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Thursday June 7, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 253
D-DAY REMEMBERED
WORLD PAGE 7
THUNDER
BEAT SPURS
SPORTS PAGE 11
DOW JUMPS
286 POINTS
BUSINESS PAGE 10
BAND OF BROTHERS HONORED IN FRANCE, WORLD WAR II
VETERANS REMEMBER AT MEMORIAL
Turning 65 soon? Understand your options?
I CAN HELP!
John Bowman
(650) 525-9180
john@baywoodinsurance.com
CA License# 0E08395
1700 S. El Camino Real Suite 355l, San Mateo
Planning chair
named to San
Carlos council
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Carlos Planning Commission
Chair Karen Clapper was unani-
mously appoint-
ed last night to
the City Council
for the interim
18-month seat,
saying she wants
to be a bridge to
the next person
in the position.
Clapper, who
has called San
Carlos home for
17 years, said she has no intent to
run for the next regular term in
November 2013 which was a con-
sideration of the four councilmen
who interviewed her and ve other
applicants last night.
Thats not what Im interested in
doing, she said.
Clapper was the rst choice of
three councilmen and a strong sec-
ond for the third. Councilman Bob
Grassilli placed former mayor Inge
Tiegel-Doherty first. Mayor Matt
Grocott said he initially entered the
interviews with some fear and trep-
idation Clapper would come out on
top because he hates to see her leave
the Planning Commission. However,
he also said he was concerned about
candidates with prior council experi-
ence like his third place candi-
date John Hoffmann because
they reach into the past rather than
look to the future.
Councilman Mark Olbert called
Clapper head and shoulders one of
the strongest people weve inter-
viewed.
Clapper emphasized increased
communication if appointed and
said she wants to say at the end of 18
months she contributed and provid-
ed stability in the community.
Clapper, who is an organization
management specialist, cited the
budget, infrastructure, public safety,
growth and economic development
as key challenges facing the city.
Clapper lls the councils fth
seat which has been empty since the
abrupt April resignation of mayor
Andy Klein for personal reasons.
Others in contention were Farrokh
Albuyeh, vice president of Open
Access Technology International,
Inc.; Ricardo Garcia-Pacheco, a
small business consultant and for-
mer member of the San Carlos
Economic Development Advisory
Commission; Steven San Filippo,
certied public accountant and for-
mer city planning commissioner;
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A routine pedestrian stop at a
South San Francisco McDonalds
Tuesday night resulted in the police
shooting death of a 15-year-old boy
who police say
pulled a gun on
the ofcer.
D e r r i c k
Gaines, a stu-
dent at Foxridge
Community Day
School, and
another teen
were acting sus-
picious at
around 9 p.m. and when an ofcer
stopped the boys near the intersec-
tion of Westborough and Gellert
boulevards, Gaines took off running
while the other teen stayed put, said
South San Francisco police Capt.
Mike Brosnan.
A short foot chase ensued and
Gaines allegedly pulled out a gun,
after which he was shot by the of-
cer in the parking lot of the Arco gas
station, next to the McDonalds.
He died later at the hospital.
Teen, 15, shot dead
South San Francisco police say boy pulled gun on officer
By Julie Pace
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO If you
have $40,000 to spend, President
Barack Obamas campaign has a
deal for you.
Write a big check, and youll get
you a picture with the president and
a chance to swap political strategy
with him all while enjoying a
gourmet meal at the lavish home of
a Hollywood celebrity or Wall
Street tycoon. And if you get the
campaign even more money, you
might just end up with a plum post
as a U.S. ambassador or an invita-
tion to an exclusive White House
state dinner.
Obama not your preference? No
problem. Mitt Romney is offering
donors perks that include every-
thing from a private dinner with him
to seats at the fall debates.
Welcome to the world of high-
dollar presidential campaign
fundraising.
Five months before the November
What $40,000 gets you in presidential fundraising
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A trio of Norteo gangmembers
who prosecutors say red on a San
Bruno cop while on their way to kill
a rival appeared in court yesterday,
including one former state prisoner
who would have qualified for
release as a non-serious offender
under the new terms of realignment.
Daniel Garcia, 23, Jordy Bernal,
18, and Michael
Apolinario, 25,
each appeared in
court on charges
of attempted
murder on a
peace officer,
conspiracy to
commit murder,
being a gang-
member and
assault with a
deadly weapon.
Garcia is also
charged with car
theft, recklessly
evading a police
ofcer and per-
sonally dis-
charging a
firearm. All
delayed enter-
ing pleas until
June 27.
The trio were
allegedly on
their way to
shoot an oppos-
ing gangmem-
ber when
police respond-
ed to calls of
s u s p i c i o u s
individuals in a
Gang trio charged with attempting to murder cop
Michael
Apolinario
Jordy Bernal Daniel
Garcia
See TRIO, Page 20
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Friends of slain teen Derrick Gaines sit next to a makeshift memorial at an Arco gas station in South San Francisco
yesterday afternoon, the site where Gaines was shot by a police ofcer Tuesday night.
Derrick Gaines
KORE CHAN/
DAILY
JOURNAL
Barack
Obama greets
supporters as
he arrives at
San Francisco
International
Airport
yesterday for
a three-hour
fundraising
trip.
See GAINES, Page 20
See OBAMA, Page 18
Karen Clapper
See CLAPPER, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Comedian Colin
Quinn is 53.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1944
During World War II, Allied forces
stormed the beaches of Normandy,
France, on D-Day, beginning the lib-
eration of German-occupied western
Europe.
A great man is one who leaves
others at a loss after he is gone.
Paul Valery, French poet and essayist (1871-1945)
Comedian Sandra
Bernhard is 57.
Actor Paul
Giamatti is 45.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Handout image courtesy of NASA shows the planet Venus at the start of its transit of the Sun.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
The story Man tried for pimping teen
to friends in the June 5 edition of the
Daily Journal included the wrong photo.
Mario Chamale is pictured here.
There was incorrect information in the
story Hate the commute? Take a boat in
the June 5 edition of the Daily Journal. The
South San Francisco terminal project,
including the vessels, cost $40 million.
Corrections
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 02 Lucky
Star in rst place; No.05 California Classic in sec-
ond place; and No. 09 Winning Spirit in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:49.69.
(Answers tomorrow)
ANKLE FORCE STIGMA GLADLY
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When Ben Franklin went on and on about his
theories on electricity, they said GO FLY A KITE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WORLP
CKKAN
GESIHL
SKCITY
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
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k

h
t
t
p
:
/
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w
.
f
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Print your
answer here:
3 5 8
37 39 42 53 55 22
Mega number
June 5 Mega Millions
1 2 4 6 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 5 6 9
Daily Four
9 9 4
Daily three evening
In 1799, American politician and orator Patrick Henry died at
Red Hill Plantation in Virginia.
In 1844, the Young Mens Christian Association was founded
in London.
In 1862, the (rst) Battle of Memphis took place during the
Civil War as Union naval forces annihilated a Confederate eet
and captured the Tennessee city.
In 1912, the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century took
place as Novarupta in Alaska began a series of explosive
episodes over a 60-hour period.
In 1925, Walter Percy Chrysler founded the Chrysler Corp.
In 1932, the Senate approved, and President Herbert Hoover
signed, a Revenue Act containing the rst federal gasoline tax,
which was one cent per gallon.
In 1933, the rst drive-in movie theater was opened by Richard
Hollingshead in Camden County, N.J. (The movie shown was
Wives Beware, starring Adolphe Menjou.)
In 1934, the Securities and Exchange Commission was estab-
lished.
In 1966, black activist James Meredith was shot and wounded
as he walked along a Mississippi highway to encourage black
voter registration.
In 1978, California voters overwhelmingly approved
Proposition 13, a primary ballot initiative calling for major cuts
in property taxes.
In 1982, Israeli forces invaded Lebanon to drive Palestine
Liberation Organization ghters out of the country. (The
Israelis withdrew in June 1985.)
In 1985, authorities in Brazil exhumed a body later identied
as the remains of Dr. Josef Mengele, the notorious Angel of
Death of the Nazi Holocaust.
Actress Billie Whitelaw is 80. Civil rights activist Roy Innis is
78. Singer-songwriter Gary U.S. Bonds is 73. Country singer
Joe Stampley is 69. Actor Robert Englund is 65. Folk singer
Holly Near is 63. Singer Dwight Twilley is 61. Playwright-actor
Harvey Fierstein is 60. International Tennis Hall of Famer Bjorn
Borg is 56. Actress Amanda Pays is 53. Record producer Jimmy
Jam is 53. Rock musician Steve Vai is 52. Rock singer-musician
Tom Araya (Slayer) is 51. Actor Jason Isaacs is 49. Rock musi-
cian Sean Yseult (White Zombie) is 46. Actor Max Casella is 45.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Damion Hall (Guy) is 44. Rock musi-
cian Bardi Martin is 43. Rock musician James Munky Shaffer
(Korn) is 42. TV correspondent Natalie Morales is 40.
Jessica Fletcher on Murder She Wrote
(1984-1996) lived at 698 Candlewood
Lane in Cabot Cove, Maine. Cabot Cove
is a ctional town.
***
Angela Lansbury (born 1925) played
Elvis Presleys (1935-1977) mother in the
1961 movie Blue Hawaii. Lansbury, at
age 35, was only 10 years older than Elvis
at the time.
***
Elvis Presley stayed at the Coco Palms
Resort on Kauai while lming Blue
Hawaii. The nal scene of the movie is
Elvis character getting married by the
lagoons at the resort.
***
Hurricane Iniki struck the island of Kauai
in September 1992. The hurricane devas-
tated the Coco Palms Resort, causing the
resort to shut down after 39 years in busi-
ness. The subject of insurance issues and
disputes, the decaying resort is still stand-
ing today.
***
A storm is classied as a hurricane if it
has winds that are more than 73 mph.
***
The names of hurricanes are established
by the World Meteorological
Organization. In order of occurrence, hur-
ricanes are named alphabetically; the rst
hurricane of the year starts with the letter
A, then B, etc. The letters Q, U, X, Y and
Z are not used.
***
The names of hurricanes are repeated
every six years. However, when an
extremely destructive hurricane hits, the
hurricanes name is retired and no longer
used. Since 1954, 40 names have been
retired.
***
The most violent weather in the world is
in the United States, according to NASA.
In one year, on average, the United States
experiences 10,000 violent thunder-
storms, 5,000 oods and 1,000 tornadoes.
***
Rogue waves in the ocean are caused by
undersea earthquakes and landslides.
***
Surfer Tom Blake (1902-1994) of
Wisconsin holds the world record for the
longest ride on a surfboard. He rode 4,500
feet on a wave in Waikiki, Hawaii in 1936.
***
In 1998 in Oahu, Hawaii, surfer Ken
Bradshaw (born 1952) rode the biggest
wave ever surfed. The wave was 85 feet
high.
***
In the 1960s, the Beach Boys were the
most popular surf band in the country.
Their rst hit song was Surn in 1961.
Can you name the other songs by the
Beach Boys that had the word surf in
their titles? See answer at end.
***
Sometimes called the ultimate surfer
movie, The Endless Summer (1966) is a
documentary about surfers searching the
world for the perfect wave. The movie
was lmed in Africa, Australia, New
Zealand, Tahiti, Hawaii and California.
***
Annette Funicello (born 1942) and
Frankie Avalon (born 1939) starred in a
series of ve beach-themed movies in the
1960s. One of the original Mouseketeers,
Annette Funicello never wore a bikini in
the movies because she promised Walt
Disney (1901-1966) that she would not
show her navel in a lm.
***
In the 1965 movie How to Stuff a Wild
Bikini (1965), Annette Funicello was
lmed from the waist up because she was
pregnant.
***
The metal spike that a cello rests on is
called an endpin.
***
Answer: SurnSafari (1962), Surn
U.S.A. (1963), Surfer Girl (1963),
Surfs Up (1971). The Beach Boys was
formed in 1961 by brothers Brian Wilson
(born 1942), Dennis Wilson (19441983)
and Carl Wilson (19461998), with Mike
Love (born 1941) and Alan Jardine (born
1942). Dennis was the only surfer in the
group.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the
weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily
Journal. Questions? Comments? Email know-
itall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200
ext. 114.
1 15 20 30 40 13
Mega number
June 2 Super Lotto Plus
Mario Chamale
3
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. A person was not happy with
service and began making threats on Walnut
Street before 10:53 a.m. Wednesday, May
23.
Vandalism. A vehicles window was broken
on Haven Avenue before 7:48 a.m.
Wednesday, May 23.
Robbery. An iPod and money were taken
and threats were made at Arguello Street and
Brewster Avenue before 3:38 p.m. Monday,
May 21.
Burglary. A laptop and other items were
taken from a residence on Central Avenue
before 3:34 p.m. Monday, May 21.
Police reports
No dogs allowed
A woman brought her dog inside a store
and her dog attacked another customer
and employee on Shaw Road in South
San Francisco before 11:11 a.m.
Thursday, May 24.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Meet Patel was a quiet kid who became a
very involved leader with an interest in learn-
ing how beliefs shape ones behavior.
The 17-year-old from Redwood City was
able to explore his interests in leadership
while at Woodside High School. In the fall,
hell be attending Harvard University. While
Patel isnt quite sure what hell study, he does
hope to learn more about the way the brain
works and how our personal beliefs shape a
persons behavior.
Meet Patel embodies all of the characteris-
tics and attributes that our educational com-
munity attempts to foster in every student. He
is kind, civic-minded and disciplined in both
his academic and personal pursuits. Meet has
served as student body president, and he has
added much to the vibrancy of Woodside High
School. He will be missed, said Principal
David Reilly.
Patel was born in Fremont but moved to
Redwood City at a young age. He enjoyed
building things but was a quiet little one with
hopes of one day being a doctor. Patel attend-
ed Hoover Elementary School through second
grade then North Star Academy from third
through eighth grade. Transitioning to
Woodside was easier than anticipated for Patel
since he joined the football team, which meant
he met people during practice over the sum-
mer months.
Football was a constant for most of Patels
high school days having played every year
except his junior.
I just like the game, he said, adding that
since the season is over, he already misses it
since Patel wont be playing in college.
During his sophomore year, Patel joined the
track team doing sprints in hopes of getting
faster. That same year, Patel joined
Woodsides Students Offering Support
Program by helping with freshman transition.
He continued helping in that capacity through
his senior year. Patel also volunteered at
Sequoia Hospital during his sophomore and
junior years by visiting patients and manning
the information desk.
Patel decided to take a break from football
his junior year to focus on academics. He took
a full load of advanced placement courses and
wanted to focus on it. Patel took that time
instead to focus on a new challenge leader-
ship. Patel served as the junior class president.
In that capacity, he helped with the juniors
who were in charge of the concession stands
at games, helping with prom and planning
graduation.
Patel continued his leadership senior year as
the student body president. The role turned
out to require more work than Patel had antic-
ipated but, in the end, it helped him realize not
to back down. Before taking on each presi-
dential position, Patel attended summer lead-
ership camps at Stanford University and the
University of California at Berkeley.
Patel also contributed at his temple junior
and senior years helping to plan activities for
students in the West Coast region.
Patel will be the rst to tell you he was sur-
prised to be accepted to Harvard. It was his
long shot. Once he got in, Patel had to go. He
isnt sure what hell study but be has an inter-
est in psychology and neuroscience.
Woodsides
graduation is
10 a.m.
Friday, June 8
at the school,
199 Churchill
A v e . ,
Woodside.
Great Grads is
in its seventh
year proling
one graduating
senior from
each of our
local schools.
Schools have
the option to
participate.
Those that
choose to par-
ticipate are
asked to nomi-
nate one stu-
dent who
deserves
A diverse high school experience
Age: 17
City: Redwood City
College: Harvard
University
Major: Undecided
What hell miss about
high school: The
environment of high
school
Biggest life lesson
learned thus far: Dont be scared to be different.
Take the chance and go for it.
Meet Patel
Alleged cabbie stabber unfit for trial
The woman accused of stabbing a cab driver as he drove her
from a Daly City shopping center back home to Pacica and steal-
ing his taxi is mentally unt for trial, accord-
ing to two court-appointed doctors.
Amanda Jenille Aldeguer, 21, will be hos-
pitalized in a state facility until doctors there
deem her able to aid in her own defense on
charges of attempted murder, assault and car-
jacking charges. Aldeguer previously pleaded
not guilty to all charges.
Pacica police arrested Aldeguer March 16
after her mother called 911 for medical help
after seeing an injury on her hand. Authorities
connected it to an earlier stabbing and car-
jacking report in the area of West Manor
Drive and Esplanade Avenue. At that call, they found a bleeding
man, a driver for Serra Yellow Cab, who said a woman he picked
up at Serramonte Center pulled out a knife during the trip to
Pacica and stabbed him in the neck. As he resisted, she contin-
ued to stab, he said. After the driver stopped the car and ed, the
woman later identied as Aldeguer got into the front seat and
drove away. Police found the car near a Pacica park with a knife
inside. The cars video camera recorded the attack, according to
the District Attorneys Ofce.
Aldeguer was apprehended in South San Francisco.
She remains in custody in lieu of $500,000 bail pending a June
26 placement hearing.
Alert neighbor directs police to
in-progress burglary three arrested
A witness reported a possible auto burglary in progress in the
500 block of Monte Diablo Avenue in San Mateo early Sunday
morning and police immediately responded and located three pos-
sible suspects in a nearby vehicle.
The suspects were identied and arrested for auto burglary. A
search of the suspects vehicle resulted in the seizure of numerous
items suspected to be the spoils of several auto burglaries, accord-
ing to San Mateo police. Police will look to match the seized prop-
erty to other crimes. Arrested were Martin Gallardo, 22, of San
Francisco; Sergio Gallardo, 18, of San Francisco; and Jesus
Renteria, 22, of South San Francisco.
The suspects were booked into San Mateo County Jail for bur-
glary, possession of stolen property, possession of burglary tools
and conspiracy.
Local briefs
Amanda
Aldeguer
4
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


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MILLBRAE I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a red-fag. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the Archdiocese of Los
Angeles has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with Stewart Enterprises
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. Stewart Enterprises runs a
website called Catholic Mortuaries.com
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I dont see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point Im trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesnt mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Half Moon Bay will retain its existing serv-
ices for the rst time in years as tax revenue is
up by about 4 percent.
In past years, the city has had to trim from its
budget considerably as it has contracted out its
police and recreation services to save it about
$990,000 annually. The city has also found
savings of about $350,000 annually through
staff concessions, furloughs and other tactics.
The City Council is currently considering
next years budget, which takes effect July 1,
and will likely subsidize some capital projects
next year by using General Fund revenue.
Although the budget is technically balanced,
the city will have about a $1.1 million decit
next year as it moves to maintain streets, lever-
age grant funds, invest in new trails and pay
down some debt to realize savings in future
years.
The General Fund budget includes revenue
of $11,101,756 and expenditures, including
capital project and reserve funding, of
$12,241,179. This creates a budget decit of
$1,139,423, although the unassigned fund bal-
ance remains at a projected $1,110,256.
City Manager Laura Snideman presented the
scal year 2012-13 budget to the council last
night.
After enduring the most challenging eco-
nomic times the city has ever faced, we now
have legitimate reasons to be proud of our
progress toward scal strength, Snideman
wrote in a prepared statement before the meet-
ing. Without question, the reason we have a
relatively healthy and stable budget today can
be directly attributed to the proactive steps
taken by our City Council. Many difcult deci-
sions were made in recent years, but we can
now look back and verify that these were the
right choices.
Proposed infrastructure projects next year
include: Street resurfacing to maintain the
citys current level; design of the Main Street
Bridge; extending Highway 1 trails; improve-
ments to Smith Field; repair of sewer mains
and enhancement to Highway 1 safety.
Other goals within the budget are to encour-
age long-term scal sustainability by paying
down debt related to a botched development
called Beachwood, funding pension stabiliza-
tion reserves to better withstand unanticipated
uctuations and updating the citys public safe-
ty emergency plan to safeguard the community
in the event of a catastrophe.
Citys finances improve
No cuts to services in Half Moon Bay
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 24-year-old man arrested for possession
and distribution of child pornography in
March was found dead in his San Mateo
home yesterday morning.
Samnang Chun, who lived on the 600
block of First Avenue, likely killed himself
as the San Mateo County Coroners Office is
investigating his death as a suicide, county
Coroner Robert Foucrault wrote the Daily
Journal in an email yesterday.
San Mateo police also confirmed the death
is not being investigated criminally although
police nor the Coroners Office revealed how
he died.
He was arrested March 22 in a countywide
sweep of suspected child pornography users
and distributors that landed 10 in jail,
including 29-year-old Ritha Chun, who was
arrested at the First Avenue residence on
unrelated charges.
Samnang Chun faced felony charges after
police searched his home and found evi-
dence on his computer linking him to the
distribution and possession of child pornog-
raphy. Chuns laptop computer revealed hun-
dreds of child pornography images, accord-
ing to the San Mateo County District
Attorneys Office.
The sweep that landed Samnang Chun in
jail was the result of a Silicon Valley ICAC
Task Force investigation that targeted peer-
to-peer file sharing online, evolving from
previous investigations when suspects often
were identified through chat room decoy
operations, according to police.
Investigators searched for hardcore images
involving pre-pubescent children then con-
nected with the suspects who shared the
images, according to police. Samnang
Chuns individual Internet protocol address
was tracked to the First Avenue home after
which a search warrant was issued and he
was arrested, according to police.
Chun was out on bail after his March 22
arrest and was last in court May 24.
Child porn suspect found dead
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An Oakland man and convicted felon who
is suspected of disguising himself as an elder-
ly white man in a string of Bay Area bank
robberies is in jail, according to police.
Duron Williams, 35, was arrested by police
May 29 in Oakland, according to police.
He is suspected of committing 10 bank rob-
beries and one attempted bank robbery in 11
cities, including a robbery in January at the
First National Bank in Millbrae and another
in at a Citibank in Belmont in March, accord-
ing to the Belmont Police Department.
Police believe Williams was armed with a
rearm during the robberies and that he wore
a sophisticated full-face mask giving him the
appearance of an elderly white man.
Search warrants were executed at homes in
Oakland and Hayward where Williams
resided and detectives allegedly discovered
further evidence implicating him in multiple
bank robberies. Detectives also discovered a
stolen van used in the robberies, according to
police.
On March 22, Belmont
police responded to the
Citibank on Ralston
Avenue on the report of a
robbery and employees
described the suspect as
wearing a flesh-colored
mask to conceal his identi-
ty. Williams allegedly
entered the bank alone
armed with a handgun and
passed a note to a teller demanding money,
according to police.
After receiving an undisclosed amount of
cash, Williams was seen eeing the area on
foot, according to police.
The Alameda County District Attorneys
Ofce charged Williams with several counts
of robbery, assault with a deadly weapon,
being armed with a rearm during the com-
mission of a felony, convicted felon in pos-
session of a rearm and vehicle theft.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Prolific bank robbery suspect jailed
Masked man suspected of robbing banks in Millbrae, Belmont
Duron Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Senate Republicans
have blocked a bill that calls for equal pay in
the workplace.
As expected, the vote Tuesday fell short of
the 60 votes needed to advance the legislation.
President Obama and his Democratic allies
argue that the legislation is needed to protect
people who try to nd out how their pay stacks
up against their coworkers. Republicans said it
puts too much burden on employers.
The vote was the latest effort by Democrats
to protect their lead among critical women
voters this presidential and congressional
election year.
Senate Republicans block
Democrats equal pay bill
6
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A man convicted of rampaging through one
closed Redwood City business, looting two
others and attacking vehicles with a re extin-
guisher late last summer pleaded no contest to
an unrelated weapon possession charge led
while he was out of custody on bail.
Kevin Michael Dolf, who in March pleaded
no contest to second-degree burglary and van-
dalism, also pleaded no contest this week to
felony possession of shuriken, a Japanese
throwing star, and admitted committing a new
felony while out on bail. He also admitted
having a prior criminal strike. Sentencing for
both cases, plus the defense request to omit
the strike, was set for July 25.
Dolf, 32, was rst arrested Aug. 14 after
causing an estimated $18,000 worth of dam-
age to downtown Redwood City businesses.
He began by smashing out the windshields
and windows of three cars on Main Street
before continuing the so-called rampage
inside a closed business.
Dolf allegedly broke the
glass doors and windows
of two other businesses,
ransacking the interiors
and putting stolen property
in outside trash bins to
later be wheeled away.
When Redwood City
police arrived, Dolf
allegedly barricaded him-
self inside one business and hid inside a cabi-
net in hope of eluding a police dog.
After police arrested Dolf, they reported he
appeared under the inuence of drugs and had
cocaine in his pocket.
A month after taking a plea deal in that case
and awaiting sentencing out of custody on
$50,000 bail, Dolf was arrested on suspicion
of possessing methamphetamine and the
shuriken.
He is in custody on $45,000 bail in the new
case and $60,000 on the older case.
Convicted vandal picks up new conviction
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Gay marriage took
another step Tuesday on its march to the U.S.
Supreme Court, when a federal appeals court
that struck down Californias ban on same-sex
unions refused to reconsider the ruling.
Now that the case has run its course in the
9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the mea-
sures sponsors absolutely plan to take the
case to the high court, said Brian Raum, a
lawyer with the Alliance Defense Fund, a
Christian legal defense group.
Backers of the ban, known as Proposition 8,
now have 90 days to petition the Supreme
Court to review the nding that the ban vio-
lates the civil rights of gay men and lesbians in
California.
If at least four justices agree to accept the
case, oral arguments would likely be held next
spring.
The developments came after the 9th U.S.
Circuit declined to review a February ruling
by two of its member judges who found the
states voter-approved same-sex marriage ban
was unconstitutional, in part because it
rescinded a right that gay and lesbian
Californians already had won.
Same sex unions briey were legal in the
state before 52 percent of voters approved the
ban in November 2008.
Gay marriage supporters welcomed the lat-
est news in the long-running legal battle. If the
Supreme Court refuses to take up the case and
lets the appellate ruling stand, same-sex mar-
riages could be legal again in California by the
end of the year.
Gay marriage ban backers
look to U.S. Supreme Court
Kevin Dolf
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park,
will challenge Republican George Yang for
the Assembly District 24 seat in November
after yesterdays open primary election elimi-
nated the other two candidates in the race.
The new district covers parts of San Mateo
and Santa Clara counties and Gordon earned
55.4 percent of the vote.
Yang, a rst-time candidate from Menlo
Park, earned 29.7 percent of the vote.
Now that there are only two candidates in
the race, hopefully I can differentiate myself
from my opponent, Yang told the Daily
Journal last night.
The other two candidates for the redrawn
seat, Geby Espinosa and Joe Rosas, both rst-
time candidates, trailed far behind the top two
vote getters.
Espinosa, from Mountain View, earned
about 10 percent of the vote and Rosas, from
Sunnyvale, earned about 5 percent of the vote.
Yang realizes he will be outspent in the race
by incumbent Gordon and is hoping his grass-
roots campaign gains some steam in the com-
ing months as he spells out
his proposals on pension
reform and protecting edu-
cation. He is also looking
to attract some volunteers
eager to put a Republican
in the seat.
Gordon, who served on
the San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors for
13 years, won nearly 60
percent of the vote in San Mateo County and
about 54 percent of the vote in Santa Clara
County.
Gordon, 63, looks at the states projected
$16 billion decit as its biggest problem. He
supports Gov. Jerry Browns tax initiatives on
the November ballot and wants the state to
start tackling the budget in two-year cycles
and to implement more performance-based
standards when funding state agencies. He
also favors reducing the number of bills an
Assembly member can introduce and is one of
the main proponents behind the blended sys-
tem for high-speed rail trains to share the
tracks locally with Caltrain, keeping cost and
disruption at a minimum.
In the region, Gordon said his constituents
are most concerned about
education.
There is a deep concern
about underinvestment,
Gordon told the Daily
Journal previously. Our
economic success is driven
by the intelligence of our
community.
Yang, 35, was the only
Republican in yesterdays
open primary for the Assembly seat. He is a
software engineer from China who is not
looking to make a career out of politics.
Fixing the states education problem will
require more than money, he said.
He does support pension reform and thinks
the states high-speed rail project should be
constructed in the East Bay and not on the
Peninsula.
Regarding pension reform, he thinks public
sector salaries should be tied to the median
salary in the private sector, factoring in the
states unemployment rate.
He also has ideas to boost tourism in the
district by attracting more visitors from China.
The two will square off in the Nov. 6 gener-
al election.
Gordon to face Republican in November
Rich Gordon George Yang
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
South San Francisco Councilman Kevin
Mullin easily earned the most votes against
his Republican rival in yesterdays open pri-
mary but, because there were only two candi-
dates in the race, Mullin will once again have
to get past Mark Gilham in the November
general election.
Mullin earned more than 68 percent of the
vote to Gilhams 32 percent.
Mullin, 41, intends to run for the seat as an
underdog and has about $200,000 in cam-
paign donations to spend
on the race. He has also
earned the endorsements
of U.S. reps. Jackie Speier,
D-San Mateo, Anna
Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, and
Assemblyman Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo. Mullins
father, Gene, also previ-
ously served in the
Assembly in Hills current
seat.
His opponent, Gilham, is a Republican out
of Redwood City who is running for ofce for
the rst time.
Gilham, 50, expects to
be vastly outspent in the
race as he has received vir-
tually no contributions to
his campaign.
Both, coincidentally, are
videographers by trade,
each running their own
businesses.
Their ideologies, how-
ever, are very different.
Mullin wins big, faces same candidate in November
Kevin Mullin
See MULLIN, Page 20
State voters
approve term
limit reform
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES California voters
tweaked term limits Tuesday to shave two
years off the total time lawmakers can serve in
the state Legislature, but will allow them to
spend their tenure in one house.
Supporters said Proposition 28 will estab-
lish consistency and reduce the inuence of
lobbyists.
California will have the best of both
worlds when it comes to the state
Legislature, said Dan Schnur, a former
Republican consultant who helped pass the
1990 term limits initiative and now directs the
Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at the
University of Southern California. On the
one hand, term limits will be even tougher,
which will mean fresh voices in Sacramento,
but it also will mean lawmakers will have the
tools to do their job before they return home.
The measure had about two-thirds support
with more than 2 million votes cast.
Proposition 28 will limit lawmakers to 12
years, but allow them to spend that time in one
house or a combination in both houses of the
state Legislature. Currently, lawmakers can
serve up to three two-year terms in the
Assembly and two four-year terms in the
Senate, for a total of 14 years.
The 1990 ballot measure that gave
California some of the strictest term limits in
the country was sold as a way to reduce the
power of special interest groups. Good gov-
ernment organizations argued that it accom-
plished the opposite, assuring the statehouse
would be lled with inexperienced politicians
who are overly reliant on lobbyists and
bureaucrats to help them write legislation.
See PROP. 28 Page 20
Mark Gilham
LOCAL/STATE 7
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Drive-in site moves forward
South City officer shoots man
A man was sent to San Francisco General Hospital in criti-
cal condition after being shot by a South San Francisco police
ofcer at the Arco gas station at 2300 Westborough Blvd. last
night.
At approximately 9 p.m., an ofcer encountered a man act-
ing suspicious in the gas station parking lot. The man made a
suspicious movement and the ofcer shot him, according to
South San Francisco police Sgt. Bruce McPhillips. The man
did have a weapon, McPhillips added.
Investigation into the incident is ongoing, McPhillips said.
There was only one ofcer involved, he added.
Developer planning large-scale office building on
Burlingame Bayfront, public hearing set for June 18
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A proposal to build a series of large ofce buildings, possibly
the home to biotech companies, at the now-vacant former
Burlingame Drive-in, is set for a public hearing later this month
after the City Council introduced ordinances necessary to possi-
bly approve the project.
Millennium Partners, New York-based developers of mixed-
used properties, applied in April 2010 to develop the 18.13-acre
site a project now known as Burlingame Point, located at 300
Airport Blvd. (also known as 350 Beach Road). Plans call for
689,810 square feet of ofce space in two ve-story buildings,
one seven-story building and one eight-story building. In
December 2010, the City Council approved an agreement to con-
duct an environmental review of the project, which became avail-
able for review late last year. In May, the Planning Commission
gave unanimous support for the proposal.
On Monday, the Burlingame City Council introduced three
ordinances to amend zoning and establish a development agree-
ment. The move was needed so the council can hold a public
hearing about the development Monday, June 18.
While the council was excited about the proposal, possible
issues were mentioned in hopes of giving developers time to pre-
pare responses before the public hearing.
Vice Mayor Ann Keighran, for example, took issue with one
condition that would allow space that is supposed to be dedicat-
ed to retail and restaurants to be used as ofce space if not lled
after two years. Mayor Jerry Deal agreed and suggested perhaps
there should be a process to review any alternative uses.
There were also suggestions about creating the development as
a destination for the community on weekends by offering some-
thing like a bike rentals shop and a water fountain for those exer-
cising in the area.
As proposed, the project will provide space for either ofce or
biotech use. When last changed, the zoning for the Bayfront was
altered to be open for biotech. There would also be a two-story,
33,400-square-foot amenities building that would include a
child-care facility, exercise facility and a cafe/break room.
Parking would be offered in a ve-story parking structure and a
podium-level parking area below the four ofce buildings and in
smaller lots scattered around the site.
Councilman Michael Brownrigg noted that the development
would call for a denser oor area ratio than currently in the reg-
ulations. He felt like it was a fair tradeoff given the developers
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES A California ballot
initiative to raise the tax on cigarettes that
pitted big-spending tobacco companies
against cycling legend Lance Armstrong
and the New York City Mayor was too
close to call Tuesday night.
A blizzard of industry-nanced radio
and television advertisements over the
last two months closed the gap on an
effort to impose an additional $1-per-
pack tax on cigarettes to fund cancer
research.
In March, a statewide poll suggested
the measure would pass with two-thirds
approval. But support slipped to 51 per-
cent of the vote with more than 2.5 mil-
lion ballots cast.
With millions of votes still to be count-
ed, it could be days or longer before a
winner is declared.
The attempt to hike taxes on cigarettes
and other tobacco products became a
national ght with tobacco companies
pouring in millions to quash the effort and
celebrities urging voters to support it.
