Section 1100 Additional Hydraulic Structures

1101

INTRODUCTION
Presented in this section are design guidelines and standards for hydraulic structures which are appurtenant to both storm sewer outlet and open channel design. These guidelines and standards are generalized since each structure is unique, with the possible exception of channel drops. The user is encouraged to coordinate with the local entity and/or the CCRFCD when planning and designing these types of hydraulic structures.

1102

CHANNEL DROPS AND ENERGY DISSIPATION STRUCTURES
The design of open channels often require the use of channel drop and/or energy dissipation structures to dissipate excess energy created by gravity acting on the storm water flow. The most common use of these structures is to control the longitudinal slope of channels to keep design velocities within acceptable limits (Section 700). These structures are also used to dissipate excess energy at storm sewer outlets and to safely lower flood flow elevations at abrupt drops in existing topography. For the purposes of this MANUAL, channel drop and energy dissipation structures are classified into two groups. Channel drops are classified as structures which shall only be used when the inflow channel flow is sub-critical (Froude Number, F, < 0.86). Energy dissipators and stilling basins, are classified as structures which may be used for either sub-critical (F, c 0.86) or super-critical (F, > 1.13) inflow conditions. Presented in Table 1101 is a listing of the structures discussed in this section along with the hydraulic limitations under which these structures are allowed to be used within the Clark County area. The designer must obtain prior approval from the local entity to use any of the listed structures outside of the stated limits. Also, if the designer desires to use a structure not discussed in the section, pertinent detailed information on said structure must be submitted to the local entity for review and approval prior to designing the facility. Criteria and charts to aid in the design of these types of structures have been developed based on many various hydraulic studies. Generalized standards for each type of channel drop based on these hydraulic studies are provided in the following sections. The reader should refer to the standard channel drop and energy dissipation design references to become familiar with the detailed information available on

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures each structure prior to design. Suggested references include Peterka, 1978; USBR, 1987; and USACE, 1970.

1102.1

Channel Drop Structures
Presented in Table 1101 are the types of channel drop structures allowed in the Clark County area. By definition, channel drop structures are to be used only when the upstream channel flow is sub-critical. Presented in Figure 1101 are the generalized profiles and nomenclature for riprap drop structures. This nomenclature is used throughout this section for discussion of specific standards for each part of the structure. The nomenclature is also applicable to gabion drop structures.

1102.1 .l

Sloping Riprap Drop Structures Presented in Table 1102 and Figure 1102 are the design standards and details for sloping riprap drop structures. The design chart for sloping riprap drop structures is based upon the unit discharge (q) of the approach channel, the riprap classification and the slope of the drop structure, and is valid only for sub-critical flow in the approach channel (i.e., Froude Number (F,) < 0.86). The unit discharge is found by taking the average or normal channel velocity (V,) for the loo-year discharge times the normal depth of the channel (Y ,). The design chart is also based upon a prismatic channel section throughout, from the upstream channel through the drop to the downstream channel. The maximum (steepest) allowable side slope for the riprap lined channel within the drop structure is 4:l. Flatter side slopes are allowable and encouraged when available ROW permits. The classification of riprap chosen for the sloping portion of the structure should be used throughout the structure, including the upstream and downstream aprons, the channel bottom and side slopes. See Section 700 for riprap classification. The riprap should extend up the side slopes to a depth equal to 1 foot above the normal major storm flow depth projected upstream from the downstream channel, or 1 foot above the critical depth in the sloping section, whichever is greater (see Figure 1102). The maximum fall allowed at any one drop structure is 3 feet from the upper channel bottom to the lower channel bottom, excluding the trickle channel. A detailed description of the drop structure and the design procedure proceeding from upstream to downstream is given below based on Figure 1102.

