You are on page 1of 24

our C ier

Claremont

Wednesday 06-06-12 u 75 cents

claremont-courier.com

Firing squad

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff A California Department of Forestry plane drops fire retardant on a small brush fire Monday afternoon in the hills above San Antonio Dam. The fire started just before 4 p.m. in a canyon adjacent to the reservoir at the bottom of Mt. Baldy creek. A multi-agency response including San Bernardino County Fire, Los Angeles County Fire, the California Department of Forestry and the US Department of Forestry had the flames knocked down in about an hour. The incident forced Claremont police to temporarily close Mt. Baldy Road at Fergus Falls to allow firefighters to work without interference from the public. Story on page 3.

t

Sip and stroll at this weekend’s Blues and Brews
Story on page 5

Keck plays host to a piece of Claremont’s art history
Story on page 10

What’s happening this weekend?
Your week in
Mountain View Elementary School fourth-grade student Shalena Sutphen shows off the origami lantern and puppy she made on Monday at the school. Mountain View teachers use the alphabet to count down the last days of school before summer and Monday was “O” for origami. Story on page 12.

9 days

Calendar starts on page 14

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

2

1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Editor and Publisher Peter Weinberger
pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

Managing Editor Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Maybe the newspaper business is becoming fashionable again

Newsroom
City Reporter Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

T

Education and Sports Reporter Landus Rigsby
reporter@claremont-courier.com

he Claremont COURIER newspaper published 80 pages last week. That’s a lot for us. In fact, that’s a lot for any newspaper in a community the size of Claremont. We simply had a lot of news and advertising.

by Peter Weinberger

Features Reporter/Obituaries Brenda Bolinger
brendabolinger@claremont-courier.com

Photo Editor/Staff Photographer Steven Felschundneff
steven@claremont-courier.com

Reporters At Large Pat Yarborough, Sarah Torribio Calendar Editor Jenelle Rensch
calendar@claremont-courier.com

Back Page Sammy
sammy@claremont-courier.com

Production
Ad/Page Design Jenelle Rensch Page Design Kathryn Dunn

Advertising
Advertising Director Mary Rose
maryrose@claremont-courier.com

Classified Editor Jacquie Fischer
classified@claremont-courier.com

Business Administration
Marketing Manager Vickie Rosenberg
legalads@claremont-courier.com

Billing/Accounting Manager Dee Proffitt Distribution/Publications Tom Smith
tomsmith@claremont-courier.com

The COURIER website had a big bump in traffic, too. It was mostly due to our promotion of opening news page access to everyone. We will go back to having a paywall requiring a login for subscribers on June 15. Our goal for now is to let everyone see the great content on claremontcourier.com. I say all this in light of recent news events wherein Warren Buffett and his company, Berkshire Hathaway, plan to buy 63 daily and weekly newspapers from Media General for $142 million. Mr. Buffett said he might even want to buy more local papers in cities with a strong sense of community (the COURIER is not for sale.) So after years of doom and gloom, this is good news for the newspaper industry. Although newspaper owners still face many challenges, the point here is that someone who’s pretty good at investing thinks newspapers are a good bet. Coverage of local news on the Internet is increasing too. Since anyone can be a publisher, there are many ideas floating around on what works best for local news coverage. The new hot term is “hyperlocal.” The hip thing now is to focus on technology to interact with readers. The bad news is there’s less interest in content once you have reached them. Interacting with readers is a good thing, but they won’t stick around without strong content. That’s why it’s so important to hire good people who bring a strong expertise to reporting news and selling advertising. And unless I’m missing something, these fine people won’t work for free. Here’s what my buddy Warren says on the subject: “The original instinct of newspapers was to offer free in digital form what they were charging for in print,” he said. “This is an unsustainable model.” In other words, if you don’t charge for news, you won’t be around long. I’ll add to that by saying…you get what you pay for. “It's your [newspaper staff’s] job to make your paper indispensable to anyone who cares about what is going on in your city or town,” Mr. Buffett said. I’ll admit Mr. Buffett may be rich, but he probably doesn’t have much expertise in running a newspaper company. But his thinking is right on. One thing that may interest Mr. Buffett is a newspaper’s ability to keep readers’ interest. Once someone puts eyes on a newspaper page, they tend to stay longer than other mediums. This is especially true when compared to the Internet,

where readers tend to flip around and surf more often. People in the business fondly call this “retention.” Retention is critical when assessing advertising buys. Advertisers pay a lot of money to have their ads seen by as many people as possible. But paying for advertising doesn’t necessarily mean people will see an ad. The COURIER has exceptional reader retention. Once someone first opens our newspaper, the large majority will look through the entire issue. If a business advertises with us, over 90 percent of our readers will see that ad. Most newspapers would be very happy with a 30-40 percent retention rate. As a supporter of Claremont business, what gives me pause is when I see local advertisers using direct mail to reach out to customers. This is the junk mail you get each day with numerous advertisements of all sizes and colors. Some advertisers get sold on junk (I’m sorry, direct) mail because the post office can quote big numbers on homes reached, at a discounted price. Advertising agencies working with big businesses like this medium because it looks great for clients. But how many people actually look through junk mail? The answer is…not many. In fact, it’s about the opposite of the COURIER’s retention rate. There are a number of surveys stating that less than 10 percent of people sent direct mail advertising actually look at it. This means you have to deliver 9 times more direct mail pieces to equal one COURIER advertisement. Just like newspapers, direct mail retention rates differ depending on many factors. But the fact remains there are still many advantages to advertising in a local newspaper. You may not see a lot of the big box advertisers, but inside these pages are success stories from businesses that understand how to best reach their community. I think Warren Buffett understands that, too.
—Peter Weinberger pweinberger@claremont-courier.com

Subscriptions
subscriptions@claremont-courier.com
The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published twice weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: 75 cents. Annual subscription: $52.00. Annual online subscription: $47. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2012. Claremont Courier

Editorial Interns
Jake Bartman, reporter Cameron Barr, photographer

One hundred and fourth year, number 43

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

3

Claremont fire season gets off to hot start

A

s part of a muti-agency effort, 75 fire personnel from the US Forest Service were called to the local hillsides Monday afternoon to tend to the flames of a basic Mt. Baldy Road brush fire.

The “Shinn Fire,” located just north of the San Antonio Dam off Shinn Road, was considered 60 percent contained as of 5:30 p.m. Monday, according to Public Affairs Officer Sherry Rollman. The Angeles National Forest district began work on the 15-acre blaze around 3:50 p.m. Helicopters were called to the scene to help fire crews pour dirt and water on the flames traveling up the chaparral and steep terrain of the mountain. Locals like Abel Chapa peppered the hillsides nearby to catch a glimpse of the area’s first fire of the season. Mr. Chapa was driving down Mt. Baldy Road on his way to work when he caught sight of the smoke. “We are all concerned about the fires up here,” said Mr. Chapa, who immediately pulled over to call and warn his wife. Fires in the lower section of the mountain are not an uncommon sight for Mr. Chapa. He explained that hikers often take a detour and sometimes create campfires without contemplating the risks, ignoring “no open fire” signs. Mr. Chapa pointed out areas along the ridge where flames wreaked havoc because of reckless activity COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff among other reasons. Claremont resident Scott Gorman of the US Forest Serviceʼs Dalton Hotshots exits his vehicle Despite suspicions, the cause of the Shinn Fire remains under as the crew prepares to battle a brush fire Monday in the hills north of San Antonio Dam. investigation, according to Ms. Rollman. —Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

ABOVE: A California Department of Forestry plane drops fire retardant on the Shinn Fire shortly after the first crew arrived on the scene Monday in the hills north of Claremont. The fire started just before 4 p.m. and was mostly out by 5:30 p.m. AT LEFT: A firefighting helicopter from the Los Angeles City Fire Department passes a hillside where a hotshot crewmember began the fire line on Monday in the hills adjacent to San Antonio Dam. Hotshot crews clear a line of brush around a wildfire in order to contain the blaze.

Explosives used to blow up residential mailboxes
Claremont police are requesting residents’ help to find a man connected with blowing up mailboxes in the northeast portion of the city. Three mailboxes have been destroyed since Saturday, June 2 by handmade explosive devices, according to a recent police report. The targeted houses are in the 800 block of Alamosa Drive, the 100 block of Limestone Road and the 3700 block of Vincennes Court. The man is described as an 18- to 20-year-old white male about 5 feet 8 inches tall, weighing 200 pounds with red or blonde hair. He was last seen wearing a white T-shirt and blue shorts, believed to be driving a black Honda Civic.

Any suspicious person or activity should be reported to the Claremont police immediately at 399-5411.

Budget workshop scheduled for June 12
City staff is planning a budget workshop prior to the Tuesday, June 12 city council meeting. The workshop will begin at 5 p.m. and will be followed by the regular city council meeting. Budget discussion will continue at the 6:30 p.m. council meeting. The public is encouraged to attend the workshop and may speak under public comment. The workshop will be webcast on the city’s website. Formal adoption of the budget is scheduled for the June 26 city council meeting.

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Thursday, June 7 Police Commission Council chamber, 7 p.m. CUSD board meeting Board room, 6:30 p.m. Monday, June 11 Sustainability Committee Citrus Room, City Hall, 4 p.m.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

4

Shopowners count the days to new thrift store opening

B

argain hunters with charitable inclinations will look forward to June 15 as a day when their interests will be united. The fifteenth will see the opening of a Charity Thrift store located just west of the intersection of Towne Avenue and Foothill Boulevard whose proceeds will go entirely to KidCare International, a local organization with a history of activism both locally and abroad.
KidCare was founded in Claremont in 1991 by Larry and Janice Kapchinsky to provide assistance to “desperately disadvantaged children” and their families in nearby cities. KidCare operates a number of local programs whose aims include tutoring, mentoring and providing school supplies. The organization’s largest local project is a Montclair food bank that caters to hundreds of families each week. “Children suffer the most,” Ms. Kapchinsky said, noting that many observers would be startled to learn of the amount of poverty in local counties, and that over 20,000 children can be identified as legally homeless in the Inland Empire alone. “I’ve seen the same things here as I’ve seen working in Tanzania and Haiti,” Ms. Kapchinsky added. The idea for the new Charity Thrift was born of a desire to found “a social enterprise company that exists to support the operations and programs of KidCare International.” The store became even more necessary after the recent economic downturn. “Donations are down, but need is rising,” Ms. Kapchinsky said. Ms. Kapchinsky’s earlier experiences as the owner of several antique stores made Charity Thrift a reasonable goal. She and her husband began moving towards the store’s creation a year ago, when KidCare started looking for a location to house the project. The exodus of Staples near CVS Pharmacy presented a long-awaited opportunity to get the store in business. Charity Thrift will be an L3C organization, which, as far as taxation goes, can be understood as partway between a nonprofit organization and a private business. The Kapchinskys felt that running the store in such a fashion would provide a more holistic approach to its charitable aims. “We feel that it’s important to give back to the community with taxes and to look at the overall scheme of things,” Ms. Kapchinsky explained. “It’s important for businesses to give back to the community, and to be a good part of that community.” Ms. Kapchinsky hopes that Charity Thrift will provide funding for all of KidCare’s projects, while keeping true to the underlying ideology of the KidCare organization. “Profit is a secondary goal,” Ms. Kapchinsky said, explaining that the store will eventually hire employees from a local women’s shelter and elsewhere who “deserve a second chance.” At present, about 60 percent of KidCare’s proceeds

COURIER photos/Camerom Barr Janice and Larry Kapchinsky stand inside their upcoming store, KidCare International Charity Thrift, in Pomona on Foothill Boulevard and Towne Avenue. The Kapchinskys own a non-profit organization based in Claremont called KidCare International, and the store will help fund programs. The store will open tomorrow with a grand opening celebration on June 15.

go towards local projects like the food bank. The other 40 percent goes to international operations in Haiti and Tanzania, where KidCare helps to establish schools and to provide other support for children in need. Last year, the food bank served 60,000 meals, an increase of about 20 percent from the previous year. “We’d eventually like to make the food bank even larger,” Ms. Kapchinsky said. Even with the charity’s international scope, Ms. Kapchinsky emphasized that one of the Charity Thrift’s advantages as a source of funding is its direct impact on the surrounding community. “It’s not a ‘distant’ charity. One can go down the street and see where their donation is going,” Ms. Kapchinsky said. Lois Scott, who is volunteer helping get the store running until it earns enough revenue to hire employees, emphasized the importance of the new store to realizing KidCare’s larger goals. “We’re really putting all of our efforts into this,” Ms. Scott said. Irene Christman, who was volunteering with her daughter Jessica, agreed. “We’ve been waiting for a location to happen. We really had to find another source of funding,” she said. Ms. Kapchinsky noted that KidCare is always looking for volunteers, and is accepting donations of furniture, clothing, and household items at the store from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.. daily.
—Jake Bartman

Rows of shoes line the racks of KidCare International Charity Thrift in Pomona. The new thrift store has taken over the former Staples building at Towne Avenue and Foothill Boulevard.

