From the Chamber

The bridge fares are taking a toll on
all of us Staten Islanders.
PAGE 4
JUNE 2012
BITS & BYTES
Is it time for a new laptop?
PAGE 6
COACH’S CORNER
You don’t “have” to do a thing.
PAGE 20
HEALTH-CARE TRENDS
Make managing diabetes your business.
PAGE 2
www.sibiztrends.com
JANET DUGO/Business Trends
Executive Director of the Jewish Community Center David Sorkin and Public Administrator Gary Gotlin were
among the many happy people on hand to celebrate the launch of the Center for Life Long Development at the
JCC, the only Staten Island “Innovative Senior Center. Just opened this year, the program already has more
than 950 active participants.
An Innovative Senior Center
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
W i l k e s - B a r r e , P A
P e r m i t 9 0
By TIM RONALDSON
Business Trends
The last 40 years have been
quite a ride for Ram Cherukuri.
With only $20 in his pocket,
Cherukuri came to the United
States from India in the 1970s and
struggled to find his place before
settling in Staten Island, earning
an MBA degree, beginning a ca-
reer in the cosmetic industry and
opening his own business in 1984.
Now, almost 20 years after he
first opened the doors of New
York Fragrance, Cherukuri is cel-
ebrating the beginning of a new
era – the start of construction on
a $3-million, 15,000 square-foot
warehouse and outlet store in
Bloomfield that should be com-
pleted in the next few months. He
said he’s excited about the expan-
sion of his business, which manu-
factures and distributes per-
fumes, colognes, aftershaves and
bath gels.
“I struggled for the first eight
to 10 years to stay where I am,”
Cherukuri said.
Hard work, determination and
networking have allowed New
Forty years after
moving to the
United States,
Ram Cherukuri
is constructing a
massive expansion
of his business,
New York
Fragrance
please see FRAGRANCE, page 26
It’s been
a wild
ride for
Ram
Cherukuri
By TIM RONALDSON
Business Trends
As if doing business on Staten Island
weren’t hard enough already, the toll hikes
enacted by The Port Authority of New York
and New Jersey last fall have made life here
even tougher.
Businesses that import and export, or rely
heavily on transportation over the bridges
connecting the Island to Brooklyn and New
Jersey, are forced into a decision as to
whether they can afford to pay the increased
tolls, or whether re-locating off the Island is
the best long-term business decision.
“They’re really considering whether or
not to continue their businesses on Staten Is-
land,” said Linda Baran, president and CEO
of the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce.
“It’s cheaper for them to have yards in New
Do higher tolls mean less business?
Port Authority’s increase in tolls are causing quite a burden on Island businesses
please see TOLLS, page 15
2 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
By DR. THEODORE STRANGE
Diabetes is one of the top 10
causes of death in the United
States, claiming roughly 70,000
lives per year. Even though some
people are pre-disposed to the dis-
ease through genetics and family
history, there are many who can
prevent certain types by keeping
track of risk factors.
Everyone puts themselves at
risk for diabetes. Obesity is an
epidemic in the U.S.; more-and-
more people who are overweight
are at risk for type 2 diabetes.
Obesity is a – big – factor for
two reasons:
1.) The body requires more in-
sulin to contest with your weight.
2.) Excess fat causes insulin re-
sistance.
There are many other risk fac-
tors for diabetes beside obesity:
bad diet, high-glycemic diet, lack
of exercise, lack of sleep – they all
play their part.
So how can you prevent this?
The best medicine is what I also
prescribe for most of the top
killers like heart disease, hyper-
tension, stroke, etc. – get more ex-
ercise, maintain a healthy diet
and check your body mass index
(BMI), which is consistent with
your height and weight. Keep it
lower than 24.
For those who have diabetes,
you need to watch your sugar in-
take and routinely check your
blood. Always have your insulin
or glucagon at the ready, and re-
member to follow your physi-
cian’s instructions on maintain-
ing your diabetes. To prevent dia-
betic episodes, be sure to eat your
scheduled meals and snack on
healthy foods (nuts, fruit and veg-
gies) 4-6 times throughout the day.
Avoid eating candy.
Fighting diabetes in the work-
place is essential for the health of
your company. The employees are
the moving parts of any business;
you have to keep your staff
healthy to achieve your organiza-
tional goals. Create a health con-
scious culture in your office!
Offer healthy solutions in the
cafeteria and stock vending ma-
chines with healthy snacks; you’ll
get more out of a granola bar
than a Snickers. Make sure the
water cooler is stocked. Offer
drinks with natural flavors and
stay away from ones with artifi-
cial. It doesn’t take much; you’ll
lower absenteeism and lower the
cost of health care for your em-
ployees with these simple steps.
Partner up with health at your
organization. It’s the one thing
you can take to the bank.
Theodore Strange is Staten Island
University Hospital associate chair-
man of medicine and vice president
of medical operations/South Site. He
may be reached at (718) 356-6500.
Manage diabetes
like your business
HEALTH-CARE TRENDS
Drop us a line
Email: news@sibiztrends.com
Mail: Business Trends, 66 Willow Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10305
4 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
By TOM SCARANGELLO
When I got married back in
1990, my wife invited her college
friend Cindy who lived in upstate
New York to our wedding recep-
tion at Snug Harbor. When Cindy
and her future husband Rich ar-
rived, they came running up to
us, not to say congratulations, but
to tell us the toll collector at the
Verrazano Narrows Bridge had
ripped them off. “He made us pay
$5 to get through the toll plaza!”
They weren’t joking, either; they
could not fathom that it would
cost $5 to go over a bridge. They
gave us a nice card and a check
for $95.
Now it’s $13, for one trip over
that bridge. What’s worse is that,
in September 2011, the Port Au-
thority raised their tolls by 50 per-
cent, to $12 a trip. The justifica-
tion is that they have a lot of im-
provements to make to the cross-
ings and need to fund the con-
struction of the Freedom Tower –
oh wait they didn’t mean that.
That would mean we are pay-
ing for the construction of a
building and then the Port Au-
thority is going to collect billions
in rent on our dime.
As Staten Islanders, we are car-
rying an unfair financial burden -
5.7 percent of all tolls in the Unit-
ed States are collected at our four
toll plazas, yet we represent about
.15 percent of the population.
That’s one fifteenth of 1 percent,
for those of you who run out of
fingers when counting to 11. We
pay the highest tolls in the world,
(yes the world!) and the real kick
in the crotch is that much of the
money goes to support public
transportation systems we can’t
use.
Get this – Staten Islanders pay
more in tolls than 43 states! Just
our little old borough generates
more toll revenue than all but
seven entire states. Sorry, Gover-
nors Cuomo and Christie, but
that just ain’t fair. The higher
tolls are not justified on any level.
Imagine if they privatized the
bridges? I’m no civil engineer, but
I’m sure a private company could
maintain any of our New Jersey
crossings for a lot less than the
current toll generates. Conserva-
tively, 75,000 vehicles cross the
Goethals Bridge each day (so
37,500 pay the toll). Let’s just say
between discounts and additional
truck tolls the Port Authority col-
lects $10 a trip on average. That’s
$375,000 per day in revenue, or
about $138 million a year! That
bridge should include a two drink
minimum for that price.
Tolls are so unjustifiably high
that even retirees from the PA
want their free tolls back. They
can buy their own health insur-
ance, but taking away their free
tolls is what is killing their retire-
ment dreams!
We understand that raising the
Bayonne Bridge and replacing
the Goethals Bridge will cost a lot
of money.
But we have been paying more
than our fair share for too long,
and the increase of 50 percent,
with plans for more increases
over the next few years in this
economy, is just not right.
That’s why the Chamber of
Commerce made a trip to Wash-
ington, D.C., last month and
pleaded with our federal repre-
sentatives for relief. If we can get
some federal funding for trans-
portation projects, we have a case
for asking New York and New Jer-
sey to stop the toll increases. In
fact, we want a discount back to
toll levels before the increases. If
you want to help, or just want
more information, please get in
touch with the Chamber of Com-
merce at (718) 727-1900 to discuss
the plans to fight the toll increas-
es.
Tom Scarangello, a principal with
Scaran Heating, Air Conditioning and
Plumbing, is chair of the Small Busi-
ness Committee of the Staten Island
Chamber of Commerce.
It takes
a toll on us
FROM THE CHAMBER
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1361 North Railroad Ave
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Mail: Business Trends, 66 Willow Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10305
in our opinion
Stage is set for showdown
For all of the talk, presidential race comes down to a few states
6 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
T
here’s going to be a lot of blus-
ter, posturing and campaigning
done over the next seven
months as President Obama and Mitt
Romney vie for votes.
But, honestly, barring any big news,
the campaign will come down to tradi-
tional battleground states.
New York likely will break for the
president.
Hence, don’t expect a lot of cam-
paign stops from either camp here.
No, the two candidates likely will
spend a lot of time in Florida and
Ohio.
Closer to home, maybe we see the
candidates in Pennsylvania, if the
economy is weak and Romney feels
like he has a shot at capturing those
electoral votes.
Still, it’s good to have a contest that
is at least competitive.
We remember 1984.
That’s the year Ronald Reagan won
every state except Walter Mondale’s
Minnesota.