1102.1.1.1 Criteria a. I Approach Depth: The upstream and downstream channels will normally be trapezoidal sections with low flow channels to convey
HYDROLOGIC CRITERIA AND DRAINAGE DESIGN MANUAL 1103

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures normal low water flows. The maximum normal depth, Y,, is 5 feet and the maximum normal velocity, V,, is 7 fps. b. Low Flow Channel: The low flow channel shown in this case is a rectangular concrete channel. The concrete channel ends at the upstream end of the upstream riprap apron. A combination cut-off wall and foundation wall is provided to give the end of the low flow channel additional support. The water is allowed to “trickle” through the upstream apron and through the crest wall (discussed below). Riprap low flow channels would simply feather into the upstream apron. Approach Apron: A IO-foot long riprap apron is provided upstream of the cutoff wall to protect against the increasing velocities and turbulence which result as the water approaches the sloping portion of the drop structure. The same riprap design and bedding should be used as specified for the portion of the drop structure downstream of the cut-off wall. Crest Wall: The crest wall is a very important part of the drop structure, and has several purposes, one of which is to provide a level rigid boundary section and distribute the flow evenly over the entire width of the structure. This is extremely important since the selection of the riprap is based upon the unit discharge, and without the wall, flow concentrations could result which would greatly exceed the design discharge. The crest wall is also used to reduce or eliminate seepage and piping along with the failures which can result from these problems. The low flow channel is ended at the upstream end of the upstream apron to prevent the low flow channel from concentrating additional water at a point during high flows, thus exceeding the design unit discharge. The apron and the crest wall combine to disperse the concentrated flow. The low flows must be allowed through the crest wall to prevent ponding. A series of notches in the wall will allow the low flows to do this. The size and number of notches will depend on the design discharge of the low flow channel. Note that they are offset from the trickle channel to permit flow of water through the upstream apron. The voids in the riprap below the notch inverts are expected to silt in rapidly or they can be filled at the time of construction. The two most common types of walls used will be reinforced concrete or sheet pile. The design of the wall is a structural problem which will not be addressed here. The depth of the wall should be at least to the bottom of the bedding material and could be deeper if necessary for the control of piping. I The top of the crest wall should be placed a distance P above the upstream channel bottom. This is done to create a higher water
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C.

d.

Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures surface elevation upstream, thus reducing the drawdown effects normally caused by a drop structure. P can be determined from Table 1104 and is not considered in the total allowable vertical drop. e. Chute Apron: The allowable size of riprap and chute slope for the chute portion of the drop structure and the downstream apron are obtained from Table 1102. The riprap size and chute slope are determined from the table by first computing q = V,Y,. Next, enter the table at the proper value of q in the left-hand column. Then, determine the allowable slopes in the row for that q and select the best combination of riprap classification and slope using site and cost considerations. The length of the downstream apron L, and the depth of the riprap D, can also be obtained from Table 1102. The riprap must be placed on bedding as shown in Figure 1102. The term “bedding” used in this section (Section 1100) refers to 6-inch Type II Aggregate Base as specified in the STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS. The 2 foot long filter fabric cutoffs help prevent piping failures. The riprap should extend up the side slopes a distance of Y, + 1 foot as projected from the downstream channel or the critical depth plus 1 foot, whichever is greater. The side slopes for the chute and downstream apron should be the same as the crest wall and upstream channel with the exception that a riprap slope as steep as 2:l can be used starting above the height of the riprap lining required above. The thickness of the riprap immediately downstream of the crest wall should be increased to D,, as shown in Table 1102. This extra thickness is necessary to protect the most critical area of the structure. The voids in the apron can be filled during construction to reduce ponding of low flows in the apron area. f. Exit Depth: The downstream channel should be the same as the upstream channel, including a low flow channel. The low flow channel invert must be below the top of the adjacent riprap section to ensure that low flows will drain into the low flow channel. For concrete low flow channels a foundation wall similar to the one used for the upstream low flow channel should be used. In some instances the wall may also be used to control seepage and piping. A design example for a sloping riprap drop structure is presented in Section 1102.3.1. 1102.1.2 Vertical Riprap Drop Structures Presented in Table 1103 and on Figure 1103 are the design standards and details for vertical riprap drop structures.