Tobacco taxes have been proven to
reduce smoking. But opponents said the
initiative would create an unaccountable
bureaucracy and hurt the economy by
sending tax money raised in California to
other states.
An extra tax in the nations most popu-
lous state also could mean major losses
for tobacco companies.
Both camps said Tuesday night that
they had anticipated a close race and
remained condent.
Its going to be a long night, and thats
what we expected, said Beth Miller,
spokeswoman for the no on 29 campaign.
Its been a question of the voters taking
a look and deciding that they really didnt
want to support this measure, but its also
coupled with the fact that people general-
ly do support cancer research.
Supporters promised the tax revenue
would stay in California and said tobacco
companies were inventing arguments to
obscure their true motive safeguarding
prots.
Weve been ahead all night and we
expect to stay ahead, Jim Knox of the
American Cancer Society said Tuesday.
I think the public health message has
gotten through the smoke screen of the
tobacco companies nearly $50 million
misinformation campaign.
Armstrong and a coalition of anti-
smoking groups raised about $18 million
to bolster the measure. New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg gave
$500,000 to the campaign to help offset
the industry donations.
The tax would generate about $735
million a year, according to the independ-
ent legislative analysts ofce.
Voters on both sides of the issue
expressed strong convictions Tuesday.
I think that we should aggressively
discourage smoking make it less con-
venient, make it more expensive, said
Susan Hyman, a Democrat who cast her
ballot at a Long Beach polling station.
In nearby Glendale, Craig Jerpseth, a
43 year-old nurse, was equally certain
about voting the measure down, along
with anything or anyone who might mean
more taxes.
Voters split on $1 per pack tobacco tax
Local brief
Rendering of the Burlingame Point proposal.
See DRIVE-IN, Page 20
LOCAL/NATION 8
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Thursdays, 48pm
Downtown Laurel Street
For more information, visit www.sancarloschamber.org
Brought to you by: Music sponsored by:
Lesly Joseph Moresco
Lesly Joseph Moresco, born June 3, 1920,
died May 26, 2012.
Lesly Moresco was the
youngest of 10 children in
Vacaville and later moved
to San Francisco and
worked the family grocery
store. Moresco was a pro-
fessional accordion player
at the Palace of Fine Arts
in 1939 during the Worlds
Fair, and during World
War II he was an Air Force crew chief repair-
ing airplanes in the European theater. He
moved to Millbrae with wife Barbara until her
death in 2002, then to Palm Desert where he
lived out remainder of his life. He worked in
construction for more than 40 years and was
an active member and past president of both
the Millbrae Lions Club and the Peninsula
Council of Lions. He recently renewed his
love of music with the accordion and singing
karaoke.
Survived by sons Dennis and Michael,
daughters-in-law Patricia and Rita, four
grandchildren Daniel, James, Nicholas and
Alex, and his dearest friend, companion and
confidant of the last nine years Fran
Morehouse.
Lesly loved life because he loved people
and he was loved by all. He will be greatly
missed by all of his friends in the Del Webb
Community of Palm Desert and throughout
the San Francisco Bay Area.
Family and friends may visit on Friday, June
8 after 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. at the Chapel of the
Highlands, El Camino real at 194 Millwood
Drive in Millbrae, with a vigil service begin-
ning at 6 p.m. Committal at Holy Cross
Catholic Cemetery in Colma will be private.
Remembrances can be sent to your favorite
charity.
Patricia Churchill
Patricia Churchill, born May 24, 1916, died
May 12, 2012 after a courageous two-year
battle with lung cancer just
12 days shy of her 96th
birthday.
Pat worked for Dr. Allen
Scott (orthodontist), Dr.
Breit and Dr. Dashbauch,
the Nabisco Company in
San Francisco and
Norwich Pharma. She was
President of the Womens
Club at Chapel of Our Savior in Colorado
Springs, Colo. Pat married Air Force pilot, Lt.
Col. Eugene Churchill (deceased 2005) in
January 1943 and is survived by children;
Thomas Churchill, Susan Churchill and
granddaughter, Corey Churchill. Gene and
family were stationed at Hamilton Field,
Calif.; Richards-Gebaur in Kansas City, Mo.,
ENT Air Force base in Colorado Springs,
Colo.; and Perrin Air Force Base in Denison,
Texas. In all, there were 11 moves with the Air
Force and more than 20 years of service to our
beloved country. The family returned to their
home in San Mateo in 1966 when Gene retired
from the Air Force.
Pat attended Park School, San Mateo High
School and College of San Mateo. She loved
cheering on the San Francisco Giants, KNBR,
crossword puzzles, reading and her police
scanner. Her wonderful sense of humor, per-
sonality, kindness and knitting skills will be
greatly missed. No service will be held at her
request.
Irma Hedlin
Irma Hedlin, of Hayward, formerly of San
Bruno, died at her home June 3, 2012.
She was 61.
She is survived by her daughter Lisa Hedlin
and sons Shawn and Brian Hedlin, three
grandchildren and two brothers, two sisters
and her mother Juanita Mersinger. She was a
native of El Salvador and relocated to the
United States at 8 years of age with her par-
ents, Jacob and Juanita Mersinger. She was
the former wife of the late Dale Hedlin and
was preceded in death by her father Jacob
Mersinger.
Family and friends may visit after 2 p.m.
Sunday, June 10 and attend the 4 p.m. funeral
liturgy service at the Chapel of the Highlands,
194 Millwood Drive at El Camino Real in
Millbrae. Committal services will be at Holy
Cross Cemetery in Colma at a later date.
Bill Freitas
Bill Freitas, resident of San Mateo, died after
a long illness on May 30, 2012 at the age of 49.
Bill lived in San Mateo his whole life and
was an electrician and a member of IBEW
Local 617. He will be remembered for his love
of baseball, the Giants, motorcycles and dirt-
bike riding. Bill was preceded in death by his
loving grandparents Tom and Marie Wallace
and is survived by his daughter Hallie Freitas
and her mother Maura Freitas; mother Barbara
Freitas; sister Sheri (Anthony) Mendes; nieces
Deborah Mendes Jones and Jacelyn Mendes.
Friends are invited to a 7 p.m. memorial
service Friday, June 8 at Crippen & Flynn
Carlmont Chapel, 1111 Alameda de las Pulgas
in Belmont. Friends may sign the guestbook at
www.crippenynn.com.
Kenneth Dale Dotson
Kenneth Dale Dotson, of San Mateo, died at
his home May 21, 2012.
He was the husband of the late Yolanda
Dotson and is survived by his sons, James
Dotson, Rudy Lopez (his wife, Elizabeth) and
Steve Lopez (his wife, Star), three grandchil-
dren, his mother Elizabeth Ruth Stubbles, his
brother Gary Dotson and sister Shirley Gilletti.
He was the son of the late Lennie Dotson,
father of the late Daniel Dotson and brother to
the late Ron Dotson and Ardith Tougher.
He was a native of South San Francisco, age
68 and was a production manager for L3
Communications for more than 43 years.
Family and friends are invited to a memori-
al service to celebrate Kens life 2 p.m.
Saturday, June 23 at the Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El Camino
Real in Millbrae. Private inurnment will be at
Olivet Memorial Park in Colma. The family
suggests memorial contributions be made to
your favorite charity.
Obituaries
CITY GOVERNMENT
San Bruno will study the recommended 2012-13 general fund, spe-
cial revenue funds and enterprise funds budgets at a study session to be
held 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 in room 115 at City Hall, 567 El Camino
Real, San Bruno.
By Scott Bauer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MADISON, Wis. Wisconsin Gov. Scott
Walker beat back a recall challenge Tuesday,
winning both the right to nish his term and a
voter endorsement of his strategy to curb state
spending, which included the explosive meas-
ure that eliminated union rights for most public
workers.
The rising Republican star becomes the rst
governor in U.S. history to survive a recall
attempt with his defeat of Milwaukee Mayor
Tom Barrett and the union leaders who rallied
for months against his agenda.
In an interview, Walker said it was time to
put our differences aside and nd ways to work
together to move Wisconsin forward.
The governor said he planned to invite law-
makers to meet as soon as next week over burg-
ers and brats to discuss ways to bridge the polit-
ical divide.
With more than 60 percent of precincts
reporting, Walker was ahead 57 percent to 42
percent for Barrett, according to early returns
tabulated by the Associated
Press.
A Barrett spokesman said
the campaign was not con-
ceding, citing ongoing vot-
ing in Milwaukee, Madison
and Racine.
Democrats and organized
labor spent millions to oust
Walker, but found them-
selves hopelessly outspent
by Republicans from
across the country who donated record-setting
sums to Walker. Republicans hope the victory
carries over into November and that their get-
out-the-vote effort can help Mitt Romney
become the rst GOP nominee to carry the state
since Ronald Reagan in 1984.
Romney issued a statement saying Walkers
victory will echo beyond the borders of
Wisconsin.
Walker has shown that citizens and taxpay-
ers can ght back and prevail against the
runaway government costs imposed by labor
bosses, Romney said.
U.S. official: Al-Qaida
No. 2 killed by U.S. drone
WASHINGTON A U.S. ofcial says a
drone strike in Pakistans northwest tribal region
has killed al-Qaidas second-in-command.
The death of Abu Yahya al-Libi is a signi-
cant blow to the terror network, which has lost a
string of top leaders at the hands of the
American drone program.
The ofcial, who spoke on condition of
anonymity to discuss intelligence matters, says
that no one left in al-Qaida comes close to
replacing the expertise al-Qaida has just lost.
Al-Libi would be the latest in the dozen-plus
senior commanders removed in the clandestine
U.S. war against al-Qaida since Navy SEALs
killed Osama bin Laden just over a year ago.
Eyes turn skyward as
Venus travels across the sun
HONOLULU None of us will likely see
Venus pass, like a moving beauty spot, across
the face of the sun again. From the U.S. to South
Korea, people around the world turned their
attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and
early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they
caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The
next one wont be for another 105 years.
If you can see the mole on Cindy Crawfords
face, you can see Venus, Van Webster, a mem-
ber of the Los Angeles Astronomical Society,
told anyone who stopped by his telescope for a
peek on Mount Hollywood.
Walker survives recall
election in Wisconsin
Around the nation
Scott Walker
OPINION 9
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Thrive thanks Jackie Speier
Editor,
On behalf of Thrive the Alliance of
Nonprots for San Mateo County, I want to
thank U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
for recently convening a meeting of San
Mateo County core safety net service
providers and community based organizations,
along with county and city representatives to
discuss ways we can lift some of the barriers
to participation in the federal food stamps pro-
gram (CalFresh). Congresswoman Speier rec-
ognizes that the nonprot community is at the
front lines of helping those most in need in
our community and had the foresight to part-
ner with us to brainstorm ideas for the more
effective provision of federal resources. Thrive
was proud to serve as a planning partner for
this meeting.
Porcia Chen Silverberg
Redwood City
The letter writer is the executive director of
Thrive The Alliance of Nonprots for San
Mateo County.
Poll proves high-speed rail
unaffordable and unwanted
Editor,
A May 29, 2012 USC/LA Times statewide
poll shows, again, that Californians over-
whelmingly do not want California legislators
to authorize the sale of new HSR bonds/debt,
and that the project should be killed. This fol-
lows ve other statewide polls (Field,
SurveyUSA, etc.) all conrming that
Californians want limited tax dollars spent on
seniors, parks, teachers, mental facilities (75
percent) versus a high-speed rail train (11 per-
cent) that 70 percent said they would never
ride. And Gov. Jerry Browns new proposal to
trash and burn the environmentally required
California Environmental Quality Act review
of this high-speed rail project is an assault on
the Sierra Club and all environmentalists who
fought so hard for these environmental protec-
tions. If you care about the environment,
emissions, etc. then you must contact your
Sacramento representatives to object to this
rape of CEQA.
The high-speed rail boondoggles continued
existence illustrates why most reasonable peo-
ple leave California i.e. politicians lie about
a bad budget to convince you to raise taxes
to save K-12 children supplies, only to spend
those taxes on a Union-fed HSR farces that
polls repeatedly show Californians dont want.
Well, at least the taxes will be defeated.
Mike Brown
Burlingame
Leaf blower regulations
Editor,
Apparently, the Burlingame City Council
has nothing better to do than to change the
laws regarding leaf blowers in Burlingame.
Now all gardeners will have only one day in
an assigned area when they will be allowed to
mow. This will mean that one day a week, all
homes in that one area will have many gar-
deners mowing and blowing and making noise
rather than having it as it is now with noise
and pollution only occasionally. If more
money is whats desired, and it seems to be
the case, then go ahead and require the leaf
blowers to be inspected and collect the money,
but do not impair the gardeners from making a
living as they see t. Its a free country.
The idea of having only one day a week,
without being ned, for mowing is ridiculous.
What if for two weeks, on the day your gar-
dener is scheduled, it rains so heavily the lawn
cant be mowed? What if you have a special
occasion for which youd like your lawns
mowed, but its the wrong day for your gar-
dener? What if the homeowner can only mow
his lawn on a weekday?
All problems do not have to be addressed
by new legislation. A sensible approach to
inspecting equipment and allowing gardeners
free reign to schedule their customers would
be reasonable. I hope the council will rethink
this silly law.
Barbara Nagata
Burlingame
DMB and Cargills facetious plans
Editor,
DMB Associates and Cargill Inc. veiled
their aggressive development plans under the
euphemism of the more appealing name
Saltworks and a 50-50 balanced plan
designed solely by them. They showered the
Redwood City community with a massive PR
campaign that would put a politician to
shame. DMB/Cargill, counting on a couple of
local politicians and launching catered recep-
tions, extensive advertising and (heretofore
limited) charitable donations, lobbied the
Redwood City community for several years to
accept their expansive Bay development plan.
It now seems evident that, in their arro-
gance, DMB/Cargill (both rms out of state)
seriously underestimated the Bay Areas sup-
port for preserving the Bay.
Sobered by the pushback on their haughty
plans, these rms are now seeking to dene
the jurisdiction of the Environmental
Protection Agency and the Army Corps of
Engineers before proceeding to involve more
Redwood City resources in another plan. I
suspect some others might wisely have chosen
this action as a rst step.
R J Donovan
Redwood City
Yes, the end could justify the means!
Editor,
I think its absolutely fabulous that a young
student such as 18-year-old Justin Combs
earned a full athletic scholarship to the
University of California (in response to
Michelle Durands column When does the
end justify the means? in the June 5 edition
of the Daily Journal). I see a compromise in
the making, where we honor the merits of
another student who has earned their way and
didnt receive a scholarship (and whose par-
ents were not nancially well off). So what to
do?
I recommend that Sean Combs sponsor a
nancially needy student with a similar schol-
arship. The scholarship would be a pay-as-
you-go each year for a worthy student who
could not normally afford to go to the
University of California at Berkeley. The
recipient would have to demonstrate their
advancement based on grades and proper
comportment. As an added incentive, the
donated scholarship might become tax-
deductible. The money for the scholarship
would be placed into an escrow account. The
downside for athletic scholarships is that the
scholarship may not continue if the student
does not perform adequately. That should not
affect the donated scholarship and is a risk
that Mr. Combs might take as an offset to the
tax deduction.
Lastly, this idea should be advanced to other
parents whose children earned a scholarship
so that students in need have the means to
advance their scholarship! Parenthetically, per-
haps the Daily Journal can forward this rec-
ommendation to Sean Combs and maybe
other nancially secure parents will donate
similar scholarships small donations can be
bundled into a larger singular scholarship!
Jack Kirkpatrick
Redwood City
What about jobs?
Editor,
Republican presidential hopeful Mitt
Romney insists that only the private sector
creates jobs. He conveniently ignores that, in
an organized society, government creates jobs
in defense, justice, law enforcement, re ght-
ing, education, research, libraries, museums,
infrastructure (roads, bridges, harbors, air-
ports, governmental buildings, tunnels, dams,
parks), regulatory agencies, foreign service,
air trafc control, space exploration, VA hos-
pitals, monetary and postal services, local,
state and federal administration and many oth-
ers.
Besides being the largest direct job creator,
governmental services also stimulate the econ-
omy by creating additional private jobs to
meet the needs of the public functions and
projects. While government creates jobs
deemed necessary for the common good, and
not for prot, the private sector handles the
rest, mostly for prot.
Its not a matter of either public or private
entities and jobs, but the synergy between all
functions, where many can only be handled by
government and not with prot as a goal. How
can Romney promote himself as qualied for
the top ofce because he allegedly knows how
to create jobs, despite claiming that govern-
ment cannot, and should not, create jobs? At
Bain he destroyed jobs, or outsourced with
negative impacts on the U.S. economy.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Seeing things in
different ways
T
here was a time a few years back
when a group of friends and I went
on a road trip to Eastern Oregon to
deliver some paintings for an art show. The
artist was on the trip, along with his best
friend, his best
friends girlfriend, and
me. It was an interest-
ing trip for several
reasons, including the
belief we saw ying
deer, we made a
wrong turn from the
highway into a resi-
dential neighborhood
at 75 mph, and the
fact that the
speedometer of the
Dodge Caravan got
stuck at 80 mph when,
I, in fact was driving signicantly faster. I
only learned I was going faster than 120 mph
when the speedometer got unstuck and it
pegged out at the highest speed that could be
recorded on the minivan for a good ve sec-
onds before dropping down. Before that, I had
thought the trafc was going eerily slow.
About the ying deer: It turned out we were
driving on the side of a mountain we couldnt
quite see and the deer were just jumping to
the lower side of the mountain on the other
side of the road right in front of our wind-
shield.
It was one of those spur-of-the-moment
weekend trips that required a lot of time in the
car. On the way up, we decided to stop at a
roadside diner for an early breakfast. The
place was nice enough, lled with various arts
and crafts that one might eventually see in a
thrift store. The waitress had done much of
the work herself and, upon learning that we
were on a trip to deliver artwork, wanted to
see my friends paintings. His work was best
described as disturbing. He liked to take old
thrift store paintings and put his own touch on
them my favorite painting was a dead deer
being barbecued whole on an undersized grill
in front of a traditional landscape of moun-
tains, a river and trees. It was cartoon-like and
funny. But the waitress was less than
impressed. She tried to maintain a pleasant
demeanor, but I could tell she was rattled. She
wanted to know what made it art. And why
my friend had altered perfectly good paintings
for what he called art. He was pleasant
enough in return, but also annoyed that he had
to explain his ne art culled at the San
Francisco Art Institute to someone he thought
of as a lesser artist, someone who made crafts.
The conversation resonated with me for
years. As much as I liked my friend, I thought
his attitude toward the waitress was a little
pompous. There is a reason why people say
beauty is in the eye of the beholder and art is
subjective. Some people think modifying thrift
store paintings is art, others think a fake
ower arrangement is art.
I was reminded of this experience when I
encountered someone who just moved to
Burlingame and they asked a friend who
worked at the Apple Store what the city was
like. They reported their friend said
Burlingame is full of old rich people. Its like
when I was a child and thought the Peninsula
was full of power lines, ofce buildings and
trash since my only experience with it was
Highway 101. Both are myopic observations.
Its like the fable of the blind men with the
elephant. One felt the leg and said the ele-
phant was like a pillar. One felt the tail and
said the elephant was like a rope. One felt the
trunk and said the elephant was like a tree
trunk. One felt the ear and said the elephant
was like a hand fan. One felt the belly and
said the elephant was like a wall. And one felt
the tusk and said the elephant was like a solid
pipe.
No one is wrong, and all are right. But they
all sense a singular thing in a very different
way. At a newspaper, our goal is to see all
sides and present the most accurate picture
possible. And that is an ongoing challenge.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily
Journal. He can be reached at jon@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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we choose to reect the diverse character of this
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,127.95 +0.22% 10-Yr Bond 1.556 +1.90%
Nasdaq2,778.11 +0.66% Oil (per barrel) 84.230003
S&P 500 1,285.50 +0.57% Gold 1,618.10
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK As world leaders
searched for a way out of Europes
mounting debt crisis, U.S. investors
moved to the sidelines.
The major market indexes closed
modestly higher, after wavering between
slight gains and losses throughout the
morning. Trading volume was light and
the stock moves were small. In Europe,
markets were mixed.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
26.49 points, or 0.2 percent, to
12,127.95. It traded within a range of 75
points, one of the narrowest of the year.
Timothy McCandless, senior stock
analyst at Bel Air Investment Advisors in
Los Angeles, described Tuesdays mar-
ket as stuck in purgatory: The economy
is not strong enough to represent a
healthy recovery, but not weak enough
for the Federal Reserve to do more to
help.
Its wrestling with those two sides,
McCandless said. Were right in
between.
Finance ministers and central bank
presidents from the worlds seven
wealthiest nations held an emergency
conference call to discuss how Europe
can heal its weakest countries without
alienating the stronger ones that have to
foot the bill. Leaders are worried that
Spain and Cyprus, which are scrambling
for money to prop up their troubled
banks, will soon need to be bailed out by
their richer counterparts.
As we saw in Lehman Brothers, when
fear hits the banking system, it shuts
down, said Jim Millstein, CEO of the
advisory rm Millstein & Co. and a for-
mer Treasury ofcial who oversaw the
agencys investments in AIG and other
troubled nancial institutions.
The call didnt yield any concrete
solutions for Europe, at least not pub-
licly. Several investors who were unsure
of what to do Tuesday said they expect
more clarity and perhaps more drama
later this month, after Greece holds
elections June 17 and world leaders from
the nations known as the Group of 20
meet for the two days afterward.
Spain isnt part of the Group of Seven,
the countries that held the conference
call, but the U.S. and Germany are. As
the G-7 leaders met, Spains prime min-
ister issued a plea for Europe to support
those that are in difculty.
Stocks inch higher
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
US Airways Group Inc., up 44 cents at $11.62
The airline said that a key measure of passenger
revenue rose about 6 percent in May compared
with the same month last year.
Dollar General Corp., down $1.73 at $46.76
The discount retailer said that its rst-quarter
prot rose 36 percent, but its revenue was just
below Wall Street expectations.
Mednax Inc., up $1.44 at $61.64
A Stifel Nicolaus analyst initiated coverage of
the medical group with a Buyrating,citing the
companys prospects for growth.
Nasdaq
Starbucks Corp., down $1.49 at $52.41
The coffee chain said that it is increasing its
offerings in the highly competitive food market
by buying a small bakery chain for $100 million.
Complete Genomics Inc., up 14 cents at $2.18
The life sciences company will lay off about 20
percent of its workforce to cut costs and explore
strategic options.
Westport Innovations Inc., up $4.75 at $27.02
The natural gas engine maker said that it
reached a deal with Caterpillar Inc. to jointly
develop engines for off-road equipment.
G-III Apparel Group Ltd., up 93 cents at $24.93
The apparel maker said that its rst-quarter loss
widened, but its results met the expectations
of Wall Street analysts.
Layne Christensen Co., up 62 cents at $19.22
The drilling and construction services provider
said rst-quarter net income fell,but its revenue
rose and beat analysts expectations.
Big movers
Google buys maker of Quickoffice mobile app
SAN FRANCISCO Google is escalating its rivalry
with Microsoft with the purchase of Quickofce, the maker
of a widely used mobile application for working on docu-
ments created in Microsofts programs for word process-
ing, spreadsheets and presentations.
The deal announced Tuesday gives Google Inc. a new
weapon to foil Microsoft Corp. as more people get work
done on smartphones and tablet computers. Quickofce
makes those devices compatible with Microsoft Ofce even
if the software suite isnt installed on them.
Although it makes virtually all of its money from online
advertising, Google already has spent several years trying
to siphon sales away from Microsoft by offering its own
suite of Ofce-like programs that are accessible over the
Internet. Some of these applications, called Google Docs,
are given away for free, while more sophisticated versions,
called Google Apps, are sold in subscription packages cost-
ing $50 annually per user.
Forrester Research analyst Ted Schadler said Googles
online applications dont interact well with Microsoft
Office files on mobile devices, a shortcoming that
Quickofce presumably will address.
Oracle buying Collective Intellect
REDWOOD SHORES Oracle is buying Collective
Intellect Inc. for an undisclosed sum as it expands its social
media tracking services.
Collective Intellect helps businesses monitor and respond
to consumer conversations on Facebook, Twitter and other
social media platforms. Clients can then use this data to
improve products, customer service, marketing campaigns
and nd new customers. The privately held company was
founded in 2005 and is based in Boulder, Colo.
The software maker announced the deal Tuesday, one
day after Salesforce.com Inc. said that it would buy social
media marketing company Buddy Media. As more compa-
nies promote themselves on social media, technology com-
panies are looking for ways to help customers manage their
presence in those mediums.
Business briefs
By David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRANKFURT, Germany The
European Central Bank has a powerful
weapon that just might push political
leaders into helping solve the continents
nancial crisis: withholding further sup-
port.
The ECB isnt likely to take any new
steps when it meets Wednesday, analysts
say, even as anxiety builds over the dete-
riorating outlook for Europes economy
and banking system.
ECB President Mario Draghi signaled
last week that he wants to see stronger
political and nancial ties among the 17
countries that use the euro. If such ties
are forged possibly at a European
Union summit later this month ana-
lysts say the ECB would be more likely
to reward European governments and
banks with the nancial shot in the arm
they desperately need.
Its a risky game because euro coun-
tries are in big trouble.
Spains borrowing costs are rising to
an unsustainable level as the country
struggles to come up with billions to
prop up banks saddled by bad real estate
loans. Concerns are rising that it could
be forced to join Ireland, Greece and
Portugal in seeking an international
financial rescue. Spains economy is
much larger than the other three, making
its problems an order of magnitude more
worrisome for European leaders.
In just over two weeks, Greek voters
return to the polls. If they elect a gov-
ernment that rejects the terms of the
countrys multibillion-euro bailout, this
could force the country out of the euro
an outcome that would have uncer-
tain and potentially dire consequences
for global nancial markets.
All across Europe, ailing banks and
governments are joined at the hip.
Bailing out banks has been a huge bur-
den on governments; and weakened gov-
ernment nances have been a drag on
banks that own government bonds.
Over the past week, some of Europes
leading authorities have been pushing
political leaders to act quickly to break
this burdensome link.
The European Commission called on
politicians last Wednesday to create a
central European authority with the
nancial muscle to x the continents
broken banks. The next day, Draghi
echoed those comments, saying the cur-
rent setup of the 17-country currency
union was unsustainable.
ECB withholding further support
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Former President
Bill Clinton said Tuesday that broad tax
cuts that expire in January should be
temporarily renewed, including for the
wealthiest Americans, to give lawmakers
time to reach a deal on a longer-term
extension that should exclude the rich.
Clintons comments were in contrast
to President Barack Obama, whose re-
election he is supporting. Obama has
opposed renewing the tax reductions for
people earning over $250,000 a year,
saying they must contribute to the effort
to control rampant federal decits.
Reductions in income tax rates and
other levies rst enacted under President
George W. Bush expire in January, at the
same time that $1.2 trillion in automatic
spending cuts begin to take effect. The
nonpartisan Congressional Budget
Ofce and others have warned that let-
ting both events occur would suck so
much money out of the economy that it
could spark a renewed recession next
year.
What I think we need to do is to nd
some way to avoid the scal cliff, to
avoid doing anything that would contract
the economy now, and then deal with
whats necessary in the long-term debt
reduction plan as soon as they can,
which presumably will be after the elec-
tion, Clinton said on CNBCs Closing
Bell With Maria Bartiromo.
Asked whether that meant extending
the tax cuts, Clinton said, They will
probably have to put everything off until
early next year. Thats probably the best
thing to do right now.
He also said Republicans will press to
include the wealthy in a permanent
extension of the tax cuts, adding, I
dont think the president should do that.
White House ofcials would not com-
ment immediately on Clintons remarks.
But ofcials pointed out that Obama has
said repeatedly that he would not extend
the Bush tax cuts for higher earners after
they expire.
Republicans have insisted that tax
rates for the rich should be kept low, say-
ing many of them run companies that
create jobs.
Bill Clinton: Extend all tax cuts temporarily
By Sebastian Abbot
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan The U.S.
has terminated funding for a $20 million
project to develop a Pakistani version of
Sesame Street in response to alleged
corruption by the local puppet theater
working on the initiative, U.S. ofcials
said Tuesday.
The organization in question is the Ra
Peer Theater Workshop, a group based in
the city of Lahore that jointly developed
the show with Sesame Workshop, the
creator of the American series.
The show, which includes Elmo and a
host of new Pakistani characters, rst
aired at the end of last year and was sup-
posed to run for at least three seasons.
The U.S. hoped it would improve educa-
tion in a country where one-third of pri-
mary school-age children are not in
class. It was also meant to increase toler-
ance at a time when the inuence of rad-
ical views is growing.
The U.S. cut off funding for the proj-
ect and launched an investigation after
receiving what it deemed to be credible
allegations of fraud and abuse on a tele-
phone hotline set up by the U.S. Agency
for International Development in
Pakistan, said U.S. State Department
spokesman Mark Toner.
U.S. ends funding for Pakistans Sesame Street
<< Aldon Smith striving to be better, page 13
Celtics take Game 5, lead series against Heat, page 15
Wednesday June 6, 2012
RENDA HEADING EAST: FORMER SERRA STANDOUT DRAFTED OUT OF CAL BY WASHINGTON NATIONALS >>> PAGE 13
Wimberly era ends suddenly
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo-Atherton co-athletic director Steve
Kryger confirmed to the Daily Journal
Tuesday that longtime girls basketball coach
Pam Wimberly, who has coached at the school
since 1968, will not return for the 2012-13
season.
Pam accomplished many great feats over
the course of her career and the M-A commu-
nity is grateful for all that she did for hundreds
of student-athletes, Kryger told the Daily
Journal in an email. We feel this is the time
to make the transition to a new head varsity
coach for our girls basketball program.
This development has caused many in the
Peninsula Athletic League and the Peninsula
basketball community to respond with shock.
You got to be kidding me, was Steve
Picchis response when told of Wimberlys
departure. Picchi, who nished his seventh
year as the girls coach at Sequoia, rst
squared off against Wimberly in the early
1980s as he helped guide Burlingame to a
state title in 1988.
I coached against Pam starting in 1981,
See COACH, Page 14
For the love of the glove: C.J. Dailey top 2B
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo College second baseman C.J. Dailey
knows that if you love your glove, it will love
you back.
And make no mistake about it, Dailey and
his Rawlings I-Web are quite the pair.
I love my glove, Dailey said. I denitely
have an attachment to it. Ive slept with it a
couple of times.
Dailey and the leather were one in the same
in 2012. So much so that the NAIA took
notice, awarding Dailey with their Gold Glove
award at second base on Tuesday.
Its just a really cool feeling, Dailey said.
I told my mom and she was just as excited, if
not more excited that I was. Just to even be
considered for something like that is a pretty
big honor. Especially at Menlo, being a small
school, we dont recognized too much and
with how well we played this year to actually
have a chance at a national Gold Glove is pret-
ty cool.
The win comes at the heels of a historic sea-
son for the Oaks in which they won their rst
ever playoff tournament and made a Regional
appearance in the NAIA.
It was unbelievable, Dailey said. Just
thinking about it kind of gives me chills. We
have some videos from the conference tourna-
ment and you cant watch it without re-living
it and getting excited. It was denitely one of
the best year Ive ever had. I wouldnt trade it
for anything.
The Oaks would denitely not trade Dailey
for anyone, especially defensively.
Dailey capped his two-year Menlo career
compiling outrageous defensive numbers. In
248 chances, the Bellevue, Wash. native did
See GLOVE, Page 14
See ESCAPE, Page 16
State title for
Serra wrestler
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Unlike a lot of high school sports in which
athletes have to wait for the following season
to make amends for a disappointing year,
Serra wrestler Chad Thodos didnt have to
wait long at all to avenge his disappointing
nish to the high school wrestling season.
Three months after nishing 12th at the
Central Coast Section championships,
Thodos, an incoming senior and wrestling
with the Peninsula Wrestling Club, won the
USA Wrestling California Greco-Roman
Cadet 182-pound state
championship in Fresno
last weekend. Thodos went
4-1, winning all four of his
matches by pin.
I had a disappointing
high school season. I was
expecting a lot and this just
shows how much hard
work and dedication pays
off, Thodos said. After
having a disappointing turnout in CCS, it real-
ly gave me the motivation and drive. Doing
well this summer would ultimately set me up
for next year.
Not only did Thodos win the Greco-Roman
title a discipline that allows only upper-
body holds and throws he nished fth in
the freestyle portion of the championships.
Freestyle is similar to the folkstyle used in
high school and college, but more dynamic.
Mike Klobuchar, head coach for Peninsula
Wrestling Club and the assistant varsity coach
at Serra, said he wasnt that surprised to see
Thodos win the championship.
Once the high school season ended for
him, he said, My next goal is to win the
Greco state championship, Klobuchar said.
Finishing in the top three earns a spot of the
state team that will then wrestle in the nation-
al championships next month in North
Dakota. Obviously, winning the Greco title
earned him a spot on that team, but the people
See THODOS, Page 14
MENLO SPORTS
C.J. Dailey of Menlo played an error-less
second base for the Oaks this season.
Peninsula coaching community and a former player are stunned by schools move
Chad Thodos
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Its never too late to fall in
love.
Alex Arrow of Redwood
City was in his late-30s
when love found him. She
found him running in 2009
and since April of 2010,
theyve been swimming,
biking and putting one foot
in front of the other.
Its a love story with the
sport, I guess, Arrow said.
The she in this case is
the triathlon and since 2010
when Arrow completed his
rst race at Folsom Lake, the
CFO of a cardiology device
manufacturer in Redwood
City says he simply cannot
get enough of her.
After the race is over,
Arrow said, and youre lay-
ing around in the grass, and
theres the award ceremony,
and everyone is all giddy
from the endorphin high
from having pushed yourself
so hard, its a serene feeling.
Thats what fuels the addic-
tion for me.
On Sunday, Arrow takes
his love for a dip in the
Pacific Ocean during the
32nd edition of Escape from
Alcatraz which features a
1.5 mile swim from Alcatraz
Island to the shore, an 18-
mile bike race and an eight-
12
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Two years ago, it was Stephen Strasburg. Last
year, Bryce Harper. This year, Tony Renda joins
the ranks of the Washington Nationals.
After a prestigious amateur Bay Area baseball
career, Renda was selected by the Nationals yes-
terday in the second round of the Major League
Baseball First-Year Player Draft.
