles per day, while major arterial roads accommodate between 10,000 and 30,000 vehicles per day. The City of Ottawa’s standard lane-widths to accommodate specific uses on collector and arterial roads are as follows: » General purpose lanes: – Curb lanes – 3.75 m – Median lanes – 3.5 m – Turn lanes – 3.5 m » Share-use lanes – 4.0 to 4.5 m

Photo

V3.2

Photo

Photo

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V4 Turn Lane Considerations
According to the Geometric Design Guide for Canadian Roads published by the Transportation Association of Canada (TAC), when the number of turning vehicles at an intersection is such that it creates hazards or reduced capacity to the intersection (i.e., queue spill-back), then volume and safety warrants are used to determine if auxiliary turn-lanes are appropriate. V4.1 When opposing traffic volumes are such that left-turning vehicles must wait for a gap to make their turn, they interfere with through traffic. The magnitude of the interference depends on the opposing volume, the advancing volume and the percentage of left-turn vehicles. For right-turns, auxiliary lanes are considered appropriate when the volume of decelerating vehicles with the through traffic volume causes undue hazard. An industry-standard rule-of-thumb at signalized intersections is a right-turn lane should be provided when the right-turning traffic is 10% to 20% of the total approach volume. The length of auxiliary lanes is based on deceleration and storage requirements, where deceleration length is determined by speed and storage length is estimated as a function of approach volume, vehicle length, signal timing parameters, and vehicle arrival patterns. The City of Ottawa suggests that the nominal left-turn storage length approaching a signalized intersection should be 38 m, but recognize that often this is not attainable in retrofit urban conditions. In urban settings, it is important to consider the interaction of vehicles with heavy pedestrian crossing demands, which result in safety concerns for pedestrian and often will impede vehicular turns at intersections. Fr pedestrian-priority areas (i.e., shorter crossing distances and wider sidewalk areas), auxiliary turn-lanes are not provided.

Photo

V4.2

V4.3

Photo

Photo

V4.4

V4.5

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V5 On-Street Parking, Loading and Taxis
Downtown Ottawa has a healthy supply of approximately 750 on-street parking spaces. On-street parking spaces must have restrictions to avoid long-term parking, peak hour traffic and by-law requirements. V5.1 On-street parking provides people with the convenience of parking near their destination. On-street parallel parking stalls are 6 to 6.7 m long to provide maneuvering space for vehicles. Stalls at either end of a series may be as short as 5.5 m, provided there is no obstruction in front or behind the stall. Parallel parking stalls are 2.3 m to 3.7 m wide. Stalls should be wider if the parking lane is used as a travel lane during peak periods, or if the parking turnover is high. Angled parking stalls are generally denoted by lines 5.5 m long. Since 2010 the City of Ottawa has began to transition into Pay and Display parking machines, this system removes the need for individual parking meters and parking stalls. On-street parking is now identified by signage located at either end of block faces. With the removal of painted parking stalls, more cars will be able to park on the street, making it more convenient for drivers. V5.3 Loading zones are vital in the downtown core, as there are not many driveways, parking lots or areas for them to pull off the road near their destination to supply local businesses. Loading zones and lay-bys are typically 2.4 m wide to accommodate a wide range of personal and commercial vehicles. The length of the loading zone/lay-by is determined by the available sidewalk space and the projected vehicle usage. There is a large range of land-use’s (offices, hotels, businesses) that require frequent taxi service. Taxi zones follow the same guidelines as stated for the above noted loading zones.

V5.2

Photo

Photo

Photo

V5.4

V5.5

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4.1 Street Design Solutions 4.2 Street Demonstrations

4 Street Demonstrations
Building on the information and analysis presented at the previous chapters, this section puts together all the individual components required to improve and enhance the mobility of our downtown streets. Specific design solutions applicable to the streets in downtown Ottawa are presented and provided as fully dimensioned crosssections. The Street Demonstrations aim at integrating urban design and transportation planning elements, also demonstrating the design of lands adjacent to the rightof-way and incorporating such provisions as pedestrian easements and/or building canopy overhangs.
City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

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85

4.1 Street Design Solutions

The Street Design Solutions presented in this section build from the elements of the Street Design Toolkit to provide fully dimensioned street cross-sections. Each street cross-section provides solutions to specific mobility problems in downtown Ottawa and enhance the overall environment of downtown streets. Design solutions are provided based on individual street function, both in regards to the street’s urban character and place in the downtown, and the street’s role in providing mobility for all modes as well as emergency response and goods movement.

S

P
Albert St (at Lyon St)

Albert Street - East of Lyon, looking West
W E

Metcalfe St (at Sparks St)

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4 Street Demonstrations

N
P
Queen St (west of O’Connor St)

West of O’Connor Street, looking West
S
P
Slater St (west of Metcalfe St)

N

4 Street Demonstrations

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87

S
P
Wellington St (at Elgin St)

N

Wellington Street - at Elgin Street, looking West

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4 Street Demonstrations

4.2 Street Demonstrations

The following Street Demonstrations correspond with the street typology presented in Section 2.3 and incorporates all elements of the functional overlay maps, as introduced in Section 3.2. Each demonstration is designed to respond to actual street constraints and meet future desirable conditions, including LRT Station entrance and access points. The designs also show how the future configuration of streets in downtown Ottawa can be implemented in linear terms, addressing matters such as LRT accesses, parking garage entrances, loading areas, crosswalk treatments for pedestrian priority areas and a rhythm of streetscaping features that create not only functional but also attractive streets.

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Demonstration 1

Albert St (at Lyon St)
Pedestrian (P)
P1.1 Clear pedestrian travel width
that corresponds to anticipated pedestrian use. Min 2.0 m wide

Cyclists (C)
C1.1 Unidirectional vertically separated
cycling facility. Min 1.8 m wide

Transit (T)
T2.4 Highly Visible LRT station
entrance with clear and appealing pedestrian approaches.

Vehicles (V)
V3.2 Vehicle lanes standardized and
minimized. Curb Lane: 3.7 m wide

P1.2 Extend pedestrian zone paving to
building edge.

C1.1 Markings indicate cycling route as
it crosses intersection.

V5.2 Parking area on “flex space”

C2.1 Short term bicycle parking area.

at sidewalk level accessed by mountable curb. Min 2.3 m wide

P1.6 Pedestrian priority intersection

indicated by changes of level, colour, material and/or texture.

V5.4 Loading/taxi stand on “flex space”
at sidewalk level accessed by mountable curb. Min 2.4 m wide

P1.9 Mountable curbs create “flex

space”. Paving colour and/or texture indicates transition from sidewalk to “flex space”.

P2.1 Line streets with diverse mix of

resilient canopy trees. Min 15 m3 soil volume per tree

P3.1 A coordinated family of street
furnishings.

P4.1 Signage and wayfinding with a
strong identity.

P5.1 Modify ground floor building

facades for street-oriented uses.

P5.2 Tall buildings have a podium. P5.3 Articulate building facades at
ground floor.

P5.4 Active ground floor uses. P5.7 Corner building frames intersection.

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4 Street Demonstrations

P5.7

P4.1

P2.1 T3.2

P5.2 P5.3 C1.1 P1.6 P5.4 P3.1 P5.4

P5.4 C2.1

P3.1 P3.1 V5.2 V3.2 P1.2 P1.1 C1.1 V3.2 P1.9 V5.4 P1.9 P3.1

4 Street Demonstrations

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Demonstration 2

Metcalfe St (at Sparks St)
Pedestrian (P)
P1.1 Clear pedestrian travel width
that corresponds to anticipated pedestrian use. Min 2.0 m wide

Cyclists (C)
C1.1 Unidirectional vertically separated
cycling facility. Min 1.8 m wide

Transit (T)

Vehicles (V)
V3.2 Vehicle lanes standardized and
minimized. Curb Lane: 3.7 m wide

P1.6 Pedestrian priority intersection

indicated by changes of level, colour, material and/or texture.

P1.8 Pedestrian priority intersection
with raised “table top”.

P2.1 Line streets with diverse mix of

resilient canopy trees. Min 15 m3 soil volume per tree

P3.1 A coordinated family of street
furnishings.

P5.4 Active ground floor uses.

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4 Street Demonstrations

P2.1 P2.1

P5.4

P3.1 P5.4

C1.1 V3.2

P3.1

V3.2

P1.8

P1.1

P3.1 P1.6

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Demonstration 3

Queen St (west of O’Connor St)
Pedestrian (P)
P1.1 Clear pedestrian travel width
that corresponds to anticipated pedestrian use. Min 2.0 m wide

Cyclists (C)
C1.4 Designated shared cycling lane.
Shared Lane: 3.3 to 4.5 m wide

Transit (T)
T2.4 Highly Visible LRT station
entrance with clear and appealing pedestrian approaches.

Vehicles (V)
V3.2 Vehicle lanes standardized and
minimized. Shared Lane: 4.0 to 4.5 m wide

C2.1 Short term bicycle parking area.

P1.2 Extend pedestrian zone paving to
building edge.

V5.2 Parking area on “flex space”

at sidewalk level accessed by mountable curb. Min 2.3 m wide

P1.9 Mountable curbs create “flex

space”. Paving colour and/or texture indicates transition from sidewalk to “flex space”.

V5.4 Loading/taxi stand on “flex space”
at sidewalk level accessed by mountable curb. Min 2.4 m wide

P2.1 Line streets with diverse mix of

resilient canopy trees. Min 15 m3 soil volume per tree

P3.1 A coordinated family of street
furnishings.

P4.1 Signage and wayfinding with a
strong identity.

P5.1 Modify ground floor building

facades for street-oriented uses.

P5.3 Articulate building facades at
ground floor.

P5.4 Active ground floor uses.

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4 Street Demonstrations

P2.1

P4.1

P2.1

T3.2

P5.1 P5.3 P3.1 P3.1 P5.4

C2.1

P5.4 P5.1

C1.4 P1.2 P3.1 V3.2 V5.2 P1.1 P1.9 P1.9 V5.4 C1.4

P1.1

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95

Demonstration 4

Slater St (west of Metcalfe St)
Pedestrian (P)
P1.1 Clear pedestrian travel width
that corresponds to anticipated pedestrian use. Min 2.0 m wide

Cyclists (C)
C1.1 Unidirectional vertically separated
cycling facility. Min 1.8 m wide

Transit (T)

Vehicles (V)
V3.2 Vehicle lanes standardized and
minimized. Curb Lane: 3.7 m wide

P1.9 Mountable curbs create “flex

V5.2 Parking area on “flex space”
space”. Paving colour and/or texture indicates transition from sidewalk to “flex space”.

at sidewalk level accessed by mountable curb. Min 2.3 m wide

P2.1 Line streets with diverse mix of

V5.4 Loading/taxi stand on “flex space”
at sidewalk level accessed by mountable curb. Min 2.4 m wide

resilient canopy trees. Min 15 m3 soil volume per tree

P3.1 A coordinated family of street
furnishings.

P4.1 Signage and wayfinding with a
strong identity.

P5.1 Modify ground floor building P5.4 Active ground floor uses.

facades for street-oriented uses.

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4 Street Demonstrations

P2.1

P2.1 P4.1

P3.1

P5.4

P5.1

P1.1

P3.1 V3.2 V5.2 V5.4 V3.2

C1.1 P1.1

P1.9

P1.9

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97

Demonstration 5

Wellington St (at Elgin St)
Pedestrian (P)
P1.1 Clear pedestrian travel width
that corresponds to anticipated pedestrian use. Min 2.0 m wide

Cyclists (C)
C1.1 Bidirectional vertically separated
cycling facility. Min 3.0 m wide

Transit (T)

Vehicles (V)
V3.2 Vehicle lanes standardized and
minimized. Curb Lane: 3.7 m wide Median Lane: 3.5 m wide Turn Lane: 3.5 m wide

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4 Street Demonstrations

P1.1

V3.2 C1.1

P1.1

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City of Ottawa 100 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

5.1 Recommended Implementation Framework/Tool 5.2 Policy Linkages & Administrative Considerations 5.3 Fiscal Tools & Cost Considerations 5.4 Planned Capital Projects 5.5 Operational & Maintenance 5.6 Outreach 5.7 Monitoring

5 Implementation

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 101

5.1 Recommended Implementation Framework/Tool

The Downtown Moves Study has identified a wide range of implementations that, when implemented as a comprehensive strategy, will enable the pursuit of the vision for downtown Ottawa. These interventions can be grouped into one (1) of seven (7) categories, as outlined below: 1. Policy and Administrative: Moves that will change city policy, procedures, programs, practices, or regulations that will enable the Downtown Moves vision to be realized. Planning and Design Guidance: Moves that will inform (via guidelines, criteria, etc) how downtown streets and adjacent land uses are designed to enable the Downtown Moves vision to be realized. Spatial (Project Based): Moves that can be located and identified as actual capital projects that will enable the Downtown Moves vision to be realized Fiscal: Moves that pursue appropriate revenue solutions that will enable the Downtown Moves vision to be realized Operational and Maintenance: Moves that will change requirements, procedures, or practices regarding the operation and maintenance of downtown streets that will enable the Downtown Moves vision to be realized Outreach (Partnerships, Education and Promotion): Moves that will foster partnerships and coordinate educational and promotional activities that will enable the Downtown Moves vision to be realized Monitoring: Moves that will enable collection and continuous evaluation and monitoring of data and actions that will enable Downtown Moves vision to be realized

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

Figure 40 illustrates the framework of a tool that can be used by the City to categorize, assess, prioritize and tackle the implementation of the ‘moves’.

City of Ottawa 102 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

5 Implementation

5 Implementation

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 103

Downtown Moves: Implemen

Working Draft - May 14,

Move Type
Potential Implications/Requirements of Move Planning and Design Guidance

Move Champion

Resources and Complexity Class

Priority

A

Operation and Maintenance

Policy and Administrative

Spation (Projec Based)

Recommended Move

Community or BIA

Monitoring

Outreach

Combo

No.

Potential within Potential for Resources, already assigned resource refunding or policy City resources allocations or solution required and/or Community creative solutions High/ Capacity Medium /Low

1

2

3

Fiscal

1 2 3 4 5 6

Figure 40: Framework of a tool to categorize, assess, prioritize and tackle implementation of the ‘moves’

City of Ottawa 104 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

City

A

5 Implementation

wn Moves: Implementation Tool

rking Draft - May 14, 2012

xity Class

Priority

Action Plan To Pursue Move

Targetted Timeframe

Completion Status of Move

0 - 2 years

3 - 5 years

5 years +

Resources, funding or policy solution required High/ Medium /Low Actions, resources, and budget requirements

3

Completed or Substantially Complete

In-progress and moving towards completion

Work program developed, resources allocated, startup scheduled

Identified as Funded

Review in Progress

Not yet addressed

5 Implementation

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 105

5.2 Policy Linkages & Administrative Considerations

Text to be added.

City of Ottawa 106 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

5 Implementation

5.3 Fiscal Tools & Cost Considerations

Text to be added.

5 Implementation

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 107

5.4 Planned Capital Projects

Text to be added.

City of Ottawa 108 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

5 Implementation

5.5 Operational & Maintenance

Text to be added.

5 Implementation

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 109

5.6 Outreach

Text to be added.

City of Ottawa 110 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

5 Implementation

5.7 Monitoring

Text to be added.

5 Implementation

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 111

City of Ottawa 112 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

/ 114 / 135 / 165

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects Appendix D Street Right-of-Way Analysis
/ 175 / 179

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis Appendix F Stakeholder Input Summary
/ 185

Appendices

A

Appendix G Implementation Framework/Tool Spreadsheet

/ 189 / 193

Appendix H Evaluation of Street Network Alternative Solutions

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 113

City of Ottawa 114 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

A.1 Ottawa Light Rail Transit Project A.2 City Policy & Guidelines A.3 National Capital Commission A.4 Provincial Policy Statement A.5 Experience from Other Cities A.6 Stakeholder Desires
This chapter provides an overview of the OLRT project as well as the general policy framework which informs the Downtown Moves study. The chapter also reports on trends and experiences from other cities, as well as desires expressed by stakeholders during the study process. The chapter is supported by the analysis table in Appendix A which provides a more detailed review of selected plans, studies, and projects.

Appendix A Background

Aa

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 115

A.1 Ottawa Light Rail Transit Project

The Ottawa Light Rail Transit (OLRT) project is an estimated $2.1 billion dollar investment to upgrade Ottawa’s transit system scheduled to begin operations in 2018. It will provide an opportunity to enhance mobility in Downtown Ottawa for pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders. In this context, and in response to several Council resolutions and reports, the Downtown Moves Study emerged in order to co-ordinate urban design at the street level with the transit station designs for the OLRT project. Some of the OLRT project highlights, as directly related to the Downtown Moves Study, include: > The underground light rail tunnel will alleviate the current bus rapid transit bottleneck downtown and create opportunities for a more inviting downtown streetscape; > Three downtown LRT stations will be created, as shown in Figure 41. These include Downtown West Station (Queen Street at Lyon Street and Lyon Street at Albert Street), Downtown East Station (Queen Street at O’Connor Street), and Rideau Station (Rideau Street at William Street); > There will be a reduction in the number of downtown surface buses, from approximately 2,600 to 600 daily buses; > There will be an opportunity to recreate Queen Street as a pedestrian-priority transit corridor; and, > Albert Street, Slater Street, and the Mackenzie King Bridge will be “freed up” and available for a new vocation.

City of Ottawa 116 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

MIDDLE

MACKENZIE

SUSSEX

WILLIAM

CLARENCE
YORK

KING

CLARENC

YORK

YOR

NE LA RN TU

PLAC

E

GEORGE

GEORGE

CUMBERLAND

OTTAWA

RIVER
LETT

FLEET
BROAD LLOYD

KING EDWARD

Downtown SPARKS West
BAY

WELLINGTON

ELGIN

MACKENZIE

LORNE

PERKIN

S EMPRES S

WALLE

LAURIER

O'CONNOR SUSSEX

METCALFE

Bay

Kent
GLOUCESTER

BankYORK
NEPEAN

WILLIAM

YORK

Laurier
COPERNICUS

CITY C ENTRE

PLAC

E

ELM

NEPEAN
PRIMROSE

SS

ELM
SPRUC

ACADEMY

GEORGE

GEORGE

EMPRE

OTTAWA

E

RIDGE

LETT

BROAD

LLOYD

S

ELGIN

ECCLE

CAMB

EHILL

LYON

ROCHE S

BAY

DERBY

BREEZ

RON K OLBUS

JACK PURCELL

KENT

METCALFE

PREST ON

CARTIER

LEBRE

PERKIN

EMPRE

ARTH

FLORENCE

O'CONNOR

LORNE

SON

BELL

BRON

PRIMR OSE ELM
YOUNG

GLOUCESTER

LOUIS A

NEPEAN

GLADSTONE
MCLEOD

COPERNICUS

FRANK

FRANK

ROBE RT

LORET

BALSA M

WALLE

PERCY

SS

S

UR

LAURIER

WAVERLEY E

WAVERLEY

Laurier
MCLEOD

RING

TON

TA

WEL

LIN

LARCH

R

WILLO W

Bay

Kent

Bank
NEPEAN

JAMES

LEWIS

NICHOLAS

N GTO

L

CHRISTIE

GILMOUR

ELGIN

LAURE

R

SLATER

MACKENZIE KING

MACDONALD

POPLA

ALBERT

FRIEL

LAURE

L

LeBreton
OAK

ECCLE

S

MACLAREN

STEWART MacKenzie-King

SERAPHIN MARION
LEWIS

WILBRODEWIS L

MetcalfeURN LAN T

Aa
HW
G

LOUIS PASTEUR

TER

ECCLE

S

QUEEN

SOMERSET

DALY

DALY
IZ

METCALFE

PRESS

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

LOUIS A

RIDGE

DELAWARE
O CH

LORET TA

E

AY M E

RAYMO

ND
Y41

COOPER

ARLINGTON
ANK
CATHERINE

ARGYLE

UNIVERSITE ARGYLE

PARK

HENDERSON

SPRUC

IDGE

CHAMPA GNE

LOUIS PASTEUR

ER

BEECH EC

CAMB R

S

CLES

ABERD

EEN
BOOTH

ROCHE ST

LYON

EHILL

RIDGE

TON

MACDONALD

BELL

DERBY

POPLA

R

BREEZ

LEBRE

LYON

CAMB

RON K OLBUS

JACK PURCELL

CHRISTIE NORMAN

GILMOUR
RI AL

GLENDALE

TON

KENT

WILLO W

RENFREW

ROSEBERY

PRETORIA

MAIN

ECCLE

PLYMO

S

UTH

AR A

MP

51
IM

HIGHWAY 417
ISABELLA

RUSSELL

ELGIN B

ECCLE

7 IC 121

SOMERSET

NELSON

H EC

SWEETLAND

RAILW

HWY417 IC 121B RAMP 16 YOUN G HIG HWA Y 41 7 GEORG E

LORNE

CAMB

FLORA LISGAR

PARK

E

IN OSGOODE K
F EN IE LD

G

S

LA

N

DI

N

NELSON

FLEET

Downtown SPARKS West

SPARKS

Downtown East
COOPER

UNIVERSITE

BESSERER
N LO CO
EL

Campus
NIC HO

HENDERSON

RIVER

LORNE

WELLINGTON

LISGAR

CUMBERLAND

Rideau

NELSON

VIMY

PRIMR OSE

WILLIAM

RING

WEL

LI

MetcalfeURN LANE YORK T

CLARENCE

CLARENCE

NICHOLAS

Bayview DDLE MI
WALNUT

ALBERT SLATER

MURRAY

ON NGT

MACKENZIE KING

MURRAY

SERAPHIN MARION
R

BEAUSOLEIL

LeBreton
BRI CKH ILL

PARENT

QUEEN

Downtown SPARKS East

Rideau
ST. PATRICK

RIDEAU

TR DALY PA T. S

IC

K

BESS

DALY

STEWART MacKenzie-King WILBROD

RIDEAU
QU EE

TEM

HW

CHAMBERLAIN
PE

MACLAREN

75 119A RAMP HWY417 IC

Campus
NIC S LA HO
GRAHAM

O

GR

E

HAVELOCK

HARVEY

HARVEY

HWY41

RAMP76 7 IC118

HAWTHORNE

CARTIER

LEBRE

ARTH

FLORENCE

BELL

GLADSTONE

BRON

METCALFE

LOUIS A

CAMB RIDGE

MCLEOD
FLORA

DELAWARE
MCLEOD
O CH

121B RAMP 16 HIG HWA Y 41

PARK
ARGYLE

7

RAYMO

ND
Y41

ARLINGTON
BANK
CATHERINE
RA MP 51
IM

ARGYLE

PARK

E

K

IN

G

S

N LA

DI

N

G

MANN

HW

N
BOOTH

PLYMO

UTH

7 IC 121 A

HIGHWAY 417
ISABELLA
PRETORIA
STRATHCONA

H EC

O

GR

N EE

FI

EL

D

HAVELOCK

MAIN

CAMB RIDGE

CHAMBERLAIN

P75 119A RAM HWY417 IC

HARVEY

HARVEY

HWY41

RAMP7 7 IC118

6

TON

BELL

LEBRE

LYON

ORMAN

Appendix A Background

GLENDALE
RENFREW

ROSEBERY

HAWTHORNE

GRAHAM

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 117
TR AN SI T

one d’étude

CHAPEL

SON

Figure 41: Existing Bus-Rapid Transit and Location of Future Light Rail Transit Stations in Downtown Ottawa. Source: City of Ottawa.