CHS Theatre renovation kicks off with groundbreaking celebration

T

he public is invited to a groundbreaking ceremony for the renovation of the Claremont High School Theatre set for Wednesday, June 6 from 5 to 5:45 p.m.

When work on the facility concludes next spring, the Don F. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts will feature a 1,600-square-foot lobby with a ticket window and handicap-accessible restrooms plus 3,500 square feet of backstage space. The latter addition will allow room for set construction, a costume shop, storage for scenery and

props, dressing rooms and student restrooms. The project is funded in part by a $1.5 million Career and Technical Education grant from the State Allocation Board. Theatre boosters have raised $400,000 toward the project and the Claremont Unified School District has pitched in with a $1.5 million bridge loan.

The project design has been approved by the Department of State Architecture, and the building contract has been awarded to the Paul C. Miller Construction company. The groundbreaking will take place in front of the theatre at Claremont High School, 1601 N. Indian Hill Blvd.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

5

Beer lovers to take Village by storm at Blues and Brews

M

usic and beer will be flowing this Saturday, June 9, for Claremont’s third annual Blues and Brews. Craft beer and food tastings will span the streets of the Claremont Village from 4 to 8 p.m.

“It’s a pleasant way to spend a late afternoon, early evening in June,” suggested Ms. Stump, adding that Blues and Brews is also a way to give back to the local community. In addition to satiating appetites, event participants will also help provide for local nonprofit organizations. This year’s proceeds will benefit Pomona Valley Hospital Auxiliary, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and The summer food and drink crawl Shoes That Fit. is modeled after Claremont’s autumn Revelers must be 21 years or older wine walk. Also sponsored by the to participate. Tickets may be purClaremont Chamber and Village Marchased in advance at a number of Vilketing Group, it provides the opportulage businesses: Aromatique, Bert & nity for local foodies and beer lovers Rocky’s Cream Company, Claremont to become acquainted with Old Towne Chamber of Commerce, Claremont Claremont, good food and company. Village Treasures, Colors 91711, Heir“We’re very blessed with the Villoom, On a Mission, Sonja Stump lage being as vibrant as it is,” said COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger Photography, Stamp Your Heart Out event organizer Sonja Stump. “I love shoots a photo of 'Lil A the Allnighters at and Rhino Records. Advanced tickets watching people enjoy themselves, Sonja Stump, at left with camera, yearʼs Blues and Brews&event. This yearʼs will be sold for $35 with any remainYale and Bonita Avenues at last walking around, listening to music event will offer more than 30 tasting sites, according to Ms. Stump. ing tickets for sale the day of the event and getting to know our businesses.” for $40. The event will cap at 1000 In between the food and beverage stops, passersby In contrast to the wine walk, Blues and Brews has tickets so event organizers encourage participants to allowed the Village Marketing Group to cater to a will be serenaded with the tunes of 12 different blues purchase in advance. younger, more diverse demographic interested in ex- bands, ranging from hometown favorites like The In addition to purchasing tickets at the aforemenploring craft beers, according to organizer Bob Fagg. Claremont Voodoo Society to a taste of Chicago-style tioned Village shops, tickets are also available for the This year’s brews will sample a diverse range of tunes from the Melvin Eddie Blues Band. first time online at www.claremontblues Ticketholders may select up to 10 locations to samtastes with over 30 Village businesses participating, andbrews.com. Questions may be directed to each boasting a different brew. Eureka Burger has ple craft beer creations and hors d’oeuvre. One option info@ClaremontBluesandBrews.com, or call Sonja been hard at work coordinating the different selec- this year is “dining under the stars” sponsored by La Stump Photography at 626-1147. tions, including local favorite Dale Bros. and a new Piccoletta and Therapy Solutions. The parking lot —Beth Hartnett Belgian brewery out of Colorado. Non-alcoholic op- next to the 2 Village businesses will be repurposed to news@claremont-courier.com tions will also be available, such as root beer floats at serve as a venue where patrons can enjoy dinner and music beneath the summer evening sky. Stamp Your Heart Out.

Lissa Petersen named Ordway Award winner by League

L

issa Petersen was recently named as the 2012 Ruth Ordway Award recipient by the Claremont League of Women Voters.
The Ruth Ordway Award is presented in Mrs. Ordway’s memory each spring to a Claremont man or woman who has performed outstanding service to the community. Mrs. Ordway was a founding member of the Claremont League and twice served as its president. She was also a leader in establishing the Claremont Intercultural Council, which helped develop housing in the barrio area and gave scholarships and loans to Mexican-American students. After her death in November 1982, her friends and family established the Ordway Award in her memory. The recipient need not be a League member. However, this year, the League states that they are “delighted to present this year’s award to one of our own members who has been creatively omnipresent in our community and at The Claremont Colleges for over 40 years. “ Born in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, Lissa Petersen received a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University and a master’s degree in literature from Harvard University. She arrived in Claremont in 1973 and immediately became part of multiple facets of community life. As a young mother of 2 sons, Ms. Petersen dived into the work of the League of Women Voters—coauthoring a substantial Education Study in 1974. She continued with various portfolios, particularly education, from 1975 to 1984, and has continued as a member of many League committees and studies. Community Friends of International Students was formed in the mid-1970s to reach out to international

students enrolled in the Claremont Colleges, with Ms. Petersen active with the group from its inception by “herding students to the Thursday lunch and conversations, enlisting them to operate the Flower Shop at the International Festival from dawn to dusk every year since 1979.” Photo Pitzer College She has served on the Lissa Petersen was named Community Friends’ recipient of the Ordway board since 2004.  Award by the Claremont Donald Delgado, League of Women Voters. current director of International Place, writes, “A well-deserved honor for Lissa. Always a caring and calming presence, she has hosted numerous students in the host family program, often taking more than one student at a time, helping them with shopping, apartment hunting and more. Proof of her positive impact on students is the number who visit her when they return to Claremont.” Ever passionate about education, Ms. Petersen was elected to the Claremont Unified School District Board of Education in 1984 and subsequently served for 10 years. “Lissa Petersen was one of our most effective members, with an easy-to-like personality, and teaching experience, which lent insight to lay board members,” said Michael Fay, a fellow board member at the time. “She was exceptionally adept at asking hard questions, which gave the rest of us pause as we deliberated.We all learned to listen carefully to Lissa’s advice.”

Committed to improving public education, Ms. Petersen pioneered, along with the National Council of Negro Women, a tutorial program for low-income and at-risk elementary school children in the apartments on San Jose Avenue. In 2005, this program fused with another after-school tutoring program to become the Claremont After School Programs. Ms. Petersen joined early in the effort to “Save Johnson’s Pasture,” accepting a position on the board of the Claremont Wildlands Conservancy (CWC), where with the city, Trust for Public Land and property owners, she explored possible funding methods for acquiring the 180 acres. She was actively involved helping get the bond measure passed in November, 2006. She has continued on the board through additional land acquisition efforts and now serves as president of the CWC Board. In 1991, Ms. Petersen was among the originators of the Youth Master Plan, a joint effort of CUSD and the city of Claremont. She sought out Mr. Fay to chair a special citizens committee to formulate the plan, and served on the committee and on its first board of directors to oversee its implementation. In academia, Ms. Petersen founded and directed the English for Graduate Studies Program and the Writing Center at Claremont Graduate University and was a founding member of Pitzer’s English language program in 1996. While officially retiring in 2010, she continues to teach classes and remains as academic director of the International Fellows Program offered through the Drucker School of Management. This program, founded by Ms. Petersen, is especially tailored to the Drucker curriculum and is widely known for its academic rigor.
—Marilee Scaff, Convener —Georgeann Andrus and Charlene Martin Ruth Ordway Committee, 2012

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

6

The many revolutions that start in Claremont
by John Pixley

Something revolutionary happened here last month.
Angela Davis was in Claremont. More specifically, the famous—or infamous—black, radical academic and activist was back in Claremont lecturing. Even more specifically, she was in the honored position of being the main speaker at Pitzer College’s graduation. When I first heard that Ms. Davis was giving the commencement address at Pitzer, I wasn’t at all surprised. I thought, “Natch!” After all, Pitzer is wellknown as the most liberal of the Claremont Colleges, at least, and for proudly being pretty out there in terms of activism. But, as I was reminded during the bright Saturday morning ceremony, this was more than Pitzer being Pitzer, with the graduates choosing a provocative speaker; Ms. Davis speaking was the triumphant closing of a circle and, in a sense, a sweet, victorious homecoming. I knew that Ms. Davis had taught at the colleges, but I had forgotten just how controversial the appointment, made by the joint black studies department, was. I didn’t know that Ms. Davis accepted the position before it could be withdrawn and that the classes were essentially held in secret. The classes were scheduled on Friday evenings and Saturdays in different locations, which the students had to swear not to divulge. It was 1974, and Ms. Davis had been fired— twice—by UCLA for her controversial views, her Communist sympathies and her activism. She had also been accused of murder, only to have the charge dropped. Ronald Reagan, who was then governor and an UC regent, vowed that she would never again teach in California. So Claremont was a refuge for Ms. Davis. Not only that, it rebooted her teaching career. Most ironically, she ended up holding a distinguished professorship for many years at UC Santa Cruz, and Pitzer College

observer
President Laura Trombley said during the graduation that she is welcome to come and teach at the college anytime. Making a victory out of a defeat was one of Ms. Davis’ themes during her address. So was freedom and how it demands that we share our knowledge and talents. After asking the graduates to “look at all the men, women and trans-people around you,” she quoted author Toni Morrison, saying, “The function of freedom is to free someone else.” Aren’t such turn-arounds and reaching out what Claremont is about? Isn’t it this revolutionary activity that puts Claremont on the map? Angela Davis wasn’t the only one here talking revolution last month. There were many revolutions going on in Claremont, as there are every spring, with thousands of students graduating from Pitzer and the other colleges. This is what Claremont is known for, after all. Millions of people have come here over the years to learn and to grow, to find out who they are and perhaps, yes, reboot. Each spring, we see the results displayed with all the majestic regalia and pomp and circumstance, with a flurry of commencement exercises as all these people are sent off into their lives and into the world with their new knowledge and inspiration. Not bad for Claremont. “Claremont,” as student speaker Benjamin Tumin pronounced with some disdain the next morning at Pomona College’s gradua-

tion. To him, if not to all his fellow students, Claremont is, as he said, “a nice retirement town.” But, as was evident at Pomona College’s commencement, the colleges aren’t the only thing in Claremont producing revolutions. Growing up in Claremont can be revolutionary. Proof of this was Cameron Munter, the main speaker and an honorary degree recipient. Mr. Munter didn’t attend one of the Claremont Colleges but was raised here—he gave a Mother’s Day shout-out to his mother, Helen-Jeane, who, along with his father, Leonard, was in the audience and still lives in Claremont—and became a foreign diplomat, serving most recently in Pakistan. Such a job is definitely not for the faint of heart. Much hope and faith is required. Mr. Munter said a good preparation for this was growing up in Claremont, “a sun-dappled place where peace and all was possible.” He talked about spending hours wandering around the college campuses as a kid. He also recalled his fellow Claremont High schoolers building a huge statue on top of Bridges Auditorium and adding the name Zappa, as in Frank, to the composers listed on the facade. There are plenty of these sorts of memories of growing up in Claremont. There are plenty who have these memories. Some are still living here, and many are living far away and all over. They are all changing the world, whether in big ways or in tiny ways, and some of that is because they have these memories of growing up in Claremont. Put all of these together with all of the students who come from all over to the colleges here and that’s a lot of lives, a lot of revolutions, shaped by Claremont. We see this, as we do every year, with the graduations, both at the colleges last month and with our high school students this month.