The Hillsborough native became one of the
most prolic hitters in Cal history over the past
three years. The sweet-swinging inelder com-
piled a career average of .348, while his nal col-
legiate hit made Cal history, moving Renda
ahead of Xavier Nady for sixth on the schools
all-time career hits list, and rst among three-
year players.
Before setting course across the Bay Bridge,
Renda helped Serra to three consecutive Central
Coast Section appearances, culminating in a
2009 CCS Division I crown. As the Padres all-
time career hits leader, Renda ended his Serra
career along with legendary manager Pete
Jensen, who retired after the championship sea-
son.
Im really proud of him for a lot of reasons,
Jensen said. In addition to being a great
ballplayer, he was always just a model guy. He
was a terric worker, a great teammate, and he
knew how to compete. He is a coachs
dream.
Perhaps the reason Renda is such a well-
rounded athlete is because he has a knack for
reaching into all worlds. He was an honors stu-
dent at Serra, an American Studies major at Cal,
yet he would spend every offseason working out
at a local community college.
Then theres his family, who showed in force
to see his nal game for Cal. While it was played
at Stanfords Sunken Diamond, Renda seemed
to have the biggest fan club of any individual
player. And, in the front row nearest the eld was
his mother Larree, who arrived early for batting
practice sporting an authentic Cal jersey an
actual game jersey from the 2011 College World
Series bearing Rendas No. 14.
Renda expresses nothing but love for his fam-
ily, especially his father Frank, who passed away
July 18, 2010. Of all the expert clinical coaching
Renda has received throughout his life, he cred-
its Frank for most inuencing his baseball abili-
ties.
Id go 1 for 4 and I would get chewed out,
Renda said. Id say: Well dad, the guy was
throwing hard, and I lined
out to shortstop twice.And,
hed say: I dont care. Get a
hit. Find a way to get hits.
Thats all that matters.
High standards and a lot
of discipline were the way
in the Renda household, as
was a lot of love for the
game of baseball. Rendas
older brother Tommy
played college ball at the University of Portland,
and is set to play for a semipro team in Oregon
this summer. His sister was a prep soccer player,
but is an avid baseball fan.
I am the way that I am mainly because of
my dad, and what he has instilled into me,
Renda said.
Renda started his Cal career as a freshman All-
American in 2010. Last year he led the Golden
Bears to the College World Series while earning
Pac-10 Player of the Year honors. This season he
was named a rst-team All-American. Yet,
Renda nds a way to stay grounded while deal-
ing with the phenomenon of being larger than
life.
Ive had a great career, and I have a lot of peo-
ple to thank for that, Renda said. Ive made a
name for myself, sure. Its great. Its not the fame
part of it thats great about it, though. Its when
you have a mom come up to you after a game
with her four-year-old son, and she says: He has
these toy baseball gurines that are his baseball
superheroes, and youre one of them Tony.
With Renda likely embarking on a profession-
al baseball career, the phenomenon gures to get
more surreal in a hurry. So too does his chance to
continue a winning tradition that has been preva-
lent throughout his life.
The Nationals entered play yesterday atop the
National League East standings. With a breadth
of potential superstars on the rise such as
Strasburg and Harper, the franchise gures to be
good for a while. And by all accounts, Renda
stands to be a perfect t for such a tradition.
Hes had a great career up til now, and I think
its going to continue, Jensen said. Hes going
to play in the big leagues some day, I think.
Terry Bernal is a freelance writer whose baseball blog
can be found at http://fungolingo.wordpress.com. He
can be reached by email at Fungolingo@hotmail.com.
Renda drafted by
first-place Nationals
Tony Renda
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA In one breath, Aldon
Smith says he has moved past the disappoint-
ment of not winning the Associated Press
NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year award. In
the next, he still simmers.
That was last year, Smith said Tuesday
after the San Francisco 49ers wrapped up
another offseason organized team activity.
This year, I just want to be the best defensive
player in the NFL.
But I havent forgot-
ten.
After racking up a fran-
chise-rookie record 14
sacks best among NFL
rookies to go with two
forced fumbles, Smiths
personal goal seemed well
within reach. Instead, he
finished runner-up to
Denvers Von Miller, who
received 39 votes from a nationwide panel of
50 media members who regularly cover the
NFL. Smith had the other 11.
Smith believes that many considered him a
one-dimensional player.
Converted from a defensive end drafted sev-
enth overall out of Missouri, Smith piled up
sacks next to All-Pros Justin Smith, Patrick
Willis and NaVorro Bowman for one of the
NFLs best defense at a remarkable rate. He
never started once.
All that could soon change.
As much of a transition as he made as a
rookie, Smith enters his second-year with an
added twist.
The 22-year-old is working to be more than
just a pass-rushing outside linebacker in a 3-4
scheme this offseason. The demanding shift
requires more smarts and athleticism than
anything the linebacker did as a rookie, and
its a hurdle he knows he has to clear if he ever
wants to be considered a Pro Bowl talent.
The 6-foot-4, 258-pounder is adjusting to
chasing running backs and receivers in hopes
of being an every down player and a starter
for a defensive unit that propelled resur-
gent San Francisco to a 13-3 regular season
and an overtime loss in the NFC champi-
onship game to the New York Giants. Hes
hoping to play a bigger role for a team con-
sidered a strong Super Bowl contender.
Thats somebody whos rising fast, 49ers
coach Jim Harbaugh said of Smiths develop-
ment. Its been the same Aldon that we saw
last season. And even better.
And more often.
Smith entered almost exclusively on passing
downs last season. He played 489 snaps or
about 48 percent of the teams total defensive
snaps and most came as a defensive end in
coordinator Vic Fangios nickel package.
Expectations soared from the start.
Smiths surprise selection by 49ers general
manager Trent Baalke on the rst night of the
draft stunned many fans in the Bay Area who
craved a quarterback or a more well-known
quantity. Some scouts also believed he was
selected too high and doubts about whether he
could transition lingered.
Smith proved them all wrong.
Last year, I was really just coming in on
pass rushing, Smith said. This year, Im an
every down guy. Im covering receivers and
backs, so its a new challenge.
Familiarity should also help come fall.
Smith had to learn a new position last sea-
son and an entirely different technique
standing in an upright position and dropping
back instead of starting with his ngers plant-
ed in the ground. Now, its more about stami-
na and smarts, a big part of the reason he has
spent countless hours in the lm room analyz-
ing all he did wrong last year.
49ers Aldon Smith aiming
higher in second season
Aldon Smith
SPORTS 14
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Picchi said. As far as Im concerned, Pam is
a coaching institution. Her program is
always top notch and more importantly, she is
the ultimate professional in the way she deals
with all the people who are associated with
girls basketball.
Wimberly took over as girls basketball
coach in 1968 and, since the implementation
of the Central Coast Section championships in
1977, has qualied teams 24 times, missing
the playoffs only 10 times in 41 years. She
won CCS titles in 1984 and three straight
from 1991 to 1993. She also led the Bears to
ve runner-up nishes in 1983, 1990, 1994,
2006 and 2010.
The Bears have missed the playoffs the last
two seasons, however, the rst time that has
happened since the 2003-04 and 2004-05
campaigns.
That was shocking to me (when I heard the
news), said Dan Hibson, former Hillsdale
girls basketball coach. She was an ambassa-
dor for the sport. From what I saw, she
was a positive inuence on her athletes. I
have never heard a negative thing about her.
With more than 630 wins, Wimberly is the
third-winningest girls basketball coach in
California history. In 2001, she was awarded
the Girls Basketball Coach of the Year by the
California Coaches Association. In 2010, she
was selected as one of 13 coaches honored
with the Model Coach Award by the
California Interscholastic Federation.
She was a very good coach, said 2008 M-
A graduate guard Erica Hayes, who played
four years for Wimberly before spending two
years at College of San Mateo and has one
year of eligibility left at Dixie State University
in Utah.
She not only taught you basketball skills,
but also life skills. She taught us not only how
to be basketball players, but women.
After averaging 16.3 points per game her
senior year, Hayes was selected the 2008
Daily Journal Female Basketball Player of the
Year.
We did pretty good each year I was there,
Hayes said. We all got along great. Im still
playing college ball and theres been no team
(on which Ive played) that had better cama-
raderie than the time I had [at M-A].
Hayes CSM coach, Michelle Warner, was
also surprised to hear of Wimberlys ousting.
Shes always been nice and gracious to
me, Warner said. Shes had some great play-
ers go through there.
In 41 years, Im sure shes done a lot for
girls basketball.
Added Picchi: I think Pam is one of the
most respected people in Bay Area coaching.
I only hear positive things about her from her
colleagues.
Wimberly could not be reached for com-
ment.
Continued from page 11
COACH
were so impressed with his freestyle perform-
ance, they asked Thodos to be on that team as
well.
It felt pretty good to get invited for
freestyle, Thodos said.
And while he will get to wrestle against the
best in the country, Thodos is looking forward
to the training opportunity he will get during
his two-week stay in North Dakota.
I get to wrestle with the best and learn
from the best, Thodos said. It just gives me
condence for the (high school) season com-
ing up.
Unlike a lot of high school wrestlers, the
transition from the high school game to the
styles used internationally have not been a
problem for Thodos. He loves the Greco-
Roman style especially the throws he gets
to employ, ones that would get him penalized
on the high school mat.
In fact, he was dubbed The Launching
Pad by another wrestling team for Thodos
penchant for throwing people around.
Riordan High School gave me that name,
Thodos said. In one of my matches, I threw
one of their guys all over the place. It was
Senior Night (for the opponent) and I was
only a sophomore.
I win a lot of my matches in high school
with Greco moves. A lot of guys dont know
how to defend it.
Said Klobuchar: Hes more calculating that
aggressive, but when [Thodos] gets ahold you,
you know youre going to get thrown.
This year in the high school season, he
went away from throws because a lot of peo-
ple pegged him as a thrower. This year, he
worked on his takedowns. Hes gotten a lot
better over the season.
Thodos wasnt the only member of the team
to have a strong showing at the state champi-
onships. Joey DAgostino (heavyweight) and
Greg Skelley (120), who will both be sopho-
mores at Serra next school year, nished fth
and eighth, respectively, in the Cadet Greco-
Roman championships, while incoming sen-
ior Jimmy Millington (170) nished seventh
in the junior division.
Continued from page 11
THODOS
PHOTO COURTESY OF GEORGETTE DAKIS
Serra wrestler Chad Thodos,right,nicknamed
Launch Pad for his ability to throw his
opponents around, captured the
Greco-Roman state wrstling title.
not make an error all year while turning 33
double plays. The national honor comes on the
heels of Daileys NAIA West Gold Glove
award, only adding to the teams incredible
2012 run.
Coming from community college, coaches
said I wasnt as good defensively as I was
offensively, so its always nice to kind of
prove people wrong in that area, Dailey said.
Dailey said he didnt play too much second
base upon arriving at Menlo. But coaches
loved his quick hands and his instincts around
the bag.
Ive always loved the defensive side of the
ball, Dailey said. Everyone likes to hit, but
theres a certain level of knowing where to be
Ive always felt like its came naturally for
the most part, just with all the work you put in
with the coaches, just one on one, taking
ground balls, reading hops, it all packaged
together.
Its one of the best feelings in baseball, to
be able to turn two. You dont really think
about the runner until he hits you, but when
you get hit and you still make the play, its one
of the best feelings in baseball.
Dailey was a steady presence on an ineld
that saw a fair share of shortstop partners.
Still, he was quick to give credit where credit
was due.
A lot of things that Ive done, especially
defensively are because of Will Pierce (at rst
base), Dailey said. Hes picked me up all the
time this year, and made me look good as
much as I deserved, hes helped me out.
Menlo catcher Ty Finely was awarded a
conference Gold Glove at years end as well.
Oaks baseball players named
2012 NAIA scholar athletes
A trio of Menlo baseball players were rec-
ognized nationally as 2012 Daktronics-NAIA
Baseball Scholar Athletes this past week.
Seniors Chris Cleary and Will Ireton, along
with junior Coleman Cox took home the aca-
demic-based honor for their exceptional work
off the eld and in the classroom.
Ireton graduated from Menlo as the class
Valedictorian with a 3.9 GPA, and was a mul-
tiple winner of the Male Scholar Athlete
Award, handed out at the departments annual
all-athlete banquet.
Fellow senior Chris Cleary wraps up his
Oaks career as the only four-year senior to
capture the award.
Cox took home the same honor last season
as well as being named to the Capital One
Academic All-American First Team in 2011, a
distinction carried throughout all three divi-
sions of the NCAA in addition to the NAIA.
Continued from page 11
GLOVE
Former boxing champion
Winky Wright announces retirement
LOS ANGELES Former light mid-
dleweight champion Winky Wright has retired.
The 40-year-old Wright (51-6-1, 25 KOs) lost
his rst ght in three years last Saturday, drop-
ping a unanimous decision to Peter Kid
Chocolate Quillin at Home Depot Center in
Carson, Calif.
Wright had fought just once since losing to
Bernard Hopkins in July 2007. He hasnt won a
bout since December 2006, going 1-3-1 in his
last ve ghts.
Wrights co-promoter announced his retire-
ment Tuesday.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 31 22 .585
Miami 31 24 .564 1
New York 31 25 .554 1 1/2
Atlanta 30 25 .545 2
Philadelphia 28 29 .491 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 30 24 .556
Pittsburgh 28 26 .519 2
St. Louis 28 28 .500 3
Houston 24 31 .436 6 1/2
Milwaukee 24 31 .436 6 1/2
Chicago 19 36 .345 11 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 35 21 .625
San Francisco 31 25 .554 4
Arizona 26 30 .464 9
Colorado 24 31 .436 10 1/2
San Diego 19 37 .339 16
TuesdaysGames
L.A. Dodgers 2, Philadelphia 1
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 6, 12 innings
Atlanta 11, Miami 0
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 4
Houston 9, St. Louis 8
Chicago Cubs 10, Milwaukee 0
Arizona 10, Colorado 0
San Diego 6, San Francisco 5
WednesdaysGames
San Francisco at San Diego, 12:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 10:05 a.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 10:05 a.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 12:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 5:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 31 24 .564
Tampa Bay 31 24 .564
New York 30 24 .556 1/2
Toronto 29 26 .527 2
Boston 28 27 .509 3
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 31 24 .564
Cleveland 29 25 .537 1 1/2
Detroit 25 30 .455 6
Kansas City 24 30 .444 6 1/2
Minnesota 21 34 .382 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 33 23 .589
Los Angeles 29 28 .509 4 1/2
Seattle 25 33 .431 9
Oakland 24 32 .429 9

MondaysGames
Minnesota 10, Kansas City 7
Oakland 12,Texas 1
Seattle at L.A. Angels, Late
TuesdaysGames
Cleveland 4, Detroit 2
N.Y.Yankees 7,Tampa Bay 0
Baltimore 8, Boston 6, 10 innings
Kansas City 1, Minnesota 0
Toronto 9, Chicago White Sox 5
L.A. Angels 6, Seattle 1
Texas 6, Oakland 3
WednesdaysGames
Cleveland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
Cleveland at Detroit, 10:05 a.m.
Texas at Oakland, 12:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
AL STANDINGS
@Padres
12:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/7
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Rapids
6:30p.m.
CSN+
6/20
@RSL
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/23
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@FCDallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/7
@Padres
3:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/6
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/7
vs. Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/6
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 19
New York 8 3 2 26 26 18
Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 10
Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 13
Chicago 5 5 3 18 15 17
New England 5 7 1 16 18 18
Houston 4 3 4 16 12 12
Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 21
Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 14
Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 14
San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 17
Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 9
Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 18
Vancouver 5 3 4 19 13 14
Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 14
Portland 3 5 4 13 12 15
FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 24
Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 21
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturdays Games
New England 2, Chicago 0
Sunday, June 10
Houston at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
BASEBALL
Major LeagueBaseball
MLBSuspended Philadelphia minor league RHP
Carlos Best (GCL) 25 games for a violation of the
minor league drug prevention and treatment pro-
gram.
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOXActivated OF Darnell Mc-
Donald from 15-day DL.Optioned RHP Daniel Bard
to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANSActivated C Carlos San-
tana from the 7-day concussion DL. Optioned INF
Juan Diaz to Akron (EL).
KANSASCITYROYALSOptionedLHPWill Smith
to Omaha (PCL). Recalled LHP Ryan Verdugo.
LOSANGELESANGELSPlaced C Bobby Wilson
on the seven-day DL.Recalled C Hank Conger from
Salt Lake (PCL).
TAMPABAYRAYSActivated OF Desmond Jen-
nings from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Rich
Thompson to Durham (IL).
National League
NEWYORKMETSSelected the contract of RHP
ChrisYoungfromBuffalo(IL).ReinstatedRHPMiguel
Batista from the 15-day DL. Placed RHP Ramon
Ramirez on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 31.
Designated RHP Jack Egbert for assignment.
PITTSBURGHPIRATESRecalled OF Alex Presley
from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned OF Gorkys Her-
nandez to Indianapolis.
SAN DIEGO PADRESReinstated RHP Huston
Street from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Miles
Mikolas to Tucson (PCL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONACARDINALSRe-signed LB Clark Hag-
gans to a one-year contract.Released LB Broderick
Binns.
CHICAGOBEARSPromoted Chris Ballard to di-
rector of pro scouting and Marty Barrett director
of college scouting.
DETROITLIONSSigned WR Maurice Stovall to a
one-year contract. Released WR Jared Karstetter.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI Paul Pierce watched
the shot sail just over LeBron
James outstretched arm. And when
it swished, he turned toward the
Boston bench, shaking his head.
The biggest shot of the night, for
certain.
And it put the Miami Heat in big
trouble in these Eastern Conference
nals.
Kevin Garnett
nished with 26
points and 11
rebounds, Pierce
scored 19 and
the Celtics
moved one win
away from the
East title by
beating the Heat
94-90 on
Tuesday night,
taking a 3-2 lead in the series.
James nished with 30 points and
13 rebounds for Miami, though he
went 8 minutes without scoring in
the final quarter. Dwyane Wade
scored 27 for the Heat, who got no
more than nine from anyone else.
Pierces 3-pointer with 53 seconds
left put Boston up 90-86. Miami got
within two points twice, and argued
that it should have had a steal with
8.8 seconds left. Instead, a foul was
called on Udonis Haslem, Garnett
made two free throws, and the
Celtics knew they had just stolen
one on Miamis home oor.
Game 6 is Thursday night in
Boston.
@Dbacks
6:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/8
vs.Rangers
7:15p.m.
NBC
6/8
@Dbacks
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/9
@Dbacks
1:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/10
vs.Rangers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/9
vs.Rangers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/10
vs.Astros
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/12
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/12
Celtics one
win from
NBA Finals
Kevin Garnett
vs.Astros
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/13
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/13
Quakes beat Stars in U.S. Open Cup
STANFORD Steven Lenhart headed in a
goal in the 85th minute to give the San Jose
Earthquakes a 1-0 victory over the Minnesota
Stars on Tuesday night in the fourth round of
the U.S. Open Cup.
Steven Beitashour recorded the assist to
help the Earthquakes advance to the quarter-
nals for the rst time in seven years. San Jose
will host three-time defending U.S. Open Cup
champion Seattle later in June.
David Bingham made two saves for San
Jose (9-3-3 MSL) while Matt VanOekel
recorded three saves. The Stars (4-1-5 NASL)
outshot the Earthquakes 13-11.
Beitashour picked up a through ball along
the far side and made a centering pass that
Lenhart got past VanOekel from in front of the
net.
16
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mile run through San Francisco. The race is
considered one of the most difcult triathlons
in the world.
I love this race, Arrow said, because it is
the unique race within the sport. There is no
other triathlon that I know of where you just
swim point to point. You dont have to swim
around a buoy marking the course. They just
let you off a boat and they say, See that land
other there? Get there.And thats a really neat
part of the race.
Arrow got into the sport after being a runner
the majority of his life. It wasnt until 2009
when a friend convinced him to do a 100-mile
bike ride in Marin that he met the person who
would introduce him to his love ironically
enough, it was a pretty lady triathlete,
Arrow said, who convinced him to get into the
pool, hop on a bike and run all in the same
event.
I was hooked, Arrow said.
And like any new love, Arrow dove head
rst and hasnt stopped racing since. He
swims six days a week at the Peninsula
Community Center in Redwood City, logging
about 2,000 meters a day before the clock hits
7 a.m.
Unlike other athletes though, Arrow said he
doesnt focus on his running or biking,
instead, the 20-plus events he completes on a
yearly basis serve as competition/training.
Arrow said hell do 25 events in 2012 alone.
Sunday will mark the fourth time Arrow hits
the waters outside of the famed jail-turned-
tourist attraction.
Sundays swim concludes at Marina Green
Beach. Upon climbing out of the water, ath-
letes will switch to running shoes for the half-
mile warm-up run to Marina Green. Mounting
their bikes there, triathletes will start the 18-
mile ride heading west to Crissy Field,
through the Presidio, up the hill to the Palace
of the Legion of Honor Museum before loop-
ing through the streets of San Francisco.
From there, athletes begin the eight-mile
run to the Baker Beach Battery. Upon arrival
at the beach, theyll battle the 400-step
Equinox Sand Ladder then cross back under
the Golden Gate Bridge and return to sea level
to reach the nish line at Marina Green.
You may be winded just reading that, but
there is plenty that keeps Arrow head over
heels for the sport and the event.
You have that hour-long boat ride to get
out there and on that boat are 2,000 athletes,
Arrow said. I, for one, just feel incredibly
honored to be part of this group of people that
are doing this amazing thing. I even get emo-
tional about it when Im on that boat. Thats
what keeps me coming back to do this race
year after year.
Its a sense of amazement, of pride that Im
part of this group and I can hold my own with
this group of people. I think everybody, to
some extent, has their self doubt. When youre
in the middle of doing something that is as
cool as this, you feel like youve overcome
your self doubt at least in this area and at least
for this day. Its an emotional feeling. Its one
that sticks with you.
Arrow considers himself a middle-of-the-
pack triathlete and Sundays race comes with
the expectation not of podium success, but of
something deeper.
For me, a triathlon is a lot about living in
the moment, Arrow said. My real goal is to
have fun. Its a delightful way to spend your
time. It seems strange. It is painful to push
yourself, especially near the end when youre
pushing yourself the hardest. Or sometimes in
the middle of the swim, you ask yourself,
why am I doing this? But then you get a
rhythm, you get lost in the moment and you
start to enjoy it.
You start to enjoy it and then maybe even
love it like Arrow.
Continued from page 11
ESCAPE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO Rookie Logan Forsythe hit
his rst major league home run leading off the
ninth inning to lift the San Diego Padres to a
6-5 victory against the San Francisco Giants
on Tuesday night.
Forsythe hit a 1-0 pitch from Steve Edlefsen
(0-1) into the second deck in left eld.
Huston Street (1-0),
who came off the disabled
list earlier in the day,
pitched the ninth for the
win, escaping a bases-
loaded jam when Buster
Posey hit into a force
play.
San Diegos Carlos
Quentin hit his rst two
home runs at Petco Park,
giving him ve since coming off the disabled
list last week.
Tim Lincecum appeared to have earned his
rst victory since April 28 before Jeremy
Affeldt allowed Quentins shot to straight-
away center with one out in the eighth to tie
the game at 5.
Lincecum is winless in seven starts, includ-
ing three no-decisions and four losses. The
Giants had rallied from a 4-0 decit to take a
5-4 lead in the seventh, when Lincecum was
lifted for pinch-hitter Aubrey Huff. Brandon
Crawford singled to center, stole second and
scored the go-ahead run on Theriots two-out
single to right.
The Padres had runners on rst and second
with no outs in the seventh before former
teammate Clay Hensley retired the side,
including two strikeouts.
Theriot had three hits and three RBIs while
Gregor Blanco had three hits.
Lincecum allowed four runs and ve hits in
six innings, struck out eight and walked one.
He is 0-4 with three no-decisions and a 5.90
ERA in seven starts since April 28.
The Padres jumped on Lincecum for four
runs in the second, including Quentins lead-
off homer to deep left.
Bitter loss for Giants
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Ian Kinsler hit a two-run
double and Josh Hamilton also doubled in a
run to back Derek Holland, and the Texas
Rangers rebounded from an embarrassing rout
a night earlier to beat the Oakland Athletics 6-
3 on Tuesday.
Yorvit Torrealba hit a sacrice y, Adrian
Beltre singled twice and Holland (5-4) pitched
5 1-3 innings, struck out two, walked two and
allowed three runs on seven hits. That was a
big improvement after he was knocked out in
the second inning when he allowed eight
earned runs in last Wednesdays 21-8 home
loss to Seattle.
The Rangers managed a season-low three
hits their fewest since also getting three
Aug. 25, 2011, against Boston in Mondays
12-1 defeat.
This time, the Rangers had 11 hits and each
batter had at least one while ve different
players drove in runs.
Rangers hold off As
Padres 6, Giants 5
Rangers 6, As 3
Sports brief
Tim Lincecum
FOOD 17
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Fourth of July is a great holiday
to celebrate at the grill. And you dont
have to sacrifice your healthy eating
habits to do so.
Grilling is an easy way to cook
healthy foods without sacrificing great
results. Thats partly because the high
heat of the grill seals in moisture. This
keeps the food moist and tender with-
out the need for excess fat.
For a super succulent meat option
without going the cholesterol- and fat-
rich steak route, we marinated pork
tenderloin. Pork tenderloin is a neutral
base that can really soak up flavors, so
feel free to play with your seasonings
in the marinade.
We went with a basic marinade of
red wine vinegar and herbs, but apple
cider vinegar with Southwestern
spices or rice vinegar with soy sauce,
garlic and a splash of toasted sesame
oil also would be delicious.
Alongside the pork tenderloin, we
included some veggies. We threaded
them on skewers with the chunks of
meat, and let them absorb the mari-
nade too. Of course you could use
whatever veggies you prefer, but be
sure to cut them in large chunks to let
the meat have enough time to cook
before the veggies turn to mush or
burn on the grill.
MARINATED PORK KEBABS
Start to finish: 30 minutes (plus mar-
inating time)
Servings: 4
16 ounces pork tenderloin, cut into 1
1/2-inch chunks
1 small eggplant, cut into 1-inch
chunks
2 portobello mushrooms, quartered
2 small red onions, quartered
1 large red bell pepper, cored and cut
into large chunks
1 large green bell pepper, core and
cut into large chunks
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons minced fresh rose-
mary
2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme
3 cloves garlic, minced
Thread the pork, eggplant, mush-
rooms, red onions and both bell pep-
pers onto wooden or metal skewers,
alternating the meat and vegetables as
you go. Arrange the skewers in a shal-
low dish that allows them to lay flat. A
9-by-13-inch pan usually works well.
In a small bowl, whisk together the
olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt, pep-
per, rosemary, thyme and garlic. Pour
over the skewers, turning and massag-
ing them with your hands to thorough-
ly coat the meat and vegetables. Cover
with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2
hours or up to overnight.
When ready to cook, heat the grill to
high. Using a paper towel soaked in
vegetable oil held with a pair of tongs,
lightly oil the grates.
Place the skewers on the grates and
cook for 7 minutes per side, or until
the meat registers 145 F. Serve imme-
diately.
Nutrition information per serving
(values are rounded to the nearest
whole number): 260 calories; 70 calo-
ries from fat (27 percent of total calo-
ries); 8 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g trans
fats); 75 mg cholesterol; 19 g carbohy-
drate; 28 g protein; 8 g fiber; 310 mg
sodium
High heat grilling means high flavor and healthy
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Roasted beets, tortellini and fresh
blueberries admittedly sound like an
unusual combination for a summer
pasta salad.
But trust us on this one. The a-
vors and textures work surprisingly
well together. The beets are both
sweet and savory, pairing nicely
with the pasta. The blueberries are
refreshing, yet not at all out of
place. Their gentle sweetness and
low acidity make them an ideal fruit
for savory recipes.
Finally, everything is pulled
together with a generous seasoning
of fresh herbs, and a topping of
crumbled soft goat cheese.
ROASTED BEET
TORTELLINI SALAD
Start to nish: 1 1/2 hours (40
minutes active)
Servings: 10
2 pounds beets, peeled and cut
into 1-inch pieces
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Salt and ground black pepper
Two 20-ounce packages fresh
cheese tortellini
1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
mint
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
chives
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
oregano
1 tablespoon sugar
12-ounce container fresh blue-
berries
1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans
4 ounces soft goat cheese
Heat the oven to 400 F.
Spread the beets on a rimmed
baking sheet. Sprinkle the beets
with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil,
then season with salt and black
pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, or
until tender when pierced with a
fork. Set aside to cool.
Bring a large saucepan of salted
water to a boil. Add the tortellini
and cook according to package
directions. Drain the tortellini, then
spread out on a rimmed baking.
Drizzle them with 1 tablespoon of
the olive oil, then set aside to cool.
Meanwhile, in a blender com-
bine the remaining 2 tablespoons
of the olive oil, the rice vinegar,
mint, chives, oregano and sugar.
Blend until well mixed. Season
with salt and pepper.
In a large bowl, toss together the
roasted beets, tortellini, blueber-
ries, pecans and herb vinaigrette.
Gently toss to coat, then crumble
the goat cheese over the top. Serve
at room temperature. If you make it
ahead, refrigerate; let it stand at
room temperature for 30 minutes
before serving.
Roasted beets sweeten, brighten a classic salad
A blueberrys gentle sweetness and low acidity make them an ideal fruit
for savory recipes.
18
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Expires June 30, 2012
were knocked out of the race yesterday.
Webster, a Libertarian, earned about 15 per-
cent of the vote and Chiang, a Democrat from
Mountain View, earned about 11 percent of
the vote.
About 80 percent of Senate District 13 resi-
dents now live in San Mateo County, Hills
stronghold as he served on the county Board
of Supervisors for 10 years and was also the
mayor of San Mateo.
Lieber, however, called yesterdays results a
win for her campaign.
Anything less than 65 percent of the vote
for Jerry is a win for us, Lieber told the Daily
Journal last night.
Hill said that was a bizarre way of looking
at the numbers.
She would consider that a victory? Thats
hard to believe, Hill said.
Hill won about 38 percent of the vote in
Santa Clara County to Liebers 29 percent. In
San Mateo County, Hill won about 60 percent
of the vote to Liebers 17 percent.
With yesterdays historically low turnout,
Lieber is looking to campaign hard to the dif-
ferent pool of voters who will turn out for the
November presidential election.
We spent as frugal as possible leading up
to the primary. Our goal was to get into a
runoff, Lieber said.
Hill expressed concern that Lieber would
now open up her familys fortune to spend on
this portion of the race. Hill said he focused
on a grassroots style campaign and sees that
continuing until November. He also hopes
voters will focus on his background and sup-
port of the areas innovative economy.
We want to sustain that, he said.
Lieber, 51, is a Mountain View resident and
former mayor there who aims to strengthen
environmental protection and put a spotlight
on womens issues if she is elected to the seat.
She also supports Gov. Jerry Browns tax
measures to trim from the states nearly $10
billion decit and his 12-point plan to reform
the states pension system.
As a woman, however, she looks to encour-
age more to participate in state government as
the Legislature is comprised of mostly men,
about 70 percent.
She also says women get a raw deal in the
state from issues ranging from pay parity to
how they are treated in the states prison sys-
tem.
Hill, 65, looks to continue to put pressure
on the California Public Utilities Commission
to improve the way it oversees private utility
companies and their safety standards follow-
ing the explosion and re in San Bruno in
2010 that killed eight people and destroyed 40
homes.
The state has cut nearly $46 billion from its
budget since Hill rst won a seat in the
Assembly, he said. About $15 billion of that is
from education, including K-12, community
colleges and state four-year colleges.
In other election news: U.S. Rep. Jackie
Speier, D-San Mateo, earned nearly 75 per-
cent of the vote in her re-election bid yester-
day for her U.S. Congress District 14 seat.
She will face Debbie Bacigalupi, a
Republican, in the November general elec-
tion. Bacigalupi earned about 21 percent of
the vote while Democrat Michael Moloney
earned about 4 percent of the vote.
U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, earned
about 60 percent of the vote in her re-election
bid for her U.S. Congress District 18 seat. She
will face Republican Dave Chapman in the
November general election. Chapman earned
about 31 percent of the vote yesterday.
Democrat William Parks earned about 5 per-
cent of the vote while Green Party candidate
Carol Brouillet earned just 4 percent of the
vote.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
HILL
tax for county re service in the Highlands,
passed with a two-thirds majority 70.11
percent yes.
The trio of measures T, U and X was meant
to raise $13 million annually for county cof-
fers and proponents campaigned on the prom-
ise that not getting that money means more
cuts to public safety, health and stafng. The
rental car tax will bring in approximately
$7.75 million in general fund revenue annual-
ly based on the $310 million in receipts gen-
erated in 2010, according to estimates from
the County Managers Ofce.
But the opposition, bolstered with more
than $300,000 donated by Enterprise and
Hertz rental car companies, countered the
measures would dissuade tourism and actual-
ly hurt the countys bottom line.
The three other taxes were promoted by San
Mateo County Forward, a coalition of elected
ofcials, service providers and others who
described the measures as a way to stave off
further cuts and recoup some of the money
spent on services and infrastructure used by
travelers. Although the airport was the pri-
mary focus of the campaign, federal law pro-
hibits the county from exclusively taxing air-
port-related business so the taxes would have
applied to all commercial operators in the
unincorporated area, including restaurants
with valet parking and hotels that charge sep-
arately for parking.
The formal opposition, a group known as
Taxpayers for a Strong Economy, argued that
the taxes would actually affect residents and
the countys economy negatively by dissuad-
ing tourism and impose more costs on those
who either own or use such businesses. The
group, funded by the two major car rental
companies, fought the taxes in a media blitz of
ads that proponents called purposely mislead-
ing.
The $13 million in estimated revenue to be
generated by the taxes is already incorporated
into the recommended county budget. With
two of the three taxes now a no-go, the ques-
tion is how county ofcials will pencil out a
way to make up for that loss. The county has
already cut more than $70 million in operating
costs through a combination of eliminating
500 positions, slashing budgets and negotiat-
ing $13 million in labor cost reductions.