FRANK

FRANK

ROBE RT

BALSA M

PERCY

UR

Study Area Future LRT (Stations) Existing BRT (Stations)

Zone d’étude Future LRT (Stations) Existing BRT (Stations)

JAMES

LEWIS

LEWIS STRATHCONA

LEWIS

TEMPLETON

WAVERLEY

WAVERLEY

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LE ES

HW Y4 17 IC 11 8 RA P6 M 4

M RA

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PE

RI AL

A.2 City Policy & Guidelines

There are a range of City of Ottawa policies and guidelines that have influenced this Study. The key policies and guidelines are outlined below.

Official Plan
The Downtown Moves Study is both influenced and supported by the City of Ottawa Official Plan (OP), Amendment 76 approved by City Council on June 24, 2009, as it provides strategic directions to support transit, cycling and walking as viable and attractive alternatives to the private automobile, as well as an emphasis on urban design. The majority of the study area is designated Central Area in Schedule B of the OP (Figure 42). The OP states that walking, cycling and transit to and in the Central Area are priority modes, particularly during peak traffic periods. This supports the pursuit of a safe and comfortable pedestrian and cycling environment on all downtown streets. Central Area policies consider the needs of all users of usable open spaces, pocket parks, sunlit pedestrian amenity areas and other culture and leisure resources, including an increased urban forest cover, that enhance the downtown experience. The OP provides the policy framework that guides land use planning which is intended to result in the substantial increase in the use of public transit and reduced automobile dependence during peak hours. The OP emphasizes the creation of pedestrian-friendly environments, requires the creation of places highly favourable to cyclists, and protects corridors for the Primary and Supplementary RapidTransit Network and transit-priority network. The OP is presently under review. The City’s Official Plan can be found online at: http://ottawa.ca/e/CON015317

Central Central Area Area
General Urban Area Area General Urban Major Open Space

Major Open Space

Figure 42: Central Area designation limits, Official Plan. Source: Schedule B, Official Plan.

City of Ottawa 118 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

WEL
WALNUT

LIN

GTO

BA

N

Town
LAURIER

SLATER

The
O'CONNOR

K RIC HI L L

ank reet

ON ER

LORNE

PERKIN S

EMPRES S

E

CITY C ENTR

ELM

PRIMR OSE ELM

GLOUCESTER

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PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

SS

SPRUC

E

LORNE

EMPRE

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COOPER

ECCLE
EHILL

CAMB RIDGE

S

LYON

PREST ON

ARTH

RIVER OTTAWA

WELLINGTON

LEBRE

LETT

ELGIN BRON SON

BELL

FLEET

RIDEAU Rideau StreetFLORENCE

CUMBERLAND

BROAD

LLOYD

The Secondary Plan for the Central Area provides detailed area-based policy direction for a number of character areas within the Central Area of Ottawa. These character areas are: Parliamentary Precinct, Sparks Street, Upper Town, The Core, Bank Street, The Canal, Rideau Congress Centre and Rideau Street (Figure 43). The vision and policies provided in the Central Area Secondary Plan that directly YOUNG relate to the Downtown Moves Study are:
WALNUT

MIDDLE

MACKENZIE

RON K OLBUS

CHRISTIE

YORK

KENT

E

TON

TA

PLAC

LORET

BALSA M
SPARKS

PERCY

UR

Parliamentary Precinct Sparks Street
QUEEN SPARKS

NELSON

VIMY

WILLIAM

LARCH
NE LA RN

WILLO W

Lowertown YORK (Byward Village) GEORGE
GEORGE

YORK

DERBY

BREEZ

SUSSEX

L

WILLIAM

LAURE
TU

POPLA

ROCHE S

MURRAY

MURRAY

R

Byward Market

CLARENCE

CLARENCE

BEAUSOLEIL

LAURE

L

OAK

ECCLE

S

PARENT

ST. PATRICK

KING EDWARD

Central Area Secondary Plan

TER

ECCLE

S

R AT .P ST

IC

K

SOMERSET

GILMOUR

JAMES

LEWIS

WAVERLEY

CAMB METCALFE RIDGE

PRIMRO

UNIVERSITE

HENDERSON

BANK

SPRUCE

CHAMPA LO GNE RNE

CAMB RIDGE

RUSSELL

ELGIN

ECCLES

SWEETLAND

NELSON

> Pedestrians will enjoy a safe, secure, comfortable, enriched, and enhanced street environment; BEECH
ELM

LORET

RAILW AY

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SE

LOUIS PASTEUR

TER

BOOTH

HILL

BRON SO

LOUISA

GLADSTONE

METCALFE

BEECH

CHAMPA GNE

BOOTH

RIDGE

LEBRET ON

BELL

BREEZE

> Place a priority on pedestrian movement at-grade, especially along pedestrian corridors which provide direct access to pedestrian-oriented uses and mid-block connections, particularly between Sparks and Queens Streets;
LORETT A
AY RAILW
ABERDE EN

CAMB

YOUNG

LOUISA

RIDGE

HWY417 IC12 1B RAMP16 YOUN G HIG HWA Y 41 7 GEORGE

Figure 43: Central Area Secondary Plan – CharacterMCLEOD Source: City of Ottawa. Areas. MCLEOD
FLORA

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RAYMON D

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BANK
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O

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ISABELLA
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LD IE NF EE HAVELOCK

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S

LA

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IN

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MANN

HILL

GLENDALE

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CHAMBERLAIN
ROSEBERY

19A RAMP75 HWY417 IC1

HARVEY

HARVEY

HWY417

MP76 IC118 RA

LYON

CAMB

NORMAN

HAWTHORNE

RENFREW

GRAHAM

> Generally discourage above or below-grade pedways, and undertake to limit them to strategic locations which ensure the prominence of at-grade movement; > Ensure minimum clear sidewalk widths and a continuity of weather protection; > Reduce the number of commuter buses along Wellington Street, and the eventual removal of trucks, as alternative routes become available; and, > Investigate the long-term open space needs of Upper Town. The City’s Central Area Secondary Plan can be found online at: http://ottawa.ca/e/ WD026832

Study Area

Zone d’étude

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 119

CHAPEL

BELL

> Pedestrian corridors will connect with transit services and nearby areas, such as Sparks Street, Parliament Hill, the Canal, Rideau Street, Upper Town, and the Centretown neighbourhood;
EHILL
ROCHES
BREEZE

LYON

RIDGE

LAUREL

ECCLES

HWY417 IC LAURIER 121B RAMP 16 YOUN GLOUCESTER G HIG HWA RAYMO NEPEAN Y 41 ND NEPEAN 7 ACADEMY PRIMROSE GEORG E HW LISGAR Y41 7 IC COOPER 121 ABERD AR EEN AM PSOMERSET LYMOU P51 TH
L
O'CONNOR
MACLAREN

LORNE

PERKINS

EMPRES S

WALLER

FLORA
COPERNICUS

CITY CE NTRE

RING

LIN WEL

NICHOLAS

GTO

N

Upper Town
BAY

ALBERT

FRIEL

LOUIS
MM S IS N IO ER

A

SLATER

LOUIS

A

The Core

Sandy DALY Rideau/ DALY Hill Congress STEWART West The MACKENZIE KING Centre SERAPHIN MARION WILBROD Canal

BESSERER

FRANK
GLADSTONE

CO

Bank Street

M

KHIL BRIC

TA

ARLINGTON

ARGY
OSGOODE

EMPRES S

CATHERINE
EE QU N IZ EL AB

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OAK

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CHAMBERLAIN
BY
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MACDONALD

POPLAR

JACK PURCELL

CHRISTIE

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LEBRET ON

CAMB

LORETT A

KENT

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Study Area
N

Zone d’étude

FRANK

FRANK

ROBE

BALSAM

ARTH UR

PERCY

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RT

WAVERLEY

WAVERLEY

RENFREW

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N

LEBRE

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LEWIS

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NIC

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TON

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PE RI AL

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N

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HW Y4 17 IC 11 8 RA M P3 5
LE ES

HW Y4 17 IC 11 8 RA M P6 4
TR T SI AN

RI AL

Transportation Master Plan
The update of the Transportation Master Plan (TMP) was approved by the City of Ottawa Council in November 2008. The TMP sets the priorities and polices for the planning and development of mobility in Ottawa for the next 20 years. Among others, it establishes the Rapid Transit Network, and encourages the development of values, targets and policies for improved walking, cycling and transit usage. In keeping with the Official Plan, the TMP seeks to achieve the following increases in the share of morning peak-hour travel by pedestrian, cycling and public transit modes by 2031: > Walking modal share of all person trips – from 9.6 per cent in 2005 to 10 per cent in 2031; > Cycling modal share of all person trips – from 1.7 per cent in 2005 to 3 per cent in 2031; and, > Public transit – from 23 per cent of total motorized trips in 2005 to 30 per cent in 2031. All streets in Downtown Ottawa will play important roles in the attainment of these objectives. The TMP is presently under review. The City’s Transportation Master Plan can be found online at: http://ottawa.ca/e/ CON042839

Cycling Plan
The Ottawa Cycling Plan (CP), approved in 2008, builds on the urban cycling transportation network as outlined in the Official Plan (Figure 44), providing a framework to inform cycling in Downtown Ottawa. When the City of Ottawa Council approved the CP in July 2008, the downtown component of the plan was conceptual in nature as neither the Transportation Master Plan nor the Downtown Ottawa Light Rail Tunnel project had been approved. Therefore, there is an opportunity for the Downtown Moves Study to explore refinements to the CP in Downtown Ottawa. The City’s Cycling Plan can be found online at: http://ottawa.ca/e/CON030825

Off-road cycling routes

Off-road cycling routes routes

On-road cycling On-road cycling routes

Figure 44: Existing Urban Cycling Transportation Network. Source: Schedule C, Official Plan, City of Ottawa.

City of Ottawa 120 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

An Urban The Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy (DOUDS) was approved by City Design Council in 2004 as an action-oriented strategy to improve urban design and the Strategy public realm in the core of Canada’s capital. It contains over 40 strategies to be addressed over two decades. As it relates to Downtown Moves, somefor recof the ommendations in DOUDS are: Downtown Ottawa
Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy
P

> Create more hospitable and pedestrian-friendly street level environments for residents, workers and visitors to the Business Precinct;
Legend / Légende

> Protect key east-west streets from the negative impacts of traffic;

> Recognize the importance of north-south streets as equal to the downtown’s east-west streets to ensure that the same level of maintenance and development controls are in place along these streets;
Escarpment Falaise

> Increase the provision of bicycle routes and bicycle connections across Downtown Ottawa; and, > Provide priority sites for open spaces. The Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy can be found online at: http://ottawa. ca/e/CON020356

BUILD | ANALYZE | IDENTIFY | RECOMMEND
Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy 2020

.22

Improvement to/or New Open Space Amélioration à un/ou nouvel espace vert

Development site that should be considered for Public or Private Potential Open Space or part thereof Site potentiel pouvant contenir en tout ou en partie un espace vert privé ou public Potential Development Site and Intensification Area Site potentiel de développement et d'intensification Key Civic Building Bâtiment civique clef National Symbolic Building Bâtiment symbolique d'envergure national Key Historic Building Bâtiment historique clef

Facade Improvement to address the Public Realm/ P Amélioration de façade pour adresser le domaine public

.22

Main Street Streetscape Improvement Amélioration de rue principale Key Street Improvement Streetscape Amélioration de rue clef Special Streetscape or Area Improvement Amélioration spéciale de rue ou de secteur

Two way conversion- Priority Candidate Transformation en voie à double sens- Candidat prioritaire Two way conversion- Secondary Candidate Transformation en voie à double sens- Candidat secondaire Targeted Precinct Strategy Reference Number Numéro de référence de la stratégie d'arrondissement Neighbourhood Quartier

25

An Urban Design Strategy for Downtown Ottawa
Legend / Légende
Improvement to/or New Open Space Amélioration à un/ou nouvel espace vert Development site that should be considered for Public or Private Potential Open Space or part thereof Site potentiel pouvant contenir en tout ou en partie un espace vert privé ou public Potential Development Site and Intensification Area Site potentiel de développement et d'intensification Key Civic Building Bâtiment civique clef National Symbolic Building Bâtiment symbolique d'envergure national Key Historic Building Bâtiment historique clef Escarpment Falaise Facade Improvement to address the Public Realm/ Amélioration de façade pour adresser le domaine public Main Street Streetscape Improvement Amélioration de rue principale Key Street Improvement Streetscape Amélioration de rue clef Special Streetscape or Area Improvement Amélioration spéciale de rue ou de secteur Two way conversion- Priority Candidate Transformation en voie à double sens- Candidat prioritaire Two way conversion- Secondary Candidate Transformation en voie à double sens- Candidat secondaire

BUILD | ANALYZE | IDENTIFY | RECOMMEND
Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy 2020

Aa

25

Targeted Precinct Strategy Reference Number Numéro de référence de la stratégie d'arrondissement Neighbourhood Quartier

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 121

Choosing Our Future
Choosing our Future is a combined initiative of the City of Ottawa, the City of Gatineau and the National Capital Commission (NCC) to help Canada’s Capital Region become more sustainable, resilient and liveable. One of the initiative’s main goals is to enhance connectivity and mobility within the capital region. As it relates to Downtown Moves, Choosing Our Future intents to: > Promote walking, cycling, and transit-riding amongst the capital region’s residents as first-choices for transportation; > Reduce travel distances through careful land use planning; and, > Connect transportation networks between and within communities, minimizing environmental impacts, moving residents and goods safely, efficiently, and affordably, and encouraging social interaction.

City of Ottawa 122 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

A.3 National Capital Commission

Planning and design in Ottawa are also guided by the National Capital Commission. As such, the overarching vision for physical planning and development in the National Capital Region is set out in the Plan for Canada’s Capital (first issued in 1998). Some of the key planning directions proposed in the Plan, as they relate 14 to and support the Downtown Moves Study, include the following:
GATINEAU PARK
TO

> Complete the gaps in the recreational pathway network; > Promote the revitalization of Sparks Street Mall; and, > Support the City of Ottawa in actions to reinforce the CBD and enhance its S EC TO R P LAN F OR C ANADA’ S C AP ITAL C OR E quality, to consolidate the links between the Capital and Civic Realms. A R EA /
P LAN
DE S EC TEU R DU C OEU R DE LA C AP ITALE
PARC ROCKCLIFFE PARK

> The long-term vitality of the Capital core area as a priority;
H S E P JO
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U

R

V

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S

M

BO

N

E

D

UL

R

VA

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C

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> The continuing 10 of Confederation Boulevard as the primary focus of pubrole lic programming and capital investment;
U
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> Continued improvement of the Capital Pathway Network; and, 3
9
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DESC PONT HAUD BRID IERES GE

> Location of key cultural and employment institutions in the core area, sup4 13 ported by public transit. 4
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> Reinforce and strengthen the Confederation Boulevard, increasing the prominence of public land uses and activities; > Enhance and expand opportunities for public experience in the Core Area, including through the addition of new commemorations and public art; > Improve linkages and mobility, facilitate the movement of both residents and visitors to and through the Core Area; > Study and Promote Interprovincial transit integration which connects the downtown cores of Ottawa and Gatineau;
W L EL

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12 The vision established in the Plan for Canada’s Capital is applied to all areas within 7 11 5 the National Capital Region through master, sector and area plans. The downtown core of Ottawa is referred to as “Core Area”. The NCC’s Capital Core Area Sector Plan (2005) sets out how federal government lands in this core area should be planned until 2025. Within the core area of Ottawa, there are various character areas as illustrated in Figure 45. Key initiatives of the Sector Plan include:
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CHARACTER AREAS/ AIRES À CARACTÈRE DISTINCT
Legend/Legende
1
Parliamentary Precinct/ Cité parlementaire

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O R A T N -C E O P LDDG A I N R B

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AFFAIRES ÉTRANGÈRES\ EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

LeBreton South/ LeBreton sud Ottawa River/ Rivière des Outaouais Promenade du Portage

S TA N L E Y

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Parliamentary Precinct East/ Cité parlementaire est Parliamentary Precinct West and Judicial Precinct / Cité parlementaire ouest et cité judiciaire

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Gatineau Central Waterfront/ Aire riveraine centrale de Gatineau Sussex

E

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EA

Brewery Creek and Portage Par Ruisseau de la Brasserie et parc des Portageurs Ottawa CBD/ Centre des affaires d'Ottawa Retail, Arts & Theatre Precinct/ Arrondissement arts, du théâtre et du commerce ByWard Market/ Marché By Old Hull/ Vieux-Hull Sparks Street/ Rue Sparks Confederation Boulevard/ Boulevard de la Confédération Core Area Boundary/ Limite du Coeur de la capitale

A A T N DR POA N G E X ID L EB R

IL

U

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3A
MUSEE DES BEAUX-ARTS DU CANADA/ NATIO NAL GALLERY OF CANADA

CATHCA RT

RIV ER
C R IT C H

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PARC BORDELEAU PARK
BRUYERE

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S T.A N D R E W

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BASILIQUE NOTRE-DAME BASILICA

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O L DS T.PAT R I C K

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. ST

3B

4
V A N IE R P A R K W A Y

Islands and LeBreton North Les îles et LeBreton nord

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PARC MAJOR HILL ASS P A R K A M BD E S A D E
U.S.A. EMBASSY

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MURRAY

CLARENCE

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EAST

4A 4B 4C

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Industrial Waterfront, Chaudières and Victoria West Islands/ Aire riveraine industrielle, Îles des Chaudières et Victoria ouest Victoria Island East and Richmond's Landing/ Île Victoria est et débarcadère de Richmond The Islands and LeBreton North/ LeBreton nord

LA PLAINE LEBRETON COMMON

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JARDINDES PROVINCES/GARDEN OFTHEPROVINCES PA R C BRONSON PARK

COLLINE DU PA RL EM E N T/ PARLIAMENT HILL

PARC MACDONALD PARK

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SUSSEX

MacKENZIE

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C H AT E A U LAURIER

TORMEY

WELLINGTON

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PLACEDELA C ON F E D E R AT I O N SQUARE

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RIDEAU

15

SPA RKS

CENTRE RIDEAU CENTRE
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CUMBERLAND

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7
ALBERT

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5
P

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al Can u ea Rid al Can

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6

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11

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5
L O UI SPAS T E UR
UNIVERSITÉ