Dear, you have to cut back on political personal-approval polls, daily presidential polls, golf, ball scores and stock market. It’s making you seasick.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

7

A country divided

Dear Editor: To paraphrase a great author Tom Paine, these are truly times that will try men’s souls. Our economy is struggling and fear grips not only America but especially Europe. In many ways our financial future is out of our control. What we do have control over is that our representatives in Washington include too many sunshine patriots who claim to be job creators, but will not pass any bill that will hire Americans to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure. And why won’t they pass any real jobs bill? Because they are more interested in partisan gain than in helping to rebuild America. This attitude is unpatriotic. Our representatives in Washington should have the national interests at heart and they should not put the interests of their political party ahead of what we, the people, need. We are a country divided. Our middle class is under fire and shrinking. Our Republic can not stand if partisanship reigns while the division between the very wealthy and powerful grow and the ranks of the ever increasing poor continue to increase. The super wealthy and the powerful on Wall Street are our new aristocracy, no less dangerous to liberty than the monarchy we fought against in our revolution. The far right would have you believe that law and regulations that seek to manage greed endanger liberty, but quite the contrary. Laws and regulations are there to protect capitalism against the scourge of greed. It is time for a second Bill of Rights

READERS’ COMMENTS
that will guarantee American security. Americans have the right to a livable wage. Americans should demand the freedom from unfair competition and monopolies. There is nothing fair about corporate welfare for oil companies. The price per barrel has gone down dramatically but the price at the pump has remained high. Americans have a right to a good education and they have the right to have medical care. Medical care is not broccoli. This election in the fall will tell a lot about America. Choose wisely!!
Gar Byrum Claremont

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
coyote inquires… which way to the colleges? empty parking lot
—Andrea Eldridge

inadvertently ingested a toxic substance. The symptoms were painful and frightening. The toxic substance had to be eliminated. That process was unpleasant, but everyone feels better now. We just have to watch what we eat. Claremont Unified School District continues to promote lifelong learning.
Dave Nemer Claremont

Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.
READERS’ COMMENTS The COURIER welcomes all readers’ comments on any issue or concern. Letters may be submitted by email to editor@claremont-courier.com, by fax 621-4072, by mail 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA 91711, or hand-delivery. Email is the preferred method. Deadline for the Wednesday issue is Monday at 3 p.m.; the deadline for the Saturday issue is Thursday at 3 p.m. The COURIER cannot guarantee publication of every letter. We reserve the right to edit letters. Letters should not exceed 250 words.

Disappointed
Dear Editor: After all of the articles about Frank D’Emilio’s character and the Claremont Unified School District’s handling of issues surrounding it, we were able to read 2 voices of reason reported by Sarah Torribio: those of Judy Kingsley and Victoria Shea. It appears that the district, in seeking to be fair and reasonable with Mr. D’Emilio, forgot issues of his complete absence of thoughtful, ethical behavior and lack of good judgment. The parents of Claremont should be able to expect that anyone serving their children exhibit an honest and worthy example. It is clear that Mr. D’Emilio’s acts of deception in dealing with all seekers of truth, coupled with his complete disregard with the mandate of reporting suspected child abuse, is sufficient to prevent his ability to serve our children in future. That some in the community were able to whip up support for questionable behavior by use of social media is

A healthy community

Dear Editor: The school board deserves our gratitude for responding to the clear sentiment of the community and rescinding the dismissal of Frank D’Emilio. It is not easy for a governing body to reverse a decision. Elected officials generally believe they have sound judgment. When the public disagrees, government officials often dig in their heels and succumb to a defensive siege mentality. Our school board members demonstrated the willingness to listen to their constituents and the ability to reconsider a difficult decision. That is how we like to think Claremont can work. Our community, which the school board represents, ultimately functioned as a healthy complex organism that had

not in keeping with what most adults expect in those who work closely with children. Some of us were disappointed that he was allowed to remain in any position in Claremont Unified School District.
Linda Callaway Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

8

Who? Claremont resident Lila O’Leary, age 10, is a fourth-grader at Chaparral Elementary School. At the time of her interview, she was looking forward to her end-of-the-year party: “I’m so excited!” she exclaimed. Currently reading: Lila is enjoying Peeled by Joan Bauer. Learning from her teacher that the book was “really good,” she’s now finding that out firsthand. A Newbery Honor book, Peeled tells the story of the feisty, funny teenager Hildy Biddle, a reporter for her high school’s newspaper. The chance to go big with her reporting arises after a series of creepy happenings, including a dead body found in an apple grove. “That’s where I am right now,” Lila said. Recent reads: An avid reader, Lila has polished off the following books in the recent past: Mick Harte Was Here by Barbara Park; Shimmer: A Riley Bloom Story by Alyson Noël; Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson; From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankenweiler by E.L. Konigsburg; When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit by Judith Kerr; and Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell. Among these novels, Lila enjoyed Island of the

Lila O’Leary

BOOKMARK
Blue Dolphins the most, due to its compelling plot. “The main girl, Karana, gets left on her tribe’s island, and she has to live by herself, on a small island, for 20 years,” Lila explained about the Newbery Medal-winning book. Favorite book: Lila’s favorite novel is the gripping, post-apocalyptic, kill-or-be-killed novel The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins. Geared toward young adults, The Hunger Games describes a futuristic United States in which one boy and one girl from 12 surviving districts are sent annually to compete to the death, gladiator-style, in a televised show that all citizens are required to watch. When the central character, 16-year-old Katniss, offers to take the place of her younger sister in battle, a tense and dramatic story of survival and sacrifice unfolds. With reality TV shows becoming increasingly popBOOKMARK continues on the next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff As a fourth-grader, Lila OʼLeary, 10, reads not only for school assignments but for personal enrichment.

Ruth Thomson
A memorial service for longtime Pilgrim Place resident Ruth Thomson will take place at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 16, 2012 in Decker Hall at Pilgrim Place. Ms. Thomson, who spent her career with the YWCA, died on May 29, 2012. A more complete account of Ms. Thomson’s life will be published in an upcoming edition of the COURIER.

Lyman Chin
Longtime Claremont resident Lyman Chin died at home unexpectedly at age 54 on May 28, 2012. Mr. Chin, the brother of Linda Yao, wife of former Claremont Mayor Peter Yao, was a longtime restaurateur and most recently worked in real estate. A memorial service is tentatively scheduled for Saturday, June 30, 2012 in Claremont. Further details will be published in an upcoming edition of the COURIER.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

9

BOOKMARK
continued from the previous page

ular in today’s world, the novel’s exploration of this pop-culture form of entertainment is timely and thought-provoking. “What happens if we choose entertainment over humanity?” one reviewer posed.

tant, she does not impose her conviction on others. “If you don’t like it, I don’t think you should read, because then there’s no point,” she said. “But I love reading so much, I don’t see how someone could not like reading.” Words and more words: Lila enjoys reading to the tune of almost 2 million words. Chaparral fourthgraders are challenged to read 500,000 words by the end of the academic year. Their progress is tracked on an “AR (advanced reading)” computer program, through which they also take quizzes on the books they finish. With her nose frequently buried in a book, Lila has far surpassed the 500,000-word goal and expects to reach 2 million words during these final days of the school year. Looking forward to the future: Soon, Chaparral will hold its annual Family Fun Night at which Lila will participate in the book swap. She’s currently choosing the books she’ll bring to trade with fellow classmates. Beyond the school year, Lila looks forward to numer-

“The book has really good details, and it’s really cool, like saying if you get into too much reality TV, it’s going to be really bad,” Lila said. “It’s like no other book I’ve ever read.” While the extreme subject matter didn’t overwhelm or shock Lila, she said she became very sad and started to cry when some of the characters died.
Lila also liked Catching Fire, book 2 in The Hunger Games series, which she just finished. She plans to read the third and final book in the series, Mockingjay, in the near future. On the lighter side, Lila is fond of Jeff Kinney’s Diary of a Wimpy Kid series. The books are the creative journals of young Greg Heffley, who uses both words and drawings to tell outrageous, humorous and amusingly self-deprecating tales of his daily adventures. “The books show someone’s life in a weird way,” Lila said. “It’s like not really real, more like a dream with weird thoughts. It’s really cool.” The pleasure of reading: Early-reader books that didn’t engross her in a story were dull to Lila, “Like ones that just said ‘the cat ran,’” she said. But as her skills increased, so did her delight. “I’ve always enjoyed it, except when I was really little it got annoying because I didn’t know how to read very much. Like in kindergarten, they’d give me a book and say ‘read it,’ but I didn’t know how so I’d just look at the pictures and it got kind of boring. But then I learned how, and it got really fun. Like in first grade, I got to read all sorts of different books instead of baby books.” Lila said she loves reading because “there are so many different stories, and it’s really fun, and you can just imagine yourself in different places with different surroundings.” While her personal belief is that reading is impor-

ous family adventures this summer, including their traditional trek to Grassy Valley for the World Music Festival. “It’s really fun. You get to see all these people sing every day for 5 days. Every single minute they’re playing unless they’re resting,” she said. During festival downtime, Lila will probably devour several of the books recommended to her by her teacher, but instead of toting a stack of books to the fest, she will likely bring her Kindle Fire, a treat she purchased for herself with funds from her grandpa, “because he doesn’t like to shop.” “I love it. It’s really fun.” Looking toward her future, Lila hopes to become a professional soccer player or musician. She enjoyed a summer ukulele class and continues to play piano. Last soccer season, her team never lost a game. “Well, we tied one,” she admitted.
—Brenda Bolinger brendabolinger@claremont-courier.com

Warm welcome to

Henry Lewis Petersen
Claremont native Elizabeth Bobo and her husband, Michael Petersen, celebrate the birth of their first child, Henry Lewis Petersen. Henry was born in Chicago, Illinois on May 17, 2012. He weighed 8 pounds, 7 ounces and was 20 inches long at birth. Henry’s mother, Ms. Bobo, graduated from Claremont High School in 1982 and will return to Claremont this July for her 30year reunion. This semester, she was granted tenure at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette where she teaches English. Ms. Bobo earned her PhD at Claremont Graduate University in 2005. Henry’s father, Mr. Petersen, holds a PhD from Northern Illinois University and teaches English at Wright College in Chicago. Ruth Bobo of Claremont is the proud grandmother of Henry, her first grandchild. John Bobo, formerly of Claremont, and his wife, Gadge, are also proud grandparents. Brian Bobo, formerly of Claremont, is the happy uncle.

fresh

sweet

FEATURES

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

10

‘Art detective’ brings Heritage mural out of hibernation

A

mid preparations for its summer gala, Claremont Heritage has opened up its vaults to restore a long-forgotten piece of the city’s history. A mural titled “A History of Pharmacy,” formerly housed in Hendrix Pharmacy, will be cleaned, restored and returned to the Claremont community after 20 years in storage. The 45-foot mural will be hung at the Keck Graduate Institute of Applied Life Sciences (KGI) by the end of summer or early fall.