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures The design chart for the vertical channel drop structures is based upon the height of the drop and the normal depth and velocity of the approach and exit channels. The channel must be prismatic throughout, from the upstream channel through the drop to the downstream channel. The maximum (steepest) allowable side slope for the riprap stilling basin is 4:l. Flatter side slopes are allowable and encouraged when available ROW permits. The riprap should extend up the side slopes to a depth equal to 1 foot above the normal depth projected upstream from the downstream channel. (See Figure 1103). The maximum fall allowed at any one drop structure is 3 feet from the upper channel bottom to the lower channel bottom, excluding the low flow channel. A detailed description of the drop structure and the design procedure from upstream to downstream is given below and is presented on Figure 1103. a. Approach Depth: The upstream and downstream channels will normally be trapezoidal channels with trickle channels to convey normal low water flows. The maximum normal depth, Y,, is 5 feet and the maximum normal velocity, V,, is 7 fps. Low Flow Channel: The low flow channel shown in this case is a rectangular concrete channel. The concrete channel ends at the upstream end of the upstream riprap apron. A combination cut-off wall and foundation wall, to give the end of the low flow channel additional support, is provided. The water is allowed to “trickle” through the upstream apron and through the vertical wall. Riprap low flow channels would simply feather into the upstream apron. Approach Apron: A lo-foot long apron is provided upstream of the cutoff wall to protect against the increasing velocities and turbulence which result as the water approaches the vertical drop. Heavy riprap should be used for this apron. Crest Wall: The vertical wall should have the same trapezoidal shape as the approach channel. The wall distributes the flow evenly over the entire width of the drop structure. This is important to prevent flow concentrations which would adversely affect the riprap basin. The low flow channel is ended at the upstream end of the upstream apron to prevent the low flows from concentrating additional water at a point during high flows, thus exceeding the design assumptions. The apron and the vertical wall combine to disperse the flow concentrated in the low flow channel. The low flows are allowed to trickle through the , wall through a series of notches in order to prevent ponding. The voids in the riprap below the notch inverts are expected to silt in rapidly, or ’ they can be filled at the time of construction.
Adopted August 12,1999 HYDROLOGIC CRITERIA AND DRAINAGE DESIGN MANUAL 1106

b.

C.

d.

Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures The wall must be designed as a structural retaining wall. The top of the wall should be placed a distance P above the upstream channel bottom. This is done to create a higher water surface elevation upstream, thus reducing the drawdown effects normally caused by a sudden drop. P can be determined from Table 1104. e. Chute Apron: The riprap stilling basin is designed to force the hydraulic jump to occur within the basin, and is designed for essentially zero scour. The floor of the basin is depressed an amount B below the downstream channel bottom, excluding the trickle channel. This is done to create a deeper downstream sequent depth which helps keep the hydraulic jump in the basin. This arrangement will cause ponding in the basin. The trickle channel can, depending on the depth, relieve all or some of the ponding. The riprap can also be buried and vegetated to reduce the ponded area to a smaller size. The riprap basin is sized using Table 1103. To use the table, the designer must first determine the necessary height of the drop C, the normal velocity of the approach channel V,, and the upstream and downstream normal depths Y, and Y,. Both channels must have the same geometry and Y, must be equal to Y,. Designs for drops when Y, + Y, shall be discussed with the local entity and/or the CCRFCD prior to design. Enter the row which contains the correct C, V,, Y,, and Y, and select the riprap classification and necessary channel drop dimensions from that row. The riprap must be placed on bedding and filter fabric as shown in Figure 1103. The riprap should extend up the channel side slopes a distance of Y, + 1 foot as projected from the downstream channel. The basin side slopes should be the same as those in the downstream channel (4: 1 or flatter) up to the Y, + 1 foot location, above which riprap slopes as steep as 2:l are allowed. f. Exit Depth: The downstream channel should be the same as the upstream channel, including a low flow channel. For concrete low flow channels a foundation wall similar to the one used for the upstream trickle channel should be used. In some instances the wall may also be used to control seepage and piping.