January 2004 / Janvier 2004
LAURIER
PARC S T R AT H CO N A PARK

LAURIER

GLOUCESTER

S T.V I N C E N T HOTELDEVILLE CITY HALL
NEPEAN
NEPEAN

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PR O M .Q

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250

500

1000

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NELSON KING HENDERSON SWEETLAND RUSSELL CHAPEL

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EL

O'CONNOR

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B AY

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METCALFE

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PARC DUNDONALD PARK

LYON

C NI

Figure 45: NCC’s “Characters Areas”, as identified in the Capital Core Area Sector Plan (2005). Source: NCC.
LEWIS JAMES WAVERLEY

PERCY

O OL .C

IZ A B ET HD R E IV

L HO AS

L NE

EDWARD

BY

GILMOUR

U R BAN STRATE G I E S I N C .
D e lc a n M e lo s he & A s s o c ia te s L td . A p ro p o s P la nning

E IV DR

TEMPLETON

PARC McNABB PARK

FLORENCE

FRANK

6

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 123

DRAFT / ÉBAUCHE

A.4 Provincial Policy Statement

A.5 Experience from Other Cities

The Provincial Policy Statement (PPS), issued under Section 3 of the Planning Act, provides policy direction on matters of public interest related to guiding growth and development in Ontario. The underlying principles of the PPS relate to the province’s long term economic prosperity, environmental health and social well-being. As part of the long-term economic prosperity policies, which aim at to building strong communities, the PPS states that: “Long-term economic prosperity should be supported by maintaining and, where possible, enhancing the vitality and viability of downtowns and mainstreets” (PPS, Section 1.7.1.b ). As it relates to transportation, the PPS states that: “A land use pattern, density and mix of uses should be promoted that minimize the length and number of vehicle trips and support the development of viable choices and plans for public transit and other alternative transportation modes, including commuter rail and bus” (PPS, Section 1.6.5.4). The PPS can be found online at www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page1485.aspx

Municipalities from across North-America are rediscovering the role that streets and downtowns play in renewing the vitality and livability of communities. The recurring theme is that streets and downtowns should no longer be built to accommodate the needs of the private automobile only, but rather should be redesigned to rebalance the needs amongst all users, prioritizing pedestrians, cyclists and transit riders. From this analysis, the following key themes are emerging in regards to the planning and design of downtown areas and their transportation networks: > Rebalancing streets in favour of walking and cycling; > The development of transit-oriented streets; > Enhanced on-road cycling facilities; > New opportunities for adjoining public space; > Flexible use of streets; and, > Green and sustainable streets. The precedents fall into four categories: 1. Pilot projects that change how the right-of-way is used 2. Streetscape planting 3. Reinstating vehicle use on pedestrian malls 4. Flexible space on the boulevard

City of Ottawa 124 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

1. Pilot Projects that Change How the Right-of-Way is Used
New York City Plaza Program Overview NYC Plaza Program is a major NYC initiative to improve mobility and safety across Manhattan, as well as a key component of the city’s effort to ensure that all New Yorkers live within a 10-minute walk of quality open space. This project aims at retrofitting excess roadway space into public plazas and seating areas by simply painting or treating the asphalt, placing protective barriers along the periphery, and installing moveable tables and chairs. Projects completed include Times Square (47th to 42nd Streets) and Herald Square (35th to 33rd Streets). Extensive safety improvements were also made along the Broadway corridor between Columbus Circle and Madison Square. City New York City (NYC), NY Year constructed May 2009, ongoing.

Aa

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 125

Laurier Avenue Bike Lanes, Ottawa Overview The City of Ottawa implemented the first downtown segregated bike lanes in Ontario in a two-year pilot project on Laurier Avenue West. The new bike lanes are separated from motor vehicles through the use of concrete curbs, plastic poles, parked cars and planter boxes. City Ottawa, ON Year constructed 2011

City of Ottawa 126 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

2. Streetscape Planting
Michigan Avenue Planters, Chicago Overview Large planters were implemented on the sidewalks and medians on 33 blocks of Michigan Avenue. These enormous planters act as bio-retention facilities/rain gardens that clean, control and reuse stormwater. The seasonal plant displays have complex diversity, are large in scale, lush and vary in texture and colour. City Chicago, IL Year constructed 1993

Aa

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 127

Bloor Street Transformation, Toronto Overview The Bloor-Yorkville BIA partnered with the City of Toronto to completely transform and re-invigorate the corridor of Bloor Street between Church Street and Avenue Road. The streetscape uses extensive tree plantings in innovative and sustainable soil cell systems, widened granite sidewalks, seasonal flowerbeds and attractive up-lighting for each tree. City Toronto, ON Year constructed 2008-2010

City of Ottawa 128 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

3. Reinstating Vehicle Use on Pedestrian Malls
Stephen Avenue, Calgary Overview Stephen Avenue is a vibrant pedestrian street lined with restaurants, cafés, pubs and bars, high-end retail and also supports live entertainment/festivals. The street has 5,000 to 10,000 people per hour during peak times. The street is a Pedestrian Mall in the day and has pedestrian priority in the evenings and over night. Vehicular movement is permitted on Stephen Avenue from 6:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. City Calgary, AB Year constructed Pedestrianized in 1970s and major additional work for the Winter Olympics in 1988.

Aa

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 129

4. Flexible Space on the Boulevard
Pavement to Parks, San Francisco Overview San Francisco’s Pavement to Parks program reclaim unused public right of ways and turn them quickly and inexpensively into new public plazas and urban parklets, eventually creating a network of public spaces. Currently, there are nine completed projects, including four plazas (Castro, Guerrero Park, Showplace Triangle Plaza, Naples Green Plaza) and five parklets (Divisadero Parklet, 22nd Street Parklet, 24th Street Parklet at Sanchez, 24th Street Parklet at Noe, Columbus Parklet #1 with Columbus Parklet #2 forthcoming). This innovative program is lead in collaboration by San Francisco’s Mayor’s Office, the Dept. of Public Works, the Planning Department, and the Municipal Transportation Agency. City San Francisco, CA Year constructed 2009, ongoing.

City of Ottawa 130 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

King St, Kitchener Overview The revitalization of the downtown’s six-block main hub stretches 1.1km along King Street, from Frederick/Benton Street in the southeast to Francis Street in the northwest. The design creates a pedestrian-first public realm street by transforming the existing lay-by parking and sidewalk into a flexible boulevard system that maximizes the pedestrian-zone width, while being adaptable for alternate uses during the winter months. City Kitchener, ON Year constructed 2010

Aa

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 131

A.6 Stakeholder Desires

Throughout the public consultation strategy undertaken for Downtown Moves, the stakeholders involved in the process repeatedly identified opportunities to create a more desirable downtown. These recurring themes included: > Sidewalks in the Study Area are presently too narrow for today’s requirements and will become increasingly insufficient and unsafe for pedestrians when the three downtown light rail stations become operational; > Pedestrians would benefit from the creation of mid-block connections through some of the longer street blocks in downtown Ottawa; > The many wide, one-way streets in downtown Ottawa encourage high driving speeds and are difficult to navigate; > There is a need for a better pedestrian link between downtown Ottawa and By-Ward Market (Lowertown) and Lebreton Flats; > There is not enough green and public space across downtown Ottawa, especially in the western end; > There needs to be better east-west cycling connectivity to and from downtown at both ends; > More north-south cycling routes should be introduced, specially linking downtown Ottawa to the Glebe; > There is a common perception that downtown Ottawa becomes uninhabited and an uninteresting place after working hours during the week and weekends; > Strategically located on-street-parking, loading, and taxi areas are crucial for the vitality of downtown businesses; and, > Careful attention should be paid to enliven Sparks Street.

City of Ottawa 132 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix A Background

Aa

Appendix A Background

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 133

City of Ottawa 134 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

B.1 Working in Downtown Ottawa B.2 Living in Downtown Ottawa B.3 Redevelopment in Downtown Ottawa B.4 Transportation Network B.5 Urban Design B.6 Street Inventory & Analysis

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Ab

This chapter provides the basis on which the framework for Downtown Moves can be built. Existing conditions in regards to land use, population and employment, redevelopment, and transportation is summarized. An analysis of urban design and constraints and opportunities is provided, with an emphasis on street conditions.

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 135

Today, Downtown Ottawa is the economic and cultural heart of the city, based on its unique combination of employment, government, retail, housing, entertainment and cultural activities. However, Downtown Ottawa is primarily occupied by office and commercial land uses. This includes Ottawa’s highest density of commercial offices (west of Elgin Street) as well as the Rideau Centre and the By-Ward Market (east of Elgin Street). Residential uses are prevalent only in the western portion of Downtown Ottawa. The pattern of land use is shown in Figure 46.

Residential Commercial Institutional Industrial

Transportation Utility Communications Office

Recreational Open space Idle and shrub land Vacant land

Vacant building Forest Wetland Wetland

Figure 46: Land Use in Downtown Ottawa. Source: City of Ottawa GIS.

City of Ottawa Residential Transportation 136 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s StreetsRecreational
Commercial Utility Open space Institutional Communications Idle and shrub land

Vacant building Forest Wetland

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

The area also includes four Heritage Conservation Districts and three Business Improvement Areas (BIAs). Figures 47 and 48, respectively, illustrate these elements. In summary, the urban fabric of Downtown Ottawa attracts many office workers, tourists and residents to a relatively compact area.

Bank Street Byward Market Bank Street

Cathedral Hill Centretown Cathedral Hill

Sparks Street Mall Sparks Street Mall

Figure Byward Market Conservation Districts in Downtown Ottawa. Source: City of Ottawa GIS. 47: Heritage Centretown

Ab

Bank Bank Byward Byward Rideau Rideau

Somerset-Chinatown Somerset-Chinatown Sparks Sparks

Figure 48: Business Improvement Areas in Study Area of Downtown Moves. Source: City of Ottawa GIS.

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 137

B.1 Working in Downtown Ottawa

Considered the Central Business District of Ottawa, the downtown area employs approximately 98,000 people in 26 million square feet of office and commercial space. The City has projected that office and commercial space in Downtown Ottawa will increase to approximately 31 million square feet by 2031 (Source: City of Ottawa, Planning and Growth Management Department, Research and Forecasting Unit). Figure 49 provides a breakdown of estimated employment distribution by block in the Central Area in 2011. Through the visual analysis provided in Figure 37, it becomes clear that the highest density office buildings are located in the quadrant formed by Lyon, Albert, O’Connor and Gloucester streets.

As Downtown Ottawa offers a bus-rapid network along East-West streets (Albert and Slater), most office workers who commute to work via active transportation tend to use the sidewalks along Lyon, Bank and O’Connor Streets. With the forecast additional 5 million square feet of office commercial space by 2031, sidewalks will have to be enhanced to provide for pedestrian safety and comfort.
BRUYERE

MIDDLE

A

LE

X A

N

ST. ANDREW

D

R

A

496 4

GUIGUES

DALHOUSIE

LA RN TU

PARENT

VIMY
MIDDLE

PLAC

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313 60 191 MURRAY 638 204 CLARENCE
WILLIAM

69 87

880
MACKENZIE

SUSSEX

YORK

640

430 1127 231

287 611

YORK

32 628

888 2518
WELLINGTON

KING EDWARD

70 263

ST. PATRICK

NE

LETT

PLAC

E

WILLIAM

VIMY

70

60

FL 763EET

0
RIDEAU

SPARKS

33

767

LLOYD

CUMBERLAND

TU RN LA NE

1072

GEORGE

GEORGE

LETT

FLEET
LLOYD

0
M CO

SPARKS

335 1471 72

1833 2711 2903 4253 5385 3059

1711
QUEEN

SPARKS

569

914 1918 2230 2802 4623
METCALFE
O'CONNOR

669 1649 2741
ELGIN

30
BRI CKH

888
BAY

ALBERT

1002 3922 4029 1629

4173 1244 2621 3724
NEPEAN

PERKIN

LORNE

EMPRES

PERKIN

LORNE

20
NEPEAN
PRIMROSE

9

WALLE

S

S

LAURIER

400

ACADEMY

4104

1399
LORNE

PRIMROSE

SS

LORNE

EMPRE

LISGAR

EMPRE

COOPER
CAMB RIDGE

UNIVERSITE
L NE LO CO

Figure 49: 2011 Estimated Employment by Block in Central Area. Source: City of Ottawa, Central Area Development Capacity Analysis (2011 Forecast).
3-4 K 1-2 K

4+ K

2-3 K

>1 K

City of Ottawa 138 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

3-4 K

CAMB

Source : City to City of Ottawa, 4+ K 2-3 K Central Area Development Capacity Analysis (2011 Forecast)

RIDGE

COPERNICUS

GLOUCESTER

2517

386

NEPEAN
ACADEMY

SS

1-2 K

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

RING

R

6

77

1723

0

NICHOLAS

WEL

S

LI

4082

EMPRE SS

ON NGT

214

231

SLATER

3225

635

WE

G LLIN

TON

DALY

197

STEWART WILBROD

MACKENZIE KING
SERAPHIN MARION

6 20

BAY

49
ON ER

3129

1911

42

516 256
BRI

30

1174

155 266

49 888 214

14

2

CO MM S IS

7

R NE IO

2883

930

2

CKH

MI I SS

ILL

7

ILL

QU N EE EL IZ AB H ET
BY

>1 K

B.2 Living in Downtown Ottawa

Downtown Ottawa is home to approximately 10,000 residents (source: City of Ottawa, 2010). As a result of Official Plan policies that encourage residential intensification, residential construction downtown has been on the rise since the early 2000s. In 2001, there was 4 million square feet of residential space in the Central Area. This number increased to 5.1 million square feet in 2006, and to 6.4 million square feet in 2011. By 2031, the City has projected that the number of residents living in the Central Area will increase to approximately 20,000 (Source: City of Ottawa, Planning and Growth Management Department, Research and Forecasting Unit). This residential growth will in turn place increasing demand on the City’s street network to accommodate walking, cycling and transit use downtown. This analysis supports the need to enhance the size and quality of the walking environment in Downtown Ottawa.

Ab
R1 - Resid 1st Density R1 - Resid 1st R2 - Resid 2nd Density R3 - Resid R5 - Resid 5th Density Density 3rd DensityR3 - Resid 3rd Density R4 - Resid 4th Density

R5 - Resid 5th Density

R2 - Resid 2nd Density

R4 - Resid 4th Density

Figure 50: Residential zoned properties in the study area.

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 139

B.3 Redevelopment in Downtown Ottawa

The vision for the Central Area, as laid out in the Official Plan, highlights the development of vibrant transit-oriented streets with enhanced pedestrian environments and office, residential and other uses above the street (source: Official Plan, Section 3.6.6). Residential and employment growth is also encouraged downtown. As a result of such policies, there has been significant redevelopment in Downtown Ottawa offering new mixed-use development, contributing to the area’s vitality. Figure 51 provides an illustration of the current development applications in, and adjacent to, the study area. The City forecasts that, approximately 6,500

new dwelling units (or approximately 6 million new square feet of residential development) will be constructed in the Central Area by 2031.

PARENT

ST. PATRICK

MURRAYdevelopment of 2 towers • Proposed

113 Queen

KING EDWARD

R AT .P ST

IC

K

(6 and 18 stories) consisting of residential units with underground parking

MURRAY

MIDDLE

MACKENZIE

SUSSEX

300 Sparks
• Demolish existing 4 storey building • Proposed 19 storey office building

300 Queen
• Proposed 17 storey office building

YORK

WILLIAM

CLARENCE
YORK

CLARENCE
YORK
NELSON
OSGOODE

199 Slater
• Proposed 16 storey office building with 99 below grade parking spaces

VIMY

PLAC

E

WILLIAM

TU RN LA

GEORGE

OTTAWA

RIVER

• Proposed 12 storey office tower • Proposed 21 storey residential tower flanked by town houses • 244 underground parking spaces

WELLINGTON
SPARKS

• Proposed 19 storey office building with parking facility consisting of 210 spaces

CUMBERLAND

439 Queen

150 Slater

GEORGE
RIDEAU

NE

BROAD

LLOYD

• Proposed 18 storey office building with 3 levels of underground parking

152 Bank

LETT

FLEET

SPARKS QUEEN

DALY

• Proposed 17 storey office building with underground parking garage for 290 parking spaces

90 Elgin

BESSERER
DALY

CO S IS MM

ALBERT ELGIN
BAY
SLATER

STEWART
MACKENZIE KING
NICHOLAS

BRI

• Proposed two office towers, 27-30 storeys, 1.3 million square feet plus 40,000 square feet retail

801 Albert

N IO

PERKIN

S EMPRES S

O'CONNOR

LORNE

WALLE

LAURIER
GLOUCESTER

METCALFE

ELM

PRIMR OSE ELM

NEPEAN
PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

• Proposed 28 storey building with 240 unit apartment condo

70 Gloucester

EMPRE SS

224 Lyon
COOPER

E

• Proposed 2 towers of 27 storey building and one mid-rise • Linked by a 2 storey commercial building

UNIVERSITE

CAMB RIDGE

S
ER

ELGIN

ECCLE

ROCHE ST

LYON

OAK
LAURE L
LARCH
N PRESTO

ECCLE

S

MACLAREN
DERBY

R

RON K OLBUS

JACK PURCELL

CHRISTIE

TON

KENT

WILLO W

• Proposed 16 storey residential condominium

300 Lisgar

GILMOUR

MACDONALD

POPLA

• Proposed 2 1/2 storey office building and construct a 20 storey mixed use condominium with a new 3 level underground garage

112 Lisgar
BY
TH

JAMES

LEWIS

CARTIER

LEBRE

FLORENCE

FRANK

FRANK

BRON SON

BELL

LOUIS Figure A

51: Recent Development Applications In and Adjacent to Study Area. Source: City of Ottawa.
LOUIS A

GLADSTONE
MCLEOD

ROBE RT

BALSA M

ARTH UR

PERCY

WAVERLEY

• Proposed 18 storey building with 136 parking spaces

287 Lisgar

LEWIS

LEWIS

LOUIS PASTEUR

ECCLE

• Proposed 4 storey place of worship and community resource centre

SOMERSET

• Proposed 28 storey building with 230 unit apartment condo

S

WAVERLEY

RIDGE

DELAWARE
METCALFE
MCLEOD

City of Ottawa YHWY417 IC121B RAMP16 OUNG Study Area 140 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets Truck Traffic Volume
0-300 300-600 600-1000

CAMB

FLORA

PARK

PARK

Appendix ENFDowntown Ottawa Today B IE
Y4
M P3

H EC
G

O

K

IN

G

S

LA

N

DI

N

G

LD

RE

NELSON
TEMPLETON

312 Lisgar

90-96 Nepean

HENDERSON

SPRUC

LORNE

• Proposed Bronson 17 storey residential building

LISGAR

187 Metcalfe
QU N EE

COPERNICUS

RING

WEL

LI

ON NGT

SERAPHIN MARION
R

WILBROD

CKH ILL

ER

WALNUT

CO N LO EL
NIC L HO AS
BE
HW Y4 17 IC 11 8

EL A IZ

LE ES
HW 17
5 RA

11 IC 8 RA

B.4 Transportation Network
Pedestrians
Today, Downtown Ottawa offers narrow street right-of-ways (18 to 20m), with the majority of space allocated to the roadway surface. An analysis of existing sidewalk and pedestrian spaces in the Study Area is provided in Figure 52. While Sparks Street provides a pedestrian-only environment and wider sidewalks are found along Confederation Boulevard (Wellington and Elgin Streets), Downtown Ottawa, in general, offers very narrow sidewalks to accommodate pedestrian levels. Some exceptions exist adjacent to the current BRT stops along Albert and Slater Streets. The width and quality of the sidewalks in Downtown Ottawa will need to be enhanced to accommodate future demand as a result of the upcoming OLRT stations.

MB

Ab
MB

GL

MB

MB MB

GL

GL

TL TL TL TL TL

TL TL TL TL

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TL

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TL TL

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MB MB

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Figure 52: Existing Sidewalks and Associated Pedestrian Space in the Study Area. Source: Delcan, 2012.