And 1972, when Richard Nixon won
everything except Washington, D.C.,
and Massachusetts.
We’re glad this isn’t 1984 or 1972.
The economy might be moving in the
right direction, but it’s not moving
very quickly.
And there are issues such as health
care that also will divide the elec-
torate. This year, there is no “lock” on
who will be elected come November.
Which brings us back to the all-or-
nothing electoral college.
Chances are good that, if you’re a
Democrat in Mississippi or a Republi-
can in New York, your votes, essential-
ly, will not count.
By all means, people should vote. We
also remember the 2000 presidential
election, Florida and “hanging chad.”
Indeed a few votes could make a big
difference this year.
But those votes are centralized in a
few, key battleground states.
That’s what the electoral college
gives us. Voters will go to the polls,
but, unlike every other election, some
votes won’t matter.
66 Willow Avenue
Staten Island, NY 10305
347-682-4867
JANET WARREN DUGO
Publisher
TIM RONALDSON
Executive Editor
STEVE COPPOLA
Director
RICHARD GRADO
Director
ROBERT CUTRONA
Director
LAWRENCE RAMPULLA
Director
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chairman
Business Trends is mailed each month to the
business and community leaders of Staten
Island. To be added to the mailing list, e-
mail janet@sibiztrends.com. To submit a
news release, email news@sibiztrends.com.
For advertising info, call 347-682-4867 or
email janet@sibiztrends.com.
By BILL DUBOVSKY
Situation
With powerful and versatile tablet de-
vices and smart phones, is there still a
need for a notebook computer and, if so,
how does one choose? This article will out-
line my quest and I hope it will prove use-
ful to you.
Everyone has different needs so the first
thing to do is determine why you feel you
need a new device. I have mostly replaced
my 2006 era Macbook Pro with an iPad and
iPhone for presentations, research, read-
ing, quick communicating and entertain-
ment.
Things I can’t do are serious writing and
editing, financial, statistical or database
work, read/burn CDs and DVDs for new
content and archiving, and format conver-
sions. I would like a faster, lighter, larger
capacity, more versatile machine before I
have performance issues.
Step One
I don’t need a large screen as I connect
my devices to a large monitor at the office,
so a 13” to 15” screen will be fine.
I need Mac OSX for creative tasks such
as video and photo editing, and I want
seamless compatibility with our iPads and
iPhones. Windows capability is vital for
my database and statistical work (which
only runs on Windows), Microsoft Office
(applications run faster and have more
functionality on Windows) and compatibil-
ity with university teaching and develop-
ment tools. I would also like to be able to
cut and paste from one system to another
without having to reboot.
Nice to have would include a solid state
drive (SSD) for speed, durability, power
saving, lightness, compactness, and fast
start-up.
Step Two
“Good, Fast, Cheap – pick two.” The old
engineering mantra still holds true. If you
want a fast, “good” computer, it’s not going
to be cheap.
I can justify a more expensive device as
getting triple use out of it – creative, busi-
ness, and entertainment. My Macbook Pro
was the second most expensive machine I
ever bought, and it continues to serve me
well. I never had the problems that I en-
countered with my bargain-priced Win-
dows PCs, so I’m sold on good, fast and ver-
satile – even if it costs more initially.
Step Three
If I want OSX compatibility, then I need
to buy a Mac.
Which one – a Macbook Air or a Pro, and
how to make each Windows compatible?
While the Air looked tempting – sleek,
small and light, I noticed that the Pro was
decreasing in price – a sign that a new
model will be out within a month or so.
The new Pro is rumored to have better
screen graphics and battery life, faster
processors, be lighter and thinner, but like
the Air, has no optical drive for CDs and
DVDs. I suppose I can always use an exter-
nal optical drive on either system to read
or burn optical disks.
Step Four
Windows compatibility can be achieved
on both machines in two ways: one by
using Apple’s free Bootcamp software
which allows you to partition the storage
media (disk or solid state) into separate
Mac and Windows sections. Windows pro-
grams only run on the Windows side and
Mac programs only run on MacOS. The
Mac area can read and write to files on the
Windows side, but not vise versa without
special software.
By running software such as Parallels or
VMware, you can create a “virtual” Win-
dows computer within OSX. No more set-
ting up permanent partitions for each sys-
Is it time for a new laptop?
BITS & BYTES
Telecom Tech Tip of the Month
If your business uses an automated voicemail system, keep the incoming message short,
give the caller the chance to talk to an operator or leave a message without having to lis-
ten to a long spiel, and give callers the ability to listen to the message in English only
without repeating in another language. You could start off, “Hello, you’ve reached the
XYZ company. To continue in English please press one, para Espanol, presionar dos, or to
leave a message or speak to an operator, please press 3.”
please see BITS, page 7
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 7
ROSS SPITALNICK
Senior Vice President
(718) 263-3800 x371
ross@muss.com
NICHOLAS J. FORELLI
Assistant Vice President
(718) 263-3800 x307
nforelli@muss.com
MUSSDEVELOPMENT LLC
BUILDING NEW YORK CITY SINCE 1906
That's what we're all about
718-720-1600
1190 Hylan Boulevard
Staten Island, NY 10305-1920
www.heroldinc.com
Bernard Herold & Co., Inc. - A Name You Can Trust
............Municipal Bonds for Tax-Free Income.............
tem and having to reboot every
time you want to change operat-
ing systems. With this software
you can run both systems simul-
taneously and also cut and paste
from files. You do have to pur-
chase a copy of the stand-alone
Microsoft Windows operating sys-
tem and anti-virus software for
the Windows. While the Mac is
not sensitive to most common
computer viruses, the Windows
virtual machine is!
Bottom-line
The rumor is that Apple will
announce the new Macbook Pro
2012 in June, so it’s not a big deal
to wait a few weeks.
I hope readers found this exer-
cise useful for their own evalua-
tion needs and I’ll let you all
know how it turned out soon!
Bill Dubovsky - Comtel Information
Services, has a proven track record
of business success spanning over
30 years in helping hundreds of or-
ganizations improve their profitabili-
ty. He is the principal technology
specialist with Comtel Information
Services, a New York based telecom-
munications consulting firm, and an
adjunct lecturer in business at the
College of Staten Island, C.U.N.Y.
Contact him at
billdubovsky@gmail.com.
New laptop?
BITS
Continued from page 6
Charity should be a
bidirection street
Although charity does indeed
begin at home, it is a bidirection-
al street. The donor gives willing-
ly and the beneficiary receives ap-
preciatively. But, when the equa-
tion is not in balance, the benefi-
ciary stops receiving.
How often have Staten Island
organizations turned to you to
join, sponsor or support them?
The requests are innumerable.
How many of these same organi-
zations, which thrive on the
beneficence of Staten Island en-
trepreneurs, do not engage our
services and prefer doing their
business anywhere but on the Is-
land – New Jersey, Brooklyn and
the Internet.
Unfortunately, the practice of
sending business elsewhere is
much too common.
If the Staten Island business
community is to survive and
flourish, and if the organizations
wish to reap from our toil, then
they must help us sow our seed.
Yaacov Rosenrauch
letters to the editor
Visit us on the Web at www.sibiztrends.com
8 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
Join the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce!
Your business resource center, the Chamber provides:
• Business Referrals Daily
• Networking Opportunities
• Legislative Involvement
• Community and Media Access
• "Help Desk" Hotline
• Member-to-Member Discounts
…and much more!
For more information about joining
the Staten Island Chamber of Commerce,
contact Jennifer Fontana
at 718-727-1900 or jfontana@sichamber.com
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JANET DUGO/Business Trends
Kamco Supply Corp. hosted a customer appreciation event at Dyker Heights Golf Course that allowed
those in attendance to network with each other and meet the manufacturers whose products Kamco dis-
tributes. Enjoying the day were, from left: Alan Poritz of Clean Swift Janitorial and Frank DeFiore,
Yamire Fret, Chris Kunkel, Evan Meyers and Dave Kovacs of Kamco.
Kamco customer appreciation
10 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
We teach your home and business how to act -- whether you're there or not --
by installing a Control4, one-touch automation system.
These are just some of the money-saving, convenient, safety-related actions that will happen
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Visit our showroom
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2047 Victory Boulevard
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718-698-8244
SECURITY & SAVINGS
Upon leaving your home, thermostats are pre-pro-
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Lights will alternate at night to simulate occupancy. All
lights will go on if an alarm triggers and a recorded mes-
sage is blasted to a burglar. Upon returning, selected
lights will automatically light your home.
CONVENIENCE & SAVINGS
One button puts your home in vacation mode
(HVAC, Lighting, Power-Consumer Electronic
Devices, etc. are programmed to save
money). One button activates all holiday
lighting, and you may heat your pool from
your phone.
ENTERTAINMENT
One remote controls all audio
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ENERGY MONITORING &
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We let you monitor every circuit
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isolate the waste and begin sav-
ing on electricity consumption.
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Special to Business Trends
Representatives of the Staten Island Board of Realtors joined with some 13,000 colleagues from across
the nation for the recent “Rally to Protect the American Dream” at the foot of the Washington Monu-
ment. Pictured, from left, are George K. Wonica, Rosa Marciano, Harold Chesnoff, Claire Bisignano Ches-
noff, John Vernazza, Dawn Carpenter, George S. Wonica, Michael Diaz, Greg Sokol, SIBOR President
Georgianna Diaz, SIBOR Secretary/Treasurer Laird Klein, with SIBOR President-elect Traci Cangiano on
his shoulders and SIBOR CEO Sandy Krueger.