A design example for a vertical riprap drop structure is presented in Section 1102.3.2.

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures 1102.1.3 Gabion Drops Gabion drops are classified into three principal drop types according to the slope of their downstream face: a. b.
C.

Vertical type Stepped type Sloped type

Presented in Figures 1104 through 1106 are examples of these three types of gabion drops. Gabions are generally made in standard sizes ranging from 1 to 3 feet in thickness, 3 feet in width, and 6 to 12 feet in length. The number of cells in each standard gabion varies according to its dimensions, however, a cell should not be greater than 3 linear feet. Manufacturers of gabions should be consulted and their design information should be reviewed before planning and designing a gabion structure. In constructing gabion drops, either PVC coated wire mesh gabion baskets or galvanized steel wire mesh gabion baskets are used. The designer shall obtain soil corrosion data for the specific site to determine which type of coating may be used or if the soil is too corrosive for either coating. The data and coating recommendations shall be submitted to the local entity for review and approval. 1102.1.3.1 Desiqn Criteria: The manufacturer suppling the gabions should supply design guidelines and criteria used in designing gabion drops. Specific reference is made in this MANUAL to MACCAFERRI, 1987. This reference outlines typical step by step procedures for design of gabion drops and thus typical procedures are not repeated in this MANUAL. The naming of MACCAFERRI should not be construed as an endorsement or acceptance of their products. A few highlights of the design criteria are as follows:

a)

Vertical Drops 1. 2. Vertical drops are used for small drops. The maximum design discharge appears to be 100 cfs per foot. The recommended unit discharge is 35 cfs per foot. The drop structure should be designed according to the procedure specified in MACCAFERRI, 1987 or similar manufacturers guidelines.
HYDROLOGIC CRITERIA AND DRAINAGE DESIGN MANUAL 1108

t 3.

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures

W

Stepped Drops 1. Stepped drops shall only be used with light bed loads and with a maximum unit discharge of 35 cfs per foot. Technical reasons prevent in most instances a rational design of stepped drops ensuring the formation of a hydraulic jump at the toe of each fall. It is advisable not to rely upon energy dissipation in each step. The drop structure should be designed according to the procedure specified in MACCAFERRI, 1987 or similar manufacturers guidelines.

2.

3.

C)

Sloped Drop 1. Sloped drops are used where, due to the poor quality of the foundation soil, a large foundation area and a fairly uniform pressure distribution are required. The maximum design discharge recommended is 35 cfs per foot. Design of the sloped drop should be based upon the procedures specified in MACCAFERRI, 1987 or similar manufacturers guidelines.

2. 3.

In addition. the following criteria should be considered in design of gabion drops: a. Where possible small drops in series would be more desired than one large drop. Counter weirs and stilling basins should be considered when scouring problems are present. When they are not used the foundation of the drop should be below the scouring ability of channel. Structural stability should be checked for over turning and/or sliding. In heavy debris areas the gabion drop crest should be capped with concrete to avoid debris blockage. Design procedures may generally be obtained from gabion manufacturers free of charge or obligation.

b.

C.

d.

e.

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1109

Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures

1102.1.4

Straight Drop Spillways Presented in Figure 1107 are the design details for a straight drop spillway. The spillway produces a controlled overflow jet which is dissipated through impact on the structure floor and baffle blocks. The jet energy is also dissipated in the plunge pool created when impact blocks are used or through an hydraulic jump using the typical baffle block arrangements from the USBR stilling basin designs. The basin design is based on the drop distance, Y, and the unit discharge, q, as related through the drop number, D, computed as follows: D = q2 / gY3 where D = Drop Number q = Unit Discharge (cfs / ft of width) Y = Drop Distance (ft) The remaining design parameters can be obtained from Figure 1107. The impact block basin is applicable for low heads with a wide range of tailwater depths. The hydraulic jump basin may be used as long as the design parameters for the selected basin type are meet. The designer is referred to USBR, 1987, for detailed design information, guidelines, and examples. (1101)