Study Area Sidewalk Other Pedestrian Space on Adjacent Lands

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 141

M
M
M
GL
GL

TL

M

An analysis of pedestrian volumes across the Study Area revealed that the busiest pedestrian intersections are currently located along Metcalfe and Bank streets, south of Queen Street and north of Laurier Avenue. Other significant pedestrian crossings include the intersection of Wellington Street, Sussex Drive and Colonel By Drive, as well as most intersections along Queen, Albert and Slater streets (Figure 53). These busy pedestrian intersections correlate with existing bus stops and the route to major office buildings in Downtown Ottawa.
PARENT

305

RN TU
CLARENCE
MACKENZIE
SUSSEX YORK
WILLIAM

LA NE
MURRAY

SPARKS
QUEEN
YORK

187

847

255

CO MM

IS

ALBERT
GEORGE

WILLIAM

1277 174

1337 81 349

1896 154 485 963 478 774

1213 223 1243 1243 0 457

2149 380 1669 3169 1500 442

936 269

339 1212 829 3002 622 4

305

SPARKS
QUEEN

187 847 255 351 0 0

250 325 847 272 1034 727 1707 383 1047 0

0 1478 1474 345 1119 939 714 2334 436 350 1833 881 379 1764 154 124 448 0 0

LAURIER
DALY

1271 922 931

1410

3980 646 542

4378 578 800

2676 660 731

1349

236

922

3446 536 952

GLOUCESTER
STEWART

1556

1083

1663 193 134

3172 427 348

4333 107 638

2363 59 284

1073

302

ALBERT
SLATER

249 919

NEPEAN

4237 379 409

ELGIN

1400

1213

1229

490 298 266 570 260 1035 211

769 160 1634 209 1551 612 1557

586 579 1051 1613 4469 583 322 648 3139 612

458 831 1251 552 3050 616

1401 749 1083 1280 4018 733

335 354 400 2295 455

NICHOLAS

BAY

1575

3146

4629

2123

5835

1442

1193

317

2349

PRIMROSE

MACKENZIE KING

ACADEMY

SERAPHIN MARION
RING

O'CONNOR

METCALFE

NEPEAN

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

LISGAR
EE QU

COOPER Figure 53: Pedestrian Volumes across Downtown Ottawa, P Peak Period. Source: City of Ottawa. .M.

ELGIN

City of Ottawa 142 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s StreetsOttawa, P.M. Peak Period Map 1: Pedestrian Volumes Across Downtown
Study Area 0-1,000 Pedestrians 1,001-2,000 Pedestrians

SOMERSET

Map 1: Pedestrian Volumes Across Downtown Ottawa, P. Study Area UNIVERSITE 0-1,000 Pedestrians 1,001-2,000 Pedestrians 2,001-4,000 Pedestrians 4,001-6,000 Pedestrians
CO

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today
BY
TH

COPERNICUS
N

GLOUCESTER

WALLE

LAURIER

R

CUMBERLAND

269 661

WELLINGTON
173 3

212 1203 941

364 984 175

0 751 0

247 660 6

0 0

0

0

0

BAY

TU RN LA NE
0 0 0

SI

ON ER
GEORGE SLATER

I MM CO SS IO R NE

1369 1155

1616 1870 2192

567 490

2832

634

629

152

N LO

EL

IZ

EL

E AB

Pedestrians in Downtown Ottawa also have access to mid and through-block connections. These consist of indoor routes located on the ground level of office/ commercial buildings, indoor routes located below or above grade in office/commercial buildings, and outdoor routes mostly via parking lots and laneways (Figure 54). Popular shortcuts, especially in winter, often have services and retail. These mid and through-block connections greatly complement and enhance the outdoor walking routes and sidewalks that pedestrians in Downtown Ottawa use.

The Downtown Moves study will ensure to integrate these routes in the overall plan to enhance the pedestrian environment in Downtown Ottawa.

Study Area Indoor Route Indoor Route (above/below ground floor) Outdoor Route Physical Barrier Use of Stairs/Ramp/Elevator/Escalator Required Not Universally Accessible Other Paths

Ab

Figure 54: Downtown Ottawa Through-Block Connections. Source: Delcan, 2012.

Appendix B DowntownArea Study Ottawa Today
Indoor Route Indoor Route (above/below ground floor) Outdoor Route Physical Barrier

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 143

Por t age Brid g

Sussex

id

MacKenzie MACKENZIE

MIDDLE

PARENT

PARENT

ge

St. Patrick

ST. PATRIC

MurrayMURRAY
WILLIAM
CLARENCE

SUSSEX

BRUYERE

O'CONNOR

CAMB RIDGE

Preston

ELGIN

PRIMRO SE

GLOUCESTER

COPERNICUS

TER

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

King Edward

The existing cycling network across Downtown Ottawa is comprised of dedicated, signed and segregated cycling routes (Figure 55). Dedicated (painted) cycling routes are found along Bay and Lyon streets as well as over the Mackenzie King Bridge. Signed cycling routes, making up the majority of the cycling network in the Study Area, exist on Slater, Albert, Queen, Bank, Elgin and Wellington streets. Two segregated onedirection routes are located on Laurier Avenue, constructed in 2012.

PLAC

E

Por t age Brid

VIMY

Sussex

ST. ANDREW St. Andrew

WILLIAM

OTTAWA

Booth

rkway Ottawa Pa
BROAD

RIVER

PARENT

WELLINGTON
SPARKS

Wellington Sparks Queen
ALBERT
QUEEN SPARKS

St. Patrick

ST. PATRICK

LETT

MacKenzie

FLEET DLE
MID

MurrayMURRAY
WILLIAM
CLARENCE

Rideau
CLARENCE

LLOYD

MACKENZIE

SUSSEX

YORK

York

YORK

DALY

BAY

E

ELGIN

VIMY

PLAC

Albert Slater

WILLIAM

CUMBERLAND

Booth

LE PERKTT IN

FLEET

S EMPRES S

Ottawa

SPARKS

LAURIER

Preston

PRIMR OSE P ELM

BAY

SS

EMPRE

Ar thur

WALLE

E

LAURIER

LORNE

COOPER

Laurier

METCALFE

SPRUC

LO PERKINRNE S EMPRES S

Lor ne

RING

W

Slater

NICHOLAS

TO ING ELL

N

PRIMROSE
E ON R

ELGIN

rimrose

NEPEAN

Queen
ALBERT

QUEEN

GLOUCESTER

O'CONNOR

BROAD

LORNE

LLOYD

Sparks

SPARKS

Laurier

METCALFE

Parkway

Besserer Stewart STEWART

WALLER

RIVER OTTAWA

WE

LLI

WELLINGTON

Wellington

Rideau

RIDEAU

NICHOLAS

ON NGT

SLATER

GEORGE

George

MACKENZIE KING
GEORGE

SERAPHINWilbro MARIO

Laurie

Gloucester
NEPEAN

DALY

ACADEMY

Albert

MACKENZIE KING

SLATER

LISGAR

SERAPHINWilbrod MARION

WILBROD

R

Lisgar

Laurier

UNIVERSI

EMPRES

LEBRE TON

CAMB BELL RIDGE

LEBRET ON

BELL

CAMB

Figure 55: Bicycle Routes in Downtown Ottawa. Source: City of Ottawa.

City of Ottawa 144 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

LYON

NORMAN

Existing Major Cycling Network Off-Street Pathways Off-Street Pathways Segregated One-Direction Segregated One-Direction Segregated Bi-Directional Segregated Bi-Directional Dedicated (Painted) Dedicated (Painted) Other On-Street Cycling Routes Other On-Street Cycling Routes

ROSEBERY

LYON

SPRUCE In addition, there are many programs POPLA R CHRISTIE and services in place to support and ECCLES WILLOECCL W ES encourage cycling in Downtown Ottawa. ECCLES BAL POPLAR SAM These include: Bixi bicycle-sharing proCHRISTIE WILLO W gram, free City of Ottawa bike-routes BALSAM pocket map, CAN-BIKE safety courses LOUIS A and the Cycling Safety Evaluation HWY417 IC121B RAMP16 ProHIG LOUIS A HWA RAYMO gram (CSEP), amongst others. The CityY4 Y 41 ND HW 17 IC1 7 21B RAMP16 HW Y41 HIG of Ottawa also established a Roads and HWA RAYMON 7 IC Y 41 D 121 7 AR HW AM PLYMO Cycling Advisory Committee to provide Y41 P51 U 7 IC TH 121 AR AM PLYMOU P51 advice and guidance on issues, policies TH and programs related to cycling. NORMA N Existing Major Cycling Network

Lorne LORNE

LYON

HENDERSON

ROCHE S

Arthur

ECCLE

S

ECCLE Primrose S ECCLE ELM S

NEPEAN

Gloucester
NEPEAN

Somerset

SOMERSET

S

LISGAR

Lisgar MACLAREN
DERBY

CAMB RIDGE

Cartier

GILMOUR

MACDONALD

COOPER

UNIVERSITE

RON K OLBUS

JACK PURCELL

ELGIN

ge

O’Connor

LOUIS PASTEUR

RON KO LEB LBUS RETON

Metcalfe

Somerset
JAMES
LYON

SOMERSET

LEWIS

LEWIS
ON EL BY

LEWIS

TER

Cambri d

Bronso n

KENT

AR dge THU R

Percy PERCY

CARTIER

Metcalfe Bank

Cartier

Bay

DERBY

GILMOUR

MACDONALD

Lyon

Elgin

FLORENCE

JACK PURCELL

BELL

SON

O’Connor

LEBRET ON

n

JAMES
KENT

Gladstone GLADSTONE
WAVERLEY

LEWIS

FRANK

LEWIS
CARTIER

LE

FRANK WIS

ROBE RT

ROCHES

Booth

MACLAREN

WAVERLEY

WAVERLEY

Frank
H

Marie Curie

CUMBERLAND
S
DI N G

KING EDWARD

id

ge

Cumberland

Al A LE ex Xa A Nn Dd R ra A

DALHOUSIE

Cyclists
TU RN NE LA

CATHCART

CATHCART

YORK

York

ge

Br

GUIGUES

GUIGUES

GEORGE

George

Cumberland

Al A LE ex Xa A Nn Dd R ra A

Br

GUIGUES

DAL

ST. ANDREW St. Andrew

YOR

G

CO MM IS
TU NE LA RN

CK BRI HIL L
CO MM IS

SI E ON R

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Percy PERCY

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SI

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ho Nic

ee liza nE
QU EE N

s laCOL

be

ON EL

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th

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NIC HO

AB

ho Nic s laCOL
EL IZ AB ET

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Dr

ET

liza nE

H

QU EE N

LA

be

th

Dr

NIC HO LA S

UR

ROBER T

Booth

BRON

Bank

Elgin

Lyon

CAMB BRON RIDGE

ARTH

Bay

FLORENCE

WAVERLEY

Frank

METCALFE

BELL

Gladstone GLADSTONE FLORA Flora Flora

FRANK

FRANK

MCLEOD

DELAWARE Delaware

SON

MCLEOD
HW

CAMB RIDGE

METCALFE

FLORA

ARLINGTON
CATHERINE

Arlington

MCLEOD

ARGYLE
PARK
ARGYLE

DELAWARE Delaware

PARK
HO
G ARGYLE IN K S

MCLEOD

LA

N PARK

DI

N

G

H EC

O

Arlington

BANK

ARLINGTON
CATHERINE

ARGYLE

PARK

EC

BOOTH

RIDGE

BOOTH

GLENDALE

ROSEBERY
PRETORIA

Hawthor ne

MAIN

GLENDALE CHAMBERLAIN

417

ISABELLA

75 19A RAMP HWY417 IC1

PRETORIA

Hawthorne

MAIN

CHAMBERLAIN

417

BANK

HIGHWAY 417

HIGHWAY 417

ISABELLA

H 119A RA EC HWY417 IC
HARVEY

O

GR

LD IE NF EE HAVELOCK MP75

EC

H

O

LD IE NF EE GR HAVELOCK

K

IN

G

S

LA

N

HARVEY

MP7 IC118 RA HWY417

Y4

HARVEY
6

17 8 11 IC

LE ES

RA M 5 P3

HARVEY

HWY41

7 IC

PE IM

HAWTHORNE

P IM

RI

HAWTHORNE

ER

AL

IA L

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

WELLINGTON

Transit
M CO IO SS MI
CO

PARENT

SPARKS
QUEEN
MACKENZIE
SUSSEX YORK
TU

MURRAY

CLARENCE
WILLIAM

NEPEAN

LISGAR

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

COPERNICUS

OC Transpo services within the Study Area include Transitway service (comprised of long distance local routes, rapid transit routes and express routes) using dedicated corridors and dedicated lanes along the Albert/Slater corridor, and local bus routes operating on other streets in the downtown area (primarily Rideau Street, Wellington Street, Bank Street, Bronson Avenue, Queen Street and Elgin Street). Local routes are structured to provide PRIMROSE connections to services using the Transitway, other local routes, and major destinations the downtown. Today, OC Transpo provides approximately 180 buses/hr in peak direction, in peak hour. This meets the needs of approximately 10,000 PPHPD (people per hour per direction) (source: OC Transpo). OC Transpo’s 2031 Forecast Report indicates almost double the transit trips to Downtown Ottawa during morning peak hour. Société de transport de l’Outaouais (STO) services serving Gatineau Region are concentrated on the Rideau/Wellington Street corridor, with services running primarily inbound in the morning and outbound in the evening. STO buses enter/leave service via Cumberland or King Edward Avenue with a lay-up facility located at the north end of King Edward Avenue providing staging for outbound services. In 2011, there were approximately 120 STO buses in the peak direction during the weekday peak hour using the Rideau/Wellington Street corridor. One additional STO route (#21) ran on a one-way (westbound) loop using Rideau, Elgin, Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

YORK

ALBERT
SLATER
SPARKS
QUEEN

WILLIAM

MAC

GEORGE

LAURIER

DALY

CUMBERLAND

WELLINGTON

BAY

O'CONNOR

ELGIN

MACKENZIE KING

NICHOLAS

BAY

NEPEAN

SLATER

METCALFE

ALBERT

GLOUCESTER

STEWART

SERAPHIN MARION
RING

ACADEMY

LAURIER

O'CONNOR

METCALFE

GLOUCESTER

WALLER

NEPEAN

ELGIN

Study Area OC Transpo Transitway OC Transpo Routes STO Routes

Study Area OC Transpo Transitway OC Transpo Routes STO Routes

Figure 56: Existing Bus Routes and Stops in Downtown Ottawa. Source: OC-Transpo and STO.

Laurier, Metcalfe, Albert, Kent, Queen and Bay Street to connect downtown hotels with the Casino du Lac Leamy. Private carriers serving communities located outside of the cities of Ottawa and Gatineau typically operate on the Albert/Slater corridor, with some eastbound services using Queen Street west of Elgin Street. These services primarily serve commuters and are generally limited in frequency with one or two trips occurring on each route during the peak hour.

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 145

ELGIN

ELGIN

RN LA NE
RN LA NE

GEORGE

MACKENZIE

R NE
O SI IS MM

R NE

COOPER
COOPER

LISGAR
QU EE N

UNIVERSITE

SOMERSET

SOMERSET

Ab

CO N LO

EL IZ ET AB H

EL BY

OTTAWA

RIVER
LETT

WELLINGTON

FLEET
BROAD LLOYD

SPARKS
QUEEN ALBERT

SPARKS

MM CO IS

ILL CKH BRI

PARENT

SS

PERKIN S

EMPRE

MIDDLE

LAURIER
SUSSEX

MURRAY

METCALFE

Automobile & Truck Activity
The road network within the Study Area is considered a grid, with the majority of the roads designated as arterial roads according to the Official Plan. The notable exceptions are Bay, Queen and Gloucester streets which are considered local streets. The number of travel lanes on individual streets range between one lane and up to four lanes per direction during the commuter peak periods. During off-peak times, some of the travel lanes are used to accommodate on-street parking.
PRIMR OSE ELM

ST. PATRICK

KING EDWARD

LI WEL

ON NGT

SLATER

ELGIN

BAY

WILLIAM

GLOUCESTER

YORK

O'CONNOR

SI ER ON

CLARENCE

CLARENCE

TURN

L

LORNE

MACKENZIE

YORK

VIMY

PLAC E

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY
WELLINGTON

NEPEAN

WILLIAM

RN TU LA NE

NEPEAN

GEORGE

GEORGE

SS

LETT

SPRUC

E

FLEET
LLOYD

LORNE

EMPRE

RIVER OTTAWA

LISGAR
SPARKS QUEEN

CUMBERLAND

RIDEAU

SPARKS

BROAD

COOPER

RIDGE

DALY

CO MM

CAMB

NICHOLAS

METCALFE

ROCHE S

O'CONNOR

LORNE

RO CAMBR N KO IDGE LBUS

JACK PURCELL

EMPRES S

PERCY

LEBRE

ARTH

ELGIN

ECCLES

FLORENCE
SOMERSET

BELL

LYON

ROCHES

ECCLES

MACLAREN

GLADSTONE
MACDONALD

BRON

DERBY

POPLAR

LOUIS PASTEUR

TER

SON

ECCLES

FRANK
EL IZ AB

FRANK

CARTIER

BALSA M

UR

COOPER

WAVERLEY UNIVERSITE
NE LO CO

HENDERSON

KENT

SPRUCE

LORNE

TON

WILLO W

ELM

PRIMROSE

NEPEAN CHRISTIE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

DERBY

R PRIMRO SE

GLOUCESTER

GILMOUR

LISGAR

JAMES

LEWIS

COPERNICUS

POPLA

PERKIN

S EMPRES S

LAURIER

LYON

LANE TURN

WALLER

S

MACLAREN

RING

ECCLE INGTON L WEL S ECCLE
L

ELGIN

BAY

S

TER

SLATER

SERAPHIN MARION

WILBROD

ELGIN

ECCLE

ALBERT

SOMERSE MACKENZIE KING T

STEWART

IS

RIDGE

RON KO LBUS

JACK PURCELL

METCALFE

HW As shown in Figure 57 (One-Way and Two-Way Y417 IC121B RAMP 16 HIG Streets), the large majority of the streets in DownHWA RAYMO Y 41 ND 7 town Ottawa are one-way streets. Bank and Rideau HW Y41 7 IC 121 Street, the few two-way streets found in the Study AR AM PLYMO P51 UTH Area excluding Confederation Boulevard (Elgin and Wellington Streets), have primarily street-oriented NORMA N businesses, are vibrant main streets and greatly Study Area contribute to an interesting pedestrian environment One-Way Street Two-Way Street Highway 417 in downtown.
LEBRET ON

KENT

WILLO W

LOUIS A
ARTH UR

CHRISTIE

CARTIER

CAMB

FRANK

FRANK

ROBE

BALSAM

PERCY

FLORENCE

RT

N

KHIL BRIC

SI ON ER

LEWIS

WAVERLEY

QU

EE N

Y LB

ET H

NIC

GILMOUR

JAMES

LEWIS
WAVERLEY

LEWIS

LEWIS

MCLEOD
S

D

HO

LA

FLORA
GLADSTONE

WAVERLEY

MCL

PARK
ARGYLE

BELL

BRON SO

ARLINGTON
MCLEOD

ARGYLE
IN
D

METCALFE

LOUISA

IDGE

DELAWARE
MCLEOD
HO

CAMBR

PARK
ARGYLE

BANK

HWY417 IC1 21B RAMP16

FLORA

CATHERINE
ARGYLE

HIG

HWA Y

417

RAYMON D
HW

ARLINGTON
BANK

PARK

EC

K

G

S

LA

N

DI

N

G

PARK

HW Y4 17 IC 11 8 M RA
LE

ES

Y41

BOOTH

7 IC 1

CATHERINE

RIDGE

LEBBEE R LL ON T

PLYMOU TH

21A

RA

MP

51

CHAMBERLAIN

HIGHWAY 417

EC

O H

HAVELOCK ISABELLA
HARVEY

GR

NF HIGHWAY EE

L IE

417 75 119A RAMP HWY417 IC
MP76 IC118 RA

P3

5

BELL

BOOTH

CAMBR IDGE

LEBRET ON

GLENDALE
RENFREW

LYON

CAMB

LYON

NORMAN

ROSEBERY

PRETORIA

RENFREW

ROSEBERY
GRAHAM

MAIN

CHAMBERLAIN

GLENDALE

ISABELLA

75 19A RAMP HWY417 IC1

HARVEY

PRETORIA

HWY417

IM PE

IM

HAWTHORNE

RI

A RI PE

Study Area One-Way Street Two-Way Street Highway 417 Pedestrian Only Street

STRATHCONA

STRATHCONA

GRA

AL

L

Pedestrian Only Street

Much of the north-south vehicular travel is accommodated through a number of one-way streets that provide connectivity to/from the Highway 417 Corridor situated to the south (i.e., Lyon, Kent, O’Connor, Metcalfe streets). Two-way facilities providing north-south service include Bronson, Bank and Elgin streets. There are 13 northbound travel lanes and 13 southbound travel lanes. Peak hour traffic volumes on the north-south arterial streets currently range between 400 veh/h to 1,600 veh/h. City of Ottawa 146 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Figure 57: One-Way/Two-Way streets in Downtown Ottawa. Source: Delcan analysis.

Elgin Street and Bronson Avenue, located at the eastern and western extents of the study area, respectively, are noted to carry the greatest peak hour volumes. East of the Canal, the Nicholas-Waller Corridor form part of the City’s Urban Truck Route, and carry a significant amount of the daily truck traffic (more than 1000 trucks per day) compared to the balance of the roads in the downtown.