‘Rally to Protect the American Dream’
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 11
Become a
DOME SAVINGS
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and reach thousands
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For more information, call
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Dome Property Management - managers of
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Club, an "offer board" of discounted services
and products for the communities it serves.
Join national companies like Time Warner
Cable, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage and local
businesses like Jealan Fireplaces and The Pool
Therapist. To learn more, visit the Offer Board
at www.DomeGroup.com/dscOffers.
CHAMBER GOLF
OUTING
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
Location: LaTourette Golf Course,
1001 Richmond Hill Rd.
For information, call: 718-727-1900
JCC & CHRISTOPHER
MICHAEL SALON:
COMMUNITY
LEADERSHIP AWARDS
THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: Joan & Alan Bernikow
JCC, 1466 Manor Rd.
For information, call 718-475-5246
BOY SCOUTS
DINNER DANCE
FRIDAY, JUNE 8
Time: 6:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Location: Excelsior Grand, 2380
Hylan Blvd.
For information, call 212-651-2864
RICHMOND COUNTY
ORCHESTRA: SONG
& DANCE
PRIMAVERA 2012
SATURDAY, JUNE 9
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Location: St. John’s Univ., 300
Howard Ave., Campus Ctr. Gym
For information, call 212-729-4792
WBCLDC WORKSHOP:
BOC CAPITAL – HOW
TO APPLY
TUESDAY, JUNE 12
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Location: 705 Forest Ave., 2nd Fl.
Rear
For information, call 718-816-4775
SIEDC LEADERSHIP
INSTITUTE: ULTIMATE
NETWORKING EVENT
TUESDAY, JUNE 12
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location: The Vanderbilt, 300
Father Capodanno Blvd.
For information, visit: www.siulti-
matenetworking.eventbrite.com
RICHMOND CNTY.
BANKERS ASSOC.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13
Location: Mike’s Place, 4677 Hylan
Blvd.
For information, call Lou DellaBovie
at 718-370-7037
NYS WOMEN INC.
(RICHMOND CNTY.)
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location: Café Bella Vita, 1919
Hylan Blvd.
For information, call 718-816-5991
Business Calendar
please see EVENTS, page 12
WBCLDC WORKSHOP:
LEARN TO BECOME A
CERTIFIED MWBE
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
Time: 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Location: 705 Forest Ave., 2nd Fl.
Rear
For information, call 718-816-4775
ALZHEIMER’S
FOUNDATION: BUS.
& PROF. LUNCHEON
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
Location: The Staaten, 697 Forest
Ave.
For information, call 718-667-7110
CHAMBER: POLICE
OFFICER OF THE YEAR
LUNCHEON
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
Time: 12:00 p.m.
Location: The Renaissance, 2131
Hylan Blvd.
For information, call: 718-727-1900
LIGHTHOUSE MUSEUM:
LIGHT KEEPERS GALA
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Location: Richmond Cnty. Country
Club, 135 Flagg Pl.
For information, call 855-656-7469
POWERFUL YOU!
WOMEN’S
NETWORKING GROUP
THURSDAY, JUNE 14
Time: 7:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Location: Richmond Diner, 3954
Richmond Ave.
$31, includes dinner
For information, call 718-608-1640
EDEN II: FAMILY
FUN NIGHT
FRIDAY, JUNE 15
Time: 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Location: Party Jungle, 630 Shar-
rotts Road
For information, call 718-816-1422
x106
NYS WOMEN INC.
(STATEN ISLAND)
TUESDAY, JUNE 19
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location: LiGreci’s Staaten, 697
Forest Ave.
For information, call 718-226-6462
WBCLDC: 21ST
CENTURY BUSINESS
WOMAN CONFERENCE
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Location: LiGreci’s Staaten, 697 For-
est Ave.
For information, call 718-816-4775
CHAMBER: BUSINESS
AFTER HOURS
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Time: 5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Location: Silver Lake Golf Course,
915 Victory Blvd.
For information, call 718-727-1900
BUSINESS LEADERS
TOASTMASTERS
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: 43 Ramona Ave.
12 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
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682 IoresI ^ve
718.273.213U
FineArtFotos.com WeddingsByFlint.com
IKÔILSSIÔÞ^L
HL^OSHÔ1S
Business Calendar
EVENTS
Continued from page 11
please see EVENTS, page 13
For information, call Arlene Trunzo
at 718-317-0949
NETWORKING PLUS
THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Time: 8:00 a.m.
Location: Golden Dove, 3281 Rich-
mond Ave.
For information, call 718-966-6289
ALICE AUSTEN
MUSEUM: “DANCING
WITH THE SI STARS”
SATURDAY, JUNE 23
Location: Alice Austen House Muse-
um, 2 Hylan Blvd.
For information, call 718-816-4506
COAHSI: LUMEN
SATURDAY, JUNE 23
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m.
Location: Atlantic Salt Company
For information, visit:
lumenfest.org
24-7
NETWORKING SALES
MONDAY, JUNE 25
Time: 9:00 a.m.
Location: Z-One Restaurant, Rich-
mond Ave.
For information, call 973-697-8872
WORLD OF WOMEN
MONTHLY MEETING
MONDAY, JUNE 25
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: Marina Grand, Mansion
Ave.
For information, call 718-948-8175
NY CENTER FOR
INTERPERSONAL DEV.
FUNDRAISER
TUESDAY, JUNE 26
Time: 6:00 p.m.
Location: Hilton Garden Inn, 1100
South Ave.
For information, call 718-947-4025
HOME IMPROVEMENT
CONTRACTORS
MONTHLY MEETING
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 27
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: Richmond Cnty Ballpark,
Triple Suite
For information, call 718-356-2323
NEW DAY
TOASTMASTERS
THURSDAY, JUNE 28
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Location: SI Univ. Hosp., Seaview
Ave.
For information, call 718-816-5991
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 13
Business Calendar
EVENTS
Continued from page 12
Nominations being
accepted for Executive
Woman of the Year Award
The Executive Women’s Coun-
cil of the Staten Island Economic
Development Corporation is ac-
cepting nominations for its first
Executive Woman of the Year
Award, which will be presented at
the SIEDC’s Annual Awards Re-
ception in November.
Nominees must:
nWork on Staten Island
n Hold an executive-level posi-
tion at either a private company,
non-profit organization or gov-
ernment agency
n Have a demonstrable record
of promoting the advancement of
women in business
n Have a demonstrable record
of contribution to the economic
vitality and business community
of Staten Island
Extra consideration will be
given to a woman who has made a
significant economic contribu-
tion within the past year.
For a copy of the form and in-
structions on how to submit a
nominee, visit www.siedc.org.
The deadline for nominations
for the Executive Woman of the
Year Award is Sept. 28.
For more information, contact
Carol Lucciola at (718) 477-1400 or
carol@siedc.net.
14 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
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• Custom Carpentry/Artistic Wood-Working
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• Repairs/Handyman Services
• Rockscapes, Cultured Stone Installs
• Fire/Flood Restorations
Call Bob or David
718-761-8390
Insured. Bonded.
References Available.
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Project-One Construction Services
Special to Business Trends
Synergy Marketing Research, a team of upper class marketing research students from the College of
Staten Island, presented the results of a market research project they conducted for the Staten Island
Chamber of Commerce. Pictured, from left, are: (back row) CSI Adjunct Lecturer Bill Dubovsky; student
Lisa Conlon; Ryan Gleason of the Chamber; Tony Mulholland, representing the Chamber’s Marketing
Committee; student Kevin Ng; and CSI Business Dept. Chair Thomas Tellefsen; and (foreground) Sallyann
Bartels of the Chamber; and students Victoria Sakkal and Stephanie Rizzo.
Synergy Marketing Research project for the Chamber
Jersey or in other boroughs. In
Staten Island, there’s no getting
around the tolls.”
Back in September, tolls for all
Port Authority bridges and tun-
nels increased from $8 to $9.50 for
E-ZPass members during peak
hours.
In December of this year, those
tolls will increase again, up to $13
for travelers paying cash and
$10.25 for E-ZPass. By 2015, the
rate increases will end at $15 and
$12.50, respectively, a 56 percent
hike over three years.
That’s quite a burden for any
business that needs to consistent-
ly travel over the Port Authority’s
three bridges connecting Staten
Island to New Jersey – the Bayone
Bridge, the Goethals Bridge and
the Outerbridge Crossing – not to
mention the Metropolitan Trans-
portation Authority-run Ver-
razano-Narrows Bridge into
Brooklyn, Baran said.
One Chamber member recent-
ly painted a murky picture of the
future in a conversation with
Baran. The business, which takes
15 trips per day over Port Authori-
ty bridges, is planning on an addi-
tional cost of $78,000 per year due
to the increased fees.
Each year, a Chamber delega-
tion travels to Washington, D.C.,
to voice their opinion on three
timely issues to Staten Island
businesses. This year, though, the
delegation focused on only one
issue – tolls.