The county tried similar car and parking
taxes in 2008 but both failed with just more
than 52 percent voters opposed. After the elec-
tion, county supervisors blamed a lack of
active campaigning.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
TAXES
By Candice Choi
and J.M. Hirsch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK There wont be any more
candy, sugary cereal or fast-food on TV with
the morning cartoons.
The Walt Disney Co. Tuesday became the
rst major media company to ban ads for junk
food on its television channels, radio stations
and websites, hoping to stop kids from eating
badly by taking the temptation away.
First Lady Michelle Obama called it a
game changer that is sure to send a message
to the rest of the childrens entertainment
industry.
Just a few years ago if you had told me or
any other mom or dad in America that our kids
wouldnt see a single ad for junk food while
they watched their favorite cartoons on a
major TV network, we wouldnt have believed
you, said Obama, who has headed a cam-
paign to curb child obesity.
The food that doesnt meet Disneys nutri-
tional standards goes beyond candy bars and
fast food meals. Capri Sun juice (too much
sugar) and Oscar Mayer Lunchables (high
sodium) wont be advertised. Any cereal with
10 grams or more of sugar per serving is also
off the air. A full meal cant be more than 600
calories.
Disneys rules which wont take effect
until 2015 follow a controversial proposal
in New York to take supersized drinks over 16
ounces out of convenience stores, movie the-
aters and restaurants, removing choices to try
and inuence behavior.
Getting rid of junk-food ads will make it
easier to keep the family on a healthy diet, said
Nadine Haskell, a mother of two sons, 8 and
11.
If they see a commercial on TV, then the
next time we go to the grocery store theyll see
it and say they want to try it, said Haskell, of
Columbus, Ohio.
Disney declined to say how much revenue it
stands to lose from banning unhealthy food.
CEO Bob Iger said there might be a short-term
reduction in advertising revenue, but he hopes
that companies will eventually adjust and cre-
ate new products that meet the standards.
The ban would apply to TV channels such is
Disney XD, Saturday morning childrens pro-
gramming on Disney-owned ABC channels,
Radio Disney and Disney-owned websites
aimed at families with young children. The
companys Disney Channel has sponsorships,
but does not run ads.
Aviva Must, chairwoman of the Department
of Public Health and Community Medicine at
Tufts School of Medicine, said Disney could
succeed where the government has made little
progress.
There seems to be limited taste for govern-
ment regulation, said Must, who has studied
childhood obesity for decades. So I think a
large company like Disney taking a stand and
putting in a policy with teeth is a good step.
Even though many fast-food chains and
food companies are rolling out healthier
options like apples and salads, Disney said it
still could deny the companies ads.
Leslie Goodman, Disneys senior vice pres-
ident of corporate citizenship, says Disney will
consider a companys broader offerings when
deciding whether to approve ads.
Disneys new diet for kids: No junk-food ads
FOOD 19
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


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By Michael Hill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carbs? Calories? Fat? They are so
very last decade. Dieters and would-be
healthy eaters know the nutrient of the
moment being tallied, sought and bought
is protein.
Spurred by trainers, diet gurus and
weight-loss plans, Americans are seek-
ing more and more unique sources
of protein, from almonds ground into
milk and soy reshaped as pasta, to peas
and whey turned into powders and
shakes. And food producers are happy to
oblige.
Powders and energy bars packed with
20, 30 or even more grams of protein per
serving are selling briskly. Supermarket
shelves once crowded with foods boast-
ing of being high in ber or low in fat
now are jammed with claims of protein
content. Yet this is happening even as
Americans eat less meat, the go-to
source of protein for generations.
People are getting smarter about
foods in general, said Phil Lempert, a
food marketing expert known as The
Supermarket Guru. He sees higher meat
prices driving people to other sources of
protein, a movement that has becoming
more pronounced this year.
Longer term, I think youre going to
see people starting to look at more veg-
etables and different combinations to
create proteins like rice and beans.
Amanda Perry an on-the-go mom
with two jobs and a 1-year-old is a
good example. She counts on lots of pro-
tein to keep her feeling full and full of
energy. But she needs it to be portable,
so she often mixes protein powder with
almond milk, maybe a banana and some
peanut butter.
Its easily portable, which I think is
awesome for busy people because youre
on the run, said Perry, a 31-year-old
personal trainer who owns a gym in
Chelmsford, Mass., with her husband.
You cant really take a chicken breast
or a piece of steak with you if youre
going to be out for several hours.
Red meat, a rich source of protein, is
going through an especially bumpy run.
Prices are up, and so are health concerns
about beef and its saturated fat content.
Americans are expected to consume
about 15 percent less beef on a per capi-
ta basis this year compared to 2007,
according to Steiner & Company, an
economic consultant to the food indus-
try. Per capita consumption of all red
meat and poultry is expected to be down
by 10 percent over the same period.
But if forces are pushing people away
from meat, health conscious Americans
are simultaneously being lured to other
sources of protein, such as nuts, beans,
soy and seafood.
Protein has had popularity peaks
before think of the Atkins diet craze
not so many years ago though this
time there are a chorus of voices touting
the benets of protein-heavy regimens
like the Paleo Diet, which stresses the
lean meats and wild plants eaten by our
ancestors. And its being helped along
by accumulating evidence that plant-
based protein can lower cholesterol lev-
els and have other benecial effects.
A trip down the grocery aisle shows
food makers are tuned in to this trend
and happy to engage shoppers about it,
from Yoplait Greek yogurts (2X pro-
tein) to Boca meatless lasagna (21 g
protein) to Perdue chicken breast ten-
ders (excellent source of protein).
Like your protein concentrated?
Analysts say sales are up for high-pro-
tein bars.
As Americans are becoming more
health conscious and busier, protein bar
sales are increasing because they are a
convenient way to gain protein on the
go, said IBISWorld analyst Mary
Nanfelt, adding that many protein bars
are eaten after a workout to help the
stressed-out muscles.
Also popular are the protein-rich pow-
ders, often made with whey, once asso-
ciated mostly with weightlifters looking
to bulk up. Perry said her protein pow-
ders which are vegan because they sit
in her stomach better make her feel
more energetic.
I used to be afraid of it. And I have
friends and clients who are sort of afraid
of it. They think, Oh, Im going to gain
too much weight, its too many calories.
But what they dont know and this is
common for a lot of women is that
theyre not getting enough calories, and
theyre not getting enough protein.
Actually, most Americans eat plenty
of protein. The latest available federal
survey of what Americans eat, which
covers 2007-2008, shows both men and
women commonly consuming more pro-
tein than needed, sometimes by a third
or more.
Americans preoccupied with protein
Powders and energy bars packed with 20, 30 or even more
grams of protein per serving are selling briskly.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
The Older Driver Traffic Safety
Seminar. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Magnolia Senior Center, 601 Grand
Ave., South San Francisco. Presented
by the California Highway Patrol.
Items covered include myths about
older drivers, compensating for age
related changes and a confidential
self-evaluation. Refreshments will be
served. Limited to rst 50 registrants.
Free. For more information call 363-
4572.
SVForum. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. DLA
Piper, 2000 University Ave., East Palo
Alto. SVForum presents: SVForum Web
Apps Event: Keyword Commerce,
Content Discovery, etc. Free to
SVForum members, $20 for non-
members. For more information call
(408) 414-5950.
Redwood CityTogether presents:
Babel. 6:30 p.m. Community Room,
Redwood City Downtown Library,
1044 Middlefield Road. Join us for
monthly movies over the summer,
featuring some of the most
interesting and thought-provoking
films of the last few years. For more
information call 780-7305.
Millbrae Library Adult Program:
SherryAustin with Henhouse.7 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Sherry Austin with
Henhouse. A womens folk band of
gritty folk music with a bit of twang.
For more information call 697-7607.
Steve Willis performs at Club Fox
Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For more
information or to reserve tickets call
369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Menlo Park Police Explorers: Tasty
All Day Fundraiser. California Pizza
Kitchen, Stanford Shopping Center,
136 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo
Alto. The Explorer post is raising
money for their trip to Colorado this
summer for the Law Enforcement
National Exploring Conference. Bring
in Explorer Fundraising Flyer and 20
percent of your check will be donated
to the post. Flyers are available at
Menlo Park Police Dept. and City Hall.
For more information call 330-6300.
American Cancer Societyvolunteer
orientation. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
American Cancer Society, 3 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Suite 175, Redwood
City. Come learn about the many
volunteer opportunities of the
American Cancer Society. For more
information call 508-8186, opt. 3, ext.
301.
Carl Verheyen Band. 8 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $15.
For more information or to reserve
tickets call 369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Movies on the Square: Mission
Impossible: Ghost Protocol. 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City.This movie is
rated PG-13. Free. For more
information call 780-7340 or visit
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies
.html.
FRIDAY, JUNE 8
Job Seekers at San Mateo Library.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. San Mateo Main
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Job search, resume writing and online
job applications. Volunteers with
experience in human resources,
coaching and teaching are here to
help in search for job. Free. For more
information call 522-7802.
Daly City Toastmasters Club 50th
AnniversaryCelebrations and Open
House. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 271 92nd St.,
Daly City. Speeches and light
refreshments will be part of the event.
Daly City Toastmasters Club is a local
chapter of Toastmasters International
will help improve confidence and
skills for expression and
communication in any situation. Free.
For more information visit
1881.toastmastersclubs.org.
Kevy Novas 24-hour Guitar-A-
Thon. Noon. Camerons Restaurant,
1410 Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay.
There will be live music and donations
will benefit the American Cancer
Society. Event will continue to noon
on Saturday, June 9. Admission free.
For more information and to donate
visit www.kevynova.com.
Salvador Santana & Band Performs.
8 p.m. Club Fox, 2223 Broadway,
Redwood City. Doors open at 7 p.m.
$14 in advance. $16 at the door. To
buy tickets visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Bluestateat NicksRockaway. 8 p.m.
to midnight. Nicks Rockaway Beach,
100 Rockaway Beach Ave., Pacifica.
Free. For more information visit
bluestateband.net.
SATURDAY, JUNE 9
Garage Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Corner of
Elm Avenue and Crystal Springs, San
Bruno. Proceeds will go to Gods
Clobal Barnyard, and ELCA project
through which money can be
designated for one or several farm
animals to help make an overseas
family self sufficient. For more
information call 363-1452.
Volunteer Orientation. 9 a.m. Center
for Compassion, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. For more information call
340-7022 ext. 328.
Herbs in the garden, herbs in the
kitchen. 10 a.m. to noon. Lyngso
Garden Materials, 19 Seaport Blvd.,
Redwood City. Classes will be taught
by Master Gardeners Kathy Fleming
and Susie Stone. Registration
required. Free. For more information
and to register visit
lyngsogarden.com.
Line Dance Marathon. 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. American Cancer Society Relay
for Life, South San Francisco. South
San Francisco High School Small Gym,
400 B St., South San Francisco.
American Line Dancers will gather to
teach and lead in various dances to
help raise money and awareness for
the ght against cancer. This is a free
event, however, donations to the
American Cancer Society are
requested. For more information call
515-2320.
LaNebbia Winery Craft Faire and
Wine Tasting. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. La
Nebbia Winery, 12341 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. There will be a
wine tasting, food, arts and crafts,
jewelry, hats and more. Admission is
free. For more information call 483-
7840.
World Oceans Day. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Marine Science Institute, 500
Discovery Parkway, Redwood City.Will
offer two boat trips around our 90-
foot research vessel, the Robert G.
Brownlee. Two-hour journey features
a unique window into San Francisco
Bay. Will deploy nets to catch sample
of fish, obtain sample from bottom
and examine invertebrates. Children
must be ve years of age and older.
For members, adults $30, children $15.
For non-members, adults $40, children
$20. To RSVP visit
http://www.sfbaymsi.org/oceansday.
html.
Ruth Waters: A Continuum gallery
reception. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Holbrook-
Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave.,
Atherton. Ruth Waters sculptures and
paintings cover a more than five-
decade career. This exhibit is
sponsored by the Atherton Arts
Committee. Free. For more
information call 593-0572.
Peninsula Girls Chorus Concert. 2:30
p.m. Woodside Performing Arts
Center, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside.
The Peninsula Girls Chorus, a 240-
member premiere arts education and
performance organization for girls
between the ages of six and 18, will
be holding its annual spring concerts,
Come to the Music! $15 General
Admission. $10 for Students and
Seniors. $25 for Premium Seating. For
more information or to buy tickets in
advance visit
www.peninsulagirlschorus.org/conce
rts.html.
Support the Kid Presents
Barracuda Bash by the Bay. 5:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Curiodyssey, 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Support the Kid is a 501c (3) non-
profit organization that provides
funds and support to children and
families battling cancer. We are an all-
volunteer organization and our goal is
to return more than 85 percent of
money donated directly to families in
need. All donations are tax deductible.
More than 25 silent auction items will
be presented. Ticket prices vary. Visit
http://supportthekid.eventbrite.com
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
commitment to improvements like
upgrading the streets and trails in the
area. He didnt want all developers to
think they are entitled to the same
change. Instead, he hoped to make note
that the council was open to the change
as an incentive for the investing in the
city.
In other business, the council approved
an ordinance to allow up to three more
restaurants in certain areas of the
Burlingame Avenue Commercial District.
Noting a demand for restaurant space, a
property owner requested the Burlingame
City Council allow additional food estab-
lishments in the 1400 block of
Burlingame Avenue, which was consid-
ered earlier this month. As written, the
ordinance will allow for three additional
restaurants two on the 1400 block of
Burlingame Avenue and one within the
Burlingame Avenue Commercial District,
according to a staff report.
In an April 5 letter to Mayor Jerry Deal,
Greg Terry of Alain Pinel requested the
city consider allowing additional restau-
rants in the Burlingame Avenue area,
specically on the 1400 block.
In 2010, the council changed the
municipal code to allow ve additional
food establishments which could be
anything from a bar to a full-service
restaurant in portions of the
Burlingame Avenue commercial area.
However, none of those permits were
used for the specic block. Terry noted
having two properties within that block
which have resulted in calls from people
interested in opening restaurants.
In 2009, the council voted unanimous-
ly to allow ve new full-service restau-
rants to be added on Burlingame Avenue
between Primrose Road and El Camino
Real; Park Road and Lorton Avenue
between Burlingame and Howard
avenues; and Primrose Road between
Burlingame and Chapin avenues, accord-
ing to a staff report.
No businesses were added in the year,
resulting in expansion of the area in
which new businesses could open to
include the west side of California Drive
south of Burlingame Avenue. In addition,
the type of business allowed could be
expanded from full-service restaurants to
include limited-food service, such as a
take-out only facility and bars.
Brownrigg suggested the city study
getting rid of the limits on certain types of
restaurants altogether.
Continued from page 7
DRIVE-IN
Gilham says the state has a problem
with its public unions and that they
wield too much power. He wants
California to be a right-to-work state,
meaning public employees will not have
to join a union to work for the state.
He also wants to see the state make
drastic cuts to trim from its decit, rather
than raise taxes.
Gilham is also ready to stop the states
high-speed rail project in its tracks for
being too costly.
With Genentech in the north and
Oracle in the south of the newly redrawn
Assembly district, Mullin touts biotech
and high-tech industries in the region as
being an economic engine for the entire
state.
Mullin, who sits on the Metropolitan
Transportation Commission, voted for
the early investment of California High-
Speed Rail Authority funds to electrify
the Caltrain tracks.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 6
MULLIN
Mindful that term limits remain popu-
lar with voters, proponents of
Proposition 28 emphasized that the
measure would reduce lawmakers total
time in the statehouse.
Opponents, including the California
Republican Party, said the initiative was
dishonest because few lawmakers actu-
ally serve 14 years. For example,
Assembly members often fail to move to
the Senate because there are 80 seats in
the lower house and just half that in the
upper house. They warned the change
would lead to entrenchment in the state
Capitol.
Paul Jacob of the Liberty Initiative
Fund, a conservative organization that
donated $100,000 to defeat the measure,
said it was only a matter of time before
voters realize theyve been tricked.
Youre going to see people awfully
upset when they nd out that the limits
are not tougher, theyre looser, he said.
The campaign in favor of Proposition
28 raised more than twice as much
money as the opposition campaign from
a diverse coalition that included business
and labor groups.
California voters narrowly rejected a
nearly identical term measure in 2008
that would have applied to incumbent
lawmakers. This one applies only to
future legislators.
Continued from page 6
PROP. 28
Board of Education Trustee Memo
Morantes received 7.92 percent; Menlo
Park Councilman Andy Cohen received
5.02 percent and Ernie Schmidt,
Redwood City Planning Commission
vice chair, received 3.18 percent.
Both supervisors Adrienne Tissier of
District Five and Dave Pine of District
Four also retained their seats having run
unopposed.
District Four includes East Palo Alto,
Redwood City, Menlo Park and the unin-
corporated areas of North Fair Oaks and
Oak Knoll. Supervisor Rose Jacobs
Gibson, its current representative, is
being termed out of ofce.
Although a supervisor represents his
or her district, they are chosen by voters
countywide.
Masur was an early candidate for
ofce, throwing her name in the ring last
fall and steadily accumulating endorse-
ments and donations. Slocum was the
last candidate in the race, joining just
before the nomination period in March.
I got a late start but things came
together, we worked hard and had a lot
of people helping us, Slocum said.
At one point, the candidate pool had
actually swollen to eight but East Palo
Alto Councilman David Woods was dis-
qualied by the Elections Ofce in April
after twice bouncing a check to le his
candidacy papers.
While crowded, the race was relative-
ly civil among the candidates although
Romero raised eyebrows in recent weeks
when a pension reform group pulled its
endorsement, claiming he misled voters
in 2008 by claiming to have degrees
from Stanford and Harvard universities
when he actually did not complete the
rst and received certicates from the
other.
Keith also led a complaint about
Slocum after he wrote on his ballot state-
ment As your Chief Elections Ofcer
and Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder.
Slocum used the abbreviation ret. for
retired elsewhere in the statement and
later said the error was unintentional.
The Elections Ofce and a judge ordered
Slocum to revise his statement.
Slocum retired from the ofce in 2010
after two dozen years during which he
became known for innovation, pushing
all-mail ballots, the use of social media
and using the Internet to broadcast elec-
tions and weddings.
Slocum called the county budget and
ongoing decit his key priority. He sup-
ported three county tax measures on last
nights ballot, building a new jail and
aggressively marketing the county for
economic development.
Based on May finance disclosure
forms, Slocum had the largest war chest
in the race although the majority of the
$112,162 this period included $102,683
in loans from himself and his wife,
Maria Diaz-Slocum.
Masur, whose day job is executive
director of the pregnancy prevention
program Teen Talk, has sat on the school
board since 2005 and actually serves
with Diaz-Slocum. During the campaign
she touted her public health background
and experience as mom in bringing a
unique point of view and link to the
countys younger residents. She also
highlighted similarities in budgeting
between the county and schools as both
rely on the state for money.
Im just very grateful for everyone
who worked hard on the campaign, she
said. I think weve come a very long
way from being an unknown school
board member to coming in the top two.
Its pretty great.
Masur also prioritizes the budget, sup-
ported the tax measures and wants to
work collaboratively with cities, schools
and other entities to share scarce
resources and avoid duplication.
Masur raised more than $70,000 based
on May nancial disclosure forms and
took no loans.
I think that makes a huge difference
to me. It shows the grassroots support
across the county, she said.
Continued from page 1
SLOCUM
tax requires two-thirds support. All
night Tuesday, the measure appeared to
be very close to the minimum needed to
pass and jumped past the 69 percent
mark as the numbers were nalized.
Were cautiously optimistic, said
Julie Guaspari, a parent volunteer co-
chairing Redwood City Community for
Better Schools.
Guaspari added many were holding
their breath as they waited for updates.
The district has cut $25 million since
2007. About half of that, $12 million,
hasnt been felt fully as the district has
used one-time federal funds and
reserves to help lessen the blow. In that
same period of time, the districts
enrollment has increased by 1,000 stu-
dents. Passing the tax wouldnt solve
the districts problems, but ofcials said
it would help.
Details of how the funds for the parcel
tax would be used have not yet been dis-
cussed. As written in the ballot lan-
guage, the money should also help
retain and attract qualied teachers; and
support school libraries. Such funds
could be used to have specialists in sub-
jects like reading and math who come to
a class and work with a small group of
students, Trustee Dennis McBride said
previously. While those students work
with a specialist, the teacher has a
smaller group of students with which to
work.
Before putting a measure on the bal-
lot, a community survey was taken in
January showing support of 73 percent
or higher for a $75 parcel tax in either
the June or November election. Looking
for new revenue sources has been a
struggle for the district which has seen
an increase in class sizes and the work-
load for almost all employees since the
2007-08 school year.
A parcel tax would provide a new
stream of revenue, which is why district
ofcials have long researched the possi-
bility. Redwood City has attempted a
parcel tax before in 1993, 2005 and
2009; all failed to pass.
Continued from page 1
MEASURE
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6, 2012
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You should guard
against an inclination to be too possessive or too
demanding of your loved ones. This type of behavior
usually has a tendency to push others away, instead
of drawing them to you.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Neither you nor your
mate should make any major decision without frst
discussing it with the other. If either of you take ac-
tion independently, it will only cause problems.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Someone you dislike for no
particular reason doesnt feel the same way about
you. Instead of holding fast to this bias, give the
person the beneft of the doubt and get to know him
or her better.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you give in to urges
to take a risk on an exciting someone, theres a
good chance you could back the wrong horse. Its
whats deep within this person that really counts, and
chances are it stinks.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- The possibilities for the
kind of independent operation you like are very slim,
mostly because youre likely to allow others to make
demands on your time. Try to make some time for
yourself, as well.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Dont permit a past
infraction by another to totally distort your thinking
about him or her. Be on guard, but allow this person
a second chance, just in case it was one rare mo-
ment of indiscretion.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- A friend of yours
who has yet to return something that he or she bor-
rowed will put the bite on you for another loan. Before
you accede, establish some strict ground rules.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Striving to make
your mark in the world is admirable, but not if its
done at the expense of others. Know the difference
between climbing and clawing your way up to the top.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be careful about of-
fering any advice to others, even if asked. If what you
say is misunderstood or misinterpreted, you could be
blamed for the asking partys failure.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- There is a nega-
tive situation that youve had ample opportunity to
change but that you havent done anything about.
Unfortunately, this opens the door for another to walk
in and alter it to his or her liking.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If an alliance that you
established in the past didnt work out, think twice
before getting involved once again. Ask: was it the
team or the objective that was at fault?
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Just because a co-
worker isnt in accord with your way of doing things
doesnt mean you cant succeed. Dont allow a dis-
agreement between you to shut the production down.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
6-6-12
TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Doorframe part
5 Question starter
8 Shout of delight
12 Mishmash
13 Holm or Fleming
14 Teacup handles
15 Expert
16 Spring fower
18 Dented
20 Likelihood
21 Prickly seedcase
22 -- and cry
23 Pungent bulb
26 Wild blue --
29 Quaker colonist
30 Voting district
31 Tunnel
33 Double curve
34 Klutzs cry
35 Hornet kin
36 Pancake orders
38 Titled ladies
39 Visualize
40 Yes, on the Riviera
41 -- Hari
43 Wall Street denizen
46 Very hungry
48 Currier and --
50 Old Crosby tune
51 Med. plan
52 Faint, with over
53 Spotted animal
54 FICA number
55 Memorial Day race
DOWN
1 Work out
2 Grad
3 Actress -- Sorvino
4 Kentucky whiskey
5 More sensible
6 Glove fller
7 Yoko --
8 Kind of bliss
9 Like a rock
10 Winged god
11 Psychic power
17 Injury
19 Kennel feature
22 -- doeuvre
23 Unseal, poetically
24 Loch -- monster
25 Part of MIT
26 Barks shrilly
27 Red-waxed cheese
28 Greet the dawn
30 Heard the alarm
32 All-purpose MDs
34 Cruise setting
35 Oahu beach
37 Behind, on a ship
38 Twosome
40 Welles or Bean
41 One of the Three Bears
42 State openly
43 Mooches
44 Neck and neck
45 Sax mouthpiece
46 U.K. fiers
47 Mild interjections
49 Cagey
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE
GET fUZZY
Wednesday June 6, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
INSIDE SALES /
TELEMARKETING
The Daily Journal has two openings for high
output sales professionals who know their way
around a phone.
The ideal candidate will enjoy selling products
and services over the telephone, using the fax.
email, and social media as support tools. Ulti-
mately, you will need to be comfortable making
sales calls over the phone, and once in awhile,
seeing clients in person.
Must be reliable, professional, and with a drive
to succeed. We expect you to be making calls.
To apply, call Jerry at 650-344-5200.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Were a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906 or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
CUSTOMER SERVICE, DETAILERS &
PRODUCTION WORKERS Needed.
Provide exceptional customer service, bi-
lingual/Spanish speaking is a plus. We
provide training and support. Apply in
person at any Auto Pride Car Wash
locations.
DRY CLEANER, presser wanted,
(650) 589-2312
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
PROCESS SERVER (court filing legal
paper delivery) car and insurance, relia-
ble, swing shift, PT, immediate opening.
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250355
The following person is doing business
as: XpresSpa, Highway 101, SF Intl Air-
port, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94128 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
XpresSpa S.F. International, LLC, NY.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2007.
/s/ Marisol Binn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250357
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 129 Lincoln Avenue Apart-
ments, 129 Lincoln Avenue, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Richard Tod Spiek-
er & Catherine R. Spieker, 1020 Corpo-
ration Way, #100., Palo Alto, CA 94303.
The business is conducted by Husband
& Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/12.
/s/ Richard Tod Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250173
The following person is doing business
as: G & H Trucking, 23 Garibaldi Street,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Claudia
Isabel Campos, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Claudia I. Campos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250412
The following person is doing business
as: Mamas Vietnamese Cuisine, 2456 S.
El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Van Quoc Mach, 117 S. King-
ston St., San Mateo, CA 94401. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Van Quoc Mach /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250266
The following person is doing business
as: J & C One Hour Express Cleaner,
Inc., 111 W. 25th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: J & C One Hour Express
Cleaner, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Quoc Hong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/04/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250304
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Property Appraisalm 2033
Ralston Ave., #111, BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Wendy Woodard, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/1991.
/s/ Wendy Woodard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250474
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Bel Fiore Realty, 2)Bel Fiore Prop-
erties, 649 N. Delaware Street, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tawar Michael You-
khana, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Tawar Michael Youkhana /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250316
The following person is doing business
as: West Bay Tow, 1019 15th Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Daniel
Jones, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Daniel Jones /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250526
The following person is doing business
as: Paul Blackfield Photography, 266
Beachview Ave., #6, PACIFICA, CA
94044 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Paul Schwarzenfeld, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Paul Schwarzenfeld /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
23 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250165
The following person is doing business
as: VAM Design, 855 Jenevein Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Victoria
Morawietz, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/21/2007.
/s/ Victoria Morawietz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250393
The following person is doing business
as: Fidelity Brokers Real Estate, 465
Convention Way, #2, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Fidelity Brokers, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/14/2012.
/s/ Albert Valdez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250087
The following person is doing business
as: Wendy H. Bowman Consulting, 1641
Sixth Avenue, Apt. #1, BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Wendy H. Bowman, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
02/01/12.
/s/ Wendy H. Bowman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250098
The following person is doing business
as: Ambassador Senior Referral Agency,
2844 Hillside Drive, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Mark Tandoc, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Mark Tandoc /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250385
The following person is doing business
as: Bovet Road Surgery, 66 Bovet Road,
Suite 101, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Joel B. Beck, M.D., Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/29/2003.
/s/ Joel B. Beck, M.D. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250383
The following person is doing business
as: Nomnomnom, Inc., 1700 Seaport
Blvd., #110, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Nomnomnom, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/09/2012.
/s/ Young Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250493
The following person is doing business
as: 1)24 Hour Batteries, 2)24 Hour Bat-
tery, 851 Burlway Rd. Ste. 211, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Dream 2 Vision,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2012.
/s/ Alan Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250620
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Dragon Vending, 659 Hunting-
ton Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: David Seward, 1166 Maple Ave.,
San Bruno, CA 94066 and Xi Luo, 34855
Starling, #4, Union City, CA 94587. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ David Seward /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250231
The following person is doing business
as: Palm Liquors, 116 South Blvd., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Carolyn Furtado,
149 13th Ave., San Mateo, CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/28/2006.
/s/ Carolyn Furtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250635
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Arco Building Maintenance,
1359 San Mateo Ave., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Norma
Angulo & Nadia Ventura, 124 Southwood
Ct., #4, So. San Fran., CA 94080. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Norma Angulo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250514
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Kerouac Construction, 1575 Ox-
ford St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Karina Alexanyan & Stephan Fitch,
988 Godetia Dr., Woodside, CA 94062.
The business is conducted by Husband
& Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/12.
/s/ Stephan Fitch /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250564
The following person is doing business
as: The Tiny Jungle, 169 First Avenue,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Christine
Mende, 1255 Sanchez St., San Francis-
co, CA 94114. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/26/2012.
/s/ Christine Mende /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250279
The following person is doing business
as: Bad Wolf Press, 501 Seaport Court,
#205, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bad Wolf Press, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
02/14/2012.
/s/ Lisa Adams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250408
The following person is doing business
as: Diamond Motors, 1710 S. Amphlett
Blvd., Ste. 117, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: D Motors, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/13/2002.
/s/ Armen Sadakian/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250611
The following person is doing business
as: Yume, 889 Ralston Ave., BELMONT,
CA 94002 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Mike Meng, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Yan Meng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250725
The following person is doing business
as: Yesenias Fashions, 570 Kains Ave,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ol-
ga Aceituno, 33 Buena Vist Ave., Apt 2,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Olga Aceituno/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/05/12, 06/12/12, 06/19/12, 06/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250742
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hair Service, 1662 Palm Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ping
Lee & Jui Lan Liang, same address. The
business is conducted by Husband &
Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Ping Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250304
The following person is doing business
as: Final Touch, 2827 Hosmer St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Marcos Ramos,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Marcos Ramos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250743
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe Baklava, 680 Laurel St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Serende
Corp., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Ilker Yuksel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250746
The following person is doing business
as: Brad Zucker Consulting, 814 Sover-
eign Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sportsnet, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Bradley Evan Zucker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250637
The following person is doing business
as: Smiling BBQ, 189 El Camino Real,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jingjing
Gong, 234 S. Figueroa St., #1631, Los
Angeles, CA 90012. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jingjing Gong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250701
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Health Center, 1600 El Ca-
mino Real, #C, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Qun Wang, 707 Capital St., San Francis-
co, CA 94112. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Qun Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 16, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
TASTE! WINE AND CHEESE LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
890 LAUREL ST
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070-3915
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 23, 30, 2012 & June 6, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 24, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
CALEB MICHAEL ENTERPRISES, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2655 BROADWAY ST.
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063-1532
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 30, 2012 & June 6, 13, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 11, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
PIZZA MY HEART INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
235 PRIMROSE ROAD
BURLINGAME, CA 94010-4207
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 6, 13, 20, 2012
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-232252
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ma-
mas Vietnamese Cuisine, 2456 S. El Ca-
mino Real, San Mateo, CA 94403. The
fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 03/25/09.
The business was conducted by: Li
Qiong Ao, 127 Cora St., San Francisco,
CA 94134.
/s/ Li Qiong Ao/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/15/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/16/12,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 248289
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ta-
queria San Agustin, 3 N. Kingston St.,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 01/05/12. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Elaine G Barra-
za, 813 Jefferson Ct., Apt. 3, San Mateo,
CA 94401.
/s/ Elaine Barraza/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/15/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/30/12,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 245332
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: 24
Hr. Emergency Locksmith Inc., 922 Ter-
minal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070.
The fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 06/17/11.
The business was conducted by: Shay
Ben Simon, same address.
/s/ Shay Ben Simon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/29/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/30/12,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others CLAIMED!
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST SILVER BRACELET - Lost on
5/18, possibly in Millbrae, off El Camino,
Reward, (650)343-7272
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
296 Appliances
DRYER HEAVY Duty electric, like new,
Roper, all instructions $40.00.
BURLINGAME. SOLD!
HEATER, ELECTRIC Radiator, top per-
fect $15.00 SOLD!
ICE CREAM Maker, Electric, Perffect, all
instructions $10 Burlingame,
SOLD!
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 SOLD!
LARGE REFRIGERATOR- Amana
Looks and runs great. $95 OBO,
(650)627-4560
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TOWER FANS Lasko, like new, 2 availa-
ble. $25, Burlingame SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new $49, (650)494-1687
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, Retails at $3,900, new.
$1,000/obo. (650)627-4560
296 Appliances
WINDOW A/C, still in box. Soleus 6200
BTU $75, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK - Roof mounted, holds 4
bikes, $65., (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 See print: http://i.mi-
nus.com/ibeJMUpvttcRvW.JPG
(650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COLLECTIABLE DOLLS MADAME
ALEXANDER Dolls. $20 each or best of-
fer.(650)589-8348
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GIANTS BOBBLEHEADS -(6) Barry
Bonds, Lon Simmons, etc., $15. each
obo, SOLD!
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MUCH SOUGHT after Chinese silver Fat
Man coin $75 (650)348-6428
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
303 Electronics
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLAT SCEEN Monitor and Scanner, mint
condition; HP monitor 17in; Canon Scan-
ner 14 x 10 flatbed, SOLD!
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout matches the
your fingers naturally movement, avoid-
ing RSI. Num pad, $20 (650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40 See:
http://i.minus.com/ibd8yOhavekIiv.JPG,
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
See:
http://i.minus.com/ibd8yOhavekIiv.JPG,
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$50 (650)589-8348
SONY TRINITRON TV, 27 inch, Excel-
lent picture Quality, SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ALL WOOD Kitchen Table 36 plus leaf,
William-Sonoma, $75 OBO, (650)627-
4560
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53X66, SOLD!
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, (650)589-8348
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921,
650-245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
SOLD!