The number of one-way streets in the east-west direction is limited to the Albert and Slater couplet. There are seven eastbound travel lanes and seven westbound travel lanes. Peak hour traffic volumes on the east-west arterial streets currently range between 500 veh/h to 2,000 veh/h. Wellington Street, located at the northern extent of the study area and most conveniently serves inter-Provincial

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

GLOUCESTER
NEPEAN

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

travel demand, is noted to carry the greatest peak hour volumes in the east-west direction. Many of the study area streets are identified by the City of Ottawa as part of its Truck Route Network. These include portions of Wellington and Queen, and Albert and Slater, in the east/west orientation. In the north/south direction, Bronson, Kent, O’Connor, Metcalfe and Elgin are Truck Routes.
PARENT

COOPER

Study Area Truck Traffic Volume 0-300 300-600 600-1000 1000+
MURRAY

CLARENCE
MACKENZIE
SUSSEX YORK
WILLIAM

YORK

WILLIAM

Ab
STEWART

SPARKS
QUEEN

DALY

ALBERT ELGIN MACKENZIE KING
SLATER

<

SERAPHIN MARION
NICHOLAS

BAY

<

CUMBERLAND

TU RN LA NE

GEORGE

GEORGE

WELLINGTON

O'CONNOR

METCALFE

NEPEAN

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

LISGAR
E QU

COOPER

UNIVERSITE

Figure 58: 8 Hour Truck Volumes through Downtown Ottawa. Source: Delcan analysis.
ELGIN

SOMERSET

Truck Traffic Volume Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today 0-300 300-600 600-1000 1000+

Study Area

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 147
BE

COPERNICUS

GLOUCESTER

WALLE

LAURIER

RING

R

IS MM CO O SI R NE

CO

EN EL A IZ TH

N LO EL BY

Parking Supply and Loading
RN TU

According to the Central Area Parking Study, there are approximately 20,000 offstreet (structured and surface) parking spaces within the study area (west of the Canal only). The majority of the lots are private, with mid-block access driveways. In terms of on-street parking, there are approximately 750 parking spaces and additional loading spaces that support the functionality of downtown uses. These are predominantly Pay and Display spaces. A number of taxi stands, tour bus parking, and emergency service vehicle parking spaces are distributed throughout the study area.

LA NE

SPARKS
PARENT
MURRAY
8+65=73
207

7

78

QUEEN

280

WILLIAM

CO

MM

CLARENCE

188 503

MACKENZIE

SUSSEX

YORK

ALBERT
74

35

IS

164

SI

YORK
48

ON ER

WILLIAM

GEORGE

GEORGE

57 123

BAY

SPARKS
207

7

78

6

8

78

11

262

CUMBERLAND

TU RN LA NE

SLATER

40

902

WELLINGTON

LAURIER
477 296

GLOUCESTER

QUEEN

280

770

476

276

203

71

301

6

DALY
360 4 920

8+65=7

48

SLATER
57 123

40

650

650

111 274 32 600 79

47

54

108

ELGIN

1016 116

262

477

296 27 26

389

532

O'CONNOR

METCALFE

NEPEAN

142 83

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

280

908

108

LISGAR

Figure 59: Off-Street Parking Supply in Downtown Ottawa. Source: Delcan analysis. COOPER

ELGIN

City of Ottawa 148 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets
Study Area Structural Parking Surface Parking

SOMERSET

UNIVERSITE Study Area Structural Parking Surface Parking Driveway Access

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today
BE

COPERNICUS
QU EE

GLOUCESTER

51

425

173 253

40

246

WALLE

LAURIER

281

460

RING

902

602

41

NICHOLAS

BAY

R

I MM CO SS

188 503

ALBERT
74

35

977 164

263

NEPEAN

3

349

474

1107

63

468

PRIMROSE MACKENZIE KING

ACADEMY
SERAPHIN MARION

STEWART

IO R NE

L NE LO CO

N EL A IZ TH

BY

AN E

W

SPARKS
PARENT
MURRAY

QUEEN

WILLIAM

I MM CO

CLARENCE

SS IO

MACKENZIE

SUSSEX

YORK

ALBERT
YORK

NE

WILLIAM

GEORGE

GEORGE

SPARKS
QUEEN
IS SI ON ER

CUMBERLAND

WELLINGTON

LAURIER

GLOUCESTER

BAY

NE LA RN TU

R
DALY

SLATER

NEPEAN

ALBERT ELGIN
SLATER

PRIMROSE MACKENZIE KING
NICHOLAS

ACADEMY
SERAPHIN MARION

STEWART

Ab

BAY

WALLE

LAURIER

RING

R

O'CONNOR

METCALFE

NEPEAN

PRIMROSE

ACADEMY

NEPEAN

LISGAR

Figure 60: On-Street Parking Supply in Downtown Ottawa. Source: Delcan analysis. COOPER
SOMERSET
Map 1: Pedestrian Volumes Across Downtown Ottawa, P.M. Peak Period Study Area Tour Bus Zone Police Zone Loading Zone Diplomatic Zone Taxi Zone

ELGIN

Map 1: Pedestrian Volumes Across Downtown Ottawa, P.M. Peak P UNIVERSITE Study Area Tour Bus Zone Police Zone Loading Zone Diplomatic Zone Taxi Zone
N LO CO EL BY
H ET

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 149

COPERNICUS

CO MM

GLOUCESTER

COOP

QU N EE

EL

IZ

AB

B.5 Urban Design
Figure Ground: Buildings
Portage Murray

Clarence

> > >

Most of study area is built out. Buildings fill their site, not fine-grained. Downtown Ottawa is bordered by civic buildings.
Ott aR aw r ive

York Dalhousie Mackenzie

Sussex George Rideau

Wellington

Besserer Sparks

Waller

Nicholas Daly

Queen

Colo By nel
Stewart

lin Wel

gto

n
Lyon Bay

Albert Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor Bank Kent Wilbrod

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

er Slat

Laurier Percy Gloucester

Laurier

Cambridge
Primrose

Nepean

Quee n El izab
Nichol

Lisgar Cartier 0 50 100

eth
200m

as

Colo

nel By

Figure 61: Figure Ground: Buildings.

Cooper

N

Figure Ground: Streets & Open Space
Portage

Murray

Clarence

> > > >

70Ha of open space (streets, parks, parking lots, midblock connections). Typical block is 60m wide and 160-175m long. Typical street spacing is 78-105m (N-S) and 180195m (E-W). Openings in the fabric - urban open space, parking.
lin Wel gto n
Ott aR aw r ive

York Dalhousie Mackenzie

Sussex George Rideau

Wellington

Besserer Sparks

Waller

Nicholas Daly

Queen

nel Colo By

Stewart

Albert Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor Bank Kent Lyon Bay Wilbrod

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

er Slat

Laurier Percy Gloucester

Laurier

Cambridge
Primrose

Nepean

Quee n El izab
Nichol

Lisgar Cartier

eth

as

nel By Colo

Figure 62: Figure Ground: Streets & Open Space.

Cooper

0

50

100

200m

N

City of Ottawa 150 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Île Victoria
Portage

Éc du Ri
Supreme Court Cour suprême

Key Destinations
Portage

Ott

aR aw

r ive

Library & Archives Canada
Bibliothèque et Archives Canada
Major’s Hill Park Parc Major’s Hill

Parliamentary Precinct Cité parlementaire
Murray Clarence

Parliament Buildings Les édi ces du Parlement

Victoria Island Île Victoria

Wellington

Promenade Sussex Sussex Drive

>

Key destinations frame Downtown Ottawa, with major destinations within Downtown Ottawa focused on the east.
O aR ttaw

Écluses du canal Rideau
Supreme Court Cour suprême

r ive

Library & Archives Canada
Bibliothèque et Archives Canada

Parliamentary Precinct Cité parlementaire
Wellington
Currency Museum Musée de la monnaie

Parliament Buildings Delta Les édi ces du Parlement
Bay

Rideau Canal Locks Château Laurier
Confederation Square Place de la Confédération Lyon

ByWard Market Sparks Street Mall Le marché By Marriott
Currency Museum Musée de la monnaie
York Dalhousie George Rideau

Sparks

Mail de la rue Sparks

Mackenzie

Sussex

Queen

>

Major shopping and entertainment destinations are also towards the east, while Sparks Street and Bank Street are destination corridors crossing downtown. Civic uses around perimeter (including the Parliamentary Precinct) are an international destination.
ling Wel ton

llin We

gto

n

Albert Bank
Besserer

Sparks Street Mall
Delta Marriott ert Alb
Slate
Kent Lyon Bay

Sparks

Mail de la rue Sparks

Government Conference Centre Centre des conférences du gouvernement

Rideau Centre Westin Centre Rideau
Ottawa Convention Centre Centre des congrès d'Ottawa
Colo By nel

Sheraton

Metcalfe

O’Connor

Kent

Waller

Nicholas

Slater

Queen

>

r

Albert Bank Slater

Sheraton

National Arts Centre Centre national des arts

Daly

Arts Court La Cour des arts

Bronson

Stewart

Wilbrod

Laurier

Ottawa Public Library Bibliothèque publique d'Ottawa

E

Elgin

Metcalfe

O’Connor

Rue Bank

er Alb

t
Bronson

er Slat

Laurier

Ottawa Public Library Bibliothèque publique d'Ottawa

Lord Elgin

Confederation Park Parc de la Confédération

eau Rid a Can

Percy

l

Gloucester

Cambridge

Laurier

Rue Bank

a Can

Gloucester

Palais de justice provincial

Provincial Courthouse

Primrose
Primrose

Nepean

Hôtel de Ville
Portage
Quee n El
Nichol

City Hall

University of Ottawa Nepean Université d’Ottawa
Lisgar

Percy

l Rid

Bank Street

Figure 63: Key Destinations. Cultural / Culturel
Entertainment & Business / Divertissement & entreprises

Cambridge

eau

Lisgar Cartier

Government / Gouvernement

Parks & Open Space / Parcs & zones d’espaces verts GovernmentCooper / Gouvernement Confederation Boulevard / Boulevard de la Confédération Parliamentary Precinct / Cité parlementaire

Parks & Open 0Space / Parcs & zones d’espaces verts 50 100 200m Confederation Boulevard / Boulevard de la Confédération Parliamentary Precinct / Cité parlementaire
O aR ttaw r ive
Murray

N

Cooper

Cultural / Culturel Entertainment & Business / Divertissement & entreprises

Ab

Bank Street

izab eth

as

Colo

nel By

Open at Night
Portage

Clarence

>

The number and location of venues open at night are important factor for the vitality of a city and the perception of safety, however, few exist in the study area. If there are few places open at night, people will go elsewhere, which is what happens today in Downtown Ottawa. Restaurants/bars/shops open at night are few and scattered, not clustered (and thus not able to provide a key destination). This detracts from the livability of Downtown Ottawa.

York

Key Destinations 1 / Destinations principales 1
Ott aR aw r ive
Wellington Sparks

Dalhousie

>

Key Destinations 1 / Destinations principales 1
llin We gto n

Mackenzie

Sussex George Rideau Nicholas

Kent

Lyon

Bay

Besserer

Waller

Queen

er Alb

t

Daly

Bronson

>

lin Wel

gto

n
Lyon Bay

Albert Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor Bank Kent

r Slate

nel Colo By

Stewart

Wilbrod

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

Percy

er Slat

Cambridge

Laurier Percy

Laurier

>

Gloucester

Cambridge
Primrose

Nepean

Primrose
Quee n El izab
Nichol

Lisgar Cartier

eth

as

nel By Colo

Figure 64: Open at Night.

Open at Night / Ouvert le soir

Cooper

0

50

100 200m Open at Night / Ouvert le soir

N

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 151

Parking Garage Entrances
> > There are approximately 60 entrance to parking garages in Downtown Ottawa Entrance to parking garages disrupt the sidewalk, however, most existing entrances need to be maintained. Need to ensure pedestrians are given clear priority.

>

Murray

Clarence

O

aR ttaw

r ive

Ott

Wellington

➔ ➔ ➔ ➔ ➔ ➔
Queen Sparks

Daly

➔ ➔ ➔

Stewart

ll We

to ing

n
Lyon Bay

➔ ➔

llin We

n gto

Albert Bank

➔ ➔

ert Alb er Slat

er Alb

t

er Slat


Percy

Laurier

Laurier

Nepean

Primrose Lisgar Cartier

Primrose

Figure 65: Parking Parking Garage Entrances / Entrées de garage Garage Entrances.

Cooper

0

50

100

200m Parking Garage Entrances / Entrées de garage

N

City of Ottawa 152 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Gloucester

➔ ➔ ➔ ➔ ➔ ➔ ➔

Slater

Wilbrod

Portage Mackenzie

Portage

York Dalhousie

a aw

Sussex George

er Riv
Rideau

Besserer
Waller

➔ ➔

Nicholas

➔ ➔

n Colo y el B

Elgin

Metcalfe

O’Connor

Kent

Kent

Lyon

Bay

Bronson
Percy

Bronson

Cambridge

Cambridge

Que liza en E bet h
Nicho las
y nel B Colo

Pedestrian Arcades & Easements
> > > > _m of arcades. Intended to widen the width of sidewalk by using private frontage. No block has a continuous system, limiting the value in inclement weather. Some arcades are dark and few are successful.

Murray

Clarence

York Dalhousie

Ab
Besserer
Waller

Portage Mackenzie

Portage Sussex

George

O

aR ttaw

r ive Ott
Wellington

a aw

er Riv
Rideau

Wellington

Sparks

Sparks

Nicholas Daly

Queen

Queen

n Colo y el B

Stewart Albert Bank Kent Lyon Bay Wilbrod

llin We

gto

n
Lyon Bay

Albert Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor

llin We

gto

n

Bank

Kent

er Alb

t

Slater

er Alb

t

Slater

Bronson

Bronson

er Slat

er Slat
Laurier Percy Gloucester

Laurier Laurier Percy

Cambridge
Primrose

Glouceste

Cambridge

Nepean

Nepean

Que liza en E
Nicho

Primrose Lisgar Cartier

bet h

las

y nel B Colo

Lisgar

Pedestrian arcades Easements. Figure 66: Pedestrian Arcades &and overhangs / Piétons: arcades et porte-à-faux

Cooper

0 100 200m Pedestrian50 arcades and overhangs / Piétons: arcades et porte-à-faux

N

Cooper

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 153

Portage

Parks & Open Space
Portage

Ott

aR aw

r ive

Murray

Wellington
Clarence

> > > >

Large public opens spaces exist around perimeter of Downtown Ottawa. _Ha of semi-public open space in study area. Downtown Ottawa is bereft of high quality urban open space within the urban fabric. Urban open space and parks are not well connected.
lin Wel gto n
Ott aR aw r ive

York Mackenzie

Sparks
Dalhousie

Sussex George Rideau

Queen

llin We

gto

n

Wellington

Albert Metcalfe O’Connor Bank
Besserer

Kent

Lyon

Bay

Sparks

Waller

ert Alb Slate
Lyon Bay

Slater
Daly

Nicholas

Bronson

Queen

r

Colo By nel
Stewart

Albert Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor Bank Kent

Laurier
Wilbrod

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

Percy

er Slat

Gloucester
Laurier Laurier

Cambridge

Percy Gloucester

Nepean

Cambridge

Primrose
Primrose

Nepean

Portage

Lisgar
Nichol as

Quee n El izab

Lisgar

eth

Colo

nel By

Figure 67: Parks & Open Space. Semi-public Open Space / Espaces semi-publics

Public places, space (parks, plaza, pedestrian malls, and green spaces, etc.) / Espaces publics (parcs, places, mails, zone d’espaces verts, etc) Public open space (parks, plaza, pedestrian malls, and green spaces, etc.) / Espaces publics (parcs,open mails, zone d’espaces verts, etc) 0 50 100 200m Cooper Cooper Semi-public Open Space / Espaces semi-publics

Cartier

N

Trees
Portage

Ott

aR aw

r ive
Murray

Clarence

Wellington

>

Tree species are typical for urban areas (eg. Lindens, Honey Locusts, Norway Maples), but do nothing to address biodiversity.
Ott aR aw

York

Sparks
Dalhousie

Parks & Open Space / Parcs & zones d’espaces verts
r ive
Wellington

Mackenzie

Sussex George

Queen

> > >

Trees are far-spaced, with no hope of canopies connecting. Trees have limited soil volumes, connected soil volumes, isolated soil pits.
lin Wel

Rideau

Parks & Open Space / Parcs & zones d’espaces ver
llin We gto n

Albert

Bank

Kent

Lyon

Bay

Besserer

Sparks

Waller

Nicholas

Queen Alb

ert

Daly

Slater

Bronson

nel Colo

gto

n
Lyon Bay

Albert Bank Kent

r Slate
O’Connor

Stewart

By

Elgin

Metcalfe

Wilbrod

Laurier

Higher maintenance species and/or systems.

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

Percy

er Slat

Laurier Percy

Laurier

Gloucester

Gloucester

Cambridge

Cambridge
Primrose

Nepean

Nepean Primrose

Quee n El izab
Nichol

Lisgar

Lisgar Cartier

eth

as

nel By Colo

Figure 68: Trees.

Tree Location / L’emplacement des arbres

Cooper

Tree Location / L’emplacement des arbres

0

50

100

200m

N
Cooper

City of Ottawa 154 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Retail Uses
> > Retail uses at grade are essential ingredients to creating an attractive, vibrant, pedestrian realm. Windows, doors, articulated facades, a variety of functions help to create a visually stimulating environment. There are large gaps in the continuity of active frontages. > West third of Downtown Ottawa has virtually no active ground floor uses. This area is mostly residential with apartment building entrances at ground level.

>

Murray

Clarence

York Dalhousie Mackenzie

Ab
Besserer
Waller

Portage Sussex

Portage George

aR aw Ott

r ive

aR aw Ott

r ive

Rideau Wellington

Sparks

Nicholas Daly

Queen

By nel Colo

Stewart

ll We

to ing

n
Lyon Bay

Albert Elgin

ll We

to ing

n
Lyon Bay Wilbrod

Metcalfe

O’Connor

Bank

Kent

Kent

ert Alb er Slat

Slater

ert Alb er Slat

Bronson
Laurier Percy Gloucester

Bronson
Laurier Percy

Cambridge
Primrose

Cambridge

Nepean

Que liza en E

Primrose Lisgar Cartier

Nicho

h bet

las

y nel B Colo

Figure 69: Retail Uses. Frontages / Façades intéressantes Active

Cooper

0

50

100

Active Frontages / Façades intéressantes 200m

N

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 155

Portage

Seating/Cafe Patios
Portage

Ott

aR aw

r ive
Murray

Clarence

> >

Outdoor seating/cafe patios are an ingredient to creating a vibrant public realm. Currently, the heavy bus traffic/noise/congestion sterilizes frontages and eliminates the opportunity to create appealing streets. Outdoor cafes are concentrated on Sparks St.
lin Wel gto n
Ott aR aw r ive

York Dalhousie Mackenzie

Sussex George Rideau

Wellington

llin We
Sparks

gto

n

Lyon

Bay

Besserer

Waller

Nicholas

>

Queen

er Alb

t

Daly

Bronson

Colo

Albert Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor Bank Kent Lyon Bay

Slate

r

By nel

Stewart

Wilbrod

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

Percy

er Slat

Cambridge

Laurier Percy Gloucester

Laurier

Cambridge
Primrose

Portage

Nepean

Primrose
Quee n El izab
Nichol

Lisgar Cartier

eth

as

Colo

nel By

Figure 70: Seating/Cafeterrasses de cafés Cafe-style Patio / Petites Patios.

Seating & Bench / Sièges & bancs

Cooper

0

50 200m Seating100& Bench / Sièges & bancs

N

Public Art
Portage

Ott

aR aw

r ive

Cafe-style Patio / Petites terrasses de cafés
Murray


Clarence

✱ ✱

>

The City requires 1% of the construction costs of new public infrastructure to be used for the creation of public art.
Ott aR aw

✱✱
Mackenzie Sussex

York Dalhousie

r ive

>

There is an opportunity to extend the program to private development as is the protocol in many urban centres. Develop and implement an updated public art policy that meets professional standards and best practices, adopts a wider definition of public art, addresses Ottawa’s full geographic scope and ensures adequate art conservation practices.

Seating & Cafe Patios / Terrasses & petites terrasses de cafés
✱ ✱✱ ✱ ✱ ✱
Sparks Queen Wellington

George

✱ ✱ ✱

Rideau

✱✱

n gto llin We ✱


Besserer

Kent

Lyon

Bay

Waller


Elgin Metcalfe O’Connor

t Alb ✱er

✱✱

>

lin Wel

gto

n
Lyon Bay

Albert Bank Kent

r Slate

Seating & Cafe Patios / Te

Daly

Nicholas

Bronson

Colo

nel

Stewart

By

er Alb

t
Bronson

Slater

er Slat


Laurier Percy Gloucester

✱ ✱✱ ✱ ✱ ✱

Wilbrod

Percy

Cambridge

Laurier

Cambridge
Primrose

Nepean

Primrose
Quee n El izab
Nichol

Lisgar Cartier

Public art location / Emplacement de l’art public

Cooper

Public art location / Emplacement de N public l’art 0 50 100 200m

eth

as

Colo

nel By

Figure 71: Public Art.