1102.1.5

Baffled Aprons (USBR Type IX) Presented on Figure 1108 is the baffled apron stilling basin. This structure requires no initial tailwater to be effective, although when the tailwater forms a pool into which the flow discharges, the channel bed scour is not as deep and is less extensive. The chutes are constructed on an excavated slope, 2:1 or flatter, extending to below the channel bottom. Backfill is placed over one or more rows of baffles to restore the original streambed elevation. When scour or downstream channel degradation occurs, successive rows of baffle piers are exposed to prevent excessive acceleration of the flow entering the channel. If degradation does not occur the scour creates a stilling pool at the downstream end of the chute, stabilizing the scour pattern. Generalized design information is presented in Figure 1109. The designer is referred to PETERKA, 1978 for detailed design information, guidelines, and examples.

1102.2

Energy Dissipation Structures Presented in Table 1101 are the types of energy dissipation structures allowed in the Clark County area. By definition, energy dissipation structures may be

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1110

Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures used for both sub-critical and super-critical upstream channel (or pipe) flow conditions. For sub-critical flow conditions, these structures are designed similar to the channel drop structures discussed in the previous section. For supercritical flow conditions, the upstream channel is tied directly into the stilling basin floor (hydraulic rise) or the upstream channel is transitioned into the structure through the use of a trajectory transition section. The hydraulic design of trajectory transition sections is discussed in Section 1102.2.9. 1102.2.1 Types of Energy Dissipation Structures Many stilling basins and energy-dissipating devices have been designed in conjunction with spillways, outlet works, and canal structures, utilizing blocks, sills, or other roughness elements to impose exaggerated resistance to the flow. The type of stilling basin selected is based upon hydraulic requirements, available space and cost. The hydraulic jump which occurs in a stilling basin has distinctive characteristics depending on the energy of flow which must be dissipated in relation to the depth of the flow. A comprehensive series of tests have been performed by the USBR for determining the most efficient energy dissipators (PETERKA, 1978). The energy dissipation structures discussed herein provide a wide range of structures from which to choose the most hydraulically and cost efficient structure. The reader is encouraged to review the analysis, results, and recommendation in PETERKA, 1978, prior to final selection of energy dissipation structure. 1102.2.2 Stilling Basins With Horizontal Sloping Aprons The basis for design of all of the USBR stilling basins is analysis of the hydraulic jump characteristics on horizontal and sloping aprons. The governing equation for hydraulic jumps is based on pressure-momentum theory and may be written as follows: D 2 / D 1 = 0.5 ((1 + 8F2r1 )0.5 - 1) where D 1 D2 Fr1 = Depth of Flow at Jump Entrance (ft) = Depth of Flow at Jump Exit ft) = Froude Number at Jump Entrance (1102)