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6 x 2.5, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FRENCH PROVINCIAL COUCH - gold,
7 long, good condition, $40., San Bruno,
(650)583-8069
24
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Reason for a flight
delay
4 Part of EST: Abbr.
7 Basic ballroom
dance
14 Give __ whirl
15 __ de coeur:
pained outburst
16 Grainy cracker
17 Silky-coated dogs
19 Served, as ice
cream
20 Short coat for a
Spanish 51-
Across
22 A-list
23 Hydrating cream
brand
24 Most junk mail
27 Ten, for openers?
28 Cut of ones jib,
so to speak
29 Very, in music
31 Garment for a
French 51-Across
33 Cheerleaders
accessory
37 Pain-relieving drug
38 Shoes for a Latin
American 51-
Across
42 Piebald mount
43 __ mater
44 Wall St.
happenings
48 Word on a
Chicago cap
49 Pierres
possessive
50 60s-70s TV
Guide critic
51 Young and
sweet, only
seventeen ABBA
title girl
54 Bit of the Big Apple
57 Supple
58 Shelter denizen,
potentially
59 Well-used pencil
60 Ending with chlor-
61 Showy shower
phenomena
62 Lapsang
souchong, e.g.
63 Scoundrel
DOWN
1 Was a little false
2 The Lion in
Winter co-star
3 Appetizing
dinnertime smell
4 Make notches in
5 Quartet with an
absentee
6 Prevent the union
of
7 Region of central
Italia
8 Nutso
9 Great Plains tribe
10 Many a bagpiper
11 Make use of
12 Barely make, with
out
13 Crosswalk user,
briefly
18 Letter on a
sweater
21 Novelist Waugh
24 Giant pandas
continent
25 It has a sticking
point
26 Online
destination
28 Dolls word
29 Slithering
symbols of the
pharaohs
30 Manage moguls
31 West Coast
salmon
32 Superdome
home, briefly
33 HMO doctor
designations
34 Columbuss
home
35 Tailless feline
36 Inc. tax rate, e.g.
39 Concocts, as a
scheme
40 The Time
Machine race
41 Distinguished
44 Brash radio host
45 Flowery, in a way
46 Golden Crinkles
maker
47 Matched up, as a
laptop and a
smartphone
49 Infuriate
50 Jordanian
seaport
51 Lowdown
52 Geo or Reo
53 Krazy __
54 Impact sound
55 Coleridge wrote
one to dejection
56 Go bad
By Janie Smulyan
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/06/12
06/06/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SIDECHAIR, WOOD arms & legs, Euro
sleek styling, uphol. seat cushion NICE
$50 OBO text homessmc@yahoo.com
for foto
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
(650)343-4461
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $35 each or both for $60. nice
set. (650)583-8069
304 Furniture
VINTAGE WING back chair (flowery pat-
tern) great condition $100 (650)853-8069
WOOD PLANT stand, unused, 45 inch
wide, 22 high, 11 deep, several shelves
$15.00, SOLD!
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DELTA 15 amp. 12" Compound meter
saw excellent condition $95. SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS vintage
drinking glasses, 1970s, colored etching,
perfect condition, original box, $25.
(650)873-8167
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others SOLD!
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (7) mint condi-
tion, hard cover, eclipse, solar systems,
sun, fundamentals, photos $12.00 all,
(650)578-9208
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, 200 Mystery, sus-
pense, romance, fiction, many famous
authors, hardback and soft, 50 cents
each OBO, (650) 578 9208
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm,
(650)344-8549
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unopened, Plate
set of 4 William Sonoma white/black/red
$12.00 SOLD!
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unused, Hard
covered Recipe book, marinades, cook-
ing, BBQ, SOLD!
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $65. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PATRIOTIC BLANKETS (2) unopened,
red, white, blue, warm fleece lap throw.
$10.00 both. (650)578-9208
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $8. each (12 available), while sup-
plies last, Bill (650)871-7200
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, sealed
book Past Campaigns From Banners to
Broadcasts, insight on politics, $10.00
SOLD!
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea (650)871-7200
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
310 Misc. For Sale
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WALNUT ARMOUR with 2 drawers on
bottom and brushed gold knobs. Good
condition for $85. Kim Pizzolon
(650)455-4094
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - cage,
tunnels, 30 pieces approx., $25.,
(650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $30
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SEARSUCKER suit size 42 reg.
$30 650 245-3661
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
25 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL STEEL LUMBER
RACKS for 8 foot bed. Will go over
camper shell, $85., Mike Pizzolon
(650)455-4095
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19.
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45
(650)365-1797
LAT PULL machine, with accessories,
$50 OBO, (650)589-8348
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
PROFESSIONAL DART BOARD with
cabinet, brand new, $50obo (650)589-
8348
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
320 Spas & Hot Tubs
SUNDANCE SPAS HOT TUB - Cameo
model, 5-6 people, purchased 2000, new
cover, new motor in 2010, SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
REDWOOD CITY
255 Belmont Ave.
(x-st. Woodside Rd.)
Sat. & Sun.
June 9 & 10
8 am - 4 pm
THE THRIFT SHOP
ALL CLOTHING ON
SALE 50% OFF
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
345 Medical Equipment
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1450. 2 bedroom $1795.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
LOOKING FOR independent 1 bedroom
apt. in Belmont, San Carlos, Redwood
City or Menlo Park, (650)533-1908
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
BMW 530 95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, SOLD!
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC 93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
1979 CLASSIC OLDS CUTLASS SU-
PREME. 81K orginal miles, new paint,
excellent condition. $4500 OBO
(650)868-0436 RWC.
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - 88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, $2,700.,
(650)593-3610
635 Vans
1995 FORD Cargo Van 130K
6 Cylinder, good condition, SOLD!
DODGE 99 1/2 ton van V6 runs $100
(650)481-5296
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $2,000. Owner fi-
nancing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
670 Auto Parts
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
THULE CAR rack load bars, with locking
feet. $100 (650)594-1494
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
MENAS
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
Move in/out
Steam Carpet
Windows & Screens
Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
Cleaning Concrete
Construction
Construction Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
26
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
14086 Washington Ave
San Leandro
510-895-5400
Gutters
ESTATE SHEET METAL
Lic.# 727803
Rain Gutters,
Service & Repairs
General Sheet Metal,
Heating,
Custom Copper Work
Free Estimates
(650)875-6610
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing
Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, All types of Roofs.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
General Home Repairs
Improvements
Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
B BROS
HAULING
Free Estimates
Junk & Debris Removal
(650)619-5943
10% Off with this ad!
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO
ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
Sprinkler systems New fences
Flagstone Interlocking pavers
New driveways Clean-ups
Hauling Gardening
Retaining walls Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
New Lawns
Lawn Renovations
Sprinklers
General Clean-Up
Commercial/ industrial
(650) 347-2636
www.sher-garden-
landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES
QAC. Lic. C24951
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BATH, SINK, &
TILE GLAZING
Refinishing
Some Interior Painting
(650)720-1448
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Workmanship
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks, tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona

,
VelaShape IIand
VASER

Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
27 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Low Cost
Divorce
We handle Uncontested
and Contested Divorces
Complex Property Division
Child & Spousal Support Payments
Restraining Orders
Domestic Violence
Peninsula Law Group
One of The Bay Areas Very Best!
Same Day, Weekend
Appointments Available
Se Habla Espaol
(650) 903-2200
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Table Showers now available
One hour $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
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Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
www.smdailyjournal.com
Wednesday June 6, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 252
PROPOSITION 28, 29
STATE PAGE 6-7
WIMBERLY
ERA ENDS
SPORTS PAGE 11
PROP. 8 BACKERS LOOK
TO U.S.SUPREME COURT
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Slocum dominates primary
KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
Warren Slocum, the retired chief elections ofcer and assessor-county
clerk-recorder, hugs supporters at his primary election party.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Warren Slocum and Shelly Masur
were the two top vote-getters in the
open race for District Four county
supervisor, beating out ve others
and cementing a November runoff
election by neither receiving more
than half the ballots.
Slocum, the retired chief elections
ofcer and assessor-county clerk-
recorder, secured 39.03 percent of
the vote followed by Masur, a
trustee on the Redwood City
Elementary School District Board,
who received 21.13 percent.
Slocum and
Masur took the
lead early and
held on. With
neither candi-
date receiving
more than 50
percent of total
votes, Slocum,
64, and Masur,
47, will run
again in the Nov. 6 general election.
Slocum said he looks forward to
going head to head with Masur and
will stand on his record of innova-
tion and experience.
I think the same ingredients that
went into this election will go into
November focus, discipline, hard
work and executing the plan,
Slocum said. The status quo is just
not going to be OK.
Masur echoed the sentiment.
A good campaign requires the
same elements: get the message out
to people, work hard and keep doing
what we did going into June, she
said.
Of the remaining candidates,
Menlo Park Mayor Kirsten Keith
received 14.94 percent; East Palo
Alto Councilman Carlos Romero
received 8.78 percent; County
District Four supervisor runoff to pit former election chief against Masur
ANDREW SCHEINER/DAILY JOURNAL
Assemblyman Jerry Hill,D-San Mateo,addresses the crowd surrounded by his staff of young volunteers after seeing updated
polling numbers during the primary election.
Rental car tax
barely passes
Hotel, parking taxes fail
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 2.5 percent tax on rental cars in the unincorporated area
essentially businesses at San Francisco International Airport
barely passed by less than 100 votes last night while simi-
lar measures aimed at hotels and commercial
parking were defeated.
Measure T, which needed a simple majori-
ty to pass, received 50.05 percent of the vote.
The measure narrowly held on all night while
its companion tax proposals never reached
the 50 percent threshold. Measure U, the
addition of an 8 percent parking tax, received
46.48 percent favorable votes while Measure X to raise the
transient occupancy tax from 10 percent to 12 percent received
46.88 percent in favor.
On the other hand, Measure Z, the renewal of a $65 parcel
Redwood City Elementary
School District tax passes
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A $67 annual parcel tax to benet Redwood City schools
passed last night with 69.04 percent of the vote, according to
semi-ofcial results from the countys Elections Ofce.
Measure W, which would support the Redwood City
Elementary School District, is a ve-year levy that could bring
in $1.7 million annually. Measure supporters say the funds will
support reading, writing, science and math. Passing a parcel
See page 6
Inside
Gordon to face
Republican in
November
Mullin wins big
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Assemblyman Jerry Hill, D-San
Mateo, earned just more than 50 percent
of the vote in yesterdays open primary
race for the Senate District 13 seat that
had four candidates scrambling to earn a
chance to run for the seat in November.
Hill will face another Democrat in
November, Sally
Lieber, a Mountain
View resident and
former assembly-
woman, who earned
about 21 percent of
the vote, far behind
Hill but just ahead
enough of the other
two candidates to
have a shot at winning the seat. Lieber
was termed out of the Assembly in 2008
and has not run a campaign since 2006.
The Senate District 13 seat covers
most of San Mateo County and parts of
Santa Clara County.
The two other candidates in the race,
Christopher Chiang and John Webster,
Hill overshadows Lieber
San Mateo County assemblyman to face former assemblywoman in November
Shelly Masur
See SLOCUM, Page 20
Sally Lieber
See TAXES, Page 18
See MEASURE, Page 20 See HILL, Page 18
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Comedian Colin
Quinn is 53.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1944
During World War II, Allied forces
stormed the beaches of Normandy,
France, on D-Day, beginning the lib-
eration of German-occupied western
Europe.
A great man is one who leaves
others at a loss after he is gone.
Paul Valery, French poet and essayist (1871-1945)
Comedian Sandra
Bernhard is 57.
Actor Paul
Giamatti is 45.
Birthdays
REUTERS
Handout image courtesy of NASA shows the planet Venus at the start of its transit of the Sun.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
The story Man tried for pimping teen
to friends in the June 5 edition of the
Daily Journal included the wrong photo.
Mario Chamale is pictured here.
There was incorrect information in the
story Hate the commute? Take a boat in
the June 5 edition of the Daily Journal. The
South San Francisco terminal project,
including the vessels, cost $40 million.
Corrections
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 02 Lucky
Star in rst place; No.05 California Classic in sec-
ond place; and No. 09 Winning Spirit in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:49.69.
(Answers tomorrow)
ANKLE FORCE STIGMA GLADLY
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: When Ben Franklin went on and on about his
theories on electricity, they said GO FLY A KITE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
WORLP
CKKAN
GESIHL
SKCITY
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
c
e
b
o
o
k
.
c
o
m
/
ju
m
b
le
Print your
answer here:
3 5 8
37 39 42 53 55 22
Mega number
June 5 Mega Millions
1 2 4 6 36
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
1 5 6 9
Daily Four
9 9 4
Daily three evening
In 1799, American politician and orator Patrick Henry died at
Red Hill Plantation in Virginia.
In 1844, the Young Mens Christian Association was founded
in London.
In 1862, the (rst) Battle of Memphis took place during the
Civil War as Union naval forces annihilated a Confederate eet
and captured the Tennessee city.
In 1912, the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century took
place as Novarupta in Alaska began a series of explosive
episodes over a 60-hour period.
In 1925, Walter Percy Chrysler founded the Chrysler Corp.
In 1932, the Senate approved, and President Herbert Hoover
signed, a Revenue Act containing the rst federal gasoline tax,
which was one cent per gallon.
In 1933, the rst drive-in movie theater was opened by Richard
Hollingshead in Camden County, N.J. (The movie shown was
Wives Beware, starring Adolphe Menjou.)
In 1934, the Securities and Exchange Commission was estab-
lished.
In 1966, black activist James Meredith was shot and wounded
as he walked along a Mississippi highway to encourage black
voter registration.
In 1978, California voters overwhelmingly approved
Proposition 13, a primary ballot initiative calling for major cuts
in property taxes.
In 1982, Israeli forces invaded Lebanon to drive Palestine
Liberation Organization ghters out of the country. (The
Israelis withdrew in June 1985.)
In 1985, authorities in Brazil exhumed a body later identied
as the remains of Dr. Josef Mengele, the notorious Angel of
Death of the Nazi Holocaust.
Actress Billie Whitelaw is 80. Civil rights activist Roy Innis is
78. Singer-songwriter Gary U.S. Bonds is 73. Country singer
Joe Stampley is 69. Actor Robert Englund is 65. Folk singer
Holly Near is 63. Singer Dwight Twilley is 61. Playwright-actor
Harvey Fierstein is 60. International Tennis Hall of Famer Bjorn
Borg is 56. Actress Amanda Pays is 53. Record producer Jimmy
Jam is 53. Rock musician Steve Vai is 52. Rock singer-musician
Tom Araya (Slayer) is 51. Actor Jason Isaacs is 49. Rock musi-
cian Sean Yseult (White Zombie) is 46. Actor Max Casella is 45.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Damion Hall (Guy) is 44. Rock musi-
cian Bardi Martin is 43. Rock musician James Munky Shaffer
(Korn) is 42. TV correspondent Natalie Morales is 40.
Jessica Fletcher on Murder She Wrote
(1984-1996) lived at 698 Candlewood
Lane in Cabot Cove, Maine. Cabot Cove
is a ctional town.
***
Angela Lansbury (born 1925) played
Elvis Presleys (1935-1977) mother in the
1961 movie Blue Hawaii. Lansbury, at
age 35, was only 10 years older than Elvis
at the time.
***
Elvis Presley stayed at the Coco Palms
Resort on Kauai while lming Blue
Hawaii. The nal scene of the movie is
Elvis character getting married by the
lagoons at the resort.
***
Hurricane Iniki struck the island of Kauai
in September 1992. The hurricane devas-
tated the Coco Palms Resort, causing the
resort to shut down after 39 years in busi-
ness. The subject of insurance issues and
disputes, the decaying resort is still stand-
ing today.
***
A storm is classied as a hurricane if it
has winds that are more than 73 mph.
***
The names of hurricanes are established
by the World Meteorological
Organization. In order of occurrence, hur-
ricanes are named alphabetically; the rst
hurricane of the year starts with the letter
A, then B, etc. The letters Q, U, X, Y and
Z are not used.
***
The names of hurricanes are repeated
every six years. However, when an
extremely destructive hurricane hits, the
hurricanes name is retired and no longer
used. Since 1954, 40 names have been
retired.
***
The most violent weather in the world is
in the United States, according to NASA.
In one year, on average, the United States
experiences 10,000 violent thunder-
storms, 5,000 oods and 1,000 tornadoes.
***
Rogue waves in the ocean are caused by
undersea earthquakes and landslides.
***
Surfer Tom Blake (1902-1994) of
Wisconsin holds the world record for the
longest ride on a surfboard. He rode 4,500
feet on a wave in Waikiki, Hawaii in 1936.
***
In 1998 in Oahu, Hawaii, surfer Ken
Bradshaw (born 1952) rode the biggest
wave ever surfed. The wave was 85 feet
high.
***
In the 1960s, the Beach Boys were the
most popular surf band in the country.
Their rst hit song was Surn in 1961.
Can you name the other songs by the
Beach Boys that had the word surf in
their titles? See answer at end.
***
Sometimes called the ultimate surfer
movie, The Endless Summer (1966) is a
documentary about surfers searching the
world for the perfect wave. The movie
was lmed in Africa, Australia, New
Zealand, Tahiti, Hawaii and California.
***
Annette Funicello (born 1942) and
Frankie Avalon (born 1939) starred in a
series of ve beach-themed movies in the
1960s. One of the original Mouseketeers,
Annette Funicello never wore a bikini in
the movies because she promised Walt
Disney (1901-1966) that she would not
show her navel in a lm.
***
In the 1965 movie How to Stuff a Wild
Bikini (1965), Annette Funicello was
lmed from the waist up because she was
pregnant.
***
The metal spike that a cello rests on is
called an endpin.
***
Answer: SurnSafari (1962), Surn
U.S.A. (1963), Surfer Girl (1963),
Surfs Up (1971). The Beach Boys was
formed in 1961 by brothers Brian Wilson
(born 1942), Dennis Wilson (19441983)
and Carl Wilson (19461998), with Mike
Love (born 1941) and Alan Jardine (born
1942). Dennis was the only surfer in the
group.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in the
weekend and Wednesday editions of the Daily
Journal. Questions? Comments? Email know-
itall@smdailyjournal.com or call 344-5200
ext. 114.
1 15 20 30 40 13
Mega number
June 2 Super Lotto Plus
Mario Chamale
3
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. A person was not happy with
service and began making threats on Walnut
Street before 10:53 a.m. Wednesday, May
23.
Vandalism. A vehicles window was broken
on Haven Avenue before 7:48 a.m.
Wednesday, May 23.
Robbery. An iPod and money were taken
and threats were made at Arguello Street and
Brewster Avenue before 3:38 p.m. Monday,
May 21.
Burglary. A laptop and other items were
taken from a residence on Central Avenue
before 3:34 p.m. Monday, May 21.
Police reports
No dogs allowed
A woman brought her dog inside a store
and her dog attacked another customer
and employee on Shaw Road in South
San Francisco before 11:11 a.m.
Thursday, May 24.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Meet Patel was a quiet kid who became a
very involved leader with an interest in learn-
ing how beliefs shape ones behavior.
The 17-year-old from Redwood City was
able to explore his interests in leadership
while at Woodside High School. In the fall,
hell be attending Harvard University. While
Patel isnt quite sure what hell study, he does
hope to learn more about the way the brain
works and how our personal beliefs shape a
persons behavior.
Meet Patel embodies all of the characteris-
tics and attributes that our educational com-
munity attempts to foster in every student. He
is kind, civic-minded and disciplined in both
his academic and personal pursuits. Meet has
served as student body president, and he has
added much to the vibrancy of Woodside High
School. He will be missed, said Principal
David Reilly.
Patel was born in Fremont but moved to
Redwood City at a young age. He enjoyed
building things but was a quiet little one with
hopes of one day being a doctor. Patel attend-
ed Hoover Elementary School through second
grade then North Star Academy from third
through eighth grade. Transitioning to
Woodside was easier than anticipated for Patel
since he joined the football team, which meant
he met people during practice over the sum-
mer months.
Football was a constant for most of Patels
high school days having played every year
except his junior.
I just like the game, he said, adding that
since the season is over, he already misses it
since Patel wont be playing in college.
During his sophomore year, Patel joined the
track team doing sprints in hopes of getting
faster. That same year, Patel joined
Woodsides Students Offering Support
Program by helping with freshman transition.
He continued helping in that capacity through
his senior year. Patel also volunteered at
Sequoia Hospital during his sophomore and
junior years by visiting patients and manning
the information desk.
Patel decided to take a break from football
his junior year to focus on academics. He took
a full load of advanced placement courses and
wanted to focus on it. Patel took that time
instead to focus on a new challenge leader-
ship. Patel served as the junior class president.
In that capacity, he helped with the juniors
who were in charge of the concession stands
at games, helping with prom and planning
graduation.
Patel continued his leadership senior year as
the student body president. The role turned
out to require more work than Patel had antic-
ipated but, in the end, it helped him realize not
to back down. Before taking on each presi-
dential position, Patel attended summer lead-
ership camps at Stanford University and the
University of California at Berkeley.
Patel also contributed at his temple junior
and senior years helping to plan activities for
students in the West Coast region.
Patel will be the rst to tell you he was sur-
prised to be accepted to Harvard. It was his
long shot. Once he got in, Patel had to go. He
isnt sure what hell study but be has an inter-
est in psychology and neuroscience.
Woodsides
graduation is
10 a.m.
Friday, June 8
at the school,
199 Churchill
A v e . ,
Woodside.
Great Grads is
in its seventh
year proling
one graduating
senior from
each of our
local schools.
Schools have
the option to
participate.
Those that
choose to par-
ticipate are
asked to nomi-
nate one stu-
dent who
deserves
A diverse high school experience
Age: 17
City: Redwood City
College: Harvard
University
Major: Undecided
What hell miss about
high school: The
environment of high
school
Biggest life lesson
learned thus far: Dont be scared to be different.
Take the chance and go for it.
Meet Patel
Alleged cabbie stabber unfit for trial
The woman accused of stabbing a cab driver as he drove her
from a Daly City shopping center back home to Pacica and steal-
ing his taxi is mentally unt for trial, accord-
ing to two court-appointed doctors.
Amanda Jenille Aldeguer, 21, will be hos-
pitalized in a state facility until doctors there
deem her able to aid in her own defense on
charges of attempted murder, assault and car-
jacking charges. Aldeguer previously pleaded
not guilty to all charges.
Pacica police arrested Aldeguer March 16
after her mother called 911 for medical help
after seeing an injury on her hand. Authorities
connected it to an earlier stabbing and car-
jacking report in the area of West Manor
Drive and Esplanade Avenue. At that call, they found a bleeding
man, a driver for Serra Yellow Cab, who said a woman he picked
up at Serramonte Center pulled out a knife during the trip to
Pacica and stabbed him in the neck. As he resisted, she contin-
ued to stab, he said. After the driver stopped the car and ed, the
woman later identied as Aldeguer got into the front seat and
drove away. Police found the car near a Pacica park with a knife
inside. The cars video camera recorded the attack, according to
the District Attorneys Ofce.
Aldeguer was apprehended in South San Francisco.
She remains in custody in lieu of $500,000 bail pending a June
26 placement hearing.
Alert neighbor directs police to
in-progress burglary three arrested
A witness reported a possible auto burglary in progress in the
500 block of Monte Diablo Avenue in San Mateo early Sunday
morning and police immediately responded and located three pos-
sible suspects in a nearby vehicle.
The suspects were identied and arrested for auto burglary. A
search of the suspects vehicle resulted in the seizure of numerous
items suspected to be the spoils of several auto burglaries, accord-
ing to San Mateo police. Police will look to match the seized prop-
erty to other crimes. Arrested were Martin Gallardo, 22, of San
Francisco; Sergio Gallardo, 18, of San Francisco; and Jesus
Renteria, 22, of South San Francisco.
The suspects were booked into San Mateo County Jail for bur-
glary, possession of stolen property, possession of burglary tools
and conspiracy.
Local briefs
Amanda
Aldeguer
4
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


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MILLBRAE I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a red-fag. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the Archdiocese of Los
Angeles has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with Stewart Enterprises
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. Stewart Enterprises runs a
website called Catholic Mortuaries.com
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I dont see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point Im trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesnt mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Half Moon Bay will retain its existing serv-
ices for the rst time in years as tax revenue is
up by about 4 percent.
In past years, the city has had to trim from its
budget considerably as it has contracted out its
police and recreation services to save it about
$990,000 annually. The city has also found
savings of about $350,000 annually through
staff concessions, furloughs and other tactics.
The City Council is currently considering
next years budget, which takes effect July 1,
and will likely subsidize some capital projects
next year by using General Fund revenue.
Although the budget is technically balanced,
the city will have about a $1.1 million decit
next year as it moves to maintain streets, lever-
age grant funds, invest in new trails and pay
down some debt to realize savings in future
years.
The General Fund budget includes revenue
of $11,101,756 and expenditures, including
capital project and reserve funding, of
$12,241,179. This creates a budget decit of
$1,139,423, although the unassigned fund bal-
ance remains at a projected $1,110,256.
City Manager Laura Snideman presented the
scal year 2012-13 budget to the council last
night.
After enduring the most challenging eco-
nomic times the city has ever faced, we now
have legitimate reasons to be proud of our
progress toward scal strength, Snideman
wrote in a prepared statement before the meet-
ing. Without question, the reason we have a
relatively healthy and stable budget today can
be directly attributed to the proactive steps
taken by our City Council. Many difcult deci-
sions were made in recent years, but we can
now look back and verify that these were the
right choices.
Proposed infrastructure projects next year
include: Street resurfacing to maintain the
citys current level; design of the Main Street
Bridge; extending Highway 1 trails; improve-
ments to Smith Field; repair of sewer mains
and enhancement to Highway 1 safety.
Other goals within the budget are to encour-
age long-term scal sustainability by paying
down debt related to a botched development
called Beachwood, funding pension stabiliza-
tion reserves to better withstand unanticipated
uctuations and updating the citys public safe-
ty emergency plan to safeguard the community
in the event of a catastrophe.
Citys finances improve
No cuts to services in Half Moon Bay
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A 24-year-old man arrested for possession
and distribution of child pornography in
March was found dead in his San Mateo
home yesterday morning.
Samnang Chun, who lived on the 600
block of First Avenue, likely killed himself
as the San Mateo County Coroners Office is
investigating his death as a suicide, county
Coroner Robert Foucrault wrote the Daily
Journal in an email yesterday.
San Mateo police also confirmed the death
is not being investigated criminally although
police nor the Coroners Office revealed how
he died.
He was arrested March 22 in a countywide
sweep of suspected child pornography users
and distributors that landed 10 in jail,
including 29-year-old Ritha Chun, who was
arrested at the First Avenue residence on
unrelated charges.
Samnang Chun faced felony charges after
police searched his home and found evi-
dence on his computer linking him to the
distribution and possession of child pornog-
raphy. Chuns laptop computer revealed hun-
dreds of child pornography images, accord-
ing to the San Mateo County District
Attorneys Office.
The sweep that landed Samnang Chun in
jail was the result of a Silicon Valley ICAC
Task Force investigation that targeted peer-
to-peer file sharing online, evolving from
previous investigations when suspects often
were identified through chat room decoy
operations, according to police.
Investigators searched for hardcore images
involving pre-pubescent children then con-
nected with the suspects who shared the
images, according to police. Samnang
Chuns individual Internet protocol address
was tracked to the First Avenue home after
which a search warrant was issued and he
was arrested, according to police.
Chun was out on bail after his March 22
arrest and was last in court May 24.
Child porn suspect found dead
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
An Oakland man and convicted felon who
is suspected of disguising himself as an elder-
ly white man in a string of Bay Area bank
robberies is in jail, according to police.
Duron Williams, 35, was arrested by police
May 29 in Oakland, according to police.
He is suspected of committing 10 bank rob-
beries and one attempted bank robbery in 11
cities, including a robbery in January at the
First National Bank in Millbrae and another
in at a Citibank in Belmont in March, accord-
ing to the Belmont Police Department.
Police believe Williams was armed with a
rearm during the robberies and that he wore
a sophisticated full-face mask giving him the
appearance of an elderly white man.
Search warrants were executed at homes in
Oakland and Hayward where Williams
resided and detectives allegedly discovered
further evidence implicating him in multiple
bank robberies. Detectives also discovered a
stolen van used in the robberies, according to
police.
On March 22, Belmont
police responded to the
Citibank on Ralston
Avenue on the report of a
robbery and employees
described the suspect as
wearing a flesh-colored
mask to conceal his identi-
ty. Williams allegedly
entered the bank alone
armed with a handgun and
passed a note to a teller demanding money,
according to police.
After receiving an undisclosed amount of
cash, Williams was seen eeing the area on
foot, according to police.
The Alameda County District Attorneys
Ofce charged Williams with several counts
of robbery, assault with a deadly weapon,
being armed with a rearm during the com-
mission of a felony, convicted felon in pos-
session of a rearm and vehicle theft.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Prolific bank robbery suspect jailed
Masked man suspected of robbing banks in Millbrae, Belmont
Duron Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Senate Republicans
have blocked a bill that calls for equal pay in
the workplace.
As expected, the vote Tuesday fell short of
the 60 votes needed to advance the legislation.
President Obama and his Democratic allies
argue that the legislation is needed to protect
people who try to nd out how their pay stacks
up against their coworkers. Republicans said it
puts too much burden on employers.
The vote was the latest effort by Democrats
to protect their lead among critical women
voters this presidential and congressional
election year.
Senate Republicans block
Democrats equal pay bill
6
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A man convicted of rampaging through one
closed Redwood City business, looting two
others and attacking vehicles with a re extin-
guisher late last summer pleaded no contest to
an unrelated weapon possession charge led
while he was out of custody on bail.
Kevin Michael Dolf, who in March pleaded
no contest to second-degree burglary and van-
dalism, also pleaded no contest this week to
felony possession of shuriken, a Japanese
throwing star, and admitted committing a new
felony while out on bail. He also admitted
having a prior criminal strike. Sentencing for
both cases, plus the defense request to omit
the strike, was set for July 25.
Dolf, 32, was rst arrested Aug. 14 after
causing an estimated $18,000 worth of dam-
age to downtown Redwood City businesses.
He began by smashing out the windshields
and windows of three cars on Main Street
before continuing the so-called rampage
inside a closed business.
Dolf allegedly broke the
glass doors and windows
of two other businesses,
ransacking the interiors
and putting stolen property
in outside trash bins to
later be wheeled away.
When Redwood City
police arrived, Dolf
allegedly barricaded him-
self inside one business and hid inside a cabi-
net in hope of eluding a police dog.
After police arrested Dolf, they reported he
appeared under the inuence of drugs and had
cocaine in his pocket.
A month after taking a plea deal in that case
and awaiting sentencing out of custody on
$50,000 bail, Dolf was arrested on suspicion
of possessing methamphetamine and the
shuriken.
He is in custody on $45,000 bail in the new
case and $60,000 on the older case.
Convicted vandal picks up new conviction
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Gay marriage took
another step Tuesday on its march to the U.S.
Supreme Court, when a federal appeals court
that struck down Californias ban on same-sex
unions refused to reconsider the ruling.
Now that the case has run its course in the
9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the mea-
sures sponsors absolutely plan to take the
case to the high court, said Brian Raum, a
lawyer with the Alliance Defense Fund, a
Christian legal defense group.
Backers of the ban, known as Proposition 8,
now have 90 days to petition the Supreme
Court to review the nding that the ban vio-
lates the civil rights of gay men and lesbians in
California.
If at least four justices agree to accept the
case, oral arguments would likely be held next
spring.
The developments came after the 9th U.S.
Circuit declined to review a February ruling
by two of its member judges who found the
states voter-approved same-sex marriage ban
was unconstitutional, in part because it
rescinded a right that gay and lesbian
Californians already had won.
Same sex unions briey were legal in the
state before 52 percent of voters approved the
ban in November 2008.
Gay marriage supporters welcomed the lat-
est news in the long-running legal battle. If the
Supreme Court refuses to take up the case and
lets the appellate ruling stand, same-sex mar-
riages could be legal again in California by the
end of the year.
Gay marriage ban backers
look to U.S. Supreme Court
Kevin Dolf
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Assemblyman Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park,
will challenge Republican George Yang for
the Assembly District 24 seat in November
after yesterdays open primary election elimi-
nated the other two candidates in the race.
The new district covers parts of San Mateo
and Santa Clara counties and Gordon earned
55.4 percent of the vote.
Yang, a rst-time candidate from Menlo
Park, earned 29.7 percent of the vote.
Now that there are only two candidates in
the race, hopefully I can differentiate myself
from my opponent, Yang told the Daily
Journal last night.
The other two candidates for the redrawn
seat, Geby Espinosa and Joe Rosas, both rst-
time candidates, trailed far behind the top two
vote getters.
Espinosa, from Mountain View, earned
about 10 percent of the vote and Rosas, from
Sunnyvale, earned about 5 percent of the vote.
Yang realizes he will be outspent in the race
by incumbent Gordon and is hoping his grass-
roots campaign gains some steam in the com-
ing months as he spells out
his proposals on pension
reform and protecting edu-
cation. He is also looking
to attract some volunteers
eager to put a Republican
in the seat.
Gordon, who served on
the San Mateo County
Board of Supervisors for
13 years, won nearly 60
percent of the vote in San Mateo County and
about 54 percent of the vote in Santa Clara
County.
Gordon, 63, looks at the states projected
$16 billion decit as its biggest problem. He
supports Gov. Jerry Browns tax initiatives on
the November ballot and wants the state to
start tackling the budget in two-year cycles
and to implement more performance-based
standards when funding state agencies. He
also favors reducing the number of bills an
Assembly member can introduce and is one of
the main proponents behind the blended sys-
tem for high-speed rail trains to share the
tracks locally with Caltrain, keeping cost and
disruption at a minimum.
In the region, Gordon said his constituents
are most concerned about
education.
There is a deep concern
about underinvestment,
Gordon told the Daily
Journal previously. Our
economic success is driven
by the intelligence of our
community.
Yang, 35, was the only
Republican in yesterdays
open primary for the Assembly seat. He is a
software engineer from China who is not
looking to make a career out of politics.
Fixing the states education problem will
require more than money, he said.
He does support pension reform and thinks
the states high-speed rail project should be
constructed in the East Bay and not on the
Peninsula.
Regarding pension reform, he thinks public
sector salaries should be tied to the median
salary in the private sector, factoring in the
states unemployment rate.
He also has ideas to boost tourism in the
district by attracting more visitors from China.
The two will square off in the Nov. 6 gener-
al election.
Gordon to face Republican in November
Rich Gordon George Yang
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
South San Francisco Councilman Kevin
Mullin easily earned the most votes against
his Republican rival in yesterdays open pri-
mary but, because there were only two candi-
dates in the race, Mullin will once again have
to get past Mark Gilham in the November
general election.