“We are very excited to have this beautiful mural on permanent loan from Claremont Heritage. Its theme of the history of pharmacy and its depiction of the names of important figART ures...tie in perfectly with the opening of the new Chapman-KGI School of Biopharmacy,” said KGI President Sheldon Schuster. The school is expected to open in the fall of 2014. “A History of Pharmacy” was designed by Paul Coates and then painted with the help of Diane Divelbess in a barn that still stands behind the Claremont Post Office. It was the first time Ms. Divelbess had painted with acrylic and reflects the 1960s fascination with murals, according to Paige Stein, Keck’s media relations manager. The 12 panels, each 8 feet tall, took the duo 2 years to complete. The mural was displayed in Hendrix Pharmacy in the early 1960s, where it remained even after the building was taken over by Walter’s Restaurant. However, when Walter’s decided to expand, the artwork was removed and placed in the Claremont Heritage vault in Pomona. It remained in the vault for 20 years, until a recent encounter unearthed it out of near oblivion. Mr. Coates’ son became an “art detective” in search of the piece, described Claremont Heritage Director David Shearer, and Claremont Heritage came to his aid as his Watson. The group found the panels with a stroke of luck as the mural was not on Claremont Heritage’s archive list. “It was under plastic and about 3 inches of dust,” Mr. Shearer said. Being placed on removable panels and hung high in the old building away from elements have contributed to the mural’s longevity and relative state of repair. After cleaning, it was placed on exhibit at the Ginger Elliott Exhibition Space.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Jim Osborn surveys several of the panels that comprise a mural titled “A History of Pharmacy” at Keck Graduate University. The acrylic painting by artists Diane Divelbess and Paul Coates illustrates the history of pharmaceuticals from ancient to modern times. Hendrix Pharmacy commissioned the work in 1959 for the wall above their retail space in what is now Walterʼs Restaurant.

“It was just fantastic,” Mr. Shearer described. “[The mural] is so beautifully done.” Following the exhibition, the mural was given to KGI on permanent loan. The mural will be yet another piece added to the institute’s growing museum of artifacts and artworks. “We thought it would be great to have it on display somewhere similar to where it was originally,” Mr. Shearer said. “It will be great to have it somewhere where the public can see it and not just put back in storage. Our goal is to make all this [artwork] accessible.” Restoration for “A History of Pharmacy” is expected to begin in the next couple weeks, according to Ms. Stein. The unveiling of the restored piece is expected in September.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Don’t miss out on news between editions. Check our website daily.

www.claremont-courier.com
621-4761

our C ier
Claremont

claremont-courier.com

FEATURES

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

11

Perseverance, creativity push artist to document Argentina

C

laremont native Antrese Wood has come a long way since sketching on blank pages in the waiting room of doctors’ offices.

Today the professional artist and self-proclaimed free spirit has produced works of art displayed across the world in video games for Disney, her former employer, to galleries in South ART America, where she now resides with her husband, Jorge Palacios. Her latest adventure melds together her artistic and travel endeavors as she covers 15,600 miles and creates more than 100 paintings in an 8-month adventure across Argentina.   “A Portrait of Argentina” is Ms. Wood’s latest art series, a way of embracing her newly adopted country of Argentina. She plans to take off on her expedition next month. “I want to paint the country as it is; to remove the tourist lens, the clouded glass through which we see ‘others,’” Ms. Wood said. “I want to eliminate the preconceptions we generate of another country when we view it through the filter of our own.” In her attempt to adapt to her new lifestyle in Argentina, Ms. Wood found herself blocked by “the tourist vision,” wide-eyed and amazed by everything she saw, but constantly comparing the Argentinean culture to life in the United States. “It made it really hard to adjust, and then I realized I was making comparisons that were really unfair,” she said. Her solution was to travel to each of Argentina’s 23 provinces, painting the people and places along the way. Ms. Wood is attempting to gain new understanding of day-to-day life in Argentina from the people who know it best. Her latest trek echoes some of her past projects, like when she traveled to truck stops in northern California to paint portraits of truckers as they paused during their journeys. However, Ms. Wood is under no illusion that this trip across a big country like Argentina will be a simple task. “The country is massive and the infrastructure isn’t the same as the US. [In Argentina], roads kind of wander around, ” Ms. Wood said. “The challenge will be figuring out the logistics and the most efficient way to get from point A to point B.” The large scope of the project has not deterred her from this new adventure. This trait distinguishes her as an artist, and endears her to family and friends alike. “She is a phenomenal artist, full of passion and energy, but unlike many others she also knows how to put that drive into action and accomplish her goals,” said friend Natalia Johnson. “She’s a dreamer, but she brings perseverance to that dream. They don’t stay in

Former Claremont resident Antrese Wood poses for a photo with her husband Jorge Palacios in Argentina where the couple now lives. Photos courtesy of Antrese Wood Claremont native Antrese Wood paints a landscape in Bariloche, Argentina in December 2007, shortly after she met her husband, Jorge. Ms. Wood will travel through Argentina, creating original art along the way.

the clouds, they become a reality. Not many people can say the same.” Ms. Wood has never been one to shy away from an adventure, according to her mother Eileen Prendergast, who still resides in Claremont. Ms. Prendergast contends that her daughter has been an adventurer since day one. “She is a real go-getter,” Ms. Prendergast said of her daughter. “She is one that will come up with something and you know that she has thought it through and is ready to go. She won’t be intimidated by anything. She has thought it through and knows it is possible.” Ms. Wood has been daring in both travel and artistic pursuits, which have brought her through all sorts of journeys in her life. Though her mother claims the spirit has always been within her Ms. Wood credits her mother and Claremont schooling, especially the Montessori Academy, for fueling her creative vision. “Instead of buying me coloring books, [mom] would give me blank paper. It really sparked my creativity,” Ms. Wood said. She recalled some of her earliest memories of sketching horses on those blank papers while in the waiting room at a doctor’s office. “Part of the philosophy [of Montessori] is letting kids develop as their interests develop, and my mom really subscribed to that.”

Though she was firmly set in becoming a doctor for most of her life, her passion for art in a professional setting was sparked after taking art classes in college. Ms. Woods eventually graduated with her degree in illustration and fine arts from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. A high school study-abroad trip to Honduras while attending CHS in the 1980s ignited her passion for travel. “It taught me a lot not only about Honduras, but about other countries,” Ms. Wood said, referring to the exchange students she bonded with during her trip. After receiving her college degree, and working a series of “dream jobs” that included being a lead artist at Disney for 10 years and living in Alaska as part of AmeriCorps, Ms. Wood felt the itch to travel again, and the freedom of her career choice allowed her to indulge her free spirit. Her travels eventually led her to meet her husband Jorge, while in Argentina, where she would eventually move and continue to pursue her artistry, more recently with Portraits of Argentina. Despite the nerves associated with this latest project involving her dual interests, Ms. Wood is just happy to be on the road again. “I love road trips and I love hearing people’s stories. I’m more excited than I am nervous at this point. If I’m nervous it’s just because this [project] is public now,” Ms. Wood said. “It’s really happening.”   Learn more about Ms. Wood’s adventure or donate to her project by visiting her website at www.antrese.com.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

12

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Megan Rodriguez, left, Brittney Corral, Antonio Nunez and Demmo Zeleke fold origami on Monday in Debbie Barnesʼ fourth-grade class at Mountain View Elementary School. Toward the end of the school year, the school has a daily theme that corresponds to a letter in the alphabet.

Mountain View uses alphabet to count days until summer

T

he kids of Mountain View Elementary School are learning the ABCs…of fun.

With summer looming, students are displaying a characteristic surge in unfocused energy. Meanwhile, with state testing over, teachers have a bit more time for non-essential but memorable activities. With this in mind, the staff of Mountain View has created an alphabetical countdown to the last day of school, a tradition now in its fourth year. Each of the end-of-the-year “A-Z Days” is designated by a letter and features an associated activity. The countdown began with “A” on May 14, with kids flying paper airplanes during the last 15 minutes of school, and will conclude on June 14 with a lesson in the Latin dance-inspired fitness craze Zumba. Fourth grade teacher Debbie Barnes appreciates the way A-Z Days let teachers get back to the enjoyable moments common before state standards began to dominate curriculum. As far as she’s concerned, the countdown couldn’t come at a better time. “They’re so checked out the last couple of weeks,” she says of her students. “They’re like, ‘We have homework?’” In the past few weeks, students have tossed beach balls around, expressed their inner loon during “Crazy Dress Day” and cooled down with ice cream. In some cases, the countdown lets teachers sneak in some sound education for students burnt out by the rigors of the school year. On May 31, children got to munch while learning during “M&M Math Day.” And in the days leading up to May 18, students engaged in creative problemsolving while constructing capsules to cushion the fall

of a raw egg. Then, on “Egg Drop Day,” teachers tested students’ inventions by climbing onto the roof and dropping the variously cradled eggs. In Room 26 at Mountain View on Monday, June 4, students celebrated the day designated by the letter “O” with an origami-folding activity. Ms. Barnes brought books on the Japanese paperfolding art to class, and students were helped by classmate Isabel Ganda, who has been folding flapping birds, candy boxes and bunnies since her parents bought her a book on origami last year. “It’s really fun to do it,” she said. Folding origami takes a certain amount of precision, but Garrett Cox, who fashioned a flower, was up to the challenge. “The trick is to make sure you take time, line up the edges of the paper and make nice creases,” he explained. Julian Matus enjoyed himself while taking time on his origami creations because “art is relaxing.” A bit of creative downtime was just what the doctor ordered, because state testing had been “really stressful.” “I just feel more relaxed and comfortable choosing my answers,” he said of post-testing schoolwork. Julian was looking forward to the rest of the alphabetical activities on tap during the coming 2 weeks, especially the next day’s event: “I’m crazy about pajama day.” Time for alphabetically-ordered pleasures like watching a video and eating watermelon and yes, origami, is a gift for students. In the spirit of giving back, Sebastian Ibarra took the opportunity to make a gift for a friend, a folded paper cat of his own design. “My neighbor has a cat and it just died, so I made it for her,” he said.

x ʼ o r l c e h t s w i m a Teacher Debbie Barnes watches Tammi Ho as she folds a crane on Monday during an origami lesson Tat Mountain View.

He has enjoyed counting down the school days, especially looking forward to June 14. Along with the end of the school year, Sebastian notes the day will mark his birthday and the reopening of Disneyland’s Matterhorn, which has been closed for refurbishment since January. Talk about a red-letter day! As that momentous date nears, the last days of school are speeding by in a blur and with more than a touch of delight…thanks to A-Z Days. “I think it’s fun,” said Shalena Sutphen. “It’s nice for everyone to enjoy.”
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

13

A stroll with purpose
As part of Claremont Village Blues and Brews on Saturday, June 9 from 4 to 8 p.m., Stamp Your Heart Out, a longtime Village shop located at 141 Harvard Ave., will participate as a non-alcoholic site, offering root beer floats donated by Bert and Rocky’s Cream Company, another Village vendor. Stamp Your Heart Out will also introduce visitors to Prayerfully Popped Popcorn from the Benedictine Monastery in Tucson, Arizona. Prayerfully Popped is a venture created to support the congregation of Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration and its charities. University of Arizona business students helped the religious community bring this business forward. For more information, visit www.prayerfullypopped.com. Known for doing everything with style, Stamp Your Heart out will debut Prayerfully Popped (“Corn from the Cloisters”) with a first-ever showing of privately collected nun memorabilia, including a large portrait, nun paper dolls and both dolls and ceramic figures in nun attire depicted playing baseball, boxing, bowling and singing. The display will only be on view the evening of Blues and Brews. “We like Prayerfully Popped and know it will be a popular counterpoint for Bert and Rocky’s floats,” said Joan Bunte, owner of Stamp Your Heart Out. “We admire the community nature of the Order’s foray into business, which is the heartbeat of cities large and small across America. “Funds raised by Blues and Brews will go to assist local nonprofit organizations and to help sustain all that we value about life in Claremont Village,” Ms. Bunte said. Blues and Brews will be held this Saturday, June 9 from 4 to 8 p.m. in the Village. See story on page 5 of this edition.