“We wanted to take it to the fed-
eral level to just garner some sup-
port,” Baran said. “We wanted to
show we were a united front.”
While in D.C., the delegation
met with U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce transportation experts and
Department of Transportation
representatives, and also was
briefed on bills being proposed by
Rep. Michael Grimm. A major
stumbling block to any toll relief,
though, is the fact that two states
would have to agree on a resolu-
tion.
“I’m under the impression that
they heard us loud and clear. One
of the things we tried to say was
that it’s one thing to get a toll in-
crease and it’s another to get an
exponential toll increase,” Baran
said.
“Because individual states
don’t want to give up control…it
makes it very difficult to find a so-
lution on the federal level.”
In addition to the control issue,
the question remains just how
motivated the Port Authority is to
provide any relief. According to
Port Authority statistics, travel
over its bridges and tunnels de-
creased by 500,000 drivers per
month between October 2011 and
March 2012, a 5 percent overall de-
crease.
However, because of the in-
creased tolls, revenue actually in-
creased 31 percent, from $459 mil-
lion between October 2010 and
March 2011 to $602.7 million be-
tween October 2011 and March
2012.
As such, it might take a hard
push by Gov. Andrew Cuomo on
behalf of New York businesses,
especially since New Jersey and
its Gov. Chris Christie might actu-
ally benefit from companies leav-
ing New York.
Baran said the Chamber would
continue to stress the economic
impact of increased tolls on inter-
state commerce between Staten
Island and New Jersey. The only
choice businesses have at this
point to off-set the increased cost
is to move out of Staten Island.
“What we have to do is make
our governor aware of it, and
make our governor aware of how
sensitive it is,” she said.
In addition to a roll-back of the
toll increase, or at least a reduc-
tion, the Chamber is pushing for
more discounted incentives that
could be applied to small busi-
nesses on Staten Island, since
they are the entities most affect-
ed. However, Baran said she be-
lieves there won’t be much relief
in the near future.
“Right now, we don’t see relief
in the near future, and that’s a
problem,” she said. “That’s why
it’s so important for the governor
to realize that businesses could
just leave the state. It’s a big strug-
gle to operate and maintain a
business on Staten Island with
these tolls.”
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 15
Higher tolls, less business?
TOLLS
Continued from page 1
RUMC receives Electronic
Health Records certification
Richmond University Hospital
announced it has received Stage 1
certification of its Electronic
Health Records system from the
Office of the National Coordina-
tor, Center for Medicare Medicaid
Services – an achievement at-
tained by fewer than 800 hospitals
in the nation.
RUMC’s decision to invest in
the technology and training nec-
essary to achieve Stage 1 certifi-
cation makes the hospital eligible
to receive $10.9 million over three
years under the Medicare and
Medicaid EHR Incentive Pro-
grams.
RUMC is currently the only
hospital on Staten Island to
achieve this certification.
WILLIAM J. MARCO
Marco Wealth Strategies Group Inc.
Local financial advisor
William J. Marco, of Marco
Wealth Strategies Group Inc.,
(First Allied Securities), an-
nounced he has become a mem-
ber of the Financial Services In-
stitute in Washington, D.C. FSI is
an advocacy organization for in-
dependent financial services
firms and independent financial
advisors. Established in January
2004, it has well more than 100
broker-dealer members and more
than 35,000 financial advisor
members. Member firms have up-
ward of 180,000 financial advisors
affiliated with them. Its mission
is to create a more responsible
regulatory environment for inde-
pendent broker-dealers and their
affiliated independent financial
advisors through effective advo-
cacy, education and public aware-
ness. Strategy includes involve-
ment in FINRA governance, con-
structive engagement in the regu-
latory process and effective influ-
ence on the legislative process.
For more information, visit
www.financialservices.org.
ANTHONY J. MALTESE
The New York State Society
of Certified Public Accountants
The New York State Society of
Certified Public Accountants in-
stalled Anthony J. Maltese of
Staten Island as a vice president
at its 115th Annual Election Meet-
ing & Dinner. Maltese is a sole
practitioner of The Maltese CPA
Firm PLLC.
Maltese, a member of the
NYSSCPA since 1980, is a member
of its Board of Directors. He has
served as chair of its Business
Valuation, Chapter Relations and
Domestic Relations committees
and as a member of its Executive,
Firm Coordinators, and Nominat-
ing, Finance, Chapter Operations
and Annual Leadership Confer-
ence committees as well as a
member of the Assessment of
Members’ CPE Needs Task Force.
He is a member of the Execu-
tive Board for the Society’s Staten
Island Chapter. He also served as
the chapter’s president, presi-
dent-elect, secretary, assistant
treasurer and as a member of its
Executive Board. He is chair of
the chapter’s Sponsorship and
Taxation committees and was co-
chair of its Membership Commit-
tee. He is also a member of its
MAP Committee and previously
served on its One-on-One Pro-
gram.
Maltese is also a member of
the American Institute of Certi-
fied Public Accountants, the New
Jersey Society of Certified Public
Accountants, the Institute of
Business Appraisers and the
American College of Forensic Ex-
aminers.
He graduated from the City
University of New York, Brook-
lyn College with a bachelor of sci-
ence degree in accounting.
Representing more than 28,000
CPAs, the NYSSCPA was the first
state accounting organization in
the nation. Incorporated in 1897,
the Society is a not-for-profit or-
ganization that seeks to establish
and maintain high standards of
integrity, honor, and character
among certified public account-
ants.
VALARIE CONTRINO
Contrino Travel Inc.
Valarie Contrino of Contrino
Travel Inc. based in Staten Island,
16 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
Four Story, 16,000+ square foot development opportunity. Excellent
site for condominium, community facility or investment property.
Building to be built into hillside with proposed views of the harbor and
underground parking garage. Minutes to S.I. Ferry Terminal, shopping
and transportation. Asking $799,000.
Westerleigh -- 4,500 square foot Commercial building with ample
parking on Jewett Avenue for sale or lease. Building is currently a turn
key, 206 person restaurant with bar and kitchen. Sale includes an all-
brick, fully-detached two family home that is contiguous with the
commercial property. Please call for additional information.
Contact our Commercial Division for
more information about:
Sales & Leasing • Investment Property
Multi-dwellings • Industrial/Manufacturing
Retail Space • Raw Land
Warehouses • 1031 Exchanges
Office Buildings
Your gateway to better business and better living on Staten Island
285 St. Mark's Place • Staten Island, NY 10301
718-273-3800
www.gatewayarmsrealty.com
Our Knowledge, Experience, Teamwork + Integrity =
Results for You
Now Available
Now leasing 1,800 square feet of prime retail space and brand new 1,000-
5,000 square foot office spaces in professional elevator office building.
Located on Hyatt Street with excellent exposure to all municipal buildings,
new court house and St. George Theatre. Call for more info.
10,000 sq. ft. warehouse with office space and ample parking on over
1 acre of M3-1 zoned corner property. Exposure on both Arthur Kill
Road and Industrial Loop. 25' ceilings, overhead bays, possible devel-
opment site. Call Chris for additional information and survey.
LO
W
ER W
ARD
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ILL
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EO
RG
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R LEASE
Agent Funding & Abstract, LLC dba Mortgage Tech Home Finance Registered Mortgage Broker - NYS Banking Department
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on the job
please see JOB, page 18
Here's a revenue-boosting
opportunity that may be fly-
ing under the radar of your
business or professional net-
working circle. Decades-old
Dome Property Management,
one of the largest and most
respected companies of its
kind in the New York metro-
politan area, is offering an
unprecedented opportunity
for a limited number of ven-
dors and merchants to share
in their success.
The newly introduced Dome
Savings Club gives businesses
the opportunity to expand
their customer bases for free.
There’s absolutely no catch:
You simply agree to provide
an attractive discount to club
participants on the Dome Sav-
ings Club’s “Offer Board.”
That's it. Nothing more. A
nominal one-time set-up fee,
which includes a place on the
club’s online “Offer Board,” is
the only cost. “This is a win-
ning situation for everyone
involved,” said Michael Motel-
son, president of Dome Prop-
erty Management.”
ALL PARTIES BENEFIT
Here's why:
(1) The businesses in the
Dome Savings Club may
incorporate marketing incen-
tives that work best for them,
such as dollars-off or percent-
age-savings discounts, free
gifts or services, or other
strategies that have success-
fully worked for them in the
past. They will enjoy a huge
audience comprised of well
over 10,000 potential cus-
tomers at over 100 Dome-man-
aged communities, and are
included in the club’s online
marketing efforts.
(2) Homeowners and commu-
nities under Dome’s manage-
ment benefit from the dollars
they save on top-quality prod-
ucts and services.
(3) Dome Property Manage-
ment, notably Staten Island’s
premier property manage-
ment company, benefits from
directly interacting with the
business community and pro-
viding a greatly appreciated
advantage to the many condo
communities it services.
Founded in 1987, Dome
Property Management man-
ages over 100 condominium
and homeowners association
communities, mostly on Stat-
en Island, and is the biggest
such operation in the bor-
ough. Dome provides compre-
hensive property manage-
ment services to many types
of properties and complexes,
from under 10 to more than
500 units, and includes many
building types and individual-
ly owned homes. For now, the
Dome Savings Club is being
marketed solely to its Staten
Island condo communities.