Mullin earned more than 68 percent of the
vote to Gilhams 32 percent.
Mullin, 41, intends to run for the seat as an
underdog and has about $200,000 in cam-
paign donations to spend
on the race. He has also
earned the endorsements
of U.S. reps. Jackie Speier,
D-San Mateo, Anna
Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, and
Assemblyman Jerry Hill,
D-San Mateo. Mullins
father, Gene, also previ-
ously served in the
Assembly in Hills current
seat.
His opponent, Gilham, is a Republican out
of Redwood City who is running for ofce for
the rst time.
Gilham, 50, expects to
be vastly outspent in the
race as he has received vir-
tually no contributions to
his campaign.
Both, coincidentally, are
videographers by trade,
each running their own
businesses.
Their ideologies, how-
ever, are very different.
Mullin wins big, faces same candidate in November
Kevin Mullin
See MULLIN, Page 20
State voters
approve term
limit reform
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES California voters
tweaked term limits Tuesday to shave two
years off the total time lawmakers can serve in
the state Legislature, but will allow them to
spend their tenure in one house.
Supporters said Proposition 28 will estab-
lish consistency and reduce the inuence of
lobbyists.
California will have the best of both
worlds when it comes to the state
Legislature, said Dan Schnur, a former
Republican consultant who helped pass the
1990 term limits initiative and now directs the
Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at the
University of Southern California. On the
one hand, term limits will be even tougher,
which will mean fresh voices in Sacramento,
but it also will mean lawmakers will have the
tools to do their job before they return home.
The measure had about two-thirds support
with more than 2 million votes cast.
Proposition 28 will limit lawmakers to 12
years, but allow them to spend that time in one
house or a combination in both houses of the
state Legislature. Currently, lawmakers can
serve up to three two-year terms in the
Assembly and two four-year terms in the
Senate, for a total of 14 years.
The 1990 ballot measure that gave
California some of the strictest term limits in
the country was sold as a way to reduce the
power of special interest groups. Good gov-
ernment organizations argued that it accom-
plished the opposite, assuring the statehouse
would be lled with inexperienced politicians
who are overly reliant on lobbyists and
bureaucrats to help them write legislation.
See PROP. 28 Page 20
Mark Gilham
LOCAL/STATE 7
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Drive-in site moves forward
South City officer shoots man
A man was sent to San Francisco General Hospital in criti-
cal condition after being shot by a South San Francisco police
ofcer at the Arco gas station at 2300 Westborough Blvd. last
night.
At approximately 9 p.m., an ofcer encountered a man act-
ing suspicious in the gas station parking lot. The man made a
suspicious movement and the ofcer shot him, according to
South San Francisco police Sgt. Bruce McPhillips. The man
did have a weapon, McPhillips added.
Investigation into the incident is ongoing, McPhillips said.
There was only one ofcer involved, he added.
Developer planning large-scale office building on
Burlingame Bayfront, public hearing set for June 18
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A proposal to build a series of large ofce buildings, possibly
the home to biotech companies, at the now-vacant former
Burlingame Drive-in, is set for a public hearing later this month
after the City Council introduced ordinances necessary to possi-
bly approve the project.
Millennium Partners, New York-based developers of mixed-
used properties, applied in April 2010 to develop the 18.13-acre
site a project now known as Burlingame Point, located at 300
Airport Blvd. (also known as 350 Beach Road). Plans call for
689,810 square feet of ofce space in two ve-story buildings,
one seven-story building and one eight-story building. In
December 2010, the City Council approved an agreement to con-
duct an environmental review of the project, which became avail-
able for review late last year. In May, the Planning Commission
gave unanimous support for the proposal.
On Monday, the Burlingame City Council introduced three
ordinances to amend zoning and establish a development agree-
ment. The move was needed so the council can hold a public
hearing about the development Monday, June 18.
While the council was excited about the proposal, possible
issues were mentioned in hopes of giving developers time to pre-
pare responses before the public hearing.
Vice Mayor Ann Keighran, for example, took issue with one
condition that would allow space that is supposed to be dedicat-
ed to retail and restaurants to be used as ofce space if not lled
after two years. Mayor Jerry Deal agreed and suggested perhaps
there should be a process to review any alternative uses.
There were also suggestions about creating the development as
a destination for the community on weekends by offering some-
thing like a bike rentals shop and a water fountain for those exer-
cising in the area.
As proposed, the project will provide space for either ofce or
biotech use. When last changed, the zoning for the Bayfront was
altered to be open for biotech. There would also be a two-story,
33,400-square-foot amenities building that would include a
child-care facility, exercise facility and a cafe/break room.
Parking would be offered in a ve-story parking structure and a
podium-level parking area below the four ofce buildings and in
smaller lots scattered around the site.
Councilman Michael Brownrigg noted that the development
would call for a denser oor area ratio than currently in the reg-
ulations. He felt like it was a fair tradeoff given the developers
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES A California ballot
initiative to raise the tax on cigarettes that
pitted big-spending tobacco companies
against cycling legend Lance Armstrong
and the New York City Mayor was too
close to call Tuesday night.
A blizzard of industry-nanced radio
and television advertisements over the
last two months closed the gap on an
effort to impose an additional $1-per-
pack tax on cigarettes to fund cancer
research.
In March, a statewide poll suggested
the measure would pass with two-thirds
approval. But support slipped to 51 per-
cent of the vote with more than 2.5 mil-
lion ballots cast.
With millions of votes still to be count-
ed, it could be days or longer before a
winner is declared.
The attempt to hike taxes on cigarettes
and other tobacco products became a
national ght with tobacco companies
pouring in millions to quash the effort and
celebrities urging voters to support it.
Tobacco taxes have been proven to
reduce smoking. But opponents said the
initiative would create an unaccountable
bureaucracy and hurt the economy by
sending tax money raised in California to
other states.
An extra tax in the nations most popu-
lous state also could mean major losses
for tobacco companies.
Both camps said Tuesday night that
they had anticipated a close race and
remained condent.
Its going to be a long night, and thats
what we expected, said Beth Miller,
spokeswoman for the no on 29 campaign.
Its been a question of the voters taking
a look and deciding that they really didnt
want to support this measure, but its also
coupled with the fact that people general-
ly do support cancer research.
Supporters promised the tax revenue
would stay in California and said tobacco
companies were inventing arguments to
obscure their true motive safeguarding
prots.
Weve been ahead all night and we
expect to stay ahead, Jim Knox of the
American Cancer Society said Tuesday.
I think the public health message has
gotten through the smoke screen of the
tobacco companies nearly $50 million
misinformation campaign.
Armstrong and a coalition of anti-
smoking groups raised about $18 million
to bolster the measure. New York City
Mayor Michael Bloomberg gave
$500,000 to the campaign to help offset
the industry donations.
The tax would generate about $735
million a year, according to the independ-
ent legislative analysts ofce.
Voters on both sides of the issue
expressed strong convictions Tuesday.
I think that we should aggressively
discourage smoking make it less con-
venient, make it more expensive, said
Susan Hyman, a Democrat who cast her
ballot at a Long Beach polling station.
In nearby Glendale, Craig Jerpseth, a
43 year-old nurse, was equally certain
about voting the measure down, along
with anything or anyone who might mean
more taxes.
Voters split on $1 per pack tobacco tax
Local brief
Rendering of the Burlingame Point proposal.
See DRIVE-IN, Page 20
LOCAL/NATION 8
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Thursdays, 48pm
Downtown Laurel Street
For more information, visit www.sancarloschamber.org
Brought to you by: Music sponsored by:
Lesly Joseph Moresco
Lesly Joseph Moresco, born June 3, 1920,
died May 26, 2012.
Lesly Moresco was the
youngest of 10 children in
Vacaville and later moved
to San Francisco and
worked the family grocery
store. Moresco was a pro-
fessional accordion player
at the Palace of Fine Arts
in 1939 during the Worlds
Fair, and during World
War II he was an Air Force crew chief repair-
ing airplanes in the European theater. He
moved to Millbrae with wife Barbara until her
death in 2002, then to Palm Desert where he
lived out remainder of his life. He worked in
construction for more than 40 years and was
an active member and past president of both
the Millbrae Lions Club and the Peninsula
Council of Lions. He recently renewed his
love of music with the accordion and singing
karaoke.
Survived by sons Dennis and Michael,
daughters-in-law Patricia and Rita, four
grandchildren Daniel, James, Nicholas and
Alex, and his dearest friend, companion and
confidant of the last nine years Fran
Morehouse.
Lesly loved life because he loved people
and he was loved by all. He will be greatly
missed by all of his friends in the Del Webb
Community of Palm Desert and throughout
the San Francisco Bay Area.
Family and friends may visit on Friday, June
8 after 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. at the Chapel of the
Highlands, El Camino real at 194 Millwood
Drive in Millbrae, with a vigil service begin-
ning at 6 p.m. Committal at Holy Cross
Catholic Cemetery in Colma will be private.
Remembrances can be sent to your favorite
charity.
Patricia Churchill
Patricia Churchill, born May 24, 1916, died
May 12, 2012 after a courageous two-year
battle with lung cancer just
12 days shy of her 96th
birthday.
Pat worked for Dr. Allen
Scott (orthodontist), Dr.
Breit and Dr. Dashbauch,
the Nabisco Company in
San Francisco and
Norwich Pharma. She was
President of the Womens
Club at Chapel of Our Savior in Colorado
Springs, Colo. Pat married Air Force pilot, Lt.
Col. Eugene Churchill (deceased 2005) in
January 1943 and is survived by children;
Thomas Churchill, Susan Churchill and
granddaughter, Corey Churchill. Gene and
family were stationed at Hamilton Field,
Calif.; Richards-Gebaur in Kansas City, Mo.,
ENT Air Force base in Colorado Springs,
Colo.; and Perrin Air Force Base in Denison,
Texas. In all, there were 11 moves with the Air
Force and more than 20 years of service to our
beloved country. The family returned to their
home in San Mateo in 1966 when Gene retired
from the Air Force.
Pat attended Park School, San Mateo High
School and College of San Mateo. She loved
cheering on the San Francisco Giants, KNBR,
crossword puzzles, reading and her police
scanner. Her wonderful sense of humor, per-
sonality, kindness and knitting skills will be
greatly missed. No service will be held at her
request.
Irma Hedlin
Irma Hedlin, of Hayward, formerly of San
Bruno, died at her home June 3, 2012.
She was 61.
She is survived by her daughter Lisa Hedlin
and sons Shawn and Brian Hedlin, three
grandchildren and two brothers, two sisters
and her mother Juanita Mersinger. She was a
native of El Salvador and relocated to the
United States at 8 years of age with her par-
ents, Jacob and Juanita Mersinger. She was
the former wife of the late Dale Hedlin and
was preceded in death by her father Jacob
Mersinger.
Family and friends may visit after 2 p.m.
Sunday, June 10 and attend the 4 p.m. funeral
liturgy service at the Chapel of the Highlands,
194 Millwood Drive at El Camino Real in
Millbrae. Committal services will be at Holy
Cross Cemetery in Colma at a later date.
Bill Freitas
Bill Freitas, resident of San Mateo, died after
a long illness on May 30, 2012 at the age of 49.
Bill lived in San Mateo his whole life and
was an electrician and a member of IBEW
Local 617. He will be remembered for his love
of baseball, the Giants, motorcycles and dirt-
bike riding. Bill was preceded in death by his
loving grandparents Tom and Marie Wallace
and is survived by his daughter Hallie Freitas
and her mother Maura Freitas; mother Barbara
Freitas; sister Sheri (Anthony) Mendes; nieces
Deborah Mendes Jones and Jacelyn Mendes.
Friends are invited to a 7 p.m. memorial
service Friday, June 8 at Crippen & Flynn
Carlmont Chapel, 1111 Alameda de las Pulgas
in Belmont. Friends may sign the guestbook at
www.crippenynn.com.
Kenneth Dale Dotson
Kenneth Dale Dotson, of San Mateo, died at
his home May 21, 2012.
He was the husband of the late Yolanda
Dotson and is survived by his sons, James
Dotson, Rudy Lopez (his wife, Elizabeth) and
Steve Lopez (his wife, Star), three grandchil-
dren, his mother Elizabeth Ruth Stubbles, his
brother Gary Dotson and sister Shirley Gilletti.
He was the son of the late Lennie Dotson,
father of the late Daniel Dotson and brother to
the late Ron Dotson and Ardith Tougher.
He was a native of South San Francisco, age
68 and was a production manager for L3
Communications for more than 43 years.
Family and friends are invited to a memori-
al service to celebrate Kens life 2 p.m.
Saturday, June 23 at the Chapel of the
Highlands, 194 Millwood Drive at El Camino
Real in Millbrae. Private inurnment will be at
Olivet Memorial Park in Colma. The family
suggests memorial contributions be made to
your favorite charity.
Obituaries
CITY GOVERNMENT
San Bruno will study the recommended 2012-13 general fund, spe-
cial revenue funds and enterprise funds budgets at a study session to be
held 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 in room 115 at City Hall, 567 El Camino
Real, San Bruno.
By Scott Bauer
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MADISON, Wis. Wisconsin Gov. Scott
Walker beat back a recall challenge Tuesday,
winning both the right to nish his term and a
voter endorsement of his strategy to curb state
spending, which included the explosive meas-
ure that eliminated union rights for most public
workers.
The rising Republican star becomes the rst
governor in U.S. history to survive a recall
attempt with his defeat of Milwaukee Mayor
Tom Barrett and the union leaders who rallied
for months against his agenda.
In an interview, Walker said it was time to
put our differences aside and nd ways to work
together to move Wisconsin forward.
The governor said he planned to invite law-
makers to meet as soon as next week over burg-
ers and brats to discuss ways to bridge the polit-
ical divide.
With more than 60 percent of precincts
reporting, Walker was ahead 57 percent to 42
percent for Barrett, according to early returns
tabulated by the Associated
Press.
A Barrett spokesman said
the campaign was not con-
ceding, citing ongoing vot-
ing in Milwaukee, Madison
and Racine.
Democrats and organized
labor spent millions to oust
Walker, but found them-
selves hopelessly outspent
by Republicans from
across the country who donated record-setting
sums to Walker. Republicans hope the victory
carries over into November and that their get-
out-the-vote effort can help Mitt Romney
become the rst GOP nominee to carry the state
since Ronald Reagan in 1984.
Romney issued a statement saying Walkers
victory will echo beyond the borders of
Wisconsin.
Walker has shown that citizens and taxpay-
ers can ght back and prevail against the
runaway government costs imposed by labor
bosses, Romney said.
U.S. official: Al-Qaida
No. 2 killed by U.S. drone
WASHINGTON A U.S. ofcial says a
drone strike in Pakistans northwest tribal region
has killed al-Qaidas second-in-command.
The death of Abu Yahya al-Libi is a signi-
cant blow to the terror network, which has lost a
string of top leaders at the hands of the
American drone program.
The ofcial, who spoke on condition of
anonymity to discuss intelligence matters, says
that no one left in al-Qaida comes close to
replacing the expertise al-Qaida has just lost.
Al-Libi would be the latest in the dozen-plus
senior commanders removed in the clandestine
U.S. war against al-Qaida since Navy SEALs
killed Osama bin Laden just over a year ago.
Eyes turn skyward as
Venus travels across the sun
HONOLULU None of us will likely see
Venus pass, like a moving beauty spot, across
the face of the sun again. From the U.S. to South
Korea, people around the world turned their
attention to the daytime sky on Tuesday and
early Wednesday in Asia to make sure they
caught the rare sight of the transit of Venus. The
next one wont be for another 105 years.
If you can see the mole on Cindy Crawfords
face, you can see Venus, Van Webster, a mem-
ber of the Los Angeles Astronomical Society,
told anyone who stopped by his telescope for a
peek on Mount Hollywood.
Walker survives recall
election in Wisconsin
Around the nation
Scott Walker
OPINION 9
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Thrive thanks Jackie Speier
Editor,
On behalf of Thrive the Alliance of
Nonprots for San Mateo County, I want to
thank U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
for recently convening a meeting of San
Mateo County core safety net service
providers and community based organizations,
along with county and city representatives to
discuss ways we can lift some of the barriers
to participation in the federal food stamps pro-
gram (CalFresh). Congresswoman Speier rec-
ognizes that the nonprot community is at the
front lines of helping those most in need in
our community and had the foresight to part-
ner with us to brainstorm ideas for the more
effective provision of federal resources. Thrive
was proud to serve as a planning partner for
this meeting.
Porcia Chen Silverberg
Redwood City
The letter writer is the executive director of
Thrive The Alliance of Nonprots for San
Mateo County.
Poll proves high-speed rail
unaffordable and unwanted
Editor,
A May 29, 2012 USC/LA Times statewide
poll shows, again, that Californians over-
whelmingly do not want California legislators
to authorize the sale of new HSR bonds/debt,
and that the project should be killed. This fol-
lows ve other statewide polls (Field,
SurveyUSA, etc.) all conrming that
Californians want limited tax dollars spent on
seniors, parks, teachers, mental facilities (75
percent) versus a high-speed rail train (11 per-
cent) that 70 percent said they would never
ride. And Gov. Jerry Browns new proposal to
trash and burn the environmentally required
California Environmental Quality Act review
of this high-speed rail project is an assault on
the Sierra Club and all environmentalists who
fought so hard for these environmental protec-
tions. If you care about the environment,
emissions, etc. then you must contact your
Sacramento representatives to object to this
rape of CEQA.
The high-speed rail boondoggles continued
existence illustrates why most reasonable peo-
ple leave California i.e. politicians lie about
a bad budget to convince you to raise taxes
to save K-12 children supplies, only to spend
those taxes on a Union-fed HSR farces that
polls repeatedly show Californians dont want.
Well, at least the taxes will be defeated.
Mike Brown
Burlingame
Leaf blower regulations
Editor,
Apparently, the Burlingame City Council
has nothing better to do than to change the
laws regarding leaf blowers in Burlingame.
Now all gardeners will have only one day in
an assigned area when they will be allowed to
mow. This will mean that one day a week, all
homes in that one area will have many gar-
deners mowing and blowing and making noise
rather than having it as it is now with noise
and pollution only occasionally. If more
money is whats desired, and it seems to be
the case, then go ahead and require the leaf
blowers to be inspected and collect the money,
but do not impair the gardeners from making a
living as they see t. Its a free country.
The idea of having only one day a week,
without being ned, for mowing is ridiculous.
What if for two weeks, on the day your gar-
dener is scheduled, it rains so heavily the lawn
cant be mowed? What if you have a special
occasion for which youd like your lawns
mowed, but its the wrong day for your gar-
dener? What if the homeowner can only mow
his lawn on a weekday?
All problems do not have to be addressed
by new legislation. A sensible approach to
inspecting equipment and allowing gardeners
free reign to schedule their customers would
be reasonable. I hope the council will rethink
this silly law.
Barbara Nagata
Burlingame
DMB and Cargills facetious plans
Editor,
DMB Associates and Cargill Inc. veiled
their aggressive development plans under the
euphemism of the more appealing name
Saltworks and a 50-50 balanced plan
designed solely by them. They showered the
Redwood City community with a massive PR
campaign that would put a politician to
shame. DMB/Cargill, counting on a couple of
local politicians and launching catered recep-
tions, extensive advertising and (heretofore
limited) charitable donations, lobbied the
Redwood City community for several years to
accept their expansive Bay development plan.
It now seems evident that, in their arro-
gance, DMB/Cargill (both rms out of state)
seriously underestimated the Bay Areas sup-
port for preserving the Bay.
Sobered by the pushback on their haughty
plans, these rms are now seeking to dene
the jurisdiction of the Environmental
Protection Agency and the Army Corps of
Engineers before proceeding to involve more
Redwood City resources in another plan. I
suspect some others might wisely have chosen
this action as a rst step.
R J Donovan
Redwood City
Yes, the end could justify the means!
Editor,
I think its absolutely fabulous that a young
student such as 18-year-old Justin Combs
earned a full athletic scholarship to the
University of California (in response to
Michelle Durands column When does the
end justify the means? in the June 5 edition
of the Daily Journal). I see a compromise in
the making, where we honor the merits of
another student who has earned their way and
didnt receive a scholarship (and whose par-
ents were not nancially well off). So what to
do?
I recommend that Sean Combs sponsor a
nancially needy student with a similar schol-
arship. The scholarship would be a pay-as-
you-go each year for a worthy student who
could not normally afford to go to the
University of California at Berkeley. The
recipient would have to demonstrate their
advancement based on grades and proper
comportment. As an added incentive, the
donated scholarship might become tax-
deductible. The money for the scholarship
would be placed into an escrow account. The
downside for athletic scholarships is that the
scholarship may not continue if the student
does not perform adequately. That should not
affect the donated scholarship and is a risk
that Mr. Combs might take as an offset to the
tax deduction.
Lastly, this idea should be advanced to other
parents whose children earned a scholarship
so that students in need have the means to
advance their scholarship! Parenthetically, per-
haps the Daily Journal can forward this rec-
ommendation to Sean Combs and maybe
other nancially secure parents will donate
similar scholarships small donations can be
bundled into a larger singular scholarship!
Jack Kirkpatrick
Redwood City
What about jobs?
Editor,
Republican presidential hopeful Mitt
Romney insists that only the private sector
creates jobs. He conveniently ignores that, in
an organized society, government creates jobs
in defense, justice, law enforcement, re ght-
ing, education, research, libraries, museums,
infrastructure (roads, bridges, harbors, air-
ports, governmental buildings, tunnels, dams,
parks), regulatory agencies, foreign service,
air trafc control, space exploration, VA hos-
pitals, monetary and postal services, local,
state and federal administration and many oth-
ers.
Besides being the largest direct job creator,
governmental services also stimulate the econ-
omy by creating additional private jobs to
meet the needs of the public functions and
projects. While government creates jobs
deemed necessary for the common good, and
not for prot, the private sector handles the
rest, mostly for prot.
Its not a matter of either public or private
entities and jobs, but the synergy between all
functions, where many can only be handled by
government and not with prot as a goal. How
can Romney promote himself as qualied for
the top ofce because he allegedly knows how
to create jobs, despite claiming that govern-
ment cannot, and should not, create jobs? At
Bain he destroyed jobs, or outsourced with
negative impacts on the U.S. economy.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Seeing things in
different ways
T
here was a time a few years back
when a group of friends and I went
on a road trip to Eastern Oregon to
deliver some paintings for an art show. The
artist was on the trip, along with his best
friend, his best
friends girlfriend, and
me. It was an interest-
ing trip for several
reasons, including the
belief we saw ying
deer, we made a
wrong turn from the
highway into a resi-
dential neighborhood
at 75 mph, and the
fact that the
speedometer of the
Dodge Caravan got
stuck at 80 mph when,
I, in fact was driving signicantly faster. I
only learned I was going faster than 120 mph
when the speedometer got unstuck and it
pegged out at the highest speed that could be
recorded on the minivan for a good ve sec-
onds before dropping down. Before that, I had
thought the trafc was going eerily slow.
About the ying deer: It turned out we were
driving on the side of a mountain we couldnt
quite see and the deer were just jumping to
the lower side of the mountain on the other
side of the road right in front of our wind-
shield.
It was one of those spur-of-the-moment
weekend trips that required a lot of time in the
car. On the way up, we decided to stop at a
roadside diner for an early breakfast. The
place was nice enough, lled with various arts
and crafts that one might eventually see in a
thrift store. The waitress had done much of
the work herself and, upon learning that we
were on a trip to deliver artwork, wanted to
see my friends paintings. His work was best
described as disturbing. He liked to take old
thrift store paintings and put his own touch on
them my favorite painting was a dead deer
being barbecued whole on an undersized grill
in front of a traditional landscape of moun-
tains, a river and trees. It was cartoon-like and
funny. But the waitress was less than
impressed. She tried to maintain a pleasant
demeanor, but I could tell she was rattled. She
wanted to know what made it art. And why
my friend had altered perfectly good paintings
for what he called art. He was pleasant
enough in return, but also annoyed that he had
to explain his ne art culled at the San
Francisco Art Institute to someone he thought
of as a lesser artist, someone who made crafts.
The conversation resonated with me for
years. As much as I liked my friend, I thought
his attitude toward the waitress was a little
pompous. There is a reason why people say
beauty is in the eye of the beholder and art is
subjective. Some people think modifying thrift
store paintings is art, others think a fake
ower arrangement is art.
I was reminded of this experience when I
encountered someone who just moved to
Burlingame and they asked a friend who
worked at the Apple Store what the city was
like. They reported their friend said
Burlingame is full of old rich people. Its like
when I was a child and thought the Peninsula
was full of power lines, ofce buildings and
trash since my only experience with it was
Highway 101. Both are myopic observations.
Its like the fable of the blind men with the
elephant. One felt the leg and said the ele-
phant was like a pillar. One felt the tail and
said the elephant was like a rope. One felt the
trunk and said the elephant was like a tree
trunk. One felt the ear and said the elephant
was like a hand fan. One felt the belly and
said the elephant was like a wall. And one felt
the tusk and said the elephant was like a solid
pipe.
No one is wrong, and all are right. But they
all sense a singular thing in a very different
way. At a newspaper, our goal is to see all
sides and present the most accurate picture
possible. And that is an ongoing challenge.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily
Journal. He can be reached at jon@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
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Onlineeditionat scribd.com/smdailyjournal
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who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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we choose to reect the diverse character of this
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,127.95 +0.22% 10-Yr Bond 1.556 +1.90%
Nasdaq2,778.11 +0.66% Oil (per barrel) 84.230003
S&P 500 1,285.50 +0.57% Gold 1,618.10
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK As world leaders
searched for a way out of Europes
mounting debt crisis, U.S. investors
moved to the sidelines.
The major market indexes closed
modestly higher, after wavering between
slight gains and losses throughout the
morning. Trading volume was light and
the stock moves were small. In Europe,
markets were mixed.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
26.49 points, or 0.2 percent, to
12,127.95. It traded within a range of 75
points, one of the narrowest of the year.
Timothy McCandless, senior stock
analyst at Bel Air Investment Advisors in
Los Angeles, described Tuesdays mar-
ket as stuck in purgatory: The economy
is not strong enough to represent a
healthy recovery, but not weak enough
for the Federal Reserve to do more to
help.
Its wrestling with those two sides,
McCandless said. Were right in
between.
Finance ministers and central bank
presidents from the worlds seven
wealthiest nations held an emergency
conference call to discuss how Europe
can heal its weakest countries without
alienating the stronger ones that have to
foot the bill. Leaders are worried that
Spain and Cyprus, which are scrambling
for money to prop up their troubled
banks, will soon need to be bailed out by
their richer counterparts.
As we saw in Lehman Brothers, when
fear hits the banking system, it shuts
down, said Jim Millstein, CEO of the
advisory rm Millstein & Co. and a for-
mer Treasury ofcial who oversaw the
agencys investments in AIG and other
troubled nancial institutions.
The call didnt yield any concrete
solutions for Europe, at least not pub-
licly. Several investors who were unsure
of what to do Tuesday said they expect
more clarity and perhaps more drama
later this month, after Greece holds
elections June 17 and world leaders from
the nations known as the Group of 20
meet for the two days afterward.
Spain isnt part of the Group of Seven,
the countries that held the conference
call, but the U.S. and Germany are. As
the G-7 leaders met, Spains prime min-
ister issued a plea for Europe to support
those that are in difculty.
Stocks inch higher
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
US Airways Group Inc., up 44 cents at $11.62
The airline said that a key measure of passenger
revenue rose about 6 percent in May compared
with the same month last year.
Dollar General Corp., down $1.73 at $46.76
The discount retailer said that its rst-quarter
prot rose 36 percent, but its revenue was just
below Wall Street expectations.
Mednax Inc., up $1.44 at $61.64
A Stifel Nicolaus analyst initiated coverage of
the medical group with a Buyrating,citing the
companys prospects for growth.
Nasdaq
Starbucks Corp., down $1.49 at $52.41
The coffee chain said that it is increasing its
offerings in the highly competitive food market
by buying a small bakery chain for $100 million.
Complete Genomics Inc., up 14 cents at $2.18
The life sciences company will lay off about 20
percent of its workforce to cut costs and explore
strategic options.
Westport Innovations Inc., up $4.75 at $27.02
The natural gas engine maker said that it
reached a deal with Caterpillar Inc. to jointly
develop engines for off-road equipment.
G-III Apparel Group Ltd., up 93 cents at $24.93
The apparel maker said that its rst-quarter loss
widened, but its results met the expectations
of Wall Street analysts.
Layne Christensen Co., up 62 cents at $19.22
The drilling and construction services provider
said rst-quarter net income fell,but its revenue
rose and beat analysts expectations.
Big movers
Google buys maker of Quickoffice mobile app
SAN FRANCISCO Google is escalating its rivalry
with Microsoft with the purchase of Quickofce, the maker
of a widely used mobile application for working on docu-
ments created in Microsofts programs for word process-
ing, spreadsheets and presentations.
The deal announced Tuesday gives Google Inc. a new
weapon to foil Microsoft Corp. as more people get work
done on smartphones and tablet computers. Quickofce
makes those devices compatible with Microsoft Ofce even
if the software suite isnt installed on them.
Although it makes virtually all of its money from online
advertising, Google already has spent several years trying
to siphon sales away from Microsoft by offering its own
suite of Ofce-like programs that are accessible over the
Internet. Some of these applications, called Google Docs,
are given away for free, while more sophisticated versions,
called Google Apps, are sold in subscription packages cost-
ing $50 annually per user.
Forrester Research analyst Ted Schadler said Googles
online applications dont interact well with Microsoft
Office files on mobile devices, a shortcoming that
Quickofce presumably will address.
Oracle buying Collective Intellect
REDWOOD SHORES Oracle is buying Collective
Intellect Inc. for an undisclosed sum as it expands its social
media tracking services.
Collective Intellect helps businesses monitor and respond
to consumer conversations on Facebook, Twitter and other
social media platforms. Clients can then use this data to
improve products, customer service, marketing campaigns
and nd new customers. The privately held company was
founded in 2005 and is based in Boulder, Colo.
The software maker announced the deal Tuesday, one
day after Salesforce.com Inc. said that it would buy social
media marketing company Buddy Media. As more compa-
nies promote themselves on social media, technology com-
panies are looking for ways to help customers manage their
presence in those mediums.
Business briefs
By David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRANKFURT, Germany The
European Central Bank has a powerful
weapon that just might push political
leaders into helping solve the continents
nancial crisis: withholding further sup-
port.
The ECB isnt likely to take any new
steps when it meets Wednesday, analysts
say, even as anxiety builds over the dete-
riorating outlook for Europes economy
and banking system.
ECB President Mario Draghi signaled
last week that he wants to see stronger
political and nancial ties among the 17
countries that use the euro. If such ties
are forged possibly at a European
Union summit later this month ana-
lysts say the ECB would be more likely
to reward European governments and
banks with the nancial shot in the arm
they desperately need.
Its a risky game because euro coun-
tries are in big trouble.
Spains borrowing costs are rising to
an unsustainable level as the country
struggles to come up with billions to
prop up banks saddled by bad real estate
loans. Concerns are rising that it could
be forced to join Ireland, Greece and
Portugal in seeking an international
financial rescue. Spains economy is
much larger than the other three, making
its problems an order of magnitude more
worrisome for European leaders.
In just over two weeks, Greek voters
return to the polls. If they elect a gov-
ernment that rejects the terms of the
countrys multibillion-euro bailout, this
could force the country out of the euro
an outcome that would have uncer-
tain and potentially dire consequences
for global nancial markets.
All across Europe, ailing banks and
governments are joined at the hip.
Bailing out banks has been a huge bur-
den on governments; and weakened gov-
ernment nances have been a drag on
banks that own government bonds.
Over the past week, some of Europes
leading authorities have been pushing
political leaders to act quickly to break
this burdensome link.
The European Commission called on
politicians last Wednesday to create a
central European authority with the
nancial muscle to x the continents
broken banks. The next day, Draghi
echoed those comments, saying the cur-
rent setup of the 17-country currency
union was unsustainable.
ECB withholding further support
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON Former President
Bill Clinton said Tuesday that broad tax
cuts that expire in January should be
temporarily renewed, including for the
wealthiest Americans, to give lawmakers
time to reach a deal on a longer-term
extension that should exclude the rich.
Clintons comments were in contrast
to President Barack Obama, whose re-
election he is supporting. Obama has
opposed renewing the tax reductions for
people earning over $250,000 a year,
saying they must contribute to the effort
to control rampant federal decits.
Reductions in income tax rates and
other levies rst enacted under President
George W. Bush expire in January, at the
same time that $1.2 trillion in automatic
spending cuts begin to take effect. The
nonpartisan Congressional Budget
Ofce and others have warned that let-
ting both events occur would suck so
much money out of the economy that it
could spark a renewed recession next
year.
What I think we need to do is to nd
some way to avoid the scal cliff, to
avoid doing anything that would contract
the economy now, and then deal with
whats necessary in the long-term debt
reduction plan as soon as they can,
which presumably will be after the elec-
tion, Clinton said on CNBCs Closing
Bell With Maria Bartiromo.
Asked whether that meant extending
the tax cuts, Clinton said, They will
probably have to put everything off until
early next year. Thats probably the best
thing to do right now.
He also said Republicans will press to
include the wealthy in a permanent
extension of the tax cuts, adding, I
dont think the president should do that.
White House ofcials would not com-
ment immediately on Clintons remarks.
But ofcials pointed out that Obama has
said repeatedly that he would not extend
the Bush tax cuts for higher earners after
they expire.
Republicans have insisted that tax
rates for the rich should be kept low, say-
ing many of them run companies that
create jobs.
Bill Clinton: Extend all tax cuts temporarily
By Sebastian Abbot
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan The U.S.
has terminated funding for a $20 million
project to develop a Pakistani version of
Sesame Street in response to alleged
corruption by the local puppet theater
working on the initiative, U.S. ofcials
said Tuesday.
The organization in question is the Ra
Peer Theater Workshop, a group based in
the city of Lahore that jointly developed
the show with Sesame Workshop, the
creator of the American series.
The show, which includes Elmo and a
host of new Pakistani characters, rst
aired at the end of last year and was sup-
posed to run for at least three seasons.