City of Ottawa 156 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Public Art / Art public

B.6 Street Inventory & Analysis

Today, the majority of sidewalks in Downtown Ottawa are narrow, have few amenities and some are in poor condition, as demonstrated in the analysis provided in the previous sections. With narrow right-of-ways, often one of the few ways to increase the space for pedestrians is to reduce the amount of space given to motorized vehicles. Ottawa has had some successes in other neighbourhoods in reducing the number and/or width of travel lanes, and rationalizing on-street parking and loading, such as on Bank Street and Wellington Street West. Priority for pedestrians is of vital importance in pursuing a balance in the streets of Downtown Ottawa. While other modes may require space within the street rightof-way, all users become pedestrians at some point during their trip, so making priority for pedestrians is making priority for all street users. According to the vision for the Core Area in the Official Plan “Pedestrians will enjoy a safe, secure, comfortable, enriched and enhanced street environment”. The vision also states that the image and identity of the Core will be significantly enhanced through an “urban design renaissance”. Downtown Ottawa has many of the characteristics of a typical North American Central Business District. Many of the buildings are large, nondescript office buildings with heights ranging up to 30 storeys. Most buildings have little mix of uses, few entrances and limited active uses at grade. Retail activity is often located inside larger buildings, not facing the street. Blank walls facing the street are common. As a result, street life and vibrancy has suffered in Downtown, particularly in the evening. Tall, sterile buildings impose their scale on the narrow Downtown streets. As described in the Downtown Ottawa Urban Design Strategy (2003), buildings typically occupy most of the building envelope and footprint, with minimal setbacks and architectural detailing. Height controls cannot be revised and will continue to affect the style and type of development.

Official Plan. The Core. Vision. “The height of new buildings will ensure the visual integrity and symbolic primacy of the Parliament Buildings and other national symbols as seen from Confederation Boulevard, reflect an increased sensitivity in design, provide a sense of human scale and create pedestrian interest.”

The images over the next pages represent the range of urban conditions found along downtown streets. The following are common characteristics (with the exception of Bank and Rideau streets): > Few or no active uses at grade > No furnishings > No consistency or interest in sidewalk materials > No pedestrian lighting > No trees and/or landscape

Ab

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 157

Sparks Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly commercial space, mid-rise commercial/office buildings. Transportation Role: pedestrian mall. Cycling Facilities: pedestrian mall, no cycling allowed. Transit Role: no transit routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily street-oriented businesses, some inactive frontages.

Sparks
Queen Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly office space, mid- to high-rise commercial/office buildings. Transportation Role: local street, two-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: local OC Transpo and part of STO bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages, some street-oriented businesses.

© 2012 Google

Queen
Albert Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly office space, high-rise commercial/office buildings. Transportation Role: arterial Road, one-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: Part of the OC Transpo Transitway. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

© 2012 Google

Albert
City of Ottawa 158 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

© 2012 Google

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Slater Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly office space, high-rise commercial/office buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, one-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: part of the OC Transpo Transitway. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

© 2012 Google

Slater

Laurier Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly office space, mid- to high-rise commercial/office buildings (eastern end) and residential, highrise condominium buildings (western end). Transportation Role: arterial road, two-way. Cycling Facilities: segregated bi-directional bicycling routes. Transit Role: part of STO bus route. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages, some street-oriented businesses.

Ab
Laurier
© 2012 Google

Gloucester Street
Land Use and Building Types: mix of residential (western end), commercial/office (eastern end) and institutional (across the street), midto high-rise office and condominium buildings. Transportation Role: local street, one-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: no transit routes. Facades and Frontages: office and residential building entrances at ground level.
© 2012 Google

Gloucester
City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 159

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Rideau Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly commercial with some residential space, high-rise commercial and condominium buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, two-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: major OC Transpo and STO bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily street-oriented businesses, some inactive frontages.

Rideau
Elgin Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly office space, high-rise buildings (north of Lisgar Street) and mix commercial and residential, low-rise buildings (south of Lisgar Street). Transportation Role: arterial road, part of Confederation Boulevard, two-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: local OC Transpo and part of STO bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages (north of Lisgar Street).
© 2012 Google

© 2012 Google

Elgin

Metcalfe Street
Land Use and Building Types: mix of residential (southern end), commercial/office (northern end) and institutional, mid- to high-rise office buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, one-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: part of STO bus route. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

Metcalfe
City of Ottawa 160 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

© 2012 Google

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

O’Connor Street
Land Use and Building Types: mix of residential (southern end), commercial/office (northern end), mid- to high-rise office buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, one-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: no bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

O’Connor
Bank Street
Land Use and Building Types: commercial and office space, low-rise buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, two-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: local OC Transpo bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily street-oriented businesses, some inactive frontages.

© 2012 Google

Ab
Bank
© 2012 Google

Kent Street
Land Use and Building Types: office space, high-rise office buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, one-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: some local OC Transpo and part of STO bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

Kent

© 2012 Google

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 161

Lyon Street
Land Use and Building Types: office space, high-rise buildings and surface parking lots. Transportation Role: arterial road, one-way (two-way from Sparks to Wellington street). Cycling Facilities: painted bicycle routes. Transit Role: some local OC Transpo bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

Lyon
Bay Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly residential space, mid-rise condominium buildings. Transportation Role: local street, one-way. Cycling Facilities: painted bicycle routes. Transit Role: some local OC Transpo and part of STO bus routes. Facades and Frontages: entrance to condominium buildings at ground level.

© 2012 Google

Bay
Bronson Street
Land Use and Building Types: predominantly residential space, single detached, rowhomes and low-rise condominium buildings. Transportation Role: arterial road, two-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: local OC Transpo bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

© 2012 Google

Bronson
City of Ottawa 162 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

© 2012 Google

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Wellington Street
Land Use and Building Types: institutional, office and open space, low-rise buildings. Transportation Role: arterial Road, part of Confederation Boulevard, two-way. Cycling Facilities: no bicycle routes. Transit Role: major OC Transpo and STO bus routes. Facades and Frontages: primarily inactive frontages.

Wellington

© 2012 Google

Ab

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 163

City of Ottawa 164 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix B Downtown Ottawa Today

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

Ac

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 165

A P P E N D I X   A :       R E V I E W   O F   A S S O C I A T E D   P L A N S ,   S T U D I E S   A N D   P R O J E C T S :    
   
 

S T U D Y /I N IT IA T IV E  
Choosing  Our  Future   (City  of  Ottawa)     Rideau  Street  Vision   Statement  and  Guiding   Principles   (City  of  Ottawa)    

S A L I E N T   R E C O M M E N D A T I O N S  
• Walking,  cycling,  and  transit  are  residents’  first  choices  for  transportation.     • Walking,  cycling  and  transit  mobility  can  be  enhanced  by  electronic  communications,  good  planning  and  urban  design.   Downtown  Rideau  St  will  be  a  commercial  ‘high  street’  destination  that:     • Serves  pedestrians  as  the  priority  over  trucks  and  buses;     • Is  recognized  and  accepted  as  Ottawa’s  High  Street  that  includes  on-­‐street  parking,  evenings  and  week-­‐ends,  to  attract  the   lucrative  car  owner  customer  and  support  the  night-­‐time  economy  requirement  of  the  cultural  hub;     • Provides  traffic  calming  by  way  of  continuous,  upgraded  sidewalks  and  on-­‐street  parking  on  Rideau  St  evenings  and  week-­‐ ends;   • Has  inviting  pedestrian  links  between  the  theatre  and  arts  community,  the  ByWard  Market,  the  Ottawa  Convention  Centre,   Arts  Court,  the  Ottawa  Little  Theatre,  the  University  of  Ottawa,  condos  and  adjacent  neighbourhoods  such  as  Sandy  Hill  and   Lowertown;   • Has  appropriate  types  of  public  parking  that  are  safe  and  convenient  with  the  right  mix  of  on-­‐street  parking  and  short-­‐term,   metered  parking  to  support  the  cultural  and  night-­‐time  economy;     • Is  a  flexible  street  that  can  be  adjusted  to  accommodate  special  occasions/needs  as  they  arise;   • Has  an  uncluttered  and  beautiful  streetscape  with  inviting  and  special  pedestrian-­‐friendly  lighting  that  also  lights  building   façades  and  street  trees;     • Has  buried  wires  and  no  hydro  poles  in  the  sidewalks;   • Is  treated  as  a  ‘gateway’  and  transition  to  the  nation’s  Capital  Hill  and  that  the  city  maintains  at  the  same  standard  as  the   NCC’s  standard  of  care  of  the  parliamentary  district.   • Diverts  truck  traffic  and  inter-­‐provincial  buses  to  alternate  routes;   • Balances  competing  interests  between  pedestrians,  bikes,  cars  and  buses  so  that  it  is  easy  to  move  in,  around,  and   between,  various  modes  of  travel;   • Designs  the  new  LRT  station  to  showcase  arts  and  heritage.   • Rationalize  the  space  allocated  to  the  demands  of  the  various  functions  of  the  street,  including  public  transit.   • Transit  facilities  (shelters  and  platforms)  to  be  upgraded.     • New  street  furnishings  and  public  art  would  enhance  the  environment.  

Downtown  West  Precinct:   • Ensure  that  the  Western  Downtown  Precinct,  LeBreton  Flats  and  the  Business  Precinct  are  well  connected  through  their  road   networks,  open  space  systems  and  pedestrian  linkages.   • A  new  north-­‐south  street  or  pedestrian  connection  could  be  introduced  between  Laurier  Ave  and  Albert  St,  through  the   blocks  between  Bay  and  Bronson.  Street  connections  between  the  upper  quarter  and  the  lower  quarter  need  to  be   strengthened.     • Introduce  a  programme  of  streetscape  improvements  and  street  tree  planting  along  Laurier  and  Slater  St  between  Bronson   City of Ottawa and   166 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets Bay  St.   Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects • Re-­‐image  the  western  end  of  Sparks  St  and  the  northern  portion  of  Bronson  Ave  to  link  directly  with  LeBreton  Flats’   redevelopment.  

Rideau  Street  Urban   Design  Study   (City  of  Ottawa)   Launched  in  November   2007.    Evolved  into  the   “Rideau  Street  Vision   and  Guiding  Principles”   document  (above).       Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   Downtown  West   Precinct     (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

                                                         

document  (above).       Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   Downtown  West   Precinct     (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   Business  Precinct     (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

Downtown  West  Precinct:   • Ensure  that  the  Western  Downtown  Precinct,  LeBreton  Flats  and  the  Business  Precinct  are  well  connected  through  their  road   networks,  open  space  systems  and  pedestrian  linkages.   • A  new  north-­‐south  street  or  pedestrian  connection  could  be  introduced  between  Laurier  Ave  and  Albert  St,  through  the   blocks  between  Bay  and  Bronson.  Street  connections  between  the  upper  quarter  and  the  lower  quarter  need  to  be   strengthened.     • Introduce  a  programme  of  streetscape  improvements  and  street  tree  planting  along  Laurier  and  Slater  St  between  Bronson   and  Bay  St.   • Re-­‐image  the  western  end  of  Sparks  St  and  the  northern  portion  of  Bronson  Ave  to  link  directly  with  LeBreton  Flats’   redevelopment.   • New  buildings  in  the  block  bound  by  Sparks,  Queen,  Bronson  and  Bay  streets  should  support  a  podium-­‐base  and  be  setback   from  the  sidewalk  to  allow  for  streetscaping  and  planting.     • Pedestrian  movement  along  Sparks  St  should  be  extended  to  link  directly  through  to  LeBreton  Flats  from  Bronson  Park.   • To  allow  pedestrians  and  cyclists  to  cross  from  Cathedral  Hill  into  the  upper  park  area,  intersection  treatments  are  required   at  the  Albert,  Slater  and  Bronson/Commissioners  Road  junctions.   • Extend  the  street  at  the  base  of  the  escarpment  to  restore  the  street  grid  system  in  this  location.     • Undertake  a  comprehensive  programme  of  streetscaping  and  public  realm  improvements  along  each  of  the  new  streets.   Business  Precinct:   • Create  more  hospitable  and  pedestrian-­‐friendly  street  level  environments  for  residents,  workers  and  visitors  to  the  Business   Precinct.   • Create  a  higher  quality  and  more  even  transition  between  the  Business  Precinct  and  the  Capital  Realm.   • Protect  key  east-­‐west  streets,  including  Laurier,  Gloucester  and  Queen  from  the  negative  impacts  of  traffic.   • Recognizing  the  importance  of  north-­‐south  streets  as  equal  to  the  downtown's  east-­‐west  streets  to  ensure  that  the  same   level  of  maintenance  and  development  controls  are  in  place  along  these  streets.  New  buildings  should  front  onto  these   streets  and  access  to  parking  and  servicing  should  be  removed  or  mitigated.   • Increase  the  provision  of  secure  bicycle  parking  across  the  precinct.   • Undertaking  a  co-­‐ordinated  programme  of  streetscape  improvements  along  the  length  of  Sparks,  Bank,  Queen,  Laurier  and   Metcalfe  St.   • Key  opportunities  for  the  introduction  of  new  open  spaces  exist  along  Kent,  O'Connor  and  Bank  St.   • Capitalize  on  the  Bank  St  Axis  project  (NCC):  extend  Bank  St  northwards  to  the  Ottawa  River,  providing  a  critical  connection   between  the  Civic  and  Capital  Realms  and  expand  the  City's  waterfront  open  space  provision.  This  important  new  link  will   impact  on  how  the  northern  portion  of  the  Business  Precinct  is  used  by  workers  and  visitors  and  will  influence  patterns  of   movement  both  to  and  through  the  precinct.  Any  proposed  new  network  of  public  open  spaces  should  be  closely  linked  to   this  project.   • No  new  surface  parking  lots  should  be  permitted,  and  extensions  of  approval  for  existing  temporary  lots   should  require   landscaping  improvements  and  taking  back  of  any  encroachments  on  the  public  right-­‐of-­‐way.   • Priority  sites  for  Urban  Open  Spaces  include  the  intersection  of  Kent  and  Slater,  Laurier  and  Bank,  Queen  and  Kent,  O’Connor  

Ac

                                                                                                       

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 167

Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   Retail,  Arts  and   Theatre  Precinct   (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

and  Gloucester.     • An  opportunity  exists  to  consider  Laurier  Ave  for  the  demonstration  of  City-­‐led  urban  streetscape  improvements  at  a   consistent  standard  along  its  entire  length.   • Allocate  dedicated  funding  for  improved  waiting  area,  transit  facilities,  signage,  traffic  signals  and  p edestrian  comfort  on   Albert  and  Slater  St.     • The  two  block  section  between  Queen  and  Wellington  that  leads  from  Parliament  Hill  to  the  central  business  district  should   form  the  backbone  of  the  Interface  District  through  a  program  of  street  design  that  is  based  on  placing  the  best  of  art  and   culture,  landscape,  architecture,  programming,  industrial  design  and  regional  characteristics  from  each  of  Canada's   provinces,  territories  and  major  cities.   • Convert  Sparks  St  back  to  a  traditional  heritage-­‐scaled  street  by  removing  the  kiosks/clutter.  The  street  should  be  designed   as  a  multi-­‐use,  well-­‐managed  city  street  with  generous  well-­‐appointed  sidewalks  and  designed  to  accommodate  two-­‐way   vehicular  traffic  which  could  be  closed  at  designated  times  or  on  a  program  basis.   • Queen  St  has  the  potential  to  be  one  of  the  healthiest  streets  within  the  Business  Precinct.     • Queen  St  would  benefit  from  a  streetscaping  programme  that  is  similar  in  quality  and  style  to  the  north-­‐south  streets  of  the   Interface  District.   • Queen  St  will  contribute  to  the  Interface  District  by  aligning  itself  more  closely  with  Sparks  St  and  the  quality  of  development   present  in  the  Capital  Realm  along  Wellington  St.  Where  possible,  traditional  pedestrian  routes  through  the  shallow  block   should  be  restored  to  help  open  both  Sparks  and  Queen  and  make  them  more  accessible.  All  proposed  new  developments   should  accommodate  pedestrian  throughfares  at  grade  level.     Retail,  Arts  and  Theatre  Precinct:   • Bring  forward  the  findings  from  the  Inter-­‐Provincial  Bridge  Study  and  initiate  a  plan  for  the  removal  of  the  truck  route   through  the  heart  of  the  downtown.   • A  targeted  road  reconstruction  programme  to  normalize  the  street  pattern  is  required  for  the  Nicholas/Laurier/Mackenzie/   Waller/Rideau  urban  grid  area.  Repairing  the  urban  grid  in  this  location  will  make  available  new  development  sites  -­‐   particularly  in  the  areas  west  of  Waller  and  south  of  Laurier  Avenue  -­‐  as  well  as  improve  circulation,  enhance  linkages   between  neighbourhoods  and  place  priority  on  pedestrians,  cyclists  and  transit  users  over  interprovincial  trucks.   • Introduce  more  clear,  at  grade  pedestrian  links  across  Colonel  By  Drive  to  allow  for  greater  access  to  the  Canal  and  its   related  pedestrian  and  cycle  networks.  A  more  permeable  and  pedestrian-­‐friendly  Colonel  By  Drive  may  also  encourage  the   Rideau  Centre  and  Congress  Centre  to  open  their  front  doors  to  the  banks  of  the  Canal  and  create  a  more  animated  western   edge  for  the  precinct.     • Improve  the  pedestrian  experience  along  Rideau,  particularly  between  Sussex  Drive  and  Nicholas  St.  It  will  be  challenging  to   improve  the  quality  of  this  street  until  the  volume  of  city  buses  along  this  route  can  be  reduced  or  re-­‐routed.  To  help  achieve   this  in  the  longer  term,  Rideau  St  should  be  considered  as  a  potential  Light  Rail  Transit  route.   • A  more  vigorous  maintenance  programme  should  be  introduced  and  new  hardy  street  trees,  landscaping  and  lighting  be  re-­‐ introduced  to  make  the  area  more  attractive  and  improve  perceptions  of  safety.   • To  improve  the  visual  impression  along  Rideau  St,  one  of  the  pedestrian  bridges  linking  the  Rideau  Centre  with  the  Hudson's   Bay  Company  should  be  removed.  Alternatively,  they  should  be  re-­‐designed  into  remarkable  and  inspiring  set  pieces  for  the   Rideau  Centre.  