OUR TOWN
Brett O’Connor, Rotarian and CHS principal, introduced the following award recipients: Kailie Boen, 9th grade Douglas Mendelsohn, 9th grade Stacy Draper, 10th grade William Zershki, 10th grade Scott Martinez, principal of El Roble Intermediate School, introduced the following students: Sarah Gale, 7th grade Cameron Booth, 7th grade Clarissa Ylagan, 8th grade Matthew Standford, 8th grade Vivian Webb School Dean of Students Helen Lawrence introduced: Linfei Liu, 9th grade Kristina Oney, 10th grade Webb School Dean of Students Brett Potash introduced: Ziyad Duron, 9th grade Daniel Zhu, 10th grade The Scholarship in American Heritage award, given to 11th- and 12th-grade students, promotes American citizenship as it relates to academic achievement as well as the recipient’s personal reflection of American History and the country’s institutions. CHS Principal Brett O’Connor introduced: Nimrah Iman, 11th grade Nick Grattan, 11th grade Alina Guido, 12th grade Nick Tucker, 12th grade Vivian Webb’s Helen Lawrence introduced: Belinda Lei, 11th grade Melody Huang, 12th grade Webb’s Brett Potash introduced: Marcos Lopez, 11th grade Andrew Pandji, 12th grade

Applications can be picked up in the Chamber office and will be available for download on the Chamber’s webite beginning June 8 at www.claremont chamber.org. This is a juried event. For a full FAQ list, visit www.claremontchamber.org. Any other questions should be directed to 624-1681 or by email, contact@claremontchamber.org.

Photo courtesy of Delta Kappa Gamma TeVin Woods, Jillian Jackson and Cody Shock display their certificates at the Delta Kappa Gamma Societyʼs 39th annual Citizenship Awards Program.

20 students receive DKG citizenship awards
The Beta Mu Chapter of the Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, an organization of women educators, recently held its 39th annual Citizenship Awards Program for high school seniors from 3 school districts—Bonita, Pomona and Claremont Unified School Districts—at the Trinity United Methodist Church in Pomona. Twenty seniors from 11 high schools received the awards. Seniors were selected by school administrators and counselors for their exceptional growth during their high school years as well as for specific acts of good citizenship in their schools or communities. Participating schools were asked to select students of outstanding character who may not be recognized by other awards. Claremont High School students Jillian Jackson and Cody Shock as well as San Antonio High School student TeVin Woods all received awards at the ceremony.

Police Commission to honor officers, resident at meeting Thursday night
Awards will be presented to department members, a community patrol member and a Claremont resident during the Police Commission meeting on June 7 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held in the city council chambers at city hall. Awards will be presented to: Officer Jacob Tillman, Lifesaving Award Corporal Hector Tamayo and Officer Matt Hamill, MADD DUI awards Don Gray, in recognition of his 20 years of service as a community patrol member, including 15 as the community patrol coordinator. Officer Jennifer Ganino and Records Clerk Jason Hosch will be introduced to the Police Commission. Rachel Krieger; Claremont resident, will receive the “Police Excellence” award.

Seeking arts and crafts vendors for Village Venture
The 31st annual Village Venture will return to Claremont on Saturday, October 27 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hosted by the Claremont Chamber of Commerce, the Village Venture Arts and Crafts Faire attracts more than 20,000 visitors every year.

Rotary Club of Claremont bestows awards to local youth
The Rotary Club of Claremont has granted several deserving youths the Americanism in Action and the Scholarship in American Heritage awards. Led by longtime Committee Chair Rick Whyte, and accompanied by a room full of parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, students from Claremont High School, El Roble, Webb School and Vivian Webb School were commended for their exemplary citizenship and academic successes. The Americanism in Action award seeks to encourage young people who demonstrate qualities of character, citizenship, academic accomplishment and community involvement, illustrating American citizenship at its best. The award goes to seventh- to tenth-grade students who, in the opinion of their teachers, coaches and advisors, and by their general reputation, notably meet these criteria.

Wednesday, June 6 to Thursday, June 14

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

14

CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

Nightlife
Folk Music Center to host a fusion of Appalachian strings and Zimbabwean keys.

Galleries
Heirloom and PermaDirty join forces to display local art.

Page 15

Page 17

June Wednesday

vance or $40 per person day of event (if available) at Sonja Stump Photography, 135 W. First St., Claremont. 626-1147.

6 June Sunday 7 8

10

COMMUNITY & HUMAN SERVICES Commission Meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at the City Council Chamber located at 225 Second St., Claremont.

June Thursday June Friday

POLICE COMMISSION MEETING 7 p.m. at the City Council Chamber located at 225 W. Second St., Claremont.

AUTHOR READING Friends of the Claremont Library present Dolores Cullen, who will read from her book, Chaucer’s Pilgrims: Written in the Stars. 2 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard St., Claremont. LIVE JAZZ performance by Zzaj on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 946-1398.

June Monday

11
Photo special to the COURIER

DEMOCRATIC CLUB of Claremont will hold its monthly luncheon with speaker Garland Byrum, JD, political scientist and author, who will share his perspectives on the 2012 elections. 12 p.m. LYL Gardens Restaurant, 921 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. $10 for lunch. 626-8467 or m36ring@earth link.net. Visit www.claremontdems.org. FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Bands will perform every Friday evening this summer from 6 to 9 p.m. Bring folding chairs and enjoy the free entertainment each week in the Village. For more information, call the Claremont Chamber of Commerce at 6211681 or e-mail contact@claremontchamber.org. This week’s performances include Them Kool Kats (American songbook/ jazz) at the Public Plaza located at 101 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, Claremont Voodoo Society (blues/rock) at the Claremont Chamber of Commerce located at 205 Yale Ave., Claremont and Syc Kids (rock n’ roll) at the south side of Claremont City Hall on Second and Harvard. ROUTE 66 PARTY featuring dancing on the patio to The Ravelers, casino games, Texas hold ‘em tournament (additional fee), silent auction with over 40 themed baskets and a live auction. Presented by the Kiwanis Club of Claremont. 6:30 p.m. $35 for admission and dinner. DoubleTree Hotel, 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Tickets may be purchased from Claremont Place Senior Living: 703-0259, Jess Swick Insurance: 621-2996, Sonja Stump Photography: 626-1147 or Claremont Lock and Key: 624-6772.

SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE meeting will be held at 4 p.m. at the City Hall Citrus Room, 207 Harvard Ave., Claremont.

June Tuesday

12

Winners of the John Child Walker Memorial Competition
standing ovation resounded through the Bridges Hall of Music as the winners of the 2012 Walker Memorial Competition were announced at an awards ceremony May 26.

CALIFORNIA EDUCATION Mt. San Antonio College President Bill Scroggins will discuss “Community College: Education, Jobs and the Economy.” This program is free to attend. A buffet lunch is available at 11:45 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $5. The University Club meets each Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. in the Alexander Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont. 625-4344. SUPPORT GROUP monthly meeting to discuss and learn more about traumatic brain injury. 6:30 to 8 p.m. Claremont Place Senior Living, 120 W. San Jose Ave., Claremont. E-mail tbibridge@gmial.com or call Celeste at 260-0980. Visit www.tbibridge.org. CELEBRATION End of season celebration. Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Alexander Hughes Community Center, located at 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont.

A

June Wednesday

13

June Saturday

9

AUTHOR LECTURE Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden Library’s California Author Series. 11 a.m. The third in a series featuring Tyler Nordgren, author of Stars Above, Earth Below, a guide to astronomy in the national parks. 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. BLUES & BREWS “A toe-tappin’ beertastin’ walk in the Village.” Several locations in the Village will participate as beer tasting sites. A portion of proceeds benefit Pomona Valley Hospital Auxiliary, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and Shoes that Fit. 4 to 8 p.m. $35 per person in ad-

WORKSHOP for strategic improvisation to build skills in teamwork, creativity and communication. June 13, June 23 and July 14 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with instructor John Fort. Alexander Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont. To register call 399-5490, email info@regardingsolutions.com or visit regardingsolutions.com/workshops. ARCHITECTURAL COMMISSION MEETING will be held at 7 p.m. at the City Council Chamber located at 225 W. Second St., Claremont.

June Thursday

14

This year 50 talented young musicians in the areas of piano, strings, voice and chamber music competed throughout the day in the Thatcher Music Building on the Pomona College Campus. Their performances were evaluated by professional adjudicators. Awards were presented to the following: Piano Division Middle Piano (up to age 13) 1st: Madeline McCanne 2nd: Melody Hsu 3rd: Kenneth Tzan Honorable Mention: Andrew Case Keough, Daphne Kim Upper Piano (up to age 18 or high school senior) 1st: Enya Huang 2nd: Bryan Lin 3rd: Corey Chen Honorable Mention: Christopher Chen Raymond Duffey Memorial Prize (sponsored by Sequoia Concerts): Chloe Harsojo Voice Commendation Award: Jonathon Torres String Division Chamber Music Tamisha Basrai, Sean Chang, Aaron Hao, violin; Charlene Hao, piano Lower Strings (up to age 14) 1st: Josephine Kim 2nd: Katie Chen 3nd: Benjamin Chen Honorable Mention: Tamisha Basrai, violin Upper Strings (up to age 18 or high school senior) 1st: Esther Yoo 2nd: Sarah Yin 3rd: Vivian Tang Honorable Mention: Joanna Yang, violin Ivan Galamian Prize (sponsored by Sequoia Concerts): Cinder Chiang The Walker Memorial Competition is presented annually by the Musicians' Club of Pomona Valley. For information, contact coordinator Leonore Hall at walkercompetition@gmail.com.
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: At least one week before date of the event. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Phone: 621-4761. Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Fax: 621-4072. There is NO guarantee that all items submitted will be published. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711.

TAI CHI IN THE GARDEN Wear comfortable attire and shoes with flat soles and bring a bottle of water. No experience necessary, all are welcome to attend. 9 to 10 a.m. Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. 6258767 ext. 224.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

15

EUREKA! GOURMET BURGERS & CRAFT BEER: 580 W. First St., Claremont. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, June 7: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka! Thursday Night Music featuring The Calicos (rock). THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Sunday, June 10: Transatlantic Steel, Appalachian strings and Zimbabwean keys. Free show. 7 p.m. —Saturday, June 16: After disbanding the Los Angeles new wave/power pop group the Plimsouls, Peter Case launched a career as a singer/songwriter specializing in the flat-pick guitar style and semiautobiographical stories of drifters. 7:30 p.m. —Saturday, June 23: Joel Rafael is an internationallyrecognized songwriter from San Diego and is considered to be one of the most natural interpreters of Woody Guthrie’s songs. He has been a featured performer at the annual Woody Guthrie Folk Festival. Mr. Rafael tours the country as both a solo artist and with the Joel Rafael Band. $12. 7:30 p.m. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont. (Claremont Packing House) 18+. Show Times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —June 15 and 16: Darren Carter uses rap, break dance and hip hop with humor, headlining The Comedy Store, The Improv, The Laugh Factory and more. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., the Packing House. Wednesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Wednesday, June 6: Open Jam Night with The Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 8 p.m. —Thursday, June 7: Seth Greenberg’s Gamma Midoriyama (jazz). 8 p.m. —Friday, June 8: Hobo Jazz (jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, June 9: The Lindy Sisters (swing/jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, June 10: Sweet-Heat World Beat & Latin Rhythms (jazz/world/Latin). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, June 12: Beat Cinema (DJ). 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday, until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Wednesday, June 6: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Friday, June 8: The Bottlecap Boys (folk). 10 p.m. —Saturday, June 9: The Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 10 p.m. —Sunday, June 10: Dining music at 6 p.m. followed by Sunday Night Living Room Jam at 9 p.m. —Tuesday, June 12: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas, and $3 margaritas. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke,” rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m.