The results of the USBR analysis are presented in Figure 1109. In this figure Tw is the tailwater depth necessary to create or assist in forming the hydraulic jump. Generally, Tw is greater than D 2. The above equation is generally used to determine the approximate location of a hydraulic jump in a channel. In practical application, the actual flow depths and location of the jump will vary due to inaccuracies in estimating actual flow parameters (i.e., channel roughness, flow characteristics). The location of the
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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures jump will also vary depending on the flow rate in the channel. Therefore, from a structural and safety standpoint, horizontal and sloping apron stilling basins should not be used as energy dissipation structures without the addition of appurtenances (i.e., baffle blocks, end sills) to control the location of the hydraulic jump. Standard designs for these types of structures are discussed in the following sections. 1102.2.3 Short Stilling Basin (USBR Type lll) Presented in Figure 1110 is the standard design for a Type lll stilling basin. The chute blocks at the upstream end of a basin tend to corrugate the jet, lifting a portion of it from the floor to create a greater number of energy dissipating eddies. These eddies result in a shorter length of jump than would be possible without them, and tend to stabilize the jump. The baffle piers act as an impact dissipation device and the end sill is for scour control. The end sill has little or no effect on the jump. The only purpose of the end sill in a stilling basin is to direct the remaining bottom currents upward and away from the channel bed. This type of basin is recommended at the outlet of a sloping channel drop when there is adequate tailwater. For insufficient tailwater, a USBR Type Vl basin is recommended. 1102.2.4 Low Froude Number Basins (USBR Type IV) Presented in Figure 1111 is the standard design of a low Froude number basin. The basin is used instead of the USBR Type ll and Type lll basins in order to achieve better jump characteristic at low Froude numbers (2.5 < Fr < 4.5). At these low Froude numbers, excess waves are created because the jump is not fully developed. This basin minimizes the waves by directing jets from the tops of the baffle blocks into the roller to strengthen and intensify it. In addition, the tail water depth (Tw) should be at least 1.1 x D 2 (conjugate depth) to minimize the chance of the jump sweeping out of the basin (See Figure 1109). The end sill has little or no effect on the jump but rather directs the bottom currents upward and away from the channel bed. 1102.2.5 Impact Stilling Basin (USBR Type Vl) This stilling basin is an impact-type energy dissipator, contained in a relatively small box-like structure, and requiring little or no tailwater for successful performance. The general arrangement of the basin is shown on Figure 1112. This type of basin is subjected to large dynamic forces and turbulences which must be considered in the structural design. The structure should be made sufficiently stable to resist sliding against the impact load on the baffle wall and must resist the severe vibrations. Riprap should also be provided along the
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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures bottom and sides adjacent to the structure to avoid the tendency for scour of the outlet channel downstream from the end sill when shallow tailwater exists. This type of stilling basin is very effective at the outlet of storm drains or culverts where there is little or no tailwater. 1102.2.6 Hydraulic Design The three different stilling basin configurations can be divided into two categories, basins for spillways or channels (Type lll or IV) and basins for pipe outlets (Type Vl). A summary of the design data for all three basin types is presented in Figure 1109. The reader is referred to PETERKA, 1978, for a detailed discussion of the structural design requirements. 1102.2.7 Riprap Protection Riprap protection shall be provided downstream of the Type lll, IV, and Vl stilling basins (except in fully concrete lined channels). This protection is necessary to protect the downstream channel from erosion due to eddy currents and excess velocities in the transition zone between the structure and the design channel section. For the Type lll and Type IV basin, a 2-foot layer of regular riprap shall be installed from the end sill a distance of 4 times the design depth of flow in the downstream channel. For the Type Vl stilling basin, riprap protection shall extend downstream a distance equal to the outlet width, W, of the basin. The minimum downstream distance shall be 5 feet. A 2-foot layer of regular riprap shall be used for all basin widths of 12 feet or less. For basin widths between 12 feet and 20 feet, a 3-foot layer of heavy riprap shall be used. For basin widths greater than 20 feet, a 2-foot layer of grouted riprap shall be used. 1102.2.8 Design Flow Rates The effectiveness of energy dissipation structures is dependent on many factors including flow rates, tail water depths, and type of dissipation structure. The structures also must function over a wide range of flow rates typical of stormwater runoff. Therefore, a minimum of the minor and major storm flow rates should be analyzed to assist in protecting the structure against drowning of the hydraulic jump or sweepout of the jump into the downstream channel. The design of the impact stilling basin shall be based on the design flow rate for the upstream pipe or channel. 1102.2.9 Trajectory Transition Section

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures Energy dissipation structures may be designed for either sub-critical or supercritical upstream flow conditions. For sub-critical flow, an abrupt change in grade at the structure entrance performs satisfactorily. However, for super-critical flow, the flow tends to separate and spring away at any abrupt change in grade. Therefore, to avoid the possibility of flow separation from the channel floor, the floor shape should be flatter than the trajectory of a free discharging flow jet. Presented in Figure 1113 is a typical design of a trajectory transition section. The curvature of the trajectory section can be determined by the following equation. y where Y X K d hv = x tan 2 + x2 / K (4(d + hv) cos2 2) (1103)