DISTINGUISHED
MEMBERS
Time Warner Cable was the
first to participate in the club,
with an offer to supply partic-
ipating condo residents a sav-
ings of more than $60 per
month with bulk-rate pricing.
Additional members include
national companies, such as
Wells Fargo Home Mortgage,
and reputable local mer-
chants, such as Jealan Fire-
places. Even Dome itself has
joined in by offering preferred
pricing and enhanced servic-
es to the residents of partici-
pating communities.
Now that the word is out, it
is likely representatives of the
automotive, banking, medical,
financial and restaurant
industries will soon come on
board. Dome should also
expect to hear from numerous
home-services businesses,
such as landscaping, contract-
ing, plumbing, electrical,
woodworking, painting, multi-
service and product suppliers,
and others.
“Given the assortment of
communities and properties
we manage, and the many
goods and services they and
their residents consume, busi-
nesses offering a wide array of
products and services can
benefit from participating,”
said Enid Motelson, senior
vice president of Dome Prop-
erty Management.
SOLID REPUTATION
IS A MUST
If you are interested in partic-
ipating in the Dome Savings
Club as a merchant or vendor,
be aware that not every busi-
ness will qualify. “Only busi-
nesses with a stellar reputa-
tion for product, customer-
service and integrity will be
considered,” Michael Motel-
son said. By simply providing
a discount to Dome’s cus-
tomers in these tough eco-
nomic times, “quality mer-
chants, service providers and
vendors can strengthen the
loyalty of their existing cus-
tomers and attract and build
relationships with new
prospects.”
For additional information,
Dome Property
Management may be reached
at 718-605-2500,
e-mail at DomeProp@
DomeGroup.com, and
visited online
at www.DomeGroup.com. The
Dome Savings Club’s “Offer
Board” can be found at
www.DomeGroup.com/dscOff
ers. The company is head-
quartered at
109 Winant Place,
Staten Island, NY 10309.
Current Participants:
Dome Savings Club connects businesses
to thousands of potential customers for free
Advertisement
The Tides at Charleston, the first active-adult community of its kind in metropolitan New York, is one of over 100 condominium and home-
owners association communities benefitting from the extensive services provided by Dome Property Management.
Dome Property Management provides com-
prehensive property management services
to many types of properties and complexes,
from under 10 to more than 500 units, and
includes many building types and individual-
ly owned homes.
has become a part of The Afflu-
ent Traveler Collection, an elite
group of travel advisors who
comprise one of the most knowl-
edgeable networks of luxury trav-
el specialists in the world today.
Because they belong to The Afflu-
ent Traveler Collection, agents at
Contrino Travel Inc. share The
Affluent Traveler magazine with
their clients. At more than 220
pages, this semi-annual, coffee-
table quality magazine features
lavish photos and engaging arti-
cles that inspire readers to day-
dream of spectacular adventures
around the globe. Any of the trav-
el experiences detailed in the
magazine can be booked through
Contrino Travel Inc.
Contrino Travel Inc. was estab-
lished in February 2005. Valarie
Contrino is presently Adjunct
Professor at the College of Staten
Island teaching students How To
Start A Home-Based Travel
Agency, as well as other related
travel courses.
ROBB DECORS
Studio 16 Architecture
Dongan Hills-based firm Stu-
dio 16 Architecture announced it
has formed a strategic alliance
with Robb Decors, an established
interior design and decorating
firm. Studio 16 now offers a seam-
less integration of architecture
and interior design for the home,
office or commercial space.
Space, form, materials, color, tex-
ture, furniture placement and
decorating can be integrated dur-
ing the preliminary design stage
so that decisions can be made and
materials and finishes budgeted
early. For more information, visit
www.S16A.com.
ELI B. HOCH
Staten Island Mental Health Society
The Staten Island Mental
Health Society has named Eli B.
Hoch as its new senior vice presi-
dent of behavioral health servic-
es.
Dr. Hoch was most recently em-
ployed as the director of clinical
services and quality assurance at
the New York Psychotherapy and
Counseling Center, a network of
mental health treatment facilities
in Brooklyn and Queens, where
he worked for almost 12 years.
Previous to that, he held the posi-
tions of coordinator of Article 16
Clinic and case management and
clinical supervisor in the Resi-
dential Department of the Devel-
opmental Disabilities Division at
FEGS Health and Human Servic-
es System, with locations
throughout the city. He also
served as an adjunct professor at
the Fordham University Gradu-
ate School of Social Service for
several years.
Dr. Hoch is a governor’s ap-
pointee to the Mental Health
Services Council of the New York
State Office of Mental Health
since 2005. He is also a member of
the National Association of So-
cial Workers. He earned a Doctor-
ate in social work from Fordham
University, Master’s degrees in
psychology and social work from
18 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
On the Job
JOB
Continued from page 16
please see JOB, page 24
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By BILLY SPARKLE
Have you ever found yourself
saying “I have to do this,” or “I
have to do that?”
Take a moment to think about
it. Is it really something that you
have to do, or is it something that
you get to do?
Presumably, whatever you’re
doing must be supporting some-
thing else that you want. Other-
wise, why would you be doing it?
In fact, that’s a great question to
ask ourselves. “Is what I’m cur-
rently doing actually supporting
something else that I want?” If it
isn’t, then by all means, stop
doing it. And if it is, then recog-
nize this fact, embrace the activi-
ty you’re engaged in, and throw
yourself into it fully.
I hear people saying things
such as “I have to pay my bills,”
or “I have to go to the gym.” That
simply isn’t so. You don’t have to
do a thing. If you want something
such as a house, electricity or a
cell phone, these things happen to
come with a bill and you probably
knew that when you signed up for
them. So, to relate to these bills as
if they were being imposed on
you is to deny a choice that you
clearly made.
Rather than relating to these
activities as things you have to do,
see them as something that you
get to do. Right now there are peo-
ple who have bills that cannot be
paid because they lack the funds.
With that in mind, if you happen
to have the money to pay your
bills, celebrate that fact. It is
something that you get to do. And
by paying your bills, you also get
to continue receiving the prod-
ucts and services that these bills
are attached to.
It’s a privilege to pay your bills.
It’s a privilege to go to the gym.
Look, if you want a fabulous body
or if you’re trying to lose a cer-
tain amount of weight, going to
the gym or cutting certain foods
out of your diet would support
your desires. To then relate to
these activities as things you have
to do is to resist the very activities
that will support what you want.
Don’t contradict what you
want. Embrace what you want.
Furthermore, embrace the activi-
ties that support you having what
you want because you deserve to
be engaged in these activities. In-
stead of saying “I have to go to the
gym,” say “I get to go to the gym.”
Instead of saying “I have to stop
eating cookies,” say “I get to stop
eating cookies.”
This applies to our businesses
as well. I meet people who will say
on one hand that they want to
make a certain amount of money;
while on the other hand, they
don’t want to do the things that
actually support them in making
that money. They say, “I have to
make these phone calls but I don’t
really want to.” Or, “I have to go
on sales appointments but I can’t
stand doing it.” Well guess what?
If that’s how you feel, then you’ve
chosen the wrong profession.
If your profession calls for you
to do certain things such as mak-
ing phone calls and you say you
don’t like making phone calls,
then what you’re really saying is
that you don’t like your profes-
sion. If that’s the case, and you
feel like making phone calls (or
going on appointments, etc.) is
something that you have to do,
then do yourself and your poten-
tial customers a favor and go find
another profession. Nobody
wants to do business with some-
one who feels like what they’re
doing is a burden. Get into a pro-
fession that requires you to do
things that you’d actually love to
be doing. That way you’ll look for-
ward to those activities and be
wildly successful.
Lastly, if you aren’t ready to go
look for a different profession,
that’s OK, you don’t have to do
that either. That said, if you’re
going to be staying in the profes-
sion that you’re in, then I highly
recommend that you do as the
song suggests: “If you can’t be
with the one you love, love the one
you’re with.” Start loving the
very activities your current pro-
fession calls for. Instead of saying
“I have to do these things,” start
saying “I get to do these things.”
See these activities as a privilege
and engage in them fully.
By engaging in the activities
your current profession calls you
to engage in, you’ll be putting
your full self into them. It is only
with a full investment, that you
will receive a full return. And
when you start to experience all
of the wonderful results that
these activities are connected to,
you’ll find yourself having a lot of
fun. And everybody enjoys doing
business with someone who is
having fun doing what they do.
Isn’t it magnificent that you get
to be one of those people?
Coach Billy works with highly com-
mitted men & women to produce un-
precedented results in their busi-
nesses and their lives. Learn more at
www.billysparkle.com or contact
Billy directly via e-mail at
billy@billysparkle.com.