The U.S. hoped it would improve educa-
tion in a country where one-third of pri-
mary school-age children are not in
class. It was also meant to increase toler-
ance at a time when the inuence of rad-
ical views is growing.
The U.S. cut off funding for the proj-
ect and launched an investigation after
receiving what it deemed to be credible
allegations of fraud and abuse on a tele-
phone hotline set up by the U.S. Agency
for International Development in
Pakistan, said U.S. State Department
spokesman Mark Toner.
U.S. ends funding for Pakistans Sesame Street
<< Aldon Smith striving to be better, page 13
Celtics take Game 5, lead series against Heat, page 15
Wednesday June 6, 2012
RENDA HEADING EAST: FORMER SERRA STANDOUT DRAFTED OUT OF CAL BY WASHINGTON NATIONALS >>> PAGE 13
Wimberly era ends suddenly
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo-Atherton co-athletic director Steve
Kryger confirmed to the Daily Journal
Tuesday that longtime girls basketball coach
Pam Wimberly, who has coached at the school
since 1968, will not return for the 2012-13
season.
Pam accomplished many great feats over
the course of her career and the M-A commu-
nity is grateful for all that she did for hundreds
of student-athletes, Kryger told the Daily
Journal in an email. We feel this is the time
to make the transition to a new head varsity
coach for our girls basketball program.
This development has caused many in the
Peninsula Athletic League and the Peninsula
basketball community to respond with shock.
You got to be kidding me, was Steve
Picchis response when told of Wimberlys
departure. Picchi, who nished his seventh
year as the girls coach at Sequoia, rst
squared off against Wimberly in the early
1980s as he helped guide Burlingame to a
state title in 1988.
I coached against Pam starting in 1981,
See COACH, Page 14
For the love of the glove: C.J. Dailey top 2B
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Menlo College second baseman C.J. Dailey
knows that if you love your glove, it will love
you back.
And make no mistake about it, Dailey and
his Rawlings I-Web are quite the pair.
I love my glove, Dailey said. I denitely
have an attachment to it. Ive slept with it a
couple of times.
Dailey and the leather were one in the same
in 2012. So much so that the NAIA took
notice, awarding Dailey with their Gold Glove
award at second base on Tuesday.
Its just a really cool feeling, Dailey said.
I told my mom and she was just as excited, if
not more excited that I was. Just to even be
considered for something like that is a pretty
big honor. Especially at Menlo, being a small
school, we dont recognized too much and
with how well we played this year to actually
have a chance at a national Gold Glove is pret-
ty cool.
The win comes at the heels of a historic sea-
son for the Oaks in which they won their rst
ever playoff tournament and made a Regional
appearance in the NAIA.
It was unbelievable, Dailey said. Just
thinking about it kind of gives me chills. We
have some videos from the conference tourna-
ment and you cant watch it without re-living
it and getting excited. It was denitely one of
the best year Ive ever had. I wouldnt trade it
for anything.
The Oaks would denitely not trade Dailey
for anyone, especially defensively.
Dailey capped his two-year Menlo career
compiling outrageous defensive numbers. In
248 chances, the Bellevue, Wash. native did
See GLOVE, Page 14
See ESCAPE, Page 16
State title for
Serra wrestler
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Unlike a lot of high school sports in which
athletes have to wait for the following season
to make amends for a disappointing year,
Serra wrestler Chad Thodos didnt have to
wait long at all to avenge his disappointing
nish to the high school wrestling season.
Three months after nishing 12th at the
Central Coast Section championships,
Thodos, an incoming senior and wrestling
with the Peninsula Wrestling Club, won the
USA Wrestling California Greco-Roman
Cadet 182-pound state
championship in Fresno
last weekend. Thodos went
4-1, winning all four of his
matches by pin.
I had a disappointing
high school season. I was
expecting a lot and this just
shows how much hard
work and dedication pays
off, Thodos said. After
having a disappointing turnout in CCS, it real-
ly gave me the motivation and drive. Doing
well this summer would ultimately set me up
for next year.
Not only did Thodos win the Greco-Roman
title a discipline that allows only upper-
body holds and throws he nished fth in
the freestyle portion of the championships.
Freestyle is similar to the folkstyle used in
high school and college, but more dynamic.
Mike Klobuchar, head coach for Peninsula
Wrestling Club and the assistant varsity coach
at Serra, said he wasnt that surprised to see
Thodos win the championship.
Once the high school season ended for
him, he said, My next goal is to win the
Greco state championship, Klobuchar said.
Finishing in the top three earns a spot of the
state team that will then wrestle in the nation-
al championships next month in North
Dakota. Obviously, winning the Greco title
earned him a spot on that team, but the people
See THODOS, Page 14
MENLO SPORTS
C.J. Dailey of Menlo played an error-less
second base for the Oaks this season.
Peninsula coaching community and a former player are stunned by schools move
Chad Thodos
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Its never too late to fall in
love.
Alex Arrow of Redwood
City was in his late-30s
when love found him. She
found him running in 2009
and since April of 2010,
theyve been swimming,
biking and putting one foot
in front of the other.
Its a love story with the
sport, I guess, Arrow said.
The she in this case is
the triathlon and since 2010
when Arrow completed his
rst race at Folsom Lake, the
CFO of a cardiology device
manufacturer in Redwood
City says he simply cannot
get enough of her.
After the race is over,
Arrow said, and youre lay-
ing around in the grass, and
theres the award ceremony,
and everyone is all giddy
from the endorphin high
from having pushed yourself
so hard, its a serene feeling.
Thats what fuels the addic-
tion for me.
On Sunday, Arrow takes
his love for a dip in the
Pacific Ocean during the
32nd edition of Escape from
Alcatraz which features a
1.5 mile swim from Alcatraz
Island to the shore, an 18-
mile bike race and an eight-
12
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Two years ago, it was Stephen Strasburg. Last
year, Bryce Harper. This year, Tony Renda joins
the ranks of the Washington Nationals.
After a prestigious amateur Bay Area baseball
career, Renda was selected by the Nationals yes-
terday in the second round of the Major League
Baseball First-Year Player Draft.
The Hillsborough native became one of the
most prolic hitters in Cal history over the past
three years. The sweet-swinging inelder com-
piled a career average of .348, while his nal col-
legiate hit made Cal history, moving Renda
ahead of Xavier Nady for sixth on the schools
all-time career hits list, and rst among three-
year players.
Before setting course across the Bay Bridge,
Renda helped Serra to three consecutive Central
Coast Section appearances, culminating in a
2009 CCS Division I crown. As the Padres all-
time career hits leader, Renda ended his Serra
career along with legendary manager Pete
Jensen, who retired after the championship sea-
son.
Im really proud of him for a lot of reasons,
Jensen said. In addition to being a great
ballplayer, he was always just a model guy. He
was a terric worker, a great teammate, and he
knew how to compete. He is a coachs
dream.
Perhaps the reason Renda is such a well-
rounded athlete is because he has a knack for
reaching into all worlds. He was an honors stu-
dent at Serra, an American Studies major at Cal,
yet he would spend every offseason working out
at a local community college.
Then theres his family, who showed in force
to see his nal game for Cal. While it was played
at Stanfords Sunken Diamond, Renda seemed
to have the biggest fan club of any individual
player. And, in the front row nearest the eld was
his mother Larree, who arrived early for batting
practice sporting an authentic Cal jersey an
actual game jersey from the 2011 College World
Series bearing Rendas No. 14.
Renda expresses nothing but love for his fam-
ily, especially his father Frank, who passed away
July 18, 2010. Of all the expert clinical coaching
Renda has received throughout his life, he cred-
its Frank for most inuencing his baseball abili-
ties.
Id go 1 for 4 and I would get chewed out,
Renda said. Id say: Well dad, the guy was
throwing hard, and I lined
out to shortstop twice.And,
hed say: I dont care. Get a
hit. Find a way to get hits.
Thats all that matters.
High standards and a lot
of discipline were the way
in the Renda household, as
was a lot of love for the
game of baseball. Rendas
older brother Tommy
played college ball at the University of Portland,
and is set to play for a semipro team in Oregon
this summer. His sister was a prep soccer player,
but is an avid baseball fan.
I am the way that I am mainly because of
my dad, and what he has instilled into me,
Renda said.
Renda started his Cal career as a freshman All-
American in 2010. Last year he led the Golden
Bears to the College World Series while earning
Pac-10 Player of the Year honors. This season he
was named a rst-team All-American. Yet,
Renda nds a way to stay grounded while deal-
ing with the phenomenon of being larger than
life.
Ive had a great career, and I have a lot of peo-
ple to thank for that, Renda said. Ive made a
name for myself, sure. Its great. Its not the fame
part of it thats great about it, though. Its when
you have a mom come up to you after a game
with her four-year-old son, and she says: He has
these toy baseball gurines that are his baseball
superheroes, and youre one of them Tony.
With Renda likely embarking on a profession-
al baseball career, the phenomenon gures to get
more surreal in a hurry. So too does his chance to
continue a winning tradition that has been preva-
lent throughout his life.
The Nationals entered play yesterday atop the
National League East standings. With a breadth
of potential superstars on the rise such as
Strasburg and Harper, the franchise gures to be
good for a while. And by all accounts, Renda
stands to be a perfect t for such a tradition.
Hes had a great career up til now, and I think
its going to continue, Jensen said. Hes going
to play in the big leagues some day, I think.
Terry Bernal is a freelance writer whose baseball blog
can be found at http://fungolingo.wordpress.com. He
can be reached by email at Fungolingo@hotmail.com.
Renda drafted by
first-place Nationals
Tony Renda
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA In one breath, Aldon
Smith says he has moved past the disappoint-
ment of not winning the Associated Press
NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year award. In
the next, he still simmers.
That was last year, Smith said Tuesday
after the San Francisco 49ers wrapped up
another offseason organized team activity.
This year, I just want to be the best defensive
player in the NFL.
But I havent forgot-
ten.
After racking up a fran-
chise-rookie record 14
sacks best among NFL
rookies to go with two
forced fumbles, Smiths
personal goal seemed well
within reach. Instead, he
finished runner-up to
Denvers Von Miller, who
received 39 votes from a nationwide panel of
50 media members who regularly cover the
NFL. Smith had the other 11.
Smith believes that many considered him a
one-dimensional player.
Converted from a defensive end drafted sev-
enth overall out of Missouri, Smith piled up
sacks next to All-Pros Justin Smith, Patrick
Willis and NaVorro Bowman for one of the
NFLs best defense at a remarkable rate. He
never started once.
All that could soon change.
As much of a transition as he made as a
rookie, Smith enters his second-year with an
added twist.
The 22-year-old is working to be more than
just a pass-rushing outside linebacker in a 3-4
scheme this offseason. The demanding shift
requires more smarts and athleticism than
anything the linebacker did as a rookie, and
its a hurdle he knows he has to clear if he ever
wants to be considered a Pro Bowl talent.
The 6-foot-4, 258-pounder is adjusting to
chasing running backs and receivers in hopes
of being an every down player and a starter
for a defensive unit that propelled resur-
gent San Francisco to a 13-3 regular season
and an overtime loss in the NFC champi-
onship game to the New York Giants. Hes
hoping to play a bigger role for a team con-
sidered a strong Super Bowl contender.
Thats somebody whos rising fast, 49ers
coach Jim Harbaugh said of Smiths develop-
ment. Its been the same Aldon that we saw
last season. And even better.
And more often.
Smith entered almost exclusively on passing
downs last season. He played 489 snaps or
about 48 percent of the teams total defensive
snaps and most came as a defensive end in
coordinator Vic Fangios nickel package.
Expectations soared from the start.
Smiths surprise selection by 49ers general
manager Trent Baalke on the rst night of the
draft stunned many fans in the Bay Area who
craved a quarterback or a more well-known
quantity. Some scouts also believed he was
selected too high and doubts about whether he
could transition lingered.
Smith proved them all wrong.
Last year, I was really just coming in on
pass rushing, Smith said. This year, Im an
every down guy. Im covering receivers and
backs, so its a new challenge.
Familiarity should also help come fall.
Smith had to learn a new position last sea-
son and an entirely different technique
standing in an upright position and dropping
back instead of starting with his ngers plant-
ed in the ground. Now, its more about stami-
na and smarts, a big part of the reason he has
spent countless hours in the lm room analyz-
ing all he did wrong last year.
49ers Aldon Smith aiming
higher in second season
Aldon Smith
SPORTS 14
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Picchi said. As far as Im concerned, Pam is
a coaching institution. Her program is
always top notch and more importantly, she is
the ultimate professional in the way she deals
with all the people who are associated with
girls basketball.
Wimberly took over as girls basketball
coach in 1968 and, since the implementation
of the Central Coast Section championships in
1977, has qualied teams 24 times, missing
the playoffs only 10 times in 41 years. She
won CCS titles in 1984 and three straight
from 1991 to 1993. She also led the Bears to
ve runner-up nishes in 1983, 1990, 1994,
2006 and 2010.
The Bears have missed the playoffs the last
two seasons, however, the rst time that has
happened since the 2003-04 and 2004-05
campaigns.
That was shocking to me (when I heard the
news), said Dan Hibson, former Hillsdale
girls basketball coach. She was an ambassa-
dor for the sport. From what I saw, she
was a positive inuence on her athletes. I
have never heard a negative thing about her.
With more than 630 wins, Wimberly is the
third-winningest girls basketball coach in
California history. In 2001, she was awarded
the Girls Basketball Coach of the Year by the
California Coaches Association. In 2010, she
was selected as one of 13 coaches honored
with the Model Coach Award by the
California Interscholastic Federation.
She was a very good coach, said 2008 M-
A graduate guard Erica Hayes, who played
four years for Wimberly before spending two
years at College of San Mateo and has one
year of eligibility left at Dixie State University
in Utah.
She not only taught you basketball skills,
but also life skills. She taught us not only how
to be basketball players, but women.
After averaging 16.3 points per game her
senior year, Hayes was selected the 2008
Daily Journal Female Basketball Player of the
Year.
We did pretty good each year I was there,
Hayes said. We all got along great. Im still
playing college ball and theres been no team
(on which Ive played) that had better cama-
raderie than the time I had [at M-A].
Hayes CSM coach, Michelle Warner, was
also surprised to hear of Wimberlys ousting.
Shes always been nice and gracious to
me, Warner said. Shes had some great play-
ers go through there.
In 41 years, Im sure shes done a lot for
girls basketball.
Added Picchi: I think Pam is one of the
most respected people in Bay Area coaching.
I only hear positive things about her from her
colleagues.
Wimberly could not be reached for com-
ment.
Continued from page 11
COACH
were so impressed with his freestyle perform-
ance, they asked Thodos to be on that team as
well.
It felt pretty good to get invited for
freestyle, Thodos said.
And while he will get to wrestle against the
best in the country, Thodos is looking forward
to the training opportunity he will get during
his two-week stay in North Dakota.
I get to wrestle with the best and learn
from the best, Thodos said. It just gives me
condence for the (high school) season com-
ing up.
Unlike a lot of high school wrestlers, the
transition from the high school game to the
styles used internationally have not been a
problem for Thodos. He loves the Greco-
Roman style especially the throws he gets
to employ, ones that would get him penalized
on the high school mat.
In fact, he was dubbed The Launching
Pad by another wrestling team for Thodos
penchant for throwing people around.
Riordan High School gave me that name,
Thodos said. In one of my matches, I threw
one of their guys all over the place. It was
Senior Night (for the opponent) and I was
only a sophomore.
I win a lot of my matches in high school
with Greco moves. A lot of guys dont know
how to defend it.
Said Klobuchar: Hes more calculating that
aggressive, but when [Thodos] gets ahold you,
you know youre going to get thrown.
This year in the high school season, he
went away from throws because a lot of peo-
ple pegged him as a thrower. This year, he
worked on his takedowns. Hes gotten a lot
better over the season.
Thodos wasnt the only member of the team
to have a strong showing at the state champi-
onships. Joey DAgostino (heavyweight) and
Greg Skelley (120), who will both be sopho-
mores at Serra next school year, nished fth
and eighth, respectively, in the Cadet Greco-
Roman championships, while incoming sen-
ior Jimmy Millington (170) nished seventh
in the junior division.
Continued from page 11
THODOS
PHOTO COURTESY OF GEORGETTE DAKIS
Serra wrestler Chad Thodos,right,nicknamed
Launch Pad for his ability to throw his
opponents around, captured the
Greco-Roman state wrstling title.
not make an error all year while turning 33
double plays. The national honor comes on the
heels of Daileys NAIA West Gold Glove
award, only adding to the teams incredible
2012 run.
Coming from community college, coaches
said I wasnt as good defensively as I was
offensively, so its always nice to kind of
prove people wrong in that area, Dailey said.
Dailey said he didnt play too much second
base upon arriving at Menlo. But coaches
loved his quick hands and his instincts around
the bag.
Ive always loved the defensive side of the
ball, Dailey said. Everyone likes to hit, but
theres a certain level of knowing where to be
Ive always felt like its came naturally for
the most part, just with all the work you put in
with the coaches, just one on one, taking
ground balls, reading hops, it all packaged
together.
Its one of the best feelings in baseball, to
be able to turn two. You dont really think
about the runner until he hits you, but when
you get hit and you still make the play, its one
of the best feelings in baseball.
Dailey was a steady presence on an ineld
that saw a fair share of shortstop partners.
Still, he was quick to give credit where credit
was due.
A lot of things that Ive done, especially
defensively are because of Will Pierce (at rst
base), Dailey said. Hes picked me up all the
time this year, and made me look good as
much as I deserved, hes helped me out.
Menlo catcher Ty Finely was awarded a
conference Gold Glove at years end as well.
Oaks baseball players named
2012 NAIA scholar athletes
A trio of Menlo baseball players were rec-
ognized nationally as 2012 Daktronics-NAIA
Baseball Scholar Athletes this past week.
Seniors Chris Cleary and Will Ireton, along
with junior Coleman Cox took home the aca-
demic-based honor for their exceptional work
off the eld and in the classroom.
Ireton graduated from Menlo as the class
Valedictorian with a 3.9 GPA, and was a mul-
tiple winner of the Male Scholar Athlete
Award, handed out at the departments annual
all-athlete banquet.
Fellow senior Chris Cleary wraps up his
Oaks career as the only four-year senior to
capture the award.
Cox took home the same honor last season
as well as being named to the Capital One
Academic All-American First Team in 2011, a
distinction carried throughout all three divi-
sions of the NCAA in addition to the NAIA.
Continued from page 11
GLOVE
Former boxing champion
Winky Wright announces retirement
LOS ANGELES Former light mid-
dleweight champion Winky Wright has retired.
The 40-year-old Wright (51-6-1, 25 KOs) lost
his rst ght in three years last Saturday, drop-
ping a unanimous decision to Peter Kid
Chocolate Quillin at Home Depot Center in
Carson, Calif.
Wright had fought just once since losing to
Bernard Hopkins in July 2007. He hasnt won a
bout since December 2006, going 1-3-1 in his
last ve ghts.
Wrights co-promoter announced his retire-
ment Tuesday.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 31 22 .585
Miami 31 24 .564 1
New York 31 25 .554 1 1/2
Atlanta 30 25 .545 2
Philadelphia 28 29 .491 5
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 30 24 .556
Pittsburgh 28 26 .519 2
St. Louis 28 28 .500 3
Houston 24 31 .436 6 1/2
Milwaukee 24 31 .436 6 1/2
Chicago 19 36 .345 11 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 35 21 .625
San Francisco 31 25 .554 4
Arizona 26 30 .464 9
Colorado 24 31 .436 10 1/2
San Diego 19 37 .339 16
TuesdaysGames
L.A. Dodgers 2, Philadelphia 1
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 6, 12 innings
Atlanta 11, Miami 0
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 4
Houston 9, St. Louis 8
Chicago Cubs 10, Milwaukee 0
Arizona 10, Colorado 0
San Diego 6, San Francisco 5
WednesdaysGames
San Francisco at San Diego, 12:35 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 1:05 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 3:05 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m.
Colorado at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
L.A. Dodgers at Philadelphia, 10:05 a.m.
N.Y. Mets at Washington, 10:05 a.m.
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m.
San Francisco at San Diego, 12:35 p.m.
Atlanta at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 5:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 31 24 .564
Tampa Bay 31 24 .564
New York 30 24 .556 1/2
Toronto 29 26 .527 2
Boston 28 27 .509 3
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 31 24 .564
Cleveland 29 25 .537 1 1/2
Detroit 25 30 .455 6
Kansas City 24 30 .444 6 1/2
Minnesota 21 34 .382 10
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 33 23 .589
Los Angeles 29 28 .509 4 1/2
Seattle 25 33 .431 9
Oakland 24 32 .429 9

MondaysGames
Minnesota 10, Kansas City 7
Oakland 12,Texas 1
Seattle at L.A. Angels, Late
TuesdaysGames
Cleveland 4, Detroit 2
N.Y.Yankees 7,Tampa Bay 0
Baltimore 8, Boston 6, 10 innings
Kansas City 1, Minnesota 0
Toronto 9, Chicago White Sox 5
L.A. Angels 6, Seattle 1
Texas 6, Oakland 3
WednesdaysGames
Cleveland at Detroit, 1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 1:10 p.m.
Minnesota at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
Seattle at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
ThursdaysGames
Cleveland at Detroit, 10:05 a.m.
Texas at Oakland, 12:35 p.m.
Tampa Bay at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m.
AL STANDINGS
@Padres
12:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/7
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Rapids
6:30p.m.
CSN+
6/20
@RSL
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/23
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@FCDallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/7
@Padres
3:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/6
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. Rangers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/7
vs. Rangers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/6
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. 8 4 3 27 28 19
New York 8 3 2 26 26 18
Kansas City 8 3 1 25 17 10
Columbus 5 4 3 18 13 13
Chicago 5 5 3 18 15 17
New England 5 7 1 16 18 18
Houston 4 3 4 16 12 12
Montreal 3 7 3 12 15 21
Philadelphia 2 7 2 8 8 14
Toronto FC 1 9 0 3 8 21
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 9 3 2 29 22 14
San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 17
Seattle 7 3 3 24 16 9
Colorado 6 6 1 19 20 18
Vancouver 5 3 4 19 13 14
Chivas USA 4 6 3 15 9 14
Portland 3 5 4 13 12 15
FC Dallas 3 8 4 13 15 24
Los Angeles 3 8 2 11 15 21
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturdays Games
New England 2, Chicago 0
Sunday, June 10
Houston at Vancouver, 4 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
BASEBALL
Major LeagueBaseball
MLBSuspended Philadelphia minor league RHP
Carlos Best (GCL) 25 games for a violation of the
minor league drug prevention and treatment pro-
gram.
AmericanLeague
BOSTON RED SOXActivated OF Darnell Mc-
Donald from 15-day DL.Optioned RHP Daniel Bard
to Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANSActivated C Carlos San-
tana from the 7-day concussion DL. Optioned INF
Juan Diaz to Akron (EL).
KANSASCITYROYALSOptionedLHPWill Smith
to Omaha (PCL). Recalled LHP Ryan Verdugo.
LOSANGELESANGELSPlaced C Bobby Wilson
on the seven-day DL.Recalled C Hank Conger from
Salt Lake (PCL).
TAMPABAYRAYSActivated OF Desmond Jen-
nings from the 15-day DL. Optioned OF Rich
Thompson to Durham (IL).
National League
NEWYORKMETSSelected the contract of RHP
ChrisYoungfromBuffalo(IL).ReinstatedRHPMiguel
Batista from the 15-day DL. Placed RHP Ramon
Ramirez on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 31.
Designated RHP Jack Egbert for assignment.
PITTSBURGHPIRATESRecalled OF Alex Presley
from Indianapolis (IL). Optioned OF Gorkys Her-
nandez to Indianapolis.
SAN DIEGO PADRESReinstated RHP Huston
Street from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Miles
Mikolas to Tucson (PCL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
ARIZONACARDINALSRe-signed LB Clark Hag-
gans to a one-year contract.Released LB Broderick
Binns.
CHICAGOBEARSPromoted Chris Ballard to di-
rector of pro scouting and Marty Barrett director
of college scouting.
DETROITLIONSSigned WR Maurice Stovall to a
one-year contract. Released WR Jared Karstetter.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI Paul Pierce watched
the shot sail just over LeBron
James outstretched arm. And when
it swished, he turned toward the
Boston bench, shaking his head.
The biggest shot of the night, for
certain.
And it put the Miami Heat in big
trouble in these Eastern Conference
nals.
Kevin Garnett
nished with 26
points and 11
rebounds, Pierce
scored 19 and
the Celtics
moved one win
away from the
East title by
beating the Heat
94-90 on
Tuesday night,
taking a 3-2 lead in the series.
James nished with 30 points and
13 rebounds for Miami, though he
went 8 minutes without scoring in
the final quarter. Dwyane Wade
scored 27 for the Heat, who got no
more than nine from anyone else.
Pierces 3-pointer with 53 seconds
left put Boston up 90-86. Miami got
within two points twice, and argued
that it should have had a steal with
8.8 seconds left. Instead, a foul was
called on Udonis Haslem, Garnett
made two free throws, and the
Celtics knew they had just stolen
one on Miamis home oor.
Game 6 is Thursday night in
Boston.
@Dbacks
6:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/8
vs.Rangers
7:15p.m.
NBC
6/8
@Dbacks
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/9
@Dbacks
1:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/10
vs.Rangers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/9
vs.Rangers
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/10
vs.Astros
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/12
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/12
Celtics one
win from
NBA Finals
Kevin Garnett
vs.Astros
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/13
@Rockies
5:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/13
Quakes beat Stars in U.S. Open Cup
STANFORD Steven Lenhart headed in a
goal in the 85th minute to give the San Jose
Earthquakes a 1-0 victory over the Minnesota
Stars on Tuesday night in the fourth round of
the U.S. Open Cup.
Steven Beitashour recorded the assist to
help the Earthquakes advance to the quarter-
nals for the rst time in seven years. San Jose
will host three-time defending U.S. Open Cup
champion Seattle later in June.
David Bingham made two saves for San
Jose (9-3-3 MSL) while Matt VanOekel
recorded three saves. The Stars (4-1-5 NASL)
outshot the Earthquakes 13-11.
Beitashour picked up a through ball along
the far side and made a centering pass that
Lenhart got past VanOekel from in front of the
net.
16
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mile run through San Francisco. The race is
considered one of the most difcult triathlons
in the world.
I love this race, Arrow said, because it is
the unique race within the sport. There is no
other triathlon that I know of where you just
swim point to point. You dont have to swim
around a buoy marking the course. They just
let you off a boat and they say, See that land
other there? Get there.And thats a really neat
part of the race.
Arrow got into the sport after being a runner
the majority of his life. It wasnt until 2009
when a friend convinced him to do a 100-mile
bike ride in Marin that he met the person who
would introduce him to his love ironically
enough, it was a pretty lady triathlete,
Arrow said, who convinced him to get into the
pool, hop on a bike and run all in the same
event.
I was hooked, Arrow said.
And like any new love, Arrow dove head
rst and hasnt stopped racing since. He
swims six days a week at the Peninsula
Community Center in Redwood City, logging
about 2,000 meters a day before the clock hits
7 a.m.
Unlike other athletes though, Arrow said he
doesnt focus on his running or biking,
instead, the 20-plus events he completes on a
yearly basis serve as competition/training.
Arrow said hell do 25 events in 2012 alone.
Sunday will mark the fourth time Arrow hits
the waters outside of the famed jail-turned-
tourist attraction.
Sundays swim concludes at Marina Green
Beach. Upon climbing out of the water, ath-
letes will switch to running shoes for the half-
mile warm-up run to Marina Green. Mounting
their bikes there, triathletes will start the 18-
mile ride heading west to Crissy Field,
through the Presidio, up the hill to the Palace
of the Legion of Honor Museum before loop-
ing through the streets of San Francisco.
From there, athletes begin the eight-mile
run to the Baker Beach Battery. Upon arrival
at the beach, theyll battle the 400-step
Equinox Sand Ladder then cross back under
the Golden Gate Bridge and return to sea level
to reach the nish line at Marina Green.
You may be winded just reading that, but
there is plenty that keeps Arrow head over
heels for the sport and the event.
You have that hour-long boat ride to get
out there and on that boat are 2,000 athletes,
Arrow said. I, for one, just feel incredibly
honored to be part of this group of people that
are doing this amazing thing. I even get emo-
tional about it when Im on that boat. Thats
what keeps me coming back to do this race
year after year.
Its a sense of amazement, of pride that Im
part of this group and I can hold my own with
this group of people. I think everybody, to
some extent, has their self doubt. When youre
in the middle of doing something that is as
cool as this, you feel like youve overcome
your self doubt at least in this area and at least
for this day. Its an emotional feeling. Its one
that sticks with you.
Arrow considers himself a middle-of-the-
pack triathlete and Sundays race comes with
the expectation not of podium success, but of
something deeper.
For me, a triathlon is a lot about living in
the moment, Arrow said. My real goal is to
have fun. Its a delightful way to spend your
time. It seems strange. It is painful to push
yourself, especially near the end when youre
pushing yourself the hardest. Or sometimes in
the middle of the swim, you ask yourself,
why am I doing this? But then you get a
rhythm, you get lost in the moment and you
start to enjoy it.
You start to enjoy it and then maybe even
love it like Arrow.
Continued from page 11
ESCAPE
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO Rookie Logan Forsythe hit
his rst major league home run leading off the
ninth inning to lift the San Diego Padres to a
6-5 victory against the San Francisco Giants
on Tuesday night.
Forsythe hit a 1-0 pitch from Steve Edlefsen
(0-1) into the second deck in left eld.
Huston Street (1-0),
who came off the disabled
list earlier in the day,
pitched the ninth for the
win, escaping a bases-
loaded jam when Buster
Posey hit into a force
play.
San Diegos Carlos
Quentin hit his rst two
home runs at Petco Park,
giving him ve since coming off the disabled
list last week.
Tim Lincecum appeared to have earned his
rst victory since April 28 before Jeremy
Affeldt allowed Quentins shot to straight-
away center with one out in the eighth to tie
the game at 5.
Lincecum is winless in seven starts, includ-
ing three no-decisions and four losses. The
Giants had rallied from a 4-0 decit to take a
5-4 lead in the seventh, when Lincecum was
lifted for pinch-hitter Aubrey Huff. Brandon
Crawford singled to center, stole second and
scored the go-ahead run on Theriots two-out
single to right.
The Padres had runners on rst and second
with no outs in the seventh before former
teammate Clay Hensley retired the side,
including two strikeouts.
Theriot had three hits and three RBIs while
Gregor Blanco had three hits.
Lincecum allowed four runs and ve hits in
six innings, struck out eight and walked one.
He is 0-4 with three no-decisions and a 5.90
ERA in seven starts since April 28.
The Padres jumped on Lincecum for four
runs in the second, including Quentins lead-
off homer to deep left.
Bitter loss for Giants
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND Ian Kinsler hit a two-run
double and Josh Hamilton also doubled in a
run to back Derek Holland, and the Texas
Rangers rebounded from an embarrassing rout
a night earlier to beat the Oakland Athletics 6-
3 on Tuesday.
Yorvit Torrealba hit a sacrice y, Adrian
Beltre singled twice and Holland (5-4) pitched
5 1-3 innings, struck out two, walked two and
allowed three runs on seven hits. That was a
big improvement after he was knocked out in
the second inning when he allowed eight
earned runs in last Wednesdays 21-8 home
loss to Seattle.
The Rangers managed a season-low three
hits their fewest since also getting three
Aug. 25, 2011, against Boston in Mondays
12-1 defeat.
This time, the Rangers had 11 hits and each
batter had at least one while ve different
players drove in runs.
Rangers hold off As
Padres 6, Giants 5
Rangers 6, As 3
Sports brief
Tim Lincecum
FOOD 17
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Fourth of July is a great holiday
to celebrate at the grill. And you dont
have to sacrifice your healthy eating
habits to do so.
Grilling is an easy way to cook
healthy foods without sacrificing great
results. Thats partly because the high
heat of the grill seals in moisture. This
keeps the food moist and tender with-
out the need for excess fat.
For a super succulent meat option
without going the cholesterol- and fat-
rich steak route, we marinated pork
tenderloin. Pork tenderloin is a neutral
base that can really soak up flavors, so
feel free to play with your seasonings
in the marinade.
We went with a basic marinade of
red wine vinegar and herbs, but apple
cider vinegar with Southwestern
spices or rice vinegar with soy sauce,
garlic and a splash of toasted sesame
oil also would be delicious.
Alongside the pork tenderloin, we
included some veggies. We threaded
them on skewers with the chunks of
meat, and let them absorb the mari-
nade too. Of course you could use
whatever veggies you prefer, but be
sure to cut them in large chunks to let
the meat have enough time to cook
before the veggies turn to mush or
burn on the grill.
MARINATED PORK KEBABS
Start to finish: 30 minutes (plus mar-
inating time)
Servings: 4
16 ounces pork tenderloin, cut into 1
1/2-inch chunks
1 small eggplant, cut into 1-inch
chunks
2 portobello mushrooms, quartered
2 small red onions, quartered
1 large red bell pepper, cored and cut
into large chunks
1 large green bell pepper, core and
cut into large chunks
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons minced fresh rose-
mary
2 tablespoons minced fresh thyme
3 cloves garlic, minced
Thread the pork, eggplant, mush-
rooms, red onions and both bell pep-
pers onto wooden or metal skewers,
alternating the meat and vegetables as
you go. Arrange the skewers in a shal-
low dish that allows them to lay flat. A
9-by-13-inch pan usually works well.
In a small bowl, whisk together the
olive oil, red wine vinegar, salt, pep-
per, rosemary, thyme and garlic. Pour
over the skewers, turning and massag-
ing them with your hands to thorough-
ly coat the meat and vegetables. Cover
with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2
hours or up to overnight.
When ready to cook, heat the grill to
high. Using a paper towel soaked in
vegetable oil held with a pair of tongs,
lightly oil the grates.
Place the skewers on the grates and
cook for 7 minutes per side, or until
the meat registers 145 F. Serve imme-
diately.