NIGHTLIFE

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

16

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #165
Across 1. Museum in Pomona 6. Cancún coin 10. "___ be my pleasure!" 13. Radioactive element 14. Makes angry 15. Denials 17. Piece of code 19. Get mad quietly 20. Pancake topper 21. Freshwater crustacean with several legs 23. Filling station filler 25. Noshed 26. Become attached 27. Genesis victim 29. Law and Order's home 31. High guy in Dubai 32. Fire 35. Pull down 37. Form of mineral acquisition 41. Miniature water buffalo 42. Real 45. Farewell 49. Dangerous drug 51. Lift 52. Guru at the Claremont Senior Computer Club 54. Fitting 57. Pappy 58. Wolf-like 59. Goat antelope 61. Egyptian, for one 62. Resists 67. ___ out; betray 68. HOMES part 69. Allowed 70. Riddle-me-___ 71. Circuits 72. Adversary Down 1. Something curved in shape 2. Equinox mo. 3. Journeys 4. Backup 5. Bone cavity 6. Sty 7. Shoot off target 8. Green color 9. Pertaining to the sense of smell 10. Tell 11. Removable locks 12. Bust 16. Passover dinner 18. Published 22. Picturesque 23. Guy's date 24. Bank routing number 26. Healthy berry 28. What a house stands on 30. Sanctuaries 33. Angela Merkel and others 34. Fish swimming aid 36. Genome class abbr. 38. Sport with mallets 39. A high degree 40. Direction 43. Wanted-poster letters 44. Took the initiative 45. Country album? 46. More forbidding 47. Skewer 48. Like some mushrooms 50. Sprints 53. Staircase center 55. Ballet move 56. Ownership paper 60. Profit 63. Radio personality Glass 64. Prediction 65. Lower the lights 66. Pigs' digs

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #164

57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona. Friday through Sunday, 12 to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, 12 to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —Through June 30: “Quint-Essence” featuring paintings and sculpture by George Garside, Steve Long, Mervyn Seldon, Yi-li Chin Ward and Jay Reed. Artists Reception: June 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Saturday, 12 to 5 p.m. —Through June 30: “kilnopening.edu 2012” and “Big Fish, Small Pot V.” Lecture: Saturday, June 9 from 7 to 8 p.m. Included with paid admission. Learn about Vince Palacios’ current work and the evolution of his process. —July 14 through September 29: “Patti Warashina: Wit and Wisdom,” a retrospective exhibition that marks the evolution of Warshina’s artistic career, which illustrates a variety of themes including the human condition, feminism, car-culture and political/social topics. Opening Reception: Saturday, July 14 from 6 to 9 p.m. —Saturday, August 11: AMOCA’s Second Saturday Lecture Series. 6 to 7 p.m. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 626-3322. —Through June 30: “Forgotten Altars,” featuring paintings by artist and actor Christopher Cousins. BUNNY GUNNER GALLERY: 266 W. Second St., Pomona Arts Colony. Tuesday to Friday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, 12 to 6 p.m. 868-2808. —June 9 through July 10: Jay Merryweather’s series of paintings, “There is No Excellent Beauty,” exploring the subject of aesthetics. Opening Reception: June 9 from 3 to 10 p.m. Last Saturday Reception: June 30 from 6 to 9 p.m. CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART: www.claremontmuseum.org. —Saturday, June 9: Studio Tour including several Claremont art galleries. Check-in starts at 10:30 a.m. Memorial Park, 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. $35. The tour begins at 11 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m. Artists Reception: Garner House from 5 to 8 p.m. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St. Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: 626-5455. —Through June 22: “Staff Selects,” showcasing works by the staff and clients of First Street Gallery Art Center. A range of media will be featured including paintings, drawings, ceramics, photo/video and mixed-media sculpture. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m.

GALLERIES

by appointment only: Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Through June 30: “Expressions” open art show. Opening Reception: Saturday, June 9 from 6 to 10 p.m. LOFT204: 532 W. First St. #204, Claremont in the Packing House. Open Wednesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. and first Fridays, 6 to 9 p.m. 3914208. —Through June 29: “Creative Adventure,” drawings and assemblage by Alan Swartz. Opening Reception: Friday, June 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends—covering every continent. 399-5544. —Through September 2: “Celebrating the Traditional and Modern Arts of Japan.” RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3, and free of charge to members. 6258767 or www.rsabg.org. —Saturday, June 9: Medicinal Plants of California Herb Walk. Join experienced herbalist William Broen for a garden walk and presentation featuring medicinal and edible plants native to California. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. $20 for members or $25 for non-members. —Sunday, June 10: Natural History of L.A. Basin Butterflies. Explore the amazing life and times of local butterflies and moths in a presentation by experienced entomology-enthusiast and photographer, Clark Thompson. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. $15 for members or $20 for nonmembers. —Through July 15: Sculptor David Rogers’ “Big Bugs.” Up to 25-footlong creepy crawlies from natural materials. —June 14 and 21: “Bugs and Brews” for guests 21 and older. Brothers Curt and Andy Dale bring their distinctively California beers to RSABG. Musicians provide a soundtrack to viewing the garden, featuring avid Rogers’ “Big Bugs” art exhibition. Learn fun facts about the “bug-of-the-night” and enjoy handcrafted beer. —Through July 29: Walk among and learn about native southern California butterflies at the “Butterfly Pavilion” open daily from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. $2 per person in addition to general admission to the garden.

Claremont COURIER/Wednesday, June 6, 2012

17

Heirloom, PermaDirty take over

COURIER photos/Amanda Rhoades Spectators gather for a party at PermaDirty Project Space, located in the Packing House, after the art exhibition at Heirloom on Friday. PermaDirtyʼs current exhibition is titled Teen Love, Angst and Prepubescent Awkwardness, which features a wide variety of artwork within the theme. ABOVE LEFT: Cynde Miller, the owner and director of PermaDirty Project Space, watches artists and observers gather for the first art exhibition at Heirloom on Friday. The exhibition, themed Small Work in a Small Space, was part of what Miller called a PermaDirty take over, in which artists from the Inland Empire display their works at an off-site location in conjunction with PermaDirty. LEFT: David Falkinburg, Justin Rogers, Steven Otto and Ryan Gold discuss an art installation at PermaDirty Project Space on Friday.

PERFORMING ARTS
BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Sunday, June 10: Claremont Symphony Orchestra conducted by Robert Sage. Honoring Great Britain (site of the 2012 Olympic games). 3:30 p.m. CSO Fundraiser After Party: Harp music by CSO’s Catherine Summer and “Operatic Love Duets” program by Begona Bilbao and Don Squillace of Vineyard Touring Opera. 5:30 p.m. on the patio at Casa de Salsa, which will donate a percentage of food orders to CSO. —June 15 and 16: Claremont Clarinet Festival featuring “clarinet classics” on Friday, June 15 at 8 p.m. and “clarinet masterworks” on Saturday, June 16 at 2:30 p.m. followed by “new music for clarinet ensembles” at 8 p.m. Free admission. For more information, call 310-464-7653. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m.,

performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. The summer concert series takes place on Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m. Ticket are $20. Dinner will not be served, but beverages and desserts will be available for purchase. 626-1254 ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Saturday, June 13: Gregory Wolfe as Rod Stewart: A Salute to the Great American Songbook. —June 6 through July 22: The Music Man. —Wednesday, July 11: Roy Orbison Experience. —July 27 through August 19: Returning to Sin City. —Wednesday, August 1: The Four Preps. —Wednesday, August 8: Bella Donna: A Tribute to Stevie Nicks and Fleetwood Mac. —Wednesday, August 15: AbbaFab. —Wednesday, August 29: Michael Ryan and Friends: Gypsy Passion. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626-963-9411 or haughpac.com. —Through June 9: Citrus Fine and Performing Arts presents Kill Me, Deadly.

Restaurant Row

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit Laemmle.com for movie listings. General: $11; students with ID: $8.50; Children under 12: $8; Senior 62+: $8; bargain price: $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m., Sat-

urday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Men in Black 3 [PG13], Best Exotic Marigold Hotel [PG13], The Avengers [PG13], Snow White and the Huntsman [PG13], Bernie [PG13], The Dictator [R]. —Sunday, June 10: Giselle [NR] from London’s Royal Ballet. 10 a.m. —Tuesday, June 12: Peter Grimes [NR] from Milan’s Teatro Alla Scala. 7:30 p.m.

909.621.4761
Wednesday 06-06-12

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

18

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals............18 legals...............19 services...........20 real estate.......24
RENTALS
Apartments for Rent
NEWLY remodeled unfurnished apartment with new appliances. 2 bedroom on first floor in Claremont Village. Adults preferred, no pets. Contact Shirley to view by appointment. Monday through Wednesday only. 626-1715.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DOG bather needed. Flexible hours and love of dogs required! Please drop by and fill out an application. Michelle’s Dog Grooming, 985 W. Foothill Blvd, Suite E., Claremont. COMPANY drivers. Only 6 months experience needed. New trucks arriving daily. Pets welcome. New pay plan. O/O’s, lease purchase drivers needed. CDL-A. 888440-2465. www.drivenci.com. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Hotlines
HOUSE of Ruth Domestic Violence Services. If you have been abused or beaten by your intimate partner and need help for yourself or your children, please call; 24 hour hotline 988-5559. NAMI HELPLINE National Alliance on Mental Illness, Pomona Valley Chapter, provides information and referral in a supportive spirit. Call any day or time. 399-0305. PROJECT Sister Sexual Assault Crisis Prevention Services. If you have been sexually assaulted or victimized by child sexual abuse and need help for yourself or your children, call the 24 hotline 626-HELP (4357).

EMPLOYMENT

Mechanic Aide $11.00 - $13.28 per hour (Part-time)
The City of Claremont Community Services Division is looking for one highly motivated, enthusiastic, customer service oriented individual who is training to be a certified automotive mechanic. Additional information about job duties and qualifications are available on the City website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or from the Personnel Office at (909) 399-5450. A completed application is required and must be received by Monday, June 18, 2012, by 1:00 p.m. EOE

For Lease
NEW remodel! Claremont 2 bedroom. 3 properties available. Appliances included. Pool, spa. No smoking. $1500. www.masonprophet.com. 447-7708.

MARKETPLACE
Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. Kensoldenoddities.com

House for Rent
MT. BALDY cabin. Charming 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom plus garage/studio. Overlooking stream. Newly remodeled, $1250. 951-538-9494. NICE 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom, single story house located very close to Claremont Colleges. $1500. 626-242-8559.

ANIMALS
Found Pet

ANIMALS
Animal Shelters
Inland Valley Humane Society 623-9777 Upland Animal Shelter 931-4185 H.O.P.E Upland 1800-811-4285 West End Animal Shelter 947-3517

ANIMALS
Coyote Sightings

For Sale
SWAROVSKI CROSS, clear crystal pavé, rhodium plated mini pendant with necklace. Never worn, in box. $65. 593-4747.