                                                         

City of Ottawa 168 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   University  Precinct     (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   Central  Canal  Area   Precinct   (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

• The  City  should  redesign  the  expanded  section  between  Rideau  St  and  Mackenzie  King  Bridge  to  create  a  more  natural   continuation  of  Colonel  By  Drive  from  Rideau  St  to  Mackenzie  King  Bridge.  The  plans  for  the  future  reuse  of  the  Government   Conference  Centre,  as  well,  the  redesign  of  the  Confederation  Boulevard  node,  at  the  intersection  of  Sussex,  Rideau  and   Colonal  By  Drive,  must  be  carefully  considered  in  any  reconfiguration.   • Introduce  a  programme  of  heritage  theming  to  Nicholas  and  Daly.   University  Precinct:     • Understand  the  development  potential  around  the  Nicholas/Laurier/Mackenzie/Waller/Rideau  area  to  better  respond  to  the   possible  transportation  modification  of  a  restored  urban  grid.   • Enhance  the  relationship  of  the  western  edge  of  the  University  campus  to  the  Transitway  and  Transit  stops,  Nicholas  Stand   the  Rideau  Canal  corridor.   • Waller  St  and  Nicholas  St  are  part  of  the  proposed  Nicholas/Laurier/Mackenzie/  Waller/Rideau  Urban  Grid  Reconstruction   Area.  Traffic  calming  measures  focused  around  Laurier  and  Waller  will  create  a  more  pleasant  pedestrian  environment  and   result  in  a  superior  gateway  entrance  to  the  University  from  the  west.   • The  level  of  secure  bicycle  parking  should  be  increased.       • Opportunities  to  re-­‐image  King  Edward  south  of  Rideau  into  a  high  profile,  high  quality  street.     • To  ensure  that  King  Edward  remains  safe  for  all  users,  a  series  of  intersection  treatments  giving  pedestrians  priority  are   required  at  the  Laurier,  Osgoode,  Somerset  and  Templeton  intersections.     • To  improve  the  perception  of  King  Edward  and  make  the  street  more  desirable  for  private  investment,  street  tree  planting,   lighting,  sidewalk  enhancement,  public  art,  street  furniture  and  landscaping  are  recommended  between  Mann  and  Rideau.   • The  existing  roadway  system  around  Laurier  Bridge  and  Nicholas  creates  a  very  unpleasant  and  challenging  pedestrian   environment.  Consideration  needs  to  be  given  to  improvement  of  pedestrian  access  and  permeability  along  the  north-­‐ western  edges  of  the  precinct.   Central  Canal  Area  Precinct:     • Elgin  St  beautification:  make  Elgin  St  a  showcase  street  with  streetscape  improvements  that  mirror  the  quality  of   Confederation  Boulevard.     • While  the  sides  of  Elgin  St  were  dealt  with  in  the  creation  of  Confederation  Boulevard,  the  existing  traffic  islands  and   medians  require  significant  improvements.  The  poor  quality  of  this  central  feature  and  the  great  confusion  of  signage  and   traffic  control  measures  are  reducing  the  impact  of  the  existing  public  realm  investment  in  the  area.  Hardy  street  trees   should  be  planted  in  each  of  the  medians  and  boulevards,  and  higher  quality  finishes,  such  as  granite,  introduced.  Street   tree  planting  will  help  in  the  transition  from  the  green  spaces  of  the  Canal  Area  Precinct  to  the  harder  urban  forms  of  the   Business  Precinct.     • Narrow  Elgin  St  between  Lisgar  and  Laurier  Ave  and  remove  the  traffic  islands  in  order  to  allow  for  the  expansion  of  the   green  space  around  the  Human  Rights  Monument  and  Provincial  Courts.  This  width  reduction  will  make  Elgin  St  more   compatible  with  its  Main  Street  function  and  create  a  more  human  scale  as  it  transitions  from  the  national  ceremonial  role   to  the  civic  precincts  and  established  neighbourhoods.  De-­‐clutter  it  of  signage  and  some  street  furniture.     • To  function  more  as  a  neighbourhood  street,  Lisgar  St,  as  one  of  the  key  access  routes  to  City  Hall,  should  be  made  two-­‐way   east  of  Elgin  St.   • To  improve  the  quality  of  the  environment  along  Lisgar  St,  it  is  recommended  to:    reclaim  the  City-­‐owned  right-­‐of-­‐way  along  

Ac

                                                                                           

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 169

Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   Centretown  East   (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  on  March   2004.  

its  edges  that  are  currently  being  used  for  surface  parking  on  adjacent  lands;  convert  Lisgar  to  two-­‐way;  undertake  a  major   reinvestment  in  the  streetscape  and  public  realm  of  Lisgar  St  and  adjacent  frontages  to  match  it  to  the  improvements  on  the   City  Hall  site  outlined  below.   • The  Central  Area  precinct  is  subdivided  by  major  east-­‐west  arterials  as  well  as  north-­‐south  parkways.  These  large  roads   fragment  the  traditional  urban  street  grid,  waste  significant  amounts  of  valuable  canal-­‐side  property  and  restrict   connections  through  the  site  to  the  north  and  east.  The  impact  of  these  road  systems  needs  to  be  mitigated.   • Consider  removing  or  minimising  the  ramping  system  for  Laurier  and  implementing  traffic-­‐calming  measures,  including  safer   pedestrian  crossings  between  City  Hall  and  Confederation  Park.   • Queen  Elizabeth  Driveway  north  of  Lisgar  St  should  be  redesigned  to  allow  the  open  space  to  take  on  a  more  direct   waterfront  relationship.  The  character  of  this  road  should  be  transformed  from  a  parkway  to  a  more  gentle  multi-­‐use  drive   that  winds  through  the  park  space,  giving  pedestrians  priority  over  vehicles  and  increasing  visual  and  physical  access   through  to  the  Rideau  Canal.  New  surface  treatments  will  be  required.   • Disengage  the  primary  commuter  traffic  route  along  Queen  Elizabeth  Driveway  from  the  Mackenzie  King  Bridge  south  to   Cooper  St  to  allow  for  the  creation  of  a  new  Canal  front  open  space  and  the  provision  of  a  significantly  enhanced  setting  for   the  heritage  buildings.     • Reconnect  Cooper  to  the  Queen  Elizabeth  Parkway  to  offload  traffic  from  the  Canal  Park  Area.   • Establish  Cooper  as  a  two-­‐way  street  east  of  Elgin.   • Restore  the  landscape  parkway  character  of  Queen  Elizabeth  Driveway  between  Mackenzie  King  Bridge  and  Somerset.  The   Driveway  should  be  realigned  to  create  additional  open  space  fronting  directly  onto  the  Canal.   • Create  a  connected  series  of  public  squares  and  civic  spaces  between  the  historic  buildings  at  the  south  end  of  the  site.   • Introduce  an  expanded  network  of  pedestrian  paths  through  the  site.   • Introduce  a  programme  of  street  tree  planting  along  the  Lisgar  St  and  Laurier  Ave  edges.   • Ensure  that  buildings  along  the  eastern  edge  are  opened  up  to  the  Canal  to  reinforce  this  important  edge.   Centretown  East:   • Reinvent  Metcalfe  St  as  a  major  civic  boulevard  that  links  the  Civic  Realm  with  the  Capital  Realm.   • Introduce  a  programme  of  two-­‐way  conversions  along  O'Connor  and  Metcalfe  St.  This  will  need  to  include  a  review  of  the   ramping  system  and  the  future  proposed  changes  to  the  417  by  the  MTO.   • Restore  the  street  grid  around  the  Canadian  Museum  of  Nature  to  allow  for  the  restoration  of  this  major  civic  space.     • Introduce  a  streetscaping  program  along  Metcalfe,  Somerset  and  Cartier  Streets  between  Somerset  and  City  Hall.   • Somerset  St  will  continue  to  function  as  an  important  east-­‐west  pedestrian  and  vehicular  link  through  the  downtown.  The   existing  programme  of  planting  and  landscaping,  paving  and  street  furniture  should  be  re-­‐imaged  to  respond  to  the  very   localised  character  of  this  unique  street.   • Convert  Metcalfe  and  O’Connor  to  two-­‐way  streets.  Conversion  to  a  two-­‐way  system  will  need  to  be  linked  to  the  current   417  study  and  requires  a  review  of  the  highway  ramping  structure.   • Reconstruct  Metcalfe  St   •  as  a  Civic  Boulevard  for  Ottawa.  This  high  profile,  high  quality  public  street  creates  a  critical  link  between  the  Capital  and   Civic  realms.  The  northern  portion  of  Metcalfe  terminates  at  the  Parliament  Buildings,  the  middle  has  some  of  the  finest   examples  of  historic  local  architecture,  while  the  southern  end  is  anchored  by  the  Museum  and  proposed  improved  civic  

                                                       

City of Ottawa 170 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

park  space.  Required  streetscape  improvements  include  street  tree  planting,  special  paving,  lighting,  coordinated  street   furniture  and  traffic  calming  measures  at  key  intersections.   • Somerset  would  benefit  from  a  program  of  planting  and  landscaping,  paving  and  street  furniture  to  soften  the  pedestrian   environment.   • Restore  the  urban  grid  and  block  structure  around  the  Museum  of  Nature  to  allow  for  an  expanded  park.  This  can  be   achieved  through  the  elimination  of  the  Metcalfe  St  continuation  between  McLeod  St  and  Argyle  Avenue.   • The  intersection  of  McLeod  and  Metcalfe  should  have  a  special  treatment.  This  will  help  to  slow  traffic  and  tame  this  very   busy  corner,  making  it  more  inviting  for  pedestrians.     • The  access  system  from  the  417  and  Elgin  St  to  the  Queen  Elizabeth  Driveway  is  poor.  At  present,  this  road  network  is   confusing.  This  entry  point  to  the  downtown  has  the  potential  to  be  one  of  the  most  important  and  picturesque  gateways  to   the  heart  of  Downtown  Ottawa.   Bank  Street  Corridor:   Downtown  Ottawa   Urban  Design  Strategy:   • Clean-­‐up  signage,  street  furniture  clutter  and  lighting,  leaving  as  much  room  as  possible  for  pedestrians  along  this   Bank  Street  Corridor   predominantly  retail  street,  given  its  narrow  sidewalks.   (City  of  Ottawa)   • Reclaim  the  public  ROW  where  it  is  encroached  upon  by  surface  parking  lots,  and  should  require  enhanced  landscaping  and   Approved  on  March   screening  as  part  of  all  temporary  parking  lot  renewals.   2004.   • Kent  and  O'Connor  St  should  be  reviewed  for  conversion  back  to  two-­‐way  systems.     • Extend  the  quality  of  the  proposed  Interface  District  from  the  Capital  Realm  t o  the  Civic  Realm  along  Bank  St  at  least  as  far   south  as  Somerset  St  if  not  farther.  The  quality  and  style  of  streetscaping  and  public  realm  improvements,  including  planting   and  landscaping,  paving  and  street  furniture,  should  transition  seamlessly  from  the  Capital  to  the  Civic  Realm.  The  most   significant  investment  should  be  made  between  Queen  and  Wellington,  followed  by  Laurier  Ave  to  Queen  St,  and  finally,  a   more  modest  scale  of  investment  should  be  made  between  Somerset  St  and  Laurier  Ave.     • Preserve  the  Bank  St  frontage  as  a  Main  Street.   • It  is  recommended  that  new  open  spaces  be  located  on  corners  and  other  strategic  locations  which  can  provide  linkages   between  places.  Locations  include  parcels  along  the  Bank  and  Kent  St  seams  as  well  as  the  intersection  of  Gladstone  and   McLeod.   Downtown  Ottawa   NCC  Vision  for  the  Core  Areas  –  Bank  Street  Axis:   Urban  Design  Strategy:   • Extend  the  Bank  St  pedestrian  and  visual  corridor  northwards  down  to  the  Ottawa  River.  This  will  provide  a  critical   NCC  Vision  for  the  Core   connection  between  the  Civic  and  Capital  Realms,  including  Bank  St,  the  Parliamentary  Precinct,  the  Escarpment  Valley  and   Areas/Bank  Street  Axis     the  Ottawa  River.   (City  of  Ottawa)   • This  project  also  includes  the  redevelopment  of  Victoria  Way  and  the  upper  portion  of  Bank  St.   Approved  on  March   • Enhanced  water  access  will  be  provided  through  the  installation  of  a  riverside   2004.   dock/quay  or  floating  island  for  water  activities.  Terraced  steps  and/or  a  funicular  system  will  connect  the  Wellington/Bank   junction  with  the  Ottawa  River.  Existing  on-­‐site  parking  will  be  relocated  and  the  area  restored  to  its  natural  habitat.   Mid-­‐Centretown   • The  Mid-­‐Centertown  CDP  will  present  the  potential  solutions  to  many  of  the  mobility  issues  in  Centretown,  whereas   Community  Design   Downtown  Moves  will  work  out  the  technical  requirements  for  making  the  recommended  solutions  work.     Plan   • These  include  two-­‐way  street  conversions;  narrowing  of  selected  north  south  arterials  /  expansion  of  public  realm;   (City  of  Ottawa)     expansion  of  cycle  network;  implications  of  additional  calming  and  crossings  arterial  streets;  and  streetscape  treatment.  

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Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 171

Escarpment  District   Community  Design   Plan   (City  of  Ottawa)     Plan  approved  by  City   Council  in  December   2008.  

Pilot  Laurier  Ave   Segregated  Bicycle   Lane   (City  of  Ottawa)   Implemented  in  2011.   Municipal  Parking   Management  Strategy   (City  of  Ottawa)   Approved  by  City   Council  in  2009.   Integrated  Street   Furniture  Program   (ISFP)   (City  of  Ottawa)   Release  of  revised  RFP,   RFP  submission  due   date  and  RFP   evaluations  TBD  by  City   of  Ottawa.   Ottawa  Pedestrian  Plan     (City  of  Ottawa)     A  draft  Ottawa   Pedestrian  Plan  was   produced  in  January   2009.   Bayview/Somerset   Area  Secondary  Study   (City  of  Ottawa)  

• A  mid-­‐block  pedestrian  mews  will  run  north-­‐south  from  Slater  St  to  Laurier  Ave,  facilitating  pedestrian  movement  though   the  district  and  providing  a  link  from  Percy  St  to  the  transit  stops  on  Albert  and  Slater  St.     • Once  completed,  the  mews  would  be  dedicated  to  the  City  as  a  public  right-­‐of-­‐way.   • Streetscaping  improvements  to  strengthen  both  external  and  internal  linkages  in  order  to  increase  pedestrian  safety  and   to  create  a  more  pleasant  pedestrian  experience.     • Streetscape  improvements  could  be  undertaken  in  partnership  with  adjacent  development  and  co-­‐ordinated  with  the   development  of  the  central  park.  Primary  pedestrian  crossing  improvements  would  include  special  pavement  over  the   entire  intersection,  while  secondary  crossing  improvements  would  include  special  markings  in  the  pedestrian  crossing   zone.   • Pursue  a  multi-­‐use  pathway  for  public  use  through  the  development  application  process  at  422  Slater  St  as  indicated  in  the   City  of  Ottawa  Escarpment  District  Plan.    

• Transportation  demand  management  (TDM)  initiatives  funded  by  the  parking  program  must  be  related  to  it.  This  would   include  bicycle  parking,  designated  stalls  for  carshare  vehicles,  and  car/van  pool  spaces,  which  specifically  benefit  areas  that   have  paid  parking.   • Re-­‐evaluate  surface  parking  lots  with  the  view  towards  divesting  them.     • To  allocate  a  portion  of  paid  parking  revenues  to  BIAs,  Neighbourhood  or  Ward  for  promotion  and  marketing  and  other   projects.     • Incorporate  a  Central  City  designated  area  where  integrated  street  furniture  and  restricted  advertising  potential  as   proposed  by  staff  is  incorporated.     • That  given  the  size  of  Transitway  style  platforms  on  Rideau  St  that  size  restrictions  for  advertising  b e  established  with  the   BIA.   • Give  full  consideration  to  the  operating  cost  for  the  City  in  terms  of  bins  that  maximize  capacity,  reduce  frequency  of  pick-­‐up   and  have  positive  environmental  impacts.  

• Close  gaps  in  the  existing  sidewalk  network,  especially  where  short  gaps  occur  in  an  otherwise  continuous  network  of   sidewalks  and  pathways.   • Select  routes  that  provide  direct  access  to  crossing  points  of  key  barriers,  and  those  that  cross  arterial  roads  at  signalized   intersections  wherever  possible.   • Follow  existing  patterns  and  respect  the  style  of  pedestrian  facilities.   • Downtown  Ottawa  is  considered  a  low  priority  for  Community  Pedestrian  Improvement  Plan  to  take  place.     • Bayview  Road  is  kept  in  its  present  alignment,  and  is  conceived  as  the  community's  "Main  Street".   • A  traffic  circle  is  introduced  at  the  intersection  of  Burnside  and  Bayview  Road  to  slow  traffic  through  the  community.   • Local  roads  "fan  out"  from  Bayview  Road  -­‐  courtyards  will  be  wider  towards  the  east,  where  high-­‐rise  point  towers  will  be  

                                                         

City of Ottawa 172 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

Development  concept   approved  by  City   Council  in  2005.  

Canada's  Capital  Core   Area  Sector  Plan     (NCC)     Completed  in  2005.  

Sparks  Street  Mall   Vocation  Study     (NCC)     Ongoing  study.    

Urban  Design  Study:   Sussex  Drive,  Rideau   Street  and  Colonel  By   Drive   (NCC)     Report  completed  in   2009.  Detailed  Design   scheduled  for  2012,   subject  to  approval  of   Capital  Funds.    

located.     • An  enclosed  pedestrian  linkage  between  the  community  and  the  proposed  "transit  hub"  will  be  integrated  into  the  civic   facility  or  mixed-­‐use  development.     • An  enhanced  pedestrian  and  cycling  connection  between  the  site,  the  proposed  "transit  hub",  the  possible  national  facility   to  the  east,  the  surrounding  communities,  and  the  riverfront  area  is  suggested.     • Reinforce  and  strengthen  Confederation  Boulevard.   • Relocate  a  section  of  the  Ottawa  River  Parkway  southward  as  part  of  LeBreton  Boulevard.     • Improve  the  integration  of  interprovincial  transit  to  better  connect  the  downtown  cores  of  Ottawa  and  Gatineau.   • Create  and  enhance  connections  between  the  core  area  and  the  Ottawa  River,  as  well  as  between  the  Capital  (Crown)  and   the  civic  (Town)  spheres.   • Promote  sustainable  modes  of  transportation.   • Develop  an  illumination  strategy  to  light  up  key  symbols  and  sites  in  the  core.   • Pathways  should  be  created  through  distinctive  sidewalk  and  cross  walk  designs  drawing  people  who  have  completed  their   visit  to  Parliament  Hill  on  the  north  side  of  Wellington  St  southwards  into  the  Sparks  St  district.     • Gateway  elements  should  be  placed  at  strategic  entry  points,  such  as  on  Metcalfe  and  Bank  Sts,  facing  the  Parliamentary   Precinct,  to  beckon  visitors  to  enter  the  district.   • Existing  pedestrian  connections  should  be  improved  and  formalized  through  appropriate  landscaping  treatment  and   designated  street  crossings.   • Establish  better  linkages  between  the  three  blocks  east  of  Bank  St  and  Place  de  Ville.  This  should  be  accomplished  via   sidewalk  and  crosswalk  design  elements,  consistency  of  landscape  design  of  the  Mall,  and  raised  crosswalks  of  distinct   materials.   The  preferred  design  scenario:     • The  entire  area  east  of  the  Conference  Centre  to  the  intersection  of  Colonel  By  Drive/Rideau  St  is  dedicated  to  public  space.   The  space  is  contiguous  across  the  south  side  of  Rideau  St,  strengthening  the  relationship  to  the  Rideau  Canal,   Confederation  Square  and  Confederation  Boulevard.     • A  Grand  Boulevard  is  developed  along  Colonel  By  Drive  to  celebrate  arrival  to  the  Capital.  The  Boulevard  is  envisioned  with   wide  pedestrian  promenades  and  formalized  centre  medians.     • New  pedestrian  crossings  on  Rideau  St  at  MacKenzie  Ave  link  directly  with  the  commemorative  space.   • The  underpass  and  MacKenzie  Ave  ramp  is  removed  and  all  pedestrian  circulation  is  at  grade.     • Bicycle  lanes  are  provided  throughout  the  Node.  