20 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
Ross Spitalnick
P: 718-263-3800 x371
ross@muss.com
Nicholas Forelli
P: 718-263-3800 x307
nforelli@muss.com
MUSSDEVELOPMENT LLC
BUILDING NEW YORK CITY SINCE 1906
Retail Tenants First Floor Office Tenants
Additional Office Space Available
DEMOGRAPHICS:
Radius 1 Mile 3 Mile 5 Mile
Population: 42,470 159,866 300,574
Households: 15,244 57,141 106,423
Median Age: 40.40 39.70 39.10
Avg. HH Income: $95,448 $94,110 $92,094
ELTINGVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
4310-4370, 4434, 4456, AMBOY ROAD, STATEN ISLAND, NY 10312
One Block from Eltingville Train Station & Bus Stop on Richmond Avenue
NO. TENANT RSF
4434-1A Medical Office 4,101
4434-1B United Federation of Teachers 2,646
4434-1C Dry Cleaners 1,973
4434-1D Laundromat 2,053
4456-1A United Federation of Teachers 2,186
4456-1B Allstate Insurance Company 1,811
4456-1C Available 3,700
NO. TENANT RSF
4310 Sovereign Bank 3,615
4318 Available 6,245
4324 Subway 838
4326 China Chalet 4,000
4328 Nail Salon 821
4330 Hair Salon 955
4332 Carvel 1,158
4334 Wines & Liquor 1,691
4338 Florist 1,418
4342 Japanese Restaurant 1,428
4344 Jewelers 957
NO. TENANT RSF
4346 Cards & Gifts 1,882
4348 Available 2,400
4350 Pizzeria 3,355
4354 Travel Agent 1,055
4360 Furniture & Bedding 2,679
4362 Tanning Salon 1,814
4364 Available 1,799
4366 Alfonso’s Pastry 1,910
4368 Rite Aid 10,162
4370 Perkins Restaurant 4,891
1140 Victory Blvd.
Staten Island, NY 10301
Tel: 718.370.3464
Fax: 718.370.3462
www.paulofinancialadvisors.com
Money Management
Retirement
Financial Consulting
Estate Planning
You don’t ‘have’ to do a thing
COACH’S CORNER
22 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
Special to Business Trends
Robin Lefkowitz (right), senior vice president at Northfield Bank, vis-
ited Eden II Programs and served as “Principal for the Day” in honor
of Autism Awareness Month.
‘Principal for the Day’
Special to Business Trends
As businesses on Victory Boulevard continue to explore the possibil-
ity of forming a Business Improvement District, Richmond County
Savings Bank hosted a mixer for the Steering Committee. Pictured,
from left, are RCSB Assistant Branch Manager Olga Ayala, WBCLDC
Executive Director Angela D’Aiuto, Maryann Piazza of Majestic
Vending, Chris Williams of Williams Eyeworks and RCSB Branch Man-
ager Joanne Barone.
Let’s talk about a BID
STEVE WHITE/Business Trends
Angela Caragiulo (left) and Donna Panattieri of Gold Mine Jewelers
were among the many exhibitors making contacts at the SI Econom-
ic Development Corp.’s annual Economic Conference, held at the
Hilton Garden Inn.
Gold Mine exhibits at SI Conference
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 23
All day Conference Ticket
$85 Pre-paid by June 15th or $95 at the Door
Flex-Tickets Option: Allows you to Share your ticket with
a representative from your company
Great Opportunity to Promote Your Business in
our New Print and Online Business Directory and
Program Journal
For $175 – Receive an Online Business Listing
for 1 year, 1 ticket to Conference and Business Card
size ad in Print Journal!
Groups of 5 or more @ $80 per ticket and receive
a Half Page Journal Ad and listing in
Online Directory Too!
Corporate and Small Business Vendor
Opportunities Available
Conference Sessions Include:
Gain insight on How to Grow Your Business: Invent
and Reinvent Your Brand; Strategic Blueprint for your
Business; Rethink Import and Export Opportunities
Be Inspired: How and Why They Reinvented Them-
selves; Selling Your Brand - Who Better than You;
Connecting Venus and Mars in Business
First Annual Joann Regan Awards and Business Mixer
honoring Successful S.I. Business Women and
Networking sponsored by:
The 8th Annual 21st Century Business Woman Conference
Don’t Miss this Great Opportunity to Promote Your
Business, Be Inspired and Grow Your Business!
Wednesday, June 20 @ The Staaten
9:00am - 5:30pm
697 Forest Ave., Staten Island, NY 10310
Memory Lane
789 Post Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10310
Phone: 718-448-8032 Fax: 718-667-8431
Weddings, Anniversarys, Corporate Events,
Bat & Bar Mitzvahs, Birthdays, Sweet Sixteens
and any event you want to be special!
Elegant Catering...
at Reasonable Prices
Proceeds benefit the Alzheimer’s
Foundation of Staten Island
Drop us a line
Email: news@sibiztrends.com
Mail: Business Trends, 66 Willow Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10305
MONDAY
Bus. Outreach Ctr of SI/WBCLDC
Small Bus. Counseling –
MWBE/BOC Capital: WBCLDC, 705
Forest Ave., 2nd Fl. By appointment
only. For info, call 718-816-4775.
Kiwanis Club of Richmond Co.:
LaFontana Restaurant, 2879 Amboy
Rd. 7 p.m. For info, call 718-420-
1966.
College of S.I., Small Bus. Dev. Ctr.
Business Counseling: CSI, 2800
Victory Blvd. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. No
charge. For info, call the SBDC at
718-982-2560.
TUESDAY
Bus. Outreach Ctr of SI/WBCLDC
Small Bus. Counseling –
MWBE/BOC Capital: WBCLDC, 705
Forest Ave., 2nd Fl. By appointment
only. For info, call 718-816-4775.
Direct120.com, Ultimate Think
Tank: Lorenzo’s, 1100 South Ave. For
info, visit www.direct120.com.
Kiwanis Club of South Shore:
LaFontana, 2879 Amboy Rd. 7:30
p.m. For info, call 718-370-2770.
SCORE Business Counseling: S.I.
Bank & Trust, 1550 Richmond Rd. 9
a.m. to noon. No appointment nec-
essary. No charge. For info, call 718-
727-1221.
Business Guild I of the S.I. Cham-
ber of Commerce: Hilton Garden
Inn, 1100 South Ave. 7:45 a.m. Mem-
bers and invited guests only. For
info, call Christina Fiorenza at 347-
581-5022.
Business Network Int’l. (BNI) Net-
work Alliance Chapter: Z-One
Lounge, 1821 Richmond Ave. 7 to
8:30 a.m. For info, call Timothy
Houston at 718-981-8600.
Rotary Club Staten Island: LiGre-
ci’s Staten, 697 Forest Ave. 12:30 to
1:30 p.m. Members and guests wel-
come. For info, call 718-370-3140.
College of S.I., Small Bus. Dev. Ctr.
Business Counseling: Chamber of
Commerce, 130 Bay St. 9 a.m. No
charge. For info, call the SBDC at
718-982-2560.
College of S.I., Small Bus. Dev. Ctr.
Business Counseling: CSI, 2800
Victory Blvd. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. No
charge. For info, call the SBDC at
718-982-2560.
WEDNESDAY
Bus. Outreach Ctr of SI/WBCLDC
Small Bus. Counseling –
MWBE/BOC Capital: WBCLDC, 705
Forest Ave., 2nd Fl. By appointment
only. For info, call 718-816-4775.
Staten Island Business Council:
Lorenzo’s at Hilton Garden Inn, 1100
South Ave. 7 a.m. Members and
invited guests only. For info, call 347-
855-4488 or send an e-mail to
info@sibizcouncil.com.
Bucks Business Network: Hamp-
ton Inn, 1120 South Ave. 7:45 a.m.
For info, call 718-351-2557 or visit
www.sibucks.com.
Kiwanis Club of Brighton: Jody’s
Club Forest, 372 Forest Ave. 7:30
p.m. For info, call 718-348-0505.
Kiwanis Club of North Central:
LiGreci’s Staten, 697 Forest Ave.
7:30 p.m. For info, call Len Bosso at
347-592-1937.
Rotary Club of Gateway: The Lake
Club, 1150 Clove Rd. 7:15 p.m. For
info, call 718-447-1509.
SCORE Business Counseling:
Chamber of Commerce, 130 Bay St.
9 to 11:30 a.m. Appointment neces-
sary. No charge. For info, call 718-
727-1221.
E.L.I.T.E. (Executive, Leadership,
Interactive, Team, Effort) Net-
working Group: 1110 South Ave. 8
a.m. New members welcome. For
info, call 347-273-1375.
College of S.I., Small Bus. Dev. Ctr.
Business Counseling: CSI, 2800
Victory Blvd. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For
info, call 718-982-2560.
THURSDAY
Bus. Outreach Ctr of SI/WBCLDC
Small Bus. Counseling –
MWBE/BOC Capital: WBCLDC, 705
Forest Ave., 2nd Fl. By appointment
only. For info, call 718-816-4775.
Kiwanis Club of Staten Island:
LiGreci’s Staten, 697 Forest Ave.
7:30 p.m. For info, call 718-967-4345
or go to
kiwanisclubofstatenisland.com.
Rotary Club of South Shore: Mari-
na Grand, 141 Mansion Ave. 12:15 p.m.
For info, call 718-987-2061 or visit
southshorerotary.org.
Rotary Club Mid-Island: New Dako-
ta Diner, 921 Richmond Ave. 7:30 to
9:00 a.m. For info, call 718-981-
0700.
SCORE Business Counseling: SI
Bank & Trust, 1550 Richmond Rd. 9
a.m. to noon. No appointment nec-
essary. No charge. For info, call 718-
727-1221.