REPORT your coyote sightings! Contact Jacquie at 621-4761 or classified@clare mont-courier.com.

BROWN and white, male pitbull. No tags. Found near Claremont High School on May 29, at 6 p.m. Call Inland Valley Humane Society. 6239777.

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertiser’s obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

DEADLINES
All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds.
Classified: Monday & Thursday by 3:00 pm Real Estate: Wednesday by 3:00 pm Service Pages: Monday by 3:00 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $12 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing.

All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 128299902 APN: 8315-024-004 TRA: 002730 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx9048 REF: Berkley, Elayne J IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED November 16, 2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On June 26, 2012, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded November 28, 2006, as Inst. No. 06 2623707 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Elayne J Berkley, A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 354 S College Ave Claremont CA 91711-5339 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and rea-

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
sonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $374,506.01. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1282999-02. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: May 30, 2012. (R-411718 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12) NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Quality Loan Service Corporation TS No. CA-10-414611-RM Order No.: 100791939-CA-BFO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): DEREK HEISEY AND JENNIFER LYNN HEISEY, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded: 7/5/2007 as Instrument No. 20071599857 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 6/27/2012 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $334,118.52 The purported property address is: 698 SYCAMORE AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No. 8315-029-027 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA10-414611-RM . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-10-414611-RM IDSPub #0029962 6/6/2012 6/13/2012 6/20/2012

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 1225723-02 APN: 8712-031-023 TRA: 010698 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx4664 REF: Alvarez, Martha L IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED December 24, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On June 12, 2012, at 9:00am, CalWestern Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded January 02, 2008, as Inst. No. 20080002822 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Martha L Alvarez A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19825 Sunset Vista Rd Walnut CA 917895329 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $1,172,259.21. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1225723-02. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. CalWestern Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: May 14, 2012. (R-410420 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12) NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 1314124-10 APN: 8367-029-001 TRA: 007790 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx8156 REF: Wilson, James IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED August 06, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On June 12, 2012, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded August 17, 2007, as Inst. No. 20071935068 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by James

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
A Wilson and Sharon M Wilson Husband And Wife As Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2953 Stanton Street Pomona CA 91767 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $410,967.42. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1314124-10. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: May 14, 2012. (R-410424 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2012 075630 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as The Kamlak Center, 1465 Mural Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Betty J. Kovacs, 1465 Mural Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Kimberly Saavedra, 1465 Mural Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Kimberly Saavedra This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 04/24/12. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: May 16, 23, 30 and June 6, 2012. T.S. No.: 2011-17336 Loan No.: 71740732 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Wednesday, June 6, 2012
titious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: May 23, 30, June 6 and 13, 2012. T.S. No. 0125000948 Loan No. 2040700024 APN: 8717-006-003 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On: 6/20/2012 at 09:00 AM Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, Old Republic Title Company, a California corporation, as the duly appointed Trustee under Deed of Trust recorded on 05/08/2007, as Instrument No. 20071111605, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: A. Reginald Woolfolk, Trustee of the Albert C. Woolfolk Trust dated June 15, 2001, as Trustor, Generation Mortgage Company, as Lender/Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLICATION AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER FOR (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States by cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in the state) all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County, California, describing the land therein: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 495 Golden Prados Drive , Diamond Bar, CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made is an "AS IS" condition, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principle sum of the note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of trust, to wit: $563,702.11 (Estimated). Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: Jfyou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership ofthe property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be ajunior lien. Jfyou are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. Jfyou consult either oflhese resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed oftrust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn hether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com.using the file number assigned to this case 0125000948. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale.This property which is subject to this Notice of Sale does not fall within the purview of California Civil Code Section 2923.5. Date: 5/21/2012 Old Republic Title Company, as Trustee 1000 Burnett Avenue, Suite 400 Concord, California 94520 (866) 248-9598 By: Debbie Jackson, Assistant Vice President P951789 5/30, 6/6, 06/13/2012 Trustee Sale No. 257174CA Loan No. 3010304032 Title Order No. 1089363 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/24/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 6/13/2012 at 09:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 11/01/2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 06 2427135, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by: DANIEL J GROSZEWSKI, A WIDOWER, as Trustor, WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza,

19

TRUST DATED 8/22/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: MARTIN JAY PORCELLI, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 8/25/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2045469 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 6/27/2012 at 9:30 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $895,811.68 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 997 AND 999 NORTH COLLEGE AVENUE, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 A.P.N.: 8309-014-001 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to California Civil Code §2923.54 the undersigned, on behalf of the beneficiary, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of exemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timeframe for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of California Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the requirements. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender my hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/ TrusteeServices.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 2011-17336. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale Date: 5/17/2012 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx For Non-Automated Sale Information, call: (866) 240-3530 __________________________________ Tunisha Jennings, Trustee Sale Assistant PUBLISH: 5/30/12, 6/6/12, 6/13/12 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2012 087094 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Leavahn, LLC, 2227 Bonnie Brae Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Leavahn, LLC, 2227 Bonnie Brae Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/01/12. /s/ Nancy Hahn Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 05/09/12. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fic-

400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA Legal Description: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $368,078.03 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 518 RICHBROOK DRIVE , Claremont, CA 91711 APN Number: 8367-007-003 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 5/22/2012 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee FRED RESTREPO, ASSISTANT SECRETARY CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-892-6902 For Sales Information: (714) 730-2727 or www.lpsasap.com (714) 573-1965 or www.priorityposting.com THE FOLLOWING NOTICES APPLY TO PROPERTIES CONTAINING ONE TO FOUR SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENCES ONLY. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following two companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P947808 5/23, 5/30, 06/06/2012 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE AND OF INTENTION TO TRANSFER ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE(S) (UCC Sec. 6101 et seq. and B & P Sec. 24073 et seq.) Escrow No. 5045963-SC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale of assets and a transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is about to be made. The name(s), and business address of the seller(s)/licensee(s) are: BPL GROUP INC, 1115 W. ARROW HWY, SAN DIMAS, CA 91773 Doing business as: ARCO AM/PM All other business names(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s)/licensee(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s)/licensee(s), is/are: ARCO (#3018). 11958 RAMONA BLVD, EL MONTE, CA AND ARCO (#1584) 1245 E. 4TH ST, ONTARIO, CA The name(s) and address of the buyer(s)/applicant(s) is/are: NATHAN & NATHAN LLC, 1115 W. ARROW HWY, SAN DIMAS, CA 91773 The assets being sold are generally described as: FURNITURE, FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS, GOODWILL, TRADENAME, COVENANT NOT TO COMPETE, ALL TRANSFERABLE LICENSES, ARCO SUPPLY CONTRACT AND AM/PM FRANCHISE AGREEMENT and is/are located at: 1115 W. ARROW HWY, SAN DIMAS, CA 91773 The type of license to be transferred is/are: Type: OFF-SALE BEER AND WINE License No. 20446746 now issued for the premises located at: SAME The bulk sale and transfer of alcoholic beverage license(s) is/are intended to be consummated at the office of: CENTRAL ESCROW INC, 3660 WILSHIRE BLVD, STE 108, LOS ANGELES, CA 90010 and the anticipated sale date is UPON TRANSFER OF ABC LICENSE The purchase price of consideration in connection with the sale of the business and transfer of the license, is the sum of $2,100,000.00, INCLUDING inventory estimated at $100,000.00, which consists of the following: DESCRIPTION, AMOUNT: CHECK $100,0000.00, CASH $2,000,000.00 It has been agreed between the seller(s)/licensee(s) and the intended buyer(s)/transferee(s), as required by Sec. 24073 of the Business and Professions code, that the consideration for transfer of the business and license is to be paid only after the transfer has been approved by the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Dated: JANUARY 30, 2012 BPL GROUP INC, Seller(s)/Licensee(s) NATHAN & NATHAN LLC, Buyer(s)/Applicant(s) LA1192018 CLAREMONT COURIER 6/6/12

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor. Specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic respray and drywall repairs. Lic #602916. 909-624-8177.

Wednesday 06-06-12

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

20

Block Walls
BLOCK WALLS BRICK WORK

Concrete
JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Concrete, brick, stone, block walls, drainage. Insured. Lic. 894245 C8, C29.

Electrician
SPARKS ELECTRIC Local Electrician For All Your Electrician Needs. 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic # 922000. Hayden’s Services Inc. Since 1978 Bonded. Insured. No Job Too Big or Small! Old Home Rewiring Specialist. 24 Hour Emergency Service 909-9828910. * Senior Discount * Lic. #359145. CALL LOU 909-241-7671, Lic 285436. Repair, Service Calls, Outdoor Lighting, Flush Mount Lighting, Room Additions. Call 909-9498230, Fax 909-985-1910. TALK to an electrician, not a machine. Residential, commercial, industrial. Lic #731948. UNITED ELECTRIC. 909772-6000.

Gardening
MANUELS Garden Service. General clean-up. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-3913495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN MAINTENANCE Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and clean-ups. David: 374-1583.

Handyman
Claremont Handyman Service All your handyman needs. Carpentry, lighting, painting. Odd jobs welcome! Free Consultations. 921-6334

Installations or Repairs 30 Years Experience. Lic. #557151. C.F Privett. 909-621-5388

Care Giver
CHRISTIAN sisters. 35 years experience. In Temecula. Excellent full time care, all needs met. Healthy, nutritious meals. Excellent references. 951308-6646.

Contractor
REMODELS, ADDITIONS, Restoration Projects. Claremont Construction Company. A locally owned, full-service building contractor. We also do repairs and small jobs. Ask about installing a walk-in bathtub. Please call for a free estimate. Darrell 909-626-0028 Fully insured. 20 year Claremont resident. Lic# 751929 Room Additions, Kitchen/Bath Remodeling, Custom Cabinets, Residential/Commercial. 909-946-8664 Lic.#B710309 Visit us on Facebook! ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran. New and Repairs. 909-599-9530. Serving Claremont 30 Years! Contractors #323243.
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION

Aikido

Hauling
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Same Day One Call Does It All! Garage, Yard, Home, Moving! 909-599-9530 SAME DAY HAUL Free Estimates. Senior Discount! We Haul It All Charlie. 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Carpentry
Programs for Adults and for Children. Est. 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com www.musubidojo.org D&G Carpentry. Cabinet Refacing. Custom Cabinets, Entertainment Centers, Fireplace Mantles, Doors, Molding and More! Free Estimates! References Available 909-262-3144. Lic# 900656.

A/C & Heating
STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning. Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/ Visa. 100% financing. Senior disc. Lic 744873. 909-985-5254

Carpet Service
AAFORDABLE Carpet Care, for all your carpet and upholstery needs. Commercial and residential. Call us for our Claremont specials. 244-8329. ANDERSON CARPET SERVICE. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24 hour emergency water damage service. Please Call: 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning 20% off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

Fences and Gate
REDWOOD, CEDAR & ORNAMENTAL IRON New Installations Expert Repairs Since 1980. Lic. #557151 C.F.Privett 909-621-5388 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran. New, Repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 #323243

Drywall

Eco-Friendly Landscaping From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in edible and drought tolerant landscapes. Why mow when you can grow? 909-398-1235. www.naturalearth.biz Lic 919825. 26 YEARS experience! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs & low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall 909-944-1857. Licensed #861685 and insured.

House Cleaning
CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda 621-2162. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire, water damage. Hauling. Move in, out. 10% discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn 621-3929. ROSIE'S SPIC SPAN Cleaning Service Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009.