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Appendix C Review of Associated Plans, Studies & Projects

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 173

City of Ottawa 174 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix D Street Right-of-Way Analysis

Ad

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 175

East‐West Streets
# of On‐Street  Parking Lanes Curb to Curb  Width (m) Street Type ROW Width (m) Seg # Street One Way/ Two Way Mid‐Block Location

Afternoon Peak Avg. Travel Lane Width (m) # of On‐Street  Parking Lanes # of EB Travel Lanes # of WB Travel Lanes Bike Lane

Mid‐Day Peak Avg. Travel Lane Width (m) Pedestrian Easement (m) # of Parking  Stalls # of EB Travel Lanes # of WB Travel Lanes Parking Bay  Width (m) Sidewalk Width (m) Bike Lane Peak Hour Volumes EB AM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 213 179 177 363 482 492 394 307 525 432 950 883 859 1067 628 748 598 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 375 362 290 491 370 311 235 0 13 2126 2176 948 1032 746 490 683 516 965 924 264 241 46 41 90 393 PM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 168 190 189 343 451 704 588 546 848 493 770 704 945 773 690 789 941 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 204 168 283 392 583 420 406 0 26 1424 1479 1003 1086 1067 801 811 637 1451 1468 361 344 135 89 88 701 WB AM 94 80 165 264 221 328 289 191 132 168 252 340 358 479 579 792 1238 454 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 390 403 587 497 584 699 629 160 188 257 171 346 392 320 57 57 966 598 794 491 671 1030 733 1238 1588 515 631 506 616 409 235 533 PM 189 96 218 371 387 294 421 283 212 225 398 410 524 514 713 808 843 431 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 584 640 689 618 545 699 778 202 379 353 399 372 369 374 51 74 2442 1361 1424 811 773 951 654 1009 1132 513 671 543 599 575 258 291 # of Vehicles Per Lane EB AM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 213 179 177 363 482 492 394 307 263 216 317 294 286 267 209 249 199 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 375 362 290 491 185 311 118 0 13 709 725 474 344 373 245 342 258 241 231 132 121 46 41 90 197 PM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 168 190 189 343 451 704 588 546 424 247 257 235 315 193 230 263 314 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 204 168 283 392 292 420 203 0 26 475 493 502 362 534 401 406 319 363 367 181 172 135 89 88 351 WB AM 94 80 165 264 221 328 289 191 132 168 252 340 358 479 579 792 619 227 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 130 134 196 166 195 233 210 160 94 257 171 173 392 160 57 57 322 299 265 246 224 343 367 310 529 258 316 253 308 205 235 267 PM 189 96 218 371 387 294 421 283 212 225 398 410 524 514 713 808 422 216 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 195 213 230 206 182 233 259 202 190 353 399 186 369 187 51 74 814 681 475 406 258 317 327 252 377 257 336 272 300 288 258 146
Directional Segment Capacity

EB AM

WB PM 0.32 0.16 0.36 0.62 0.65 0.49 0.70 0.47 0.35 0.38 0.66 0.68 0.87 0.86 1.19 1.35 0.70 0.36

Two‐Way  Segment Capacity AM 0.16 0.13 0.28 0.44 0.37 0.55 0.48 0.32 0.29 0.29 0.36 0.59 0.70 0.81 0.81 0.92 0.73 0.37 0.53 0.49 0.48 0.44 0.35 0.42 0.33 0.22 0.22 0.33 0.28 0.32 0.39 0.35 0.45 0.38 0.46 0.55 0.30 0.59 0.23 0.10 0.06 0.86 0.85 0.62 0.49 0.50 0.49 0.59 0.47 0.64 0.41 0.37 0.31 0.30 0.20 0.27 0.39 PM 0.32 0.16 0.36 0.62 0.65 0.49 0.70 0.47 0.32 0.35 0.49 0.63 0.81 1.02 1.08 1.13 0.70 0.39 0.43 0.39 0.53 0.32 0.38 0.44 0.52 0.32 0.36 0.38 0.34 0.30 0.39 0.43 0.34 0.30 0.53 0.66 0.40 0.66 0.33 0.09 0.08 1.07 0.98 0.81 0.64 0.66 0.60 0.61 0.48 0.62 0.52 0.43 0.37 0.36 0.31 0.29 0.41

Heavy  Volumes EB WB

Bus  Volumes EB WB 8 Hr. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 957 0 957 0 957 0 957 0 957 0 957 0 957 0 0 921 0 921 0 921 0 921 0 921 0 921 0 921 0 0 38 0 38 42 127 42 127 42 127 42 127 42 0 0 0 0 250 450 250 450 250 450 250 450 386 661 386 661 386 661 386 771 764 744 790 744 566 770 418 609 0 0 0 0 0 0 976 882

Truck Volumes EB 8 Hr. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 40 45 75 90 95 95 105 200 115 373 243 303 253 163 213 183 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ‐13 52 133 163 118 113 0 10 210 330 165 255 294 154 224 159 141 90 34 7 56 45 84 94 WB

Truck  Volume  2‐Way 8 Hr. 20 18 30 31 37 59 54 24 90 105 130 170 280 195 240 300 460 215 373 243 303 253 163 213 183 239 429 359 219 219 179 179 25 7 60 221 256 201 181 10 10 435 460 315 350 393 323 368 398 472 296 144 143 226 335 149 217

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57

Gloucester

Laurier

1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way

Slater

Albert

Queen

Sparks Wellington

Rideau

Besserer Daly M.K. Bridge

1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 1‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way

Bronson to Percy Percy to Bay Bay to Lyon Lyon to Kent Kent to Bank Bank to O'Connor O'Connor to Metcalfe Metcalfe to Elgin Bronson to Percy Percy to Bay Bay to Lyon Lyon to Kent Kent to Bank Bank to O'Connor O'Connor to Metcalfe Metcalfe to Elgin Elgin to Nicholas Nicholas to Waller Bronson to Bay Bay to Lyon Lyon to Kent Kent to Bank Bank to O'Connor O'Connor to Metcalfe Metcalfe to Elgin Bronson to Bay Bay to Lyon Lyon to Kent Kent to Bank Bank to O'Connor O'Connor to Metcalfe Metcalfe to Elgin Bronson to Bay Bay to Lyon Lyon to Kent Kent to Bank Bank to O'Connor O'Connor to Metcalfe Metcalfe to Elgin Bronson to Bay Bay to Lyon Portage to Bay Bay to Lyon Lyon to Kent Kent to Bank Bank to O'Connor O'Connor to Metcalfe Metcalfe to Elgin W. Elgin W to Elgin E. Elgin E. to Mackenzie Mackenzie to Sussex Sussex to Dalhousie Dalhousie to Waller Nicholas to Dalhousie Dalhousie to Waller Nicholas to Waller Elgin to Waller

Res Res Res Com Mix Com Mix Com Res Res Res Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Mix Mix Com Com Com Com Com Res Res Com Com Com Com Com Res Mix Com Com Com Com Com Mix Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Mix Com

12.5 12.6 18.3 18.1 18.6 18.5 18.3 20.8 18.4 18.7 19.1 18.6 19.7 19.6 19.3 20 25.79 20.21 18.5 18.3 17.9 20.3 18.8 18.4 18.6 18.9 17.9 18.6 18.7 18.6 19.2 18 19.3 18.5 20.8 18.5 17.9 18.8 18.3 27.7 18.1 27.6 27.9 29 29.3 29.8 30.4 30.1 32 32.51 29.01 30.24 23.08 19.06 16.58 20.41 25.69

8.21 8.31 9 8.96 8.75 11.27 8.76 9.16 12.15 11.92 12 13.51 13.44 14.42 14.39 13.77 17.03 15.01 12.22 13.7 10.28 12.99 10.86 13.51 10.8 11.62 13.37 14.28 13.45 12.25 14.35 14.24 9.89 13.63 14.82 13.54 13.43 13.21 12.51 8.31 11.04 20.36 17.76 17.44 17.79 15 15 10.67 19.96 23.3 20.66 15.95 16.81 12.06 11.47 11.4 16.12

N 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

S 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 4 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 2 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 2

5.71 6.31 6.50 8.96 6.25 6.27 6.26 9.16 4.08 3.96 4.00 4.76 4.72 5.21 5.20 4.89 3.26 3.75 2.91 3.40 3.43 3.25 3.62 3.34 3.60 3.04 4.46 4.76 4.48 4.08 3.62 4.75 3.70 4.54 6.16 6.77 3.36 3.11 3.13 5.81 3.02 3.39 3.55 3.49 3.56 3.00 3.00 2.67 3.33 3.33 3.44 3.99 4.20 4.02 3.82 4.45 3.03

N 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

S 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 2 3 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 3 3 2 3 2 2 2 2 4 4 2 2 1 1 1 2

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 3 2 3 2 3 3 2 4 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 2

5.71 3.81 6.50 6.46 6.25 6.27 6.26 6.66 4.08 3.96 4.00 4.76 4.72 5.21 5.20 4.89 3.26 3.75 2.91 3.40 3.43 3.00 3.62 3.34 3.60 3.04 3.29 3.93 3.32 4.08 3.62 4.75 3.70 4.54 6.16 4.27 3.31 3.11 3.13 5.81 3.02 3.39 3.55 3.49 3.56 3.00 3.00 2.67 3.33 3.33 3.44 3.99 4.20 4.02 4.49 4.45 3.03

N 11 0 7 14 18 7 16 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 0 0 3 5 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 8 2 11 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

S 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 8 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 4 0 16 0 0 13 9 17 0 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

N ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

S ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ y ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

N

S

N

S

0.36 0.30 0.30 0.61 0.80 0.82 0.66 0.51 0.44 0.36 0.53 0.49 0.48 0.44 0.35 0.42 0.33

0.63 0.60 0.48 0.82 0.31 0.52 0.20 0.02 1.18 1.21 0.79 0.57 0.62 0.41 0.57 0.43 0.40 0.39 0.22 0.20 0.08 0.07 0.15 0.33

PM AM 0.16 0.13 0.28 0.44 0.37 0.55 0.48 0.32 0.28 0.22 0.32 0.28 0.32 0.42 0.57 0.57 0.75 0.60 1.17 0.80 0.98 0.97 0.91 1.32 0.71 1.03 0.41 0.38 0.43 0.39 0.53 0.32 0.38 0.44 0.52 0.22 0.22 0.33 0.28 0.32 0.39 0.35 0.34 0.27 0.28 0.16 0.47 0.43 0.65 0.29 0.49 0.29 0.70 0.65 0.34 0.27 0.10 0.04 0.10 0.79 0.54 0.82 0.50 0.84 0.44 0.60 0.41 0.89 0.37 0.67 0.57 0.68 0.61 0.53 0.52 0.60 0.88 0.61 0.43 0.30 0.53 0.29 0.42 0.23 0.51 0.15 0.34 0.15 0.39 0.58 0.44

0.32 0.36 0.38 0.34 0.30 0.39 0.43 0.34 0.32 0.59 0.67 0.31 0.62 0.31 0.09 0.12 1.36 1.13 0.79 0.68 0.43 0.53 0.55 0.42 0.63 0.43 0.56 0.45 0.50 0.48 0.43 0.24

8 Hr. 0 20 0 18 0 30 0 31 0 37 0 59 0 54 0 24 40 50 40 65 45 85 75 95 90 190 95 100 95 145 105 195 200 260 115 100 1330 0 1200 0 1260 0 1210 0 1120 0 1170 0 1140 0 0 1160 0 1350 0 1280 0 1140 0 1140 0 1100 0 1100 0 25 25 20 90 50 260 130 290 135 245 125 240 110 0 10 10 0 460 675 580 580 415 600 505 545 680 760 540 830 610 805 545 1010 905 1075 880 950 600 880 425 745 56 170 45 290 84 65 1070 1005

20 18 30 31 37 59 54 24 50 65 85 95 190 100 145 195 260 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 239 429 359 219 219 179 179 25 20 8 88 93 83 68 10 0 225 130 150 95 99 169 144 239 331 206 110 136 170 290 65 123

City of Ottawa 176 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix D Street Right-of-Way Analysis

North‐South Streets
# of On‐Street  Parking Lanes Curb to Curb  Width (m) Street Type ROW Width (m) Seg # Street One Way/ Two Way Mid‐Block Location

Afternoon Peak Avg. Travel Lane Width (m) # of On‐Street  Parking Lanes # of NB Travel Lanes # of SB Travel Lanes Bike Lane

Mid‐Day Peak Avg. Travel Lane Width (m) Pedestrian Easement (m) # of NB  Travel Lanes # of Parking  Stalls # of SB Travel Lanes Parking Bay  Width (m) Sidewalk Width (m) Bike Lane Peak Hour Volumes NB AM 980 829 644 384 0 332 418 479 492 394 381 0 0 0 0 0 0 1072 971 778 688 518 451 196 175 91 90 104 159 0 0 0 0 0 0 525 724 594 458 268 285 472 839 864 603 428 395 0 0 1090 65 13 285 947 751 166 PM 914 860 761 233 0 335 509 621 677 909 906 0 0 0 0 0 0 773 779 748 677 804 738 252 180 147 149 155 186 0 0 0 0 0 0 445 530 667 475 357 544 729 891 886 707 778 914 0 0 1058 60 29 304 1334 1240 312 SB # of Vehicles Per Lane NB SB
Directional Segment Capacity

NB

SB

Two‐Way  Segment Capacity

Heavy  Volumes NB SB

Bus  Volumes NB SB

Truck Volumes NB 8 Hr. 265 255 200 50 0 65 80 70 125 120 115 0 0 0 0 0 0 160 240 305 253 115 110 14 9 79 34 24 34 0 0 0 0 0 0 125 160 145 100 60 60 110 235 260 155 270 275 ‐75 0 0 25 8 233 900 850 430 SB

Truck  Volume  2‐Way 8 Hr. 452 417 200 100 15 65 80 70 125 120 115 25 115 180 172 200 225 160 240 305 253 115 110 84 144 184 159 63 93 155 135 165 145 90 65 125 160 145 100 60 60 263 473 508 333 488 203 178 710 655 340 241 362 1449 1435 1020

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56

Bronson

Bay

Lyon

Kent

Bank

O'Connor

Metcalfe

Elgin

Nicholas

Dalhousie Waller

2‐way 2‐way 1‐way 2‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 2‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 1‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 1‐way 1‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way 2‐way

Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington Gloucester to Laurier Laurier to Slater Slater to Albert Albert to Queen Queen to Sparks Sparks to Wellington E Sparks to Wellington W Laurier to Daly Laurier to M.C. Bridge Daly to Besserer Besserer to Rideau Besserer to Rideau M.C. Bridge to Daly Daly to Besserer Besserer to Rideau

Res Res Res Res Res Res Res Res Res Mix Mix Mix Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Mix Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com Com

19.9 20 19.9 19.9 17 15.9 18.3 18.2 18.2 18.3 18.4 19.2 18.3 18.3 18.3 26.7 40.7 18.4 18.3 18.3 18.3 20.4 19.3 18.2 18.3 18 18.2 18.2 18.2 19.1 18.4 18.2 12.4 18 18.2 18.3 18.2 18.3 12.3 18.2 17.9 31.3 48.6 48.7 48.6 29.7 14.9 29 14.26 23.39 16.77 18.34 19.87 24.2 23.73 21.33

12.37 13.28 7.38 9.89 6.1 7.76 8.62 8.88 8.97 9.52 9.7 11.64 11.8 11.86 14.64 15.89 14.25 13.62 13.68 13.53 13.86 13.95 11.05 12.99 7.97 7.99 9.51 7.97 7.99 13.03 14.08 14.02 10.41 13.38 10.38 12.56 15.72 13.71 8.84 12.07 11.74 18.45 24.83 24.51 21.85 11.4 17.74 14.01 10.74 18.27 14.23 9.92 15.41 19 19 11.79

W 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 2 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 3 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 0 3 1 1 2 3 4 1

2 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 4 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 3 3 3 0 4 3 2 2 1 2 2 2 1

3.09 3.32 3.69 4.95 3.60 5.76 6.62 6.88 6.97 7.52 3.85 3.88 3.93 3.95 4.88 3.97 3.58 3.41 3.42 3.38 3.47 3.82 3.68 4.33 3.99 4.00 3.17 3.99 4.00 3.26 3.52 3.51 3.96 4.94 1.69 4.19 6.11 4.57 4.42 3.54 3.37 3.69 3.55 4.09 3.64 1.90 5.91 3.50 3.58 3.65 3.91 3.71 3.85 3.80 3.17 5.90

W 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0

E 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 2 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 0 0 4 3 3 1 1 2 3 3 1

2 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 3 3 4 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 4 3 2 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 3 3 3 3 0 0 2 2 1 1 2 2 1

3.09 3.32 3.69 4.95 3.60 5.76 6.62 6.88 6.97 7.52 3.85 3.88 3.93 3.95 4.05 3.97 3.58 3.71 3.73 3.38 3.47 3.49 3.68 4.33 3.99 4.00 3.17 3.99 4.00 3.18 3.52 3.51 3.96 3.29 3.44 4.53 8.72 4.57 4.42 3.54 3.37 3.69 3.55 4.09 3.64 3.80 5.91 3.50 2.75 3.65 3.91 3.71 4.30 3.80 3.30 5.90

W 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 5 0 3 0 0 8 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0

E W 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 6 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 5 ‐ 4 ‐ 0 ‐ 5 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 y 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 3 ‐ 3 ‐ 4 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 y 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 18 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 ‐ 0 y

E ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y y ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ y ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

W

E

W

E

AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM AM PM 420 590 490 457 210 295 0.82 0.76 0.35 0.49 0.58 0.63 332 460 415 430 166 230 0.69 0.72 0.28 0.38 0.48 0.55 9 0 322 381 0 0 0.54 0.63 0.54 0.63 168 371 384 233 168 371 0.64 0.39 0.28 0.62 0.46 0.50 55 56 0 0 55 56 0.09 0.09 0.09 0.09 0 0 332 335 0 0 0.55 0.56 0.55 0.56 0 0 418 509 0 0 0.70 0.85 0.70 0.85 0 0 479 621 0 0 0.80 1.04 0.80 1.04 0 0 492 677 0 0 0.82 1.13 0.82 1.13 0 0 394 909 0 0 0.66 1.52 0.66 1.52 0 0 191 453 0 0 0.32 0.76 0.32 0.76 593 443 0 0 198 148 0.33 0.25 0.33 0.25 941 914 0 0 314 305 0.52 0.51 0.52 0.51 1066 915 0 0 355 305 0.59 0.51 0.59 0.51 1048 766 0 0 349 255 0.58 0.43 0.58 0.43 1331 751 0 0 333 188 0.55 0.31 0.55 0.31 1493 701 0 0 498 234 0.83 0.39 0.83 0.39 0 0 268 193 0 0 0.45 0.32 0.45 0.32 0 0 243 195 0 0 0.40 0.32 0.40 0.32 0 0 195 187 0 0 0.32 0.31 0.32 0.31 0 0 172 169 0 0 0.29 0.28 0.29 0.28 0 0 173 268 0 0 0.29 0.45 0.29 0.45 0 0 150 246 0 0 0.25 0.41 0.25 0.41 231 311 98 126 231 311 0.16 0.21 0.39 0.52 0.27 0.36 203 323 175 180 203 323 0.29 0.30 0.34 0.54 0.32 0.42 96 116 91 147 96 116 0.15 0.25 0.16 0.19 0.16 0.22 140 134 45 75 140 134 0.08 0.12 0.23 0.22 0.15 0.17 125 101 104 155 125 101 0.17 0.26 0.21 0.17 0.19 0.21 164 109 159 186 164 109 0.27 0.31 0.27 0.18 0.27 0.25 744 1096 0 0 186 274 0.31 0.46 0.31 0.46 546 781 0 0 137 195 0.23 0.33 0.23 0.33 795 870 0 0 199 218 0.33 0.36 0.33 0.36 680 716 0 0 340 358 0.57 0.60 0.57 0.60 624 499 0 0 312 250 0.52 0.42 0.52 0.42 615 444 0 0 308 222 0.51 0.37 0.51 0.37 0 0 175 148 0 0 0.29 0.25 0.29 0.25 0 0 362 265 0 0 0.60 0.44 0.60 0.44 0 0 198 222 0 0 0.33 0.37 0.33 0.37 0 0 229 238 0 0 0.38 0.40 0.38 0.40 0 0 134 179 0 0 0.22 0.30 0.22 0.30 0 0 143 272 0 0 0.24 0.45 0.24 0.45 662 658 157 243 331 329 0.26 0.41 0.55 0.55 0.41 0.48 771 1195 280 297 193 299 0.47 0.50 0.32 0.50 0.39 0.50 988 880 288 295 329 293 0.48 0.49 0.55 0.49 0.51 0.49 1038 901 201 236 346 300 0.34 0.39 0.58 0.50 0.46 0.45 809 648 143 259 270 216 0.24 0.43 0.45 0.36 0.34 0.40 0 0 132 305 0 0 0.22 0.51 0.22 0.51 672 529 0 0 168 132 0.28 0.22 0.28 0.22 759 872 0 0 253 291 0.42 0.48 0.42 0.48 98 173 363 353 49 87 0.61 0.59 0.08 0.14 0.34 0.37 571 693 65 60 286 347 0.11 0.10 0.48 0.58 0.29 0.34 232 168 13 29 232 168 0.02 0.05 0.39 0.28 0.20 0.16 433 491 143 152 217 246 0.24 0.25 0.36 0.41 0.30 0.33 184 90 316 445 92 45 0.53 0.74 0.15 0.08 0.34 0.41 204 122 188 310 102 61 0.31 0.52 0.17 0.10 0.24 0.31 340 244 166 312 340 244 0.28 0.52 0.57 0.41 0.42 0.46

8 Hr. 300 225 290 200 200 0 50 50 0 15 65 0 80 0 105 0 160 0 120 0 115 0 0 25 0 115 0 180 0 210 0 200 0 225 160 0 240 0 305 0 280 0 115 0 110 0 150 200 145 265 215 235 170 255 160 250 170 270 0 155 0 135 0 165 0 145 0 90 0 65 125 0 160 0 145 0 100 0 60 0 60 0 185 225 310 310 335 320 230 250 345 290 350 0 0 325 0 710 0 655 25 315 8 233 233 129 900 549 850 585 430 590

8 Hr. 35 38 35 38 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 0 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 27 0 0 0 0 0 136 130 136 130 136 130 136 130 136 211 136 211 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 75 72 75 72 75 72 75 72 75 72 75 72 75 72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

187 162 0 50 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 25 115 180 172 200 225 0 0 0 0 0 0 70 135 105 125 39 59 155 135 165 145 90 65 0 0 0 0 0 0 153 238 248 178 218 ‐72 253 710 655 315 233 129 549 585 590

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Appendix D Street Right-of-Way Analysis

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 177

City of Ottawa 178 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis

Ae

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 179

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis
Sidewalk Corner & Sidewalk 1,000 pedestrians per hour

City of Ottawa 180 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis

Corner & Sidewalk 4,000 pedestrians per hour

Corner 1,000 pedestrians per hour

Ae

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 181

Corner Level of Service D

City of Ottawa 182 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis

Ae

Appendix E Pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) Analysis

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 183

City of Ottawa 184 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix F Stakeholder Input Summary

Af

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 185

City of Ottawa 186 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix F Stakeholder Input Summary

Af

Appendix F Stakeholder Input Summary

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 187

City of Ottawa 188 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix G Implementation Framework/Tool Spreadsheet

Ag

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 189

City of Ottawa 190 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix G Implementation Framework/Tool Spreadsheet

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Appendix G Implementation Framework/Tool Spreadsheet

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 191

City of Ottawa 192 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix H Evaluation of Street Network Alternative Solutions

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City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 193

City of Ottawa 194 Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets

Appendix H Evaluation of Street Network Alternative Solutions

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Appendix H Evaluation of Street Network Alternative Solutions

City of Ottawa Downtown Moves: Transforming Ottawa’s Streets 195

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