Rotary Club of North Shore: LiGre-
ci’s Staten, 697 Forest Ave. 7 p.m.
For info, call Chris Williams at 718-
442-9047.
Business Network Int’l. (BNI) High
Achievers Chapter: Perkins Restau-
rant, 4370 Amboy Rd. 7:30 to 8:30
a.m. For info, call Timothy Houston
at 718-981-8600.
Business Network Int’l. (BNI) High
Achievers Chapter: Perkins, 4370
Amboy Road. 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. For
info, call Timothy Houston at 718-
981-8600.
Business Guild II of the S.I. Cham-
ber of Commerce: Hilton Garden
Inn, 1100 South Ave. 7:45 to 8:45
a.m. Members and invited guests
only. For info, call Bob Williams at
718-356-1952.
Business Guild III of the SI Cham-
ber of Commerce: Hilton Garden
Inn, 1100 South Ave. 7:30 a.m. New
members welcome. Call Melody
Minkoff at 718-370-0040.
College of S.I., Small Bus. Dev. Ctr.
Business Counseling: CSI, 2800
Victory Blvd. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For
info, call 718-982-2560.
Community Emergency Response
Team (CERT): 7 p.m. For info. and
locations, call John Tidona at 718-
448-7160 or e-mail
portrichcert@yahoo.com.
FRIDAY
Bus. Outreach Ctr of SI/WBCLDC
Small Bus. Counseling –
MWBE/BOC Capital: WBCLDC, 705
Forest Ave., 2nd Fl. By appointment
only. For info, call 718-816-4775.
SATURDAY
SCORE Business Counseling: St.
George Library, 5 Central Ave. 10
a.m. to noon. Appointment neces-
sary. No charge. For info, call 718-
442-8560.
SCORE Business Counseling: Rich-
mondtown Library, 200 Clarke Ave.
10 to 11:30 a.m. Appointment neces-
sary. For info, call 718-668-0413.
WEEKLY MEETINGS
New York University, and a Bach-
elor of Arts degree in psychology
from SUNY, Stony Brook.
NEW BOARD MEMBERS
Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
Protectors of Pine Oak Woods
announced the election of two
new board members: Kerry Gal-
lagher and Carolyn Pinto.
Gallagher is a third generation
Staten Islander. She has experi-
ence working for NYC Parks, the
Girl Scouts of America and the
Staten Island Zoo. She is an avid
fisherwoman and hiker who has
volunteered to teach a responsi-
ble fishing class on Staten Island
every spring. Gallagher is a resi-
dent of Rossville.
Pinto is a native Staten Is-
lander and currently a resident of
New Dorp. She worked in Man-
hattan for 12 years, first in insur-
ance and then for a private real
estate managing/development
firm, before having children and
becoming involved in Boy Scouts
Pack 25/Troop 125 for 15 years.
Pinto has been a member of the
Federated Garden Clubs of NYS
for 21 years.
She has been a registered NYC
Parks Volunteer for 18 years. She
has worked as a mortgage broker
for 15 years and is presently a re-
altor.
Protectors is committed to in-
creasing the stewardship of Stat-
en Island’s existing parkland,
bluebelt corridors and nature pre-
serves and to continuing the ef-
fort to preserve Staten Island’s
natural areas.
ADRIENNE ABBATE
The Staten Island Partnership
for Community Wellness
The Staten Island Partnership
for Community Wellness an-
nounced the appointment of
Adrienne Abbate as project direc-
tor of the Tackling Youth Sub-
stance Abuse initiative.
The aim of the initiative is to
lower the number of Staten Is-
land youth who are abusing pre-
scription drugs and alcohol by co-
ordinating the efforts already
being made towards this goal by
more than 60 organizations in-
cluding city and state agencies,
treatment providers, prevention
providers, youth development or-
ganizations, pharmacies, law en-
forcement, education, hospitals
and other medical professionals,
and philanthropic organizations.
The Staten Island Partnership
for Community Wellness has
been funded by The Staten Island
Foundation. Organizations and
individuals interested in becom-
ing involved with the TYSA ini-
tiative or in receiving the Com-
munity Network e-mail updates
about upcoming events and devel-
opments are encouraged to con-
tact TYSA2020@gmail.com.
24 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012
Members are fully licensed and insured.
When you hire a NARI-HIC member, you can be sure they have undergone
a rigorous screening process that confirms their stability and record
of providing the absolute best in service.
To choose a contractor with confidence, visit
www.hicofsi.org
or call (718) 356-2323
ATTENTION:
Contractors and Affiliated Businesses --
Enhance Your Reputation
Join NARI-HIC of Staten Island
PLUS -
Meet monthly for networking,
benefit from group advertising,
and more…
JOIN
NARI-
HIC!
NARI-HIC of Staten Island is a non-profit Trade Association that promotes
- professionalism
- quality workmanship
- customer satisfaction
in the Home Improvement/Remodeling Industry
S T A T E N I S L A N D
C H A P T E R
On the Job
JOB
Continued from page 18
Chase, LivingSocial team up
Demonstrating their ongoing
commitment to small businesses,
Chase and LivingSocial are spon-
soring “Mission: Small Business,
a grant program awarding up to
$3 million to small business own-
ers nationwide.
The program, which will pro-
vide up to 12 individual grants of
$250,000, was developed to provide
small businesses with resources
needed to make a positive impact
on their business.
Mission: Small Business in-
vites small business owners who
have been in business for at least
two years and have less than 100
employees to apply for a Grant for
their business. Small business
owners will be required to tell
why their business is unique, out-
line a proposed plan for utilizing
the Grant to grow their business
and describe how the business is
involved with its community. To
apply and for more information,
visit the Web site
www.missionsmallbusiness.com.
Consumers are encouraged to
get involved by clicking the “Sup-
port” button at online
www.missionsmallbusiness.com
and voting for their favorite regis-
tered small businesses. Each time
a consumer clicks to support
small business, Chase will add
five dollars to the Grant Pool, up
to a maximum of $3 million.
Each registered small business
must receive at least 250 votes to
be considered for a Grant. The
voting period is open through
June 30.
At the end of the Voting Peri-
od, small business applicants that
have received 250 votes will have
their applications evaluated and
Grant Recipients will be chosen.
Grant Recipients will be an-
nounced on or before Sept. 15.
Special to Business Trends
A Staten Island-based family business recently received two distinguished awards, within days of each
other. Steven J. Coppola, founder and head of APB Security Systems Inc., was honored along with his
daughter, Pamela Coppola, president of Statewide Fire Corp. and his son, Steven M. Coppola, president of
Statewide Monitoring Corp. The Small Business Administration New York District Office presented APB
Security Systems and its affiliate companies with the “Jeffery Butland Family-Owned Business of the
Year Award.” Just four days prior to the SBA honor, the New York State Small Business Development
Center presented APB Security Systems and its divisions with the “2012 New York State Small Busi-
ness Development Center Growth Business of the Year Award.” Each of the Coppola companies grew in
total revenue about 33 percent from 2010 to 2011. Pictured, from left, are Ed Piszko, senior certified
business adviser of the SBDC at the College of Staten Island; Steven M. Coppola, president of Statewide
Monitoring; Steven J. Coppola, president of APB Security Systems; Pamela Coppola Columbia, president
of Statewide Fire Corp.; Pravina Raghavan, New York City district director of the Small Business Admin-
istration, and Dean L. Balsamini, director of the Small Business Development Center at the College of
Staten Island.
APB receives two distinguished awards
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 25
Cernfy ¥our 8us|ness 1oday!
Cur Lralned sLañ and experlenced MW8L menLors provlde
Lechnlcal asslsLance Lo become ceruñed and Lhe resources
you need Lo compeLe for CovernmenL conLracLs!
uon'L Mlss our 8Lh Annual 8uslness Woman Conference: !une 20Lh aL Lhe SLaaLen!
W8CLDC |s ¥our N¥C Cmc|a| Author|ty on becom|ng
cernhed as a M|nor|ty and]or Woman Cwned 8us|ness!
kSVÞ at InfoQWest8r|ghtonLDC.com or 718-816-477S
The West Brighton Community Local Development Corporation, WBCLDC, has
been named a member of the New York City Council supported 2012 M/WBE
Leadership Association. Located at 705 Forest Ave, 2nd Floor, WBCLDC, has the
tools, knowledge, and experience to get you started. For more information on
getting certified, Call us today at 718-816-4775, info@WestBrightonLDC.com or
visit www.nyc.gov/getcertified.
This program was made possible by the New York City Council
For more information on SBS M/WBE programs, please visit
www.nyc.gov/getcertified
Get cernhed and |earn from exper|enced MW8L
cernhed 8us|nesses at our Next Coñee 1a|k on
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Cmce of W8CLDC
70S Iorest Avenue, 2nd ßoor, S.I., N¥ 10310
Special to Business Trends
Loretta Cauldwell, executive director of the Forest Avenue Business Improvement District, graduated
from the Coro Neighborhood Leadership Program during a closing ceremony with Deputy Mayor Robert
K. Steel, Small Business Services Commissioner Rob Walsh and Coro Executive Director Scott Millstein.
The program provides individuals working to strengthen New York City’s commercial corridors with the
tools, experiences and networks they need to develop new ways to lead change in their organizations and
communities. Cauldwell plans to bring about recognition as well as appreciation for the first and only BID
of Staten Island and the mutual benefits it offers businesses and residents. Pictured, from left, are
Walsh, Council Member Julissa Ferreras, Cauldwell, Steel and Millstein.