Save Money - Save Energy It's a great time for comfort. Call us Today! 909-398-1208 Get up to $4200 in Rebates & Incentives For a limited time when we design and install your New Home Comfort System Using the Quality Installation Program www.novellcustom.com License #958830 DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning. Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.# C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

THOR MCANDREW Construction. Drywall repair & installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic# 742776. Please Call: 909816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Business Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required for all businesses and must be filed and published in a local newspaper. D.B.A. renewals are every 5 years and any changes within a business must be republished promptly. The COURIER can file your D.B.A. with the LA County Clerk, publish the statement and provide proof of publication. Our publishing fee is $95. The county fee starts at $26. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B, Claremont. 909-621-4761.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.# 373833. John Cook. 909-231-8305. Claremont. Gardening service. Mowing, edging, pruning, weed control, fertilization. Free estimates. JIM'S YARD SERVICE. Low Rates, Senior Discounts. Free Estimates. Hillside Cleaning, Emergency Yard Clean Up, Sprinkler Repair and Maintenance, Comprehensive Yard Maintenance, Mowing and Edging Only. One Time Clean Ups Welcome. 909-215-3887.

Electrician

Childcare
NOW enrolling children! Licensed, loving, childcare in my Claremont home. 30 years experience. Babies welcome. Call Nancy Schreiber, 5965569, 263-1145. Serving Claremont since 1995. Residential, Commercial. Recessed Lighting and Design, Breaker Replacement, Service Panel Upgrades, Ceiling Fans, Trouble Shooting, Landscaping Lighting, Pool and Spa Equipment Replacement. Free Estimates 24 hours. References. 909-900-8930 Office: 909-626-2242 Lic #806149 MOR ELECTRIC COMPANY Free Estimates and Senior Discount. 909-989-3454 or 909-767-0062 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. No Job Too Small or Big! 24/7 Emergency Services Reasonable and Reliable. License #400-990. Over 30 Years Experience. All Electrical Service! ASA ELECTRIC Residential & Commercial New Installations, repairs and more! 951-283-9531 Claremont resident. Lic. #860606.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS, DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS, C.F.PRIVETT. LIC #557151. 909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc. Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No Job Too Big or Small! 24 Hour Emergency Service. 909-982-8910 * Senior Discount * Lic. #359145. ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, Repairs. Professional. All Sprinkler Repairs. Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Girl Friday
I’M HERE to help! Housekeeping, Shopping, Errands. Pet, Plant, House Sitting. Jenny Jones 909-626-0027 Anytime!

Chimney Sweep
Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney Sweeping, Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service & repair. Spark Arrestor supply & installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland. Gash Chimney Sweep Dust Free Chimney Cleaning. Repair Chimney Covers, Spark Arrestor, Masonry & Dampers. BBB. Please Call, 909-467-9212

Handyman
A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, Outside, Small or Large, Home, Garage, Yard. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Contractors #323243 30 Years! Claremont Area. WENGER Construction. 25 years. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic. #707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Fountains and Ponds

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite Authorized Dealer. Bathtubs & Sinks, Showers, Tile, Countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore. Porcelain, Ceramic, Fiberglass Quick & Affordable. Please call 945-7775 www.bath-brite.com BATHTUBS, showers, sinks and counters; state of the art reglazing. Lic.# 714538. Franklin Interiors. 909-3649898.

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, Broom, Color Finishes, Slate, Flagstone, Planters, Walls & Walkways Call: 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont Area. 30 Years! Contractors #323243.

SOLID STONE Fountains & Ponds. 10419 Mills Ave, Montclair. Open Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jim: 909-641-3165.

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems, lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic # 585007.

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S OLDEN Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. Lic #100108. 909-593-1846.

HANDYMAN service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

SERVICES
Landscaping
DANS GARDENING SERVICE. Sprinklers Installed, Repaired. Clean-up, Hauling. Sod, Seed, Planting, Lighting, Drainage. Free Written Estimates; Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic. #508671. Please Call 909-989-1515. GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING Co. Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping irrigation drainage designing gardening. Lic. #520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, Refurbished or Repair. Design, Drainage, Concrete, Slate, Flagstone Lighting, Irrigation, Decomposed Granite. 909-599-9530. CELL: 626-428-1691 Claremont Area 30 Years! Lic. #323243 GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping, and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers, and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds. CALL 909-992-9087 Lic. No. 941734

Wednesday 06-06-12

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

21

tax help • antiques • housecleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services

Learn Japanese

Painting
KPW PAINTING Older couple painting 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. Lic. #778506 We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron 909-615-4858.

Plumbing
RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic# 454443. Insured professional service, 909-593-1175.

Sprinklers & Repair
WASTING WATER Poor coverage? SPRINKLER REPAIR Installations and Modifications C.F. Privett. Lic. #557151. 909-621-5388 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, Repairs, Professional. All Sprinkler Repairs. Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free Estimates. License #540042. Call 982-1604.

Upholstery

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909-626-3066.

HELP you paint. We will purchase primer, spackle, plaster, tape, putty knife, sand paper, brushes, rollers, buckets and paint. We will deliver to your home or office. We can recommend a painter. Bob Dexter Painting. 2403311 or 947-4025.

Outdoor Furniture
Protect Your Wood! Free Surveys & Estimates Claremont Resident 909-621-5388 Lic. #557151

Service & Repair. Drain Cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing, fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work Guaranteed. 909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

PINK UPHOLSTERY 46 Years of experience. Up to 30% discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Weed Abatement
JOHNNYS TREE SERVICE Weed Abatement and Land Clearing, Disking and Mowing, Tree Trimming & Demolition. Certified Arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic #270275. ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran

Lic. #839835. Hayden’s Services Inc. Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No Job Too Big or Small! 24 Hour Emergency Service 909-982-8910 * Senior Discount * Lic. #359145 EXCEL PLUMBING Family Owned & Operated 30+ Years Experience. Expert Plumbing Repairs & Drain Cleaning. Water Heaters, Faucets, Sinks, Toilets, Disposals, Under Slab Lead Detection, Sewer Video Inspection. Licensed, Bonded & Insured. Lic. #673558. 909-945-1995

Stone Work

Patio & Decks
SOLID STONE Garden Furniture. 10419 Mills Ave, Montclair. Open Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jim: 909-641-3165. ADVANCED DON DAVIES New, Refurbished & Repair, Concrete, Masonry, Lighting, Planters & Retaining Walls. 909-599-9530 CELL: 626-428-1691 Claremont Area 30 Years! Contractor #323243

Painting
D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic. #423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024. STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic#542552. 909-989-9786. COLLINS PAINTING & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.#384597. 985-8484.

DISCOUNT FLAGSTONE & Landscape Boulders. 10419 Mills Ave, Montclair. Open Monday to Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jim: 909-641-3165.

Weed Eating, Mowing, Tractor Fields, Manual Slopes, Hauling. 909-599-9530 CELL: 626-428-1691 TIRED OF DEALING with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

PILATES

Tile

Window Washing
REGROUT, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719. 1-888764-7688. NACHOS WINDOW CLEANING. For window washing call Nacho 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

Eco-Friendly Landscaping From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in edible and drought tolerant landscapes. Why mow when you can grow? 909-398-1235. www.naturalearth.biz Lic 919825

YOUR neighborhood classical pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M, Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033.

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement contractor #614648. 909-984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE Care. 30+ in Claremont Ornamental Pruning Specialist of your perennials.
GUARDIAN PLUMBERS.com

Yoga

Plumbing
SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.# 373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook 909-231-8305. Claremont. BEAVERS PLUMBING Drain work starting at $50 repairs and remodels. Free estimates! Specializing in walk-in bathtubs. Senior discount always. 909-626-0028 Lic. #711770 Steve’s Plumbing. 24 HR Service * Low Cost! Free Estimates All plumbing repairs Complete drain cleaning Leak detection Water heaters Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured. Lic #744873 909-985-5254

800-315-9680 Free in home inspections. Emergency 24/7 service. Family owned and operated. Bonded and insured. Lic# 961504

909-624-8238. TOM DAY Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 629-6960. MGT PROFESSIONAL Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. Lic# 836027.

Residential/Commercial. Quality work at reasonble prices. Free estimates. Lic.#541469. 909-622-7994. ACE SEVIER Painting Interior/Exterior. BONDED and INSURED. Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic. #315050. Please Call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

Roofing
GORDEN Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic #C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Call Dominic 951-212-9384. Lic# 732789.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design, installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-944-1857. Contractor Lic. #861685.

Tutor
RESTORATIVE
PRE-KINDERGARTEN through middle school. Multiple subjects, Spanish & E.S.L. 31 years experience. Vilma 239-3720.

YOGA

Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 32 year Yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Call 909-6247770. www.musubidojo.org. perry@aiki.com.

909.621.4761
Wednesday 06-06-12

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

22

SERVICES
t
AUTOMOTIVE

Summer Sizzler
Get a month of free advertising!
See right for details.

New service businesses: our readers are looking for you!
Donʼt miss out on our SUMMER SIZZLER for new advertisers! Join the COURIER community and reach your market.

For a limited time, business card ads are only $200 for 24 insertions—thatʼs a whole month for free!
Contact Jacquie at 621-4761 or classified@claremont-courier.com

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Legal ease

We can publish your LA County legal.

Call Vickie 621-4761

Keep it local

1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 legalads@claremont-courier.com

Of course we cover Claremont news 24/7

our C ier
Claremont
claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Wednesday 06-06-12

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

23

SERVICES
HOME IMPROVEMENT
CALL Dennis FOR FREE ESTIMATES

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

tax help • antiques • housecleaning • landscaping • pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
HOME IMPROVEMENT HOME IMPROVEMENT

Check out our new staff.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

909-621-5626
HOUSE CLEANING LANDSCAPING & GARDENING PET CARE

Dick Oosterheert
Landscape Services
Donʼt Landscape…Renovate! Lic. #C-27 876953
• Save money by designing with drought tolerant materials! • Conserve water by converting existing irrigation to low flow!

909-579-0248 • 1551 W. 13th Street, Upland CA 91786
SPECIALTY SERVICE SPECIALTY SERVICE SPECIALTY SERVICE

Best rates for LEGALS
Call us at: 909-621-4761

Claremont COURIER

COURIER CALENDAR

Every Wednesday in the Claremont COURIER

Why spend hours online trying to find something to do in your local area?
Claremont COURIERʼs calendar section is the best resource for Claremont events. Nowhere else can you find a full list of Claremont current exhibits, musical performances, lectures, free family activities and more in one reliable place. The calendar is an easy read, organized by topic so you can quickly find exactly what youʼre looking for. It is the objective and trustworthy authority on all Claremont activities. Find it in Wednesdayʼs edition, or everyday online at www.claremont-courier.com.

909.621.4761
Wednesday 06-06-12

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

24

REAL ESTATE
t
Sellers: “I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home.”

“I advertise in the COURIER because it gives a seller's home the best exposure to buyers interested in purchasing real estate in the area. If I want to know what’s going on in Claremont, I read the COURIER first.”

—B.J. Nichka, realtor and broker
Ms. Nichka has lived in Claremont since 1970 and has worked in real estate locally since 1987.

Advertise in the Claremont COURIER! Call Jacquie at 909-621-4761 or e-mail classified@claremont-courier.com

GEOFF HAMILL
909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

“Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!”
Wheeler Steffen Real Estate, Inc.
An independently owned and operated member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc.

D.R.E. #00997900

Prudential

Call TODAY for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property.

Selling something special?
It’s time for Spring cleaning? So sell it! If you live in Claremont, take advantage of our FREE classified advertising special
The item you are selling cannot cost more than $200. Your free ad will run on 2 consecutive Wednesdays in the classifieds section. Only 2 ads per month please. There is a 16 word limit. So be concise. This is a great time to use Claremont’s best media resource to sell your stuff and get some cash. This special is for subscribers and Claremont residents only.

craigslist
Don’t wait! This Craigslist buster won’t last for long. Give us a call.

our C ier
Claremont

Be seen. In print. Online.

claremont-courier.com

(909) 621-4761