= = = = = 2 =

Change in Vertical Elevation (ft) Change in Horizontal Location (ft) Safety Factor Depth of Flow at Trajectory Entrance (ft) Velocity Head at Trajectory Entrance (ft) Slope Angle From Horizontal of the Upstream Channel (Degrees)

The safety factory, K, should be equal to or greater than 1.5 to assure positive contact pressure. The trajectory section should be connected to the stilling basin apron by a short, steep chute section. This section should be at a slope between 1.5 horizontal to 1 vertical and 3 horizontal to 1 vertical with 2 horizontal to 1 vertical preferred. In no case should the slope be flatter than 6 horizontal to 1 vertical. 1102.3 Example Applications The following example applications present typical design calculations for various channel drop and energy dissipation structures. The reader is referred to PETERKA, 1978, for additional design examples. 1102.3.1 Example: Sloping Riprap Drop Structure Problem: Design a sloping riprap drop for a channel with the following characteristics: Q = 1,600 cfs Upstream and Downstream Channel Parameters Bottom Width = 50 ft S = 0.0043 ft / ft Side Slopes = 4:1 Yc = 2.9 ft Yn = 4.0 ft Vn = 6.0 fps Concrete Low Flow Channel
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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures Drop Required = 3.0 ft Solution: Step 1: Determine Maximum Unit Discharge. q = V n Yn = (6.0 fps) (4 ft) = 24 cfs / ft Step 2: Select the chute slope from Table 1102 for q = 25 cfs / ft The following options are available: 1) 2) Heavy Riprap 10:1 or Flatter; DR = 1.75 ft, DRW = 2.6 ft Grouted Riprap at 6:1 or Flatter; DR = 2.6 ft; DRW = 3.25 ft

The best slope will depend on factors such as availability and cost of the riprap bedding and filter cloth and ROW limitations. For this example, a 7:1 slope was selected. Step 3: Step 4: Select Length of Downstream Apron L B = 20 ft Determine Crest Wall Elevation. (Table 1104) Bottom width = 50 ft, Yn = 4.0 ft Use P = 0.1 ft

1102.3.2

Example: Vertical Riprap Drop Structure Problem: Design a vertical riprap drop for a channel with the following characteristics: Q = 1,600 cfs Upstream and Downstream Channel Parameters: Bottom Width = 50 ft S = 0.0043 ft / ft Side Slopes = 4: 1 Yc = 2.9 ft Yn = 4.0 ft Vn = 6.0 fps Concrete Low Flow Channel Drop Required = 3.0 ft Solution: Step 1: From Table 1103, for C = 3.0 ft, V n = 6.0 fps and Yn and Y2 = 4.0 ft

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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures Select the riprap designation and the riprap basin dimensions. Riprap - Heavy B A LB D E Step 2: Step 3: 1102.3.3 = = = = = 1.0 ft 2.5 ft 20 ft 5.0 ft 4.0 ft

Determine P = 0.1 from Table 1104 Design retaining wall and finalize dimension

Example: Vertical Gabion Drop Structure Problem: Design a vertical gabion drop structure for a channel with the following characteristics: Q = 1,600 cfs Upstream and downstream channel parameters are: Bottom Width = 60 ft Side Slope 4:1, Yn = 3.3 ft Drop Required = 4 ft S = 0.0043 ft / ft Yc = 2.63 ft