Graduation ceremonies
Special to Business Trends
Council Member James S. Oddo (right) joined College of Staten Is-
land President Dr. Tomas D. Morales on the field of the College of
Staten Island Softball Complex last week to inaugurate the state of
the art field lighting that was recently installed so that players and
fans can now enjoy night games on the campus.
Let’s play ball!
26 BUSINESS TRENDS — JUNE 2012


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Steve White
6 Genesee Avenue
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Phone: 718.317.5025
Cell: 917.446.4029
Email: statenarts@aol.com
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When you take into consideration all that is included, locating your business
here becomes the obvious choice.
York Fragrance to outgrow its
Port Richmond storefront and ne-
cessitate the large warehouse
that Cherukuri said could “easi-
ly” create 80 to 100 new jobs when
complete. Currently, the business
employs six staffers and six com-
missioned sales people.
“The two things I believe in
very much in this country are
hard work and honesty,” he said.
“You have to speak the truth
about what you believe in.”
From the moment he stepped
foot in America, Cherukuri said
he knew he was in a special place,
but he didn’t always believe it
would become his permanent
home. His first American experi-
ence was in Idaho, where he grad-
uated from Idaho University with
a degree in marketing and fi-
nance. After struggling to chart
out a clear direction for his fu-
ture, he ended up in Ohio, at the
home of his cousin V.B.
Venkayya, who sponsored his ar-
rival in the United States. When
he arrived, Cherukuri believed it
would be his final stop before re-
turning home to India.
But Venkayya, who came to the
U.S. in 1954 and worked as an
aerospace engineer, would hear
nothing of his cousin’s return to
his homeland.
Cherukuri said Venkayya
taught him about America and
opened his eyes to possibilities
that abound. Venkayya would
drop him off at the library every
morning on the way to work and
pick him up on his way home as a
way to force him to learn every-
thing he could.
“Without him, I could not learn
anything,” Cherukuri said.
The cousins lived in the same
small village in India that had
one marketplace for its 3,000 peo-
ple and no electricity. So it’s no
surprise, then, that Cherukuri
still sounds amazed when he talks
about the technology and abun-
dance of places such as Home
Depot, which seem so common-
place to most Americans.
“You come from that kind of
place to here, you tell me how you
feel,” he said. “We are so lucky.”
After spending four months liv-
ing with his cousin in Ohio,
Cherukuri moved to Staten Island
at the urging of some friends. He
attended Wagner College, where
he received his MBA, and eventu-
ally landed a job at Ross Cosmet-
ics. There, he learned the indus-
try inside and out. When Ross
Cosmetics went public in the
early 1980s, Cherukuri used the
opportunity to break off on his
own and start New York Fra-
grance.
“Hard work pays you more
than smartness,” he said. “You
can be smart, but if you’re not a
hard-working guy, I don’t think
you can succeed.”
Cherukuri bought his busi-
ness’ original building for $17,000,
and now, 18 years later, he’s knee
deep in a $3 million expansion
project. The warehouse, at 600
Gulf Ave., is within the Staten Is-
land Green Zone, an area created
to attract environmentally-friend-
ly companies with tax breaks and
other incentives.
While construction isn’t ex-
pected to be complete for another
few months, Cherukuri already
has his sights set on the future be-
yond. His first goal is to grow
New York Fragrance to a $10-mil-
lion-per-year business. He eventu-
ally wants to take the company
public, make his employees
shareholders and slowly cut
down his day-to-day working
hours.
While he isn’t interested in re-
tiring anytime soon, taking a step
back from the business will allow
Cherukuri to spend more time
with his wife, daughter and son.
“I try to teach them as much as
I can the family values and hard
work and honesty. That’s what I
try to teach them day in and day
out,” he said. “Every human
being can make thousands of
mistakes…but if you are repeat-
ing the mistake again and again,
then it means something is wrong
with you.”
What a wild ride it’s been
FRAGRANCE
Continued from page 1
JANET DUGO/Business Trends
Ram Cherukuri (right), owner of New York Fragrance, grabbed a shov-
el with Cesar Claro of the Staten Island Economic Development Corp.
to perform a ceremonial groundbreaking for the start of construction
of his company’s new $3 million warehouse and outlet shop in Staten
Island’s new “Green Zone” on the west shore.
By JOHN J. VENTO
Taxes may be the last thing on
your mind when you’re changing
jobs, but overlooking their impact
could mean missed tax-saving op-
portunities. Issues to consider in-
clude the following:
n Your retirement plan. Distri-
butions from retirement plans
are generally taxable and may
also be subject to an early with-
drawal penalty.
The penalty would also apply
to amounts withheld for income
taxes. When you leave a company,
any outstanding 401(k) loan is
also considered a taxable distri-
bution if you don’t repay the loan
according to the terms of your
plan.
Planning Tip: Have the money
in your retirement account trans-
ferred directly into another quali-
fied plan or an IRA. A direct
rollover avoids automatic income
tax withholding and income
taxes.
n Job-hunting expenses. You
can deduct the costs of looking
for a new job in your present line
of work, even if you don’t get the
job. Typical expenses include
travel to job interviews, resume
costs, and employment agency
fees.
You must itemize your deduc-
tions, and your total miscella-
neous deductions must exceed 2
percent of your adjusted gross in-
come.
n Moving expenses. If you
meet two tests, you can deduct the
costs to move your household and
personal effects, including your
in-transit travel expenses and
storage expenses.
First, the distance from your
old home to your new workplace
must be at least 50 miles farther
than the distance from your old
home to your old workplace. Sec-
ond, you must work full time in
your new location for at least 39
weeks during the 12 months fol-
lowing your move. The time test
doesn’t apply if you’re laid off
from your new job or later trans-
ferred for your employer’s bene-
fit.
n Residence sale. You can ex-
clude from taxation up to $250,000
of gain ($500,000 for joint filers) if
you own and occupy a home as
your principal residence for at
least two of the five years preced-
ing its sale. If you sell your home
due to a change in employment,
you can still exclude part of the
gain even though you don’t meet
the ownership and use tests.
John J. Vento is a certified public
accountant in private practice and
president of Comprehensive Wealth
Management, Ltd. He may be
reached at (718) 980-9000 or via
email at john@ventocpa.com.
JUNE 2012 — BUSINESS TRENDS 27
MUSSDEVELOPMENT LLC
BUILDING NEW YORK CITY SINCE 1906
Ross Spitalnick
P: 718-263-3800 x371
ross@muss.com
Nicholas Forelli
P: 718-263-3800 x307
nforelli@muss.com
Retail Tenants
NO. TENANT RSF
768 Village Maria Pizzeria 1,050
770 Chinese Restaurant 1,120
772 Dry Cleaners 1,150
778 Grocery Market 8,118
778A CVS 24,332
MANOR ROAD SHOPPING CENTER
754-778 MANOR ROAD, STATEN ISLAND, NY 10314
Excellent Visibility from the SI Expressway
DEMOGRAPHICS:
Radius 1 Mile 3 Mile 5 Mile
Population: 32,964 302,319 497,982
Households: 11,635 107,001 183,295
Median Age: 40.30 37.30 37.60
Avg. HH Income: $94,759 $82,949 $80,002
NO. TENANT RSF
754 JP Morgan Chase 3,600
754A Available 1,700
756 Available 2,600
760 Liquor Store 1,025
762 Carvel 900
764 Dunkin’ Donuts 1,150
Parisi Rampulla & Lenza, P.C.
78 Martin Avenue | Staten Island, NY, 10314
(718) 761-3333
Short Sales, Mortgage Modification,
Foreclosure Defense
Drop us a line
Email: news@sibiztrends.com
Mail: Business Trends, 66 Willow Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10305
Changing jobs can
have tax consequences
Staten Island Career
Coaches featured
in PENCIL film
After three years coaching the
students of McKee Career Tech-
nical Educational High School in
preparation for entrance to the
workforce, the Staten Island Ca-
reer Coaches were featured in a
film by PENCIL, a New York-
based non-profit organization
that honors business experts and
school leaders who have demon-
strated their commitment to pub-
lic schools. The SICC work with
McKee upper classmen on re-
sume building and developing job
interview skills. During the
three-week program, the coaches
mentor McKee’s juniors and sen-
iors in identifying strengths and
developing strategies to best com-
municate their assets to potential
employers.
More than 16 SICC program
participants received job place-
ment through Workforce1, a serv-
ice provided by the NYC Depart-
ment of Small Business Services.
Twenty students are currently
participating in the Pencil Fel-
lows internship program. In addi-
tion, the school’s cosmetology stu-
dents are now volunteering at
New Vanderbilt Rehab, visiting
residents bi-weekly through a
connection made by one of the ca-
reer coaches.
Any professional interested in
volunteering with the Career
Coaches or providing internship,
job shadowing or job opportuni-
ties for students should contact
Valarie Contrino via e-mail at
valarie@contrinotravel.com.
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