Assume the drop is to be built with a lined stilling pool floor and counter drop (weir). Refer to Figure 1114 for definition of variables. Solution: Step 1: Design of Crest: Assume the width of the rectangular weir, Lg = 48 feet and length along stream = 12 feet minimum, (use more if needed for stability). Assume C = 3.1 in the weir formula: Q = CLg (Zo -fg) 3/2 Zo -fg = Q2/3 / CLg = 1,6002/3 / 3.1 x 48 Use 6 feet as the height of the crest.
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Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures Step 2: Design of Stilling Pool: Assume the width of the counter drop = 54 feet q = 1,600 / 54 = 19.6 cfs / ft With q = 29.6 cfs and Zo -fb = (4 + 4.9) = 8.9 ft using Figure 53 in MACCAFERRI,1987 Z1 -fb = 1.25 ft With Z1-fb = 1.25 ft and q = 29.6 and using dashed line in Figure 53 in MACCAFERRI, 1987 Z2 -fb = 5.8 ft Determine Z2 -fc by using weir equation Z2 -fc = Q2/3 / CLb = (1,600)2/3 / 3.1 x54 The height of the counter drop is fc -fb (Z2 -fb) - (Z2 -fc) = 5.8 - 4.5 = 1.3 ft Use 6 feet (minimum) as the length of the counter drop along stream. Determine the length of the stilling pool, L b Lb = Lg1 + L12 Since the drop is backed by streambed material Lg1 / (fg -fb) = 4.30D0.27 (Eq.16) (Eq. 15) D = q 2 / g (fg -fb)3 D = (1,600 / 48)2 / 32.2 (4)3 Lg1 = 4.30 (0.5392)0.27 x 4 = 14.6 ft L12 = 6.9 (Z2 - Z1) (Eq. 20) = 6.9 x [ (Z2 -fb) - (Z1 -fb) ] = 6.9 x (5.8 - 1.25) = 31.4 ft Lb = Lg1 + L12 = 14.6 + 31.4 = 46 ft Use L b = 48 ft

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1117

Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures Note: The above Equations 15, 16, and 20 are found in MACCAFERRI, 1987.

Step 3:

Check for seepage:

) H (Equation 22, MACCAFERRI,1987)

The total path L of seepage under and the structure must be L > C

Where C is a coefficient depending on the type of soil, and ) H is the difference between the upstream and downstream water surfaces. Assume C = 6 (riverbed sediment) Therefore L > 6 x 5.5 = 33 ft The length of stilling pool itself is 48 ft > 33 ft. Thus seepage consideration is satisfied. To prevent undermining of the counter drop (weir), an apron is constructed downstream; the length of this apron will be approximately 9 feet. Step 4: To complete the design of the drop structure, a stability analysis will be required to determine the required thickness of the gabion mattresses and depth to foundation. This stability analysis is beyond the scope of this manual. The user should refer to MACCAFERRI, 1987 for guidance for stability analysis. The hydraulic design dimensions of the structure are given in Figure 1114. 1102.3.4 Example: Impact Stilling Basin Problem: Design an impact stilling basin (USBR Type Vl) for a 48-inch RCP outlet with the following parameters: Pipe Dia = 48 in RCP Q = 214 cfs V = 17 fps < 30 fps (upper limit) Tail water depth = 2.5 ft Channel slope = 1.0 percent

Adopted August 12, 1999

HYDROLOGIC CRITERIA AND DRAINAGE DESIGN MANUAL

1118

Section 1100 - Additional Hydraulic Structures Solution: Step 1: Using the discharge (Q = 214 cfs) enter the discharge limits portion of Figure 1109 and read the maximum and minimum basin width. Wmin = 12.5 ft Wmin = 15.0 ft Step 2: From the basic dimension portion of Figure 1109 and using the discharge Q = 214 cfs, interpolate for the basin dimensions. Note that the corresponding pipe size in the table is between a 54-inch and 60-inch diameter, which is larger than the example pipe size of 48 inches. The basin will therefore provide ample room for the example pipe. The basic basin dimensions are as follows: W = 12 ft - 4 in H = 10 ft - 3 in L = 18 ft - 2 in A = 7 ft - 8 in Step 3: b = 10 ft - 6 in c = 5 ft - 8 in d = 2 ft - 4 in g = 5 ft -1 in

Determine length of downstream riprap. Downstream length = W = 12 ft - 4 in Use a downstream length of 13 in

Step 4:

Determine size and thickness of downstream riprap. For a basin width of 12 ft - 4 in, use a 3 ft layer of heavy riprap per Section 1102.2.7.

Adopted August 12, 1999

HYDROLOGIC CRITERIA AND DRAINAGE DESIGN MANUAL

1119

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