Nutrition information per serving
(values are rounded to the nearest
whole number): 260 calories; 70 calo-
ries from fat (27 percent of total calo-
ries); 8 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g trans
fats); 75 mg cholesterol; 19 g carbohy-
drate; 28 g protein; 8 g fiber; 310 mg
sodium
High heat grilling means high flavor and healthy
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Roasted beets, tortellini and fresh
blueberries admittedly sound like an
unusual combination for a summer
pasta salad.
But trust us on this one. The a-
vors and textures work surprisingly
well together. The beets are both
sweet and savory, pairing nicely
with the pasta. The blueberries are
refreshing, yet not at all out of
place. Their gentle sweetness and
low acidity make them an ideal fruit
for savory recipes.
Finally, everything is pulled
together with a generous seasoning
of fresh herbs, and a topping of
crumbled soft goat cheese.
ROASTED BEET
TORTELLINI SALAD
Start to nish: 1 1/2 hours (40
minutes active)
Servings: 10
2 pounds beets, peeled and cut
into 1-inch pieces
4 tablespoons olive oil, divided
Salt and ground black pepper
Two 20-ounce packages fresh
cheese tortellini
1/4 cup rice vinegar
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
mint
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
chives
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
oregano
1 tablespoon sugar
12-ounce container fresh blue-
berries
1/2 cup chopped toasted pecans
4 ounces soft goat cheese
Heat the oven to 400 F.
Spread the beets on a rimmed
baking sheet. Sprinkle the beets
with 1 tablespoon of the olive oil,
then season with salt and black
pepper. Roast for 30 minutes, or
until tender when pierced with a
fork. Set aside to cool.
Bring a large saucepan of salted
water to a boil. Add the tortellini
and cook according to package
directions. Drain the tortellini, then
spread out on a rimmed baking.
Drizzle them with 1 tablespoon of
the olive oil, then set aside to cool.
Meanwhile, in a blender com-
bine the remaining 2 tablespoons
of the olive oil, the rice vinegar,
mint, chives, oregano and sugar.
Blend until well mixed. Season
with salt and pepper.
In a large bowl, toss together the
roasted beets, tortellini, blueber-
ries, pecans and herb vinaigrette.
Gently toss to coat, then crumble
the goat cheese over the top. Serve
at room temperature. If you make it
ahead, refrigerate; let it stand at
room temperature for 30 minutes
before serving.
Roasted beets sweeten, brighten a classic salad
A blueberrys gentle sweetness and low acidity make them an ideal fruit
for savory recipes.
18
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Expires June 30, 2012
were knocked out of the race yesterday.
Webster, a Libertarian, earned about 15 per-
cent of the vote and Chiang, a Democrat from
Mountain View, earned about 11 percent of
the vote.
About 80 percent of Senate District 13 resi-
dents now live in San Mateo County, Hills
stronghold as he served on the county Board
of Supervisors for 10 years and was also the
mayor of San Mateo.
Lieber, however, called yesterdays results a
win for her campaign.
Anything less than 65 percent of the vote
for Jerry is a win for us, Lieber told the Daily
Journal last night.
Hill said that was a bizarre way of looking
at the numbers.
She would consider that a victory? Thats
hard to believe, Hill said.
Hill won about 38 percent of the vote in
Santa Clara County to Liebers 29 percent. In
San Mateo County, Hill won about 60 percent
of the vote to Liebers 17 percent.
With yesterdays historically low turnout,
Lieber is looking to campaign hard to the dif-
ferent pool of voters who will turn out for the
November presidential election.
We spent as frugal as possible leading up
to the primary. Our goal was to get into a
runoff, Lieber said.
Hill expressed concern that Lieber would
now open up her familys fortune to spend on
this portion of the race. Hill said he focused
on a grassroots style campaign and sees that
continuing until November. He also hopes
voters will focus on his background and sup-
port of the areas innovative economy.
We want to sustain that, he said.
Lieber, 51, is a Mountain View resident and
former mayor there who aims to strengthen
environmental protection and put a spotlight
on womens issues if she is elected to the seat.
She also supports Gov. Jerry Browns tax
measures to trim from the states nearly $10
billion decit and his 12-point plan to reform
the states pension system.
As a woman, however, she looks to encour-
age more to participate in state government as
the Legislature is comprised of mostly men,
about 70 percent.
She also says women get a raw deal in the
state from issues ranging from pay parity to
how they are treated in the states prison sys-
tem.
Hill, 65, looks to continue to put pressure
on the California Public Utilities Commission
to improve the way it oversees private utility
companies and their safety standards follow-
ing the explosion and re in San Bruno in
2010 that killed eight people and destroyed 40
homes.
The state has cut nearly $46 billion from its
budget since Hill rst won a seat in the
Assembly, he said. About $15 billion of that is
from education, including K-12, community
colleges and state four-year colleges.
In other election news: U.S. Rep. Jackie
Speier, D-San Mateo, earned nearly 75 per-
cent of the vote in her re-election bid yester-
day for her U.S. Congress District 14 seat.
She will face Debbie Bacigalupi, a
Republican, in the November general elec-
tion. Bacigalupi earned about 21 percent of
the vote while Democrat Michael Moloney
earned about 4 percent of the vote.
U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, earned
about 60 percent of the vote in her re-election
bid for her U.S. Congress District 18 seat. She
will face Republican Dave Chapman in the
November general election. Chapman earned
about 31 percent of the vote yesterday.
Democrat William Parks earned about 5 per-
cent of the vote while Green Party candidate
Carol Brouillet earned just 4 percent of the
vote.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
HILL
tax for county re service in the Highlands,
passed with a two-thirds majority 70.11
percent yes.
The trio of measures T, U and X was meant
to raise $13 million annually for county cof-
fers and proponents campaigned on the prom-
ise that not getting that money means more
cuts to public safety, health and stafng. The
rental car tax will bring in approximately
$7.75 million in general fund revenue annual-
ly based on the $310 million in receipts gen-
erated in 2010, according to estimates from
the County Managers Ofce.
But the opposition, bolstered with more
than $300,000 donated by Enterprise and
Hertz rental car companies, countered the
measures would dissuade tourism and actual-
ly hurt the countys bottom line.
The three other taxes were promoted by San
Mateo County Forward, a coalition of elected
ofcials, service providers and others who
described the measures as a way to stave off
further cuts and recoup some of the money
spent on services and infrastructure used by
travelers. Although the airport was the pri-
mary focus of the campaign, federal law pro-
hibits the county from exclusively taxing air-
port-related business so the taxes would have
applied to all commercial operators in the
unincorporated area, including restaurants
with valet parking and hotels that charge sep-
arately for parking.
The formal opposition, a group known as
Taxpayers for a Strong Economy, argued that
the taxes would actually affect residents and
the countys economy negatively by dissuad-
ing tourism and impose more costs on those
who either own or use such businesses. The
group, funded by the two major car rental
companies, fought the taxes in a media blitz of
ads that proponents called purposely mislead-
ing.
The $13 million in estimated revenue to be
generated by the taxes is already incorporated
into the recommended county budget. With
two of the three taxes now a no-go, the ques-
tion is how county ofcials will pencil out a
way to make up for that loss. The county has
already cut more than $70 million in operating
costs through a combination of eliminating
500 positions, slashing budgets and negotiat-
ing $13 million in labor cost reductions.
The county tried similar car and parking
taxes in 2008 but both failed with just more
than 52 percent voters opposed. After the elec-
tion, county supervisors blamed a lack of
active campaigning.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
TAXES
By Candice Choi
and J.M. Hirsch
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK There wont be any more
candy, sugary cereal or fast-food on TV with
the morning cartoons.
The Walt Disney Co. Tuesday became the
rst major media company to ban ads for junk
food on its television channels, radio stations
and websites, hoping to stop kids from eating
badly by taking the temptation away.
First Lady Michelle Obama called it a
game changer that is sure to send a message
to the rest of the childrens entertainment
industry.
Just a few years ago if you had told me or
any other mom or dad in America that our kids
wouldnt see a single ad for junk food while
they watched their favorite cartoons on a
major TV network, we wouldnt have believed
you, said Obama, who has headed a cam-
paign to curb child obesity.
The food that doesnt meet Disneys nutri-
tional standards goes beyond candy bars and
fast food meals. Capri Sun juice (too much
sugar) and Oscar Mayer Lunchables (high
sodium) wont be advertised. Any cereal with
10 grams or more of sugar per serving is also
off the air. A full meal cant be more than 600
calories.
Disneys rules which wont take effect
until 2015 follow a controversial proposal
in New York to take supersized drinks over 16
ounces out of convenience stores, movie the-
aters and restaurants, removing choices to try
and inuence behavior.
Getting rid of junk-food ads will make it
easier to keep the family on a healthy diet, said
Nadine Haskell, a mother of two sons, 8 and
11.
If they see a commercial on TV, then the
next time we go to the grocery store theyll see
it and say they want to try it, said Haskell, of
Columbus, Ohio.
Disney declined to say how much revenue it
stands to lose from banning unhealthy food.
CEO Bob Iger said there might be a short-term
reduction in advertising revenue, but he hopes
that companies will eventually adjust and cre-
ate new products that meet the standards.
The ban would apply to TV channels such is
Disney XD, Saturday morning childrens pro-
gramming on Disney-owned ABC channels,
Radio Disney and Disney-owned websites
aimed at families with young children. The
companys Disney Channel has sponsorships,
but does not run ads.
Aviva Must, chairwoman of the Department
of Public Health and Community Medicine at
Tufts School of Medicine, said Disney could
succeed where the government has made little
progress.
There seems to be limited taste for govern-
ment regulation, said Must, who has studied
childhood obesity for decades. So I think a
large company like Disney taking a stand and
putting in a policy with teeth is a good step.
Even though many fast-food chains and
food companies are rolling out healthier
options like apples and salads, Disney said it
still could deny the companies ads.
Leslie Goodman, Disneys senior vice pres-
ident of corporate citizenship, says Disney will
consider a companys broader offerings when
deciding whether to approve ads.
Disneys new diet for kids: No junk-food ads
FOOD 19
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


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By Michael Hill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Carbs? Calories? Fat? They are so
very last decade. Dieters and would-be
healthy eaters know the nutrient of the
moment being tallied, sought and bought
is protein.
Spurred by trainers, diet gurus and
weight-loss plans, Americans are seek-
ing more and more unique sources
of protein, from almonds ground into
milk and soy reshaped as pasta, to peas
and whey turned into powders and
shakes. And food producers are happy to
oblige.
Powders and energy bars packed with
20, 30 or even more grams of protein per
serving are selling briskly. Supermarket
shelves once crowded with foods boast-
ing of being high in ber or low in fat
now are jammed with claims of protein
content. Yet this is happening even as
Americans eat less meat, the go-to
source of protein for generations.
People are getting smarter about
foods in general, said Phil Lempert, a
food marketing expert known as The
Supermarket Guru. He sees higher meat
prices driving people to other sources of
protein, a movement that has becoming
more pronounced this year.
Longer term, I think youre going to
see people starting to look at more veg-
etables and different combinations to
create proteins like rice and beans.
Amanda Perry an on-the-go mom
with two jobs and a 1-year-old is a
good example. She counts on lots of pro-
tein to keep her feeling full and full of
energy. But she needs it to be portable,
so she often mixes protein powder with
almond milk, maybe a banana and some
peanut butter.
Its easily portable, which I think is
awesome for busy people because youre
on the run, said Perry, a 31-year-old
personal trainer who owns a gym in
Chelmsford, Mass., with her husband.
You cant really take a chicken breast
or a piece of steak with you if youre
going to be out for several hours.
Red meat, a rich source of protein, is
going through an especially bumpy run.
Prices are up, and so are health concerns
about beef and its saturated fat content.
Americans are expected to consume
about 15 percent less beef on a per capi-
ta basis this year compared to 2007,
according to Steiner & Company, an
economic consultant to the food indus-
try. Per capita consumption of all red
meat and poultry is expected to be down
by 10 percent over the same period.
But if forces are pushing people away
from meat, health conscious Americans
are simultaneously being lured to other
sources of protein, such as nuts, beans,
soy and seafood.
Protein has had popularity peaks
before think of the Atkins diet craze
not so many years ago though this
time there are a chorus of voices touting
the benets of protein-heavy regimens
like the Paleo Diet, which stresses the
lean meats and wild plants eaten by our
ancestors. And its being helped along
by accumulating evidence that plant-
based protein can lower cholesterol lev-
els and have other benecial effects.
A trip down the grocery aisle shows
food makers are tuned in to this trend
and happy to engage shoppers about it,
from Yoplait Greek yogurts (2X pro-
tein) to Boca meatless lasagna (21 g
protein) to Perdue chicken breast ten-
ders (excellent source of protein).
Like your protein concentrated?
Analysts say sales are up for high-pro-
tein bars.
As Americans are becoming more
health conscious and busier, protein bar
sales are increasing because they are a
convenient way to gain protein on the
go, said IBISWorld analyst Mary
Nanfelt, adding that many protein bars
are eaten after a workout to help the
stressed-out muscles.
Also popular are the protein-rich pow-
ders, often made with whey, once asso-
ciated mostly with weightlifters looking
to bulk up. Perry said her protein pow-
ders which are vegan because they sit
in her stomach better make her feel
more energetic.
I used to be afraid of it. And I have
friends and clients who are sort of afraid
of it. They think, Oh, Im going to gain
too much weight, its too many calories.
But what they dont know and this is
common for a lot of women is that
theyre not getting enough calories, and
theyre not getting enough protein.
Actually, most Americans eat plenty
of protein. The latest available federal
survey of what Americans eat, which
covers 2007-2008, shows both men and
women commonly consuming more pro-
tein than needed, sometimes by a third
or more.
Americans preoccupied with protein
Powders and energy bars packed with 20, 30 or even more
grams of protein per serving are selling briskly.
DATEBOOK 20
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
The Older Driver Traffic Safety
Seminar. 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Magnolia Senior Center, 601 Grand
Ave., South San Francisco. Presented
by the California Highway Patrol.
Items covered include myths about
older drivers, compensating for age
related changes and a confidential
self-evaluation. Refreshments will be
served. Limited to rst 50 registrants.
Free. For more information call 363-
4572.
SVForum. 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. DLA
Piper, 2000 University Ave., East Palo
Alto. SVForum presents: SVForum Web
Apps Event: Keyword Commerce,
Content Discovery, etc. Free to
SVForum members, $20 for non-
members. For more information call
(408) 414-5950.
Redwood CityTogether presents:
Babel. 6:30 p.m. Community Room,
Redwood City Downtown Library,
1044 Middlefield Road. Join us for
monthly movies over the summer,
featuring some of the most
interesting and thought-provoking
films of the last few years. For more
information call 780-7305.
Millbrae Library Adult Program:
SherryAustin with Henhouse.7 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Sherry Austin with
Henhouse. A womens folk band of
gritty folk music with a bit of twang.
For more information call 697-7607.
Steve Willis performs at Club Fox
Blues Jam. 7 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For more
information or to reserve tickets call
369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Menlo Park Police Explorers: Tasty
All Day Fundraiser. California Pizza
Kitchen, Stanford Shopping Center,
136 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo
Alto. The Explorer post is raising
money for their trip to Colorado this
summer for the Law Enforcement
National Exploring Conference. Bring
in Explorer Fundraising Flyer and 20
percent of your check will be donated
to the post. Flyers are available at
Menlo Park Police Dept. and City Hall.
For more information call 330-6300.
American Cancer Societyvolunteer
orientation. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
American Cancer Society, 3 Twin
Dolphin Drive, Suite 175, Redwood
City. Come learn about the many
volunteer opportunities of the
American Cancer Society. For more
information call 508-8186, opt. 3, ext.
301.
Carl Verheyen Band. 8 p.m. Club Fox,
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $15.
For more information or to reserve
tickets call 369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Movies on the Square: Mission
Impossible: Ghost Protocol. 8:45
p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City.This movie is
rated PG-13. Free. For more
information call 780-7340 or visit
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movies
.html.
FRIDAY, JUNE 8
Job Seekers at San Mateo Library.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. San Mateo Main
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
Job search, resume writing and online
job applications. Volunteers with
experience in human resources,
coaching and teaching are here to
help in search for job. Free. For more
information call 522-7802.
Daly City Toastmasters Club 50th
AnniversaryCelebrations and Open
House. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 271 92nd St.,
Daly City. Speeches and light
refreshments will be part of the event.
Daly City Toastmasters Club is a local
chapter of Toastmasters International
will help improve confidence and
skills for expression and
communication in any situation. Free.
For more information visit
1881.toastmastersclubs.org.
Kevy Novas 24-hour Guitar-A-
Thon. Noon. Camerons Restaurant,
1410 Cabrillo Highway, Half Moon Bay.
There will be live music and donations
will benefit the American Cancer
Society. Event will continue to noon
on Saturday, June 9. Admission free.
For more information and to donate
visit www.kevynova.com.
Salvador Santana & Band Performs.
8 p.m. Club Fox, 2223 Broadway,
Redwood City. Doors open at 7 p.m.
$14 in advance. $16 at the door. To
buy tickets visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Bluestateat NicksRockaway. 8 p.m.
to midnight. Nicks Rockaway Beach,
100 Rockaway Beach Ave., Pacifica.
Free. For more information visit
bluestateband.net.
SATURDAY, JUNE 9
Garage Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Corner of
Elm Avenue and Crystal Springs, San
Bruno. Proceeds will go to Gods
Clobal Barnyard, and ELCA project
through which money can be
designated for one or several farm
animals to help make an overseas
family self sufficient. For more
information call 363-1452.
Volunteer Orientation. 9 a.m. Center
for Compassion, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. For more information call
340-7022 ext. 328.
Herbs in the garden, herbs in the
kitchen. 10 a.m. to noon. Lyngso
Garden Materials, 19 Seaport Blvd.,
Redwood City. Classes will be taught
by Master Gardeners Kathy Fleming
and Susie Stone. Registration
required. Free. For more information
and to register visit
lyngsogarden.com.
Line Dance Marathon. 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. American Cancer Society Relay
for Life, South San Francisco. South
San Francisco High School Small Gym,
400 B St., South San Francisco.
American Line Dancers will gather to
teach and lead in various dances to
help raise money and awareness for
the ght against cancer. This is a free
event, however, donations to the
American Cancer Society are
requested. For more information call
515-2320.
LaNebbia Winery Craft Faire and
Wine Tasting. 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. La
Nebbia Winery, 12341 San Mateo
Road, Half Moon Bay. There will be a
wine tasting, food, arts and crafts,
jewelry, hats and more. Admission is
free. For more information call 483-
7840.
World Oceans Day. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Marine Science Institute, 500
Discovery Parkway, Redwood City.Will
offer two boat trips around our 90-
foot research vessel, the Robert G.
Brownlee. Two-hour journey features
a unique window into San Francisco
Bay. Will deploy nets to catch sample
of fish, obtain sample from bottom
and examine invertebrates. Children
must be ve years of age and older.
For members, adults $30, children $15.
For non-members, adults $40, children
$20. To RSVP visit
http://www.sfbaymsi.org/oceansday.
html.
Ruth Waters: A Continuum gallery
reception. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Holbrook-
Palmer Park, 150 Watkins Ave.,
Atherton. Ruth Waters sculptures and
paintings cover a more than five-
decade career. This exhibit is
sponsored by the Atherton Arts
Committee. Free. For more
information call 593-0572.
Peninsula Girls Chorus Concert. 2:30
p.m. Woodside Performing Arts
Center, 199 Churchill Ave., Woodside.
The Peninsula Girls Chorus, a 240-
member premiere arts education and
performance organization for girls
between the ages of six and 18, will
be holding its annual spring concerts,
Come to the Music! $15 General
Admission. $10 for Students and
Seniors. $25 for Premium Seating. For
more information or to buy tickets in
advance visit
www.peninsulagirlschorus.org/conce
rts.html.
Support the Kid Presents
Barracuda Bash by the Bay. 5:30
p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Curiodyssey, 1651
Coyote Point Drive, San Mateo.
Support the Kid is a 501c (3) non-
profit organization that provides
funds and support to children and
families battling cancer. We are an all-
volunteer organization and our goal is
to return more than 85 percent of
money donated directly to families in
need. All donations are tax deductible.
More than 25 silent auction items will
be presented. Ticket prices vary. Visit
http://supportthekid.eventbrite.com
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
commitment to improvements like
upgrading the streets and trails in the
area. He didnt want all developers to
think they are entitled to the same
change. Instead, he hoped to make note
that the council was open to the change
as an incentive for the investing in the
city.
In other business, the council approved
an ordinance to allow up to three more
restaurants in certain areas of the
Burlingame Avenue Commercial District.
Noting a demand for restaurant space, a
property owner requested the Burlingame
City Council allow additional food estab-
lishments in the 1400 block of
Burlingame Avenue, which was consid-
ered earlier this month. As written, the
ordinance will allow for three additional
restaurants two on the 1400 block of
Burlingame Avenue and one within the
Burlingame Avenue Commercial District,
according to a staff report.
In an April 5 letter to Mayor Jerry Deal,
Greg Terry of Alain Pinel requested the
city consider allowing additional restau-
rants in the Burlingame Avenue area,
specically on the 1400 block.
In 2010, the council changed the
municipal code to allow ve additional
food establishments which could be
anything from a bar to a full-service
restaurant in portions of the
Burlingame Avenue commercial area.
However, none of those permits were
used for the specic block. Terry noted
having two properties within that block
which have resulted in calls from people
interested in opening restaurants.
In 2009, the council voted unanimous-
ly to allow ve new full-service restau-
rants to be added on Burlingame Avenue
between Primrose Road and El Camino
Real; Park Road and Lorton Avenue
between Burlingame and Howard
avenues; and Primrose Road between
Burlingame and Chapin avenues, accord-
ing to a staff report.
No businesses were added in the year,
resulting in expansion of the area in
which new businesses could open to
include the west side of California Drive
south of Burlingame Avenue. In addition,
the type of business allowed could be
expanded from full-service restaurants to
include limited-food service, such as a
take-out only facility and bars.
Brownrigg suggested the city study
getting rid of the limits on certain types of
restaurants altogether.
Continued from page 7
DRIVE-IN
Gilham says the state has a problem
with its public unions and that they
wield too much power. He wants
California to be a right-to-work state,
meaning public employees will not have
to join a union to work for the state.
He also wants to see the state make
drastic cuts to trim from its decit, rather
than raise taxes.
Gilham is also ready to stop the states
high-speed rail project in its tracks for
being too costly.
With Genentech in the north and
Oracle in the south of the newly redrawn
Assembly district, Mullin touts biotech
and high-tech industries in the region as
being an economic engine for the entire
state.
Mullin, who sits on the Metropolitan
Transportation Commission, voted for
the early investment of California High-
Speed Rail Authority funds to electrify
the Caltrain tracks.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: sil-
verfarb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 6
MULLIN
Mindful that term limits remain popu-
lar with voters, proponents of
Proposition 28 emphasized that the
measure would reduce lawmakers total
time in the statehouse.
Opponents, including the California
Republican Party, said the initiative was
dishonest because few lawmakers actu-
ally serve 14 years. For example,
Assembly members often fail to move to
the Senate because there are 80 seats in
the lower house and just half that in the
upper house. They warned the change
would lead to entrenchment in the state
Capitol.
Paul Jacob of the Liberty Initiative
Fund, a conservative organization that
donated $100,000 to defeat the measure,
said it was only a matter of time before
voters realize theyve been tricked.
Youre going to see people awfully
upset when they nd out that the limits
are not tougher, theyre looser, he said.
The campaign in favor of Proposition
28 raised more than twice as much
money as the opposition campaign from
a diverse coalition that included business
and labor groups.
California voters narrowly rejected a
nearly identical term measure in 2008
that would have applied to incumbent
lawmakers. This one applies only to
future legislators.
Continued from page 6
PROP. 28
Board of Education Trustee Memo
Morantes received 7.92 percent; Menlo
Park Councilman Andy Cohen received
5.02 percent and Ernie Schmidt,
Redwood City Planning Commission
vice chair, received 3.18 percent.
Both supervisors Adrienne Tissier of
District Five and Dave Pine of District
Four also retained their seats having run
unopposed.
District Four includes East Palo Alto,
Redwood City, Menlo Park and the unin-
corporated areas of North Fair Oaks and
Oak Knoll. Supervisor Rose Jacobs
Gibson, its current representative, is
being termed out of ofce.
Although a supervisor represents his
or her district, they are chosen by voters
countywide.
Masur was an early candidate for
ofce, throwing her name in the ring last
fall and steadily accumulating endorse-
ments and donations. Slocum was the
last candidate in the race, joining just
before the nomination period in March.
I got a late start but things came
together, we worked hard and had a lot
of people helping us, Slocum said.
At one point, the candidate pool had
actually swollen to eight but East Palo
Alto Councilman David Woods was dis-
qualied by the Elections Ofce in April
after twice bouncing a check to le his
candidacy papers.
While crowded, the race was relative-
ly civil among the candidates although
Romero raised eyebrows in recent weeks
when a pension reform group pulled its
endorsement, claiming he misled voters
in 2008 by claiming to have degrees
from Stanford and Harvard universities
when he actually did not complete the
rst and received certicates from the
other.
Keith also led a complaint about
Slocum after he wrote on his ballot state-
ment As your Chief Elections Ofcer
and Assessor-County Clerk-Recorder.
Slocum used the abbreviation ret. for
retired elsewhere in the statement and
later said the error was unintentional.
The Elections Ofce and a judge ordered
Slocum to revise his statement.
Slocum retired from the ofce in 2010
after two dozen years during which he
became known for innovation, pushing
all-mail ballots, the use of social media
and using the Internet to broadcast elec-
tions and weddings.
Slocum called the county budget and
ongoing decit his key priority. He sup-
ported three county tax measures on last
nights ballot, building a new jail and
aggressively marketing the county for
economic development.
Based on May finance disclosure
forms, Slocum had the largest war chest
in the race although the majority of the
$112,162 this period included $102,683
in loans from himself and his wife,
Maria Diaz-Slocum.
Masur, whose day job is executive
director of the pregnancy prevention
program Teen Talk, has sat on the school
board since 2005 and actually serves
with Diaz-Slocum. During the campaign
she touted her public health background
and experience as mom in bringing a
unique point of view and link to the
countys younger residents. She also
highlighted similarities in budgeting
between the county and schools as both
rely on the state for money.
Im just very grateful for everyone
who worked hard on the campaign, she
said. I think weve come a very long
way from being an unknown school
board member to coming in the top two.
Its pretty great.
Masur also prioritizes the budget, sup-
ported the tax measures and wants to
work collaboratively with cities, schools
and other entities to share scarce
resources and avoid duplication.
Masur raised more than $70,000 based
on May nancial disclosure forms and
took no loans.
I think that makes a huge difference
to me. It shows the grassroots support
across the county, she said.
Continued from page 1
SLOCUM
tax requires two-thirds support. All
night Tuesday, the measure appeared to
be very close to the minimum needed to
pass and jumped past the 69 percent
mark as the numbers were nalized.
Were cautiously optimistic, said
Julie Guaspari, a parent volunteer co-
chairing Redwood City Community for
Better Schools.
Guaspari added many were holding
their breath as they waited for updates.
The district has cut $25 million since
2007. About half of that, $12 million,
hasnt been felt fully as the district has
used one-time federal funds and
reserves to help lessen the blow. In that
same period of time, the districts
enrollment has increased by 1,000 stu-
dents. Passing the tax wouldnt solve
the districts problems, but ofcials said
it would help.
Details of how the funds for the parcel
tax would be used have not yet been dis-
cussed. As written in the ballot lan-
guage, the money should also help
retain and attract qualied teachers; and
support school libraries. Such funds
could be used to have specialists in sub-
jects like reading and math who come to
a class and work with a small group of
students, Trustee Dennis McBride said
previously. While those students work
with a specialist, the teacher has a
smaller group of students with which to
work.
Before putting a measure on the bal-
lot, a community survey was taken in
January showing support of 73 percent
or higher for a $75 parcel tax in either
the June or November election. Looking
for new revenue sources has been a
struggle for the district which has seen
an increase in class sizes and the work-
load for almost all employees since the
2007-08 school year.
A parcel tax would provide a new
stream of revenue, which is why district
ofcials have long researched the possi-
bility. Redwood City has attempted a
parcel tax before in 1993, 2005 and
2009; all failed to pass.
Continued from page 1
MEASURE
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6, 2012
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- You should guard
against an inclination to be too possessive or too
demanding of your loved ones. This type of behavior
usually has a tendency to push others away, instead
of drawing them to you.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Neither you nor your
mate should make any major decision without frst
discussing it with the other. If either of you take ac-
tion independently, it will only cause problems.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Someone you dislike for no
particular reason doesnt feel the same way about
you. Instead of holding fast to this bias, give the
person the beneft of the doubt and get to know him
or her better.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- If you give in to urges
to take a risk on an exciting someone, theres a
good chance you could back the wrong horse. Its
whats deep within this person that really counts, and
chances are it stinks.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- The possibilities for the
kind of independent operation you like are very slim,
mostly because youre likely to allow others to make
demands on your time. Try to make some time for
yourself, as well.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Dont permit a past
infraction by another to totally distort your thinking
about him or her. Be on guard, but allow this person
a second chance, just in case it was one rare mo-
ment of indiscretion.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- A friend of yours
who has yet to return something that he or she bor-
rowed will put the bite on you for another loan. Before
you accede, establish some strict ground rules.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Striving to make
your mark in the world is admirable, but not if its
done at the expense of others. Know the difference
between climbing and clawing your way up to the top.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be careful about of-
fering any advice to others, even if asked. If what you
say is misunderstood or misinterpreted, you could be
blamed for the asking partys failure.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- There is a nega-
tive situation that youve had ample opportunity to
change but that you havent done anything about.
Unfortunately, this opens the door for another to walk
in and alter it to his or her liking.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- If an alliance that you
established in the past didnt work out, think twice
before getting involved once again. Ask: was it the
team or the objective that was at fault?
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Just because a co-
worker isnt in accord with your way of doing things
doesnt mean you cant succeed. Dont allow a dis-
agreement between you to shut the production down.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
6-6-12
TUESDAYS PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Doorframe part
5 Question starter
8 Shout of delight
12 Mishmash
13 Holm or Fleming
14 Teacup handles
15 Expert
16 Spring fower
18 Dented
20 Likelihood
21 Prickly seedcase
22 -- and cry
23 Pungent bulb
26 Wild blue --
29 Quaker colonist
30 Voting district
31 Tunnel
33 Double curve
34 Klutzs cry
35 Hornet kin
36 Pancake orders
38 Titled ladies
39 Visualize
40 Yes, on the Riviera
41 -- Hari
43 Wall Street denizen
46 Very hungry
48 Currier and --
50 Old Crosby tune
51 Med. plan
52 Faint, with over
53 Spotted animal
54 FICA number
55 Memorial Day race
DOWN
1 Work out
2 Grad
3 Actress -- Sorvino
4 Kentucky whiskey
5 More sensible
6 Glove fller
7 Yoko --
8 Kind of bliss
9 Like a rock
10 Winged god
11 Psychic power
17 Injury
19 Kennel feature
22 -- doeuvre
23 Unseal, poetically
24 Loch -- monster
25 Part of MIT
26 Barks shrilly
27 Red-waxed cheese
28 Greet the dawn
30 Heard the alarm
32 All-purpose MDs
34 Cruise setting
35 Oahu beach
37 Behind, on a ship
38 Twosome
40 Welles or Bean
41 One of the Three Bears
42 State openly
43 Mooches
44 Neck and neck
45 Sax mouthpiece
46 U.K. fiers
47 Mild interjections
49 Cagey
DILBERT CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE
GET fUZZY
Wednesday June 6, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
INSIDE SALES /
TELEMARKETING
The Daily Journal has two openings for high
output sales professionals who know their way
around a phone.
The ideal candidate will enjoy selling products
and services over the telephone, using the fax.
email, and social media as support tools. Ulti-
mately, you will need to be comfortable making
sales calls over the phone, and once in awhile,
seeing clients in person.
Must be reliable, professional, and with a drive
to succeed. We expect you to be making calls.
To apply, call Jerry at 650-344-5200.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Were a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906 or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
CUSTOMER SERVICE, DETAILERS &
PRODUCTION WORKERS Needed.
Provide exceptional customer service, bi-
lingual/Spanish speaking is a plus. We
provide training and support. Apply in
person at any Auto Pride Car Wash
locations.
DRY CLEANER, presser wanted,
(650) 589-2312
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
PROCESS SERVER (court filing legal
paper delivery) car and insurance, relia-
ble, swing shift, PT, immediate opening.
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250355
The following person is doing business
as: XpresSpa, Highway 101, SF Intl Air-
port, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94128 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
XpresSpa S.F. International, LLC, NY.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/2007.
/s/ Marisol Binn /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250357
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: 129 Lincoln Avenue Apart-
ments, 129 Lincoln Avenue, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061 is hereby registered by
the following owners: Richard Tod Spiek-
er & Catherine R. Spieker, 1020 Corpo-
ration Way, #100., Palo Alto, CA 94303.
The business is conducted by Husband
& Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/01/12.
/s/ Richard Tod Spieker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/11/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250173
The following person is doing business
as: G & H Trucking, 23 Garibaldi Street,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Claudia
Isabel Campos, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Claudia I. Campos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250412
The following person is doing business
as: Mamas Vietnamese Cuisine, 2456 S.
El Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Van Quoc Mach, 117 S. King-
ston St., San Mateo, CA 94401. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Van Quoc Mach /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250266
The following person is doing business
as: J & C One Hour Express Cleaner,
Inc., 111 W. 25th Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: J & C One Hour Express
Cleaner, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Quoc Hong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/04/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250304
The following person is doing business
as: Pacific Property Appraisalm 2033
Ralston Ave., #111, BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Wendy Woodard, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/1991.
/s/ Wendy Woodard /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/12. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/16/12, 05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250474
The following person is doing business
as: 1)Bel Fiore Realty, 2)Bel Fiore Prop-
erties, 649 N. Delaware Street, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Tawar Michael You-
khana, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Tawar Michael Youkhana /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250316
The following person is doing business
as: West Bay Tow, 1019 15th Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Daniel
Jones, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Daniel Jones /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250526
The following person is doing business
as: Paul Blackfield Photography, 266
Beachview Ave., #6, PACIFICA, CA
94044 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Paul Schwarzenfeld, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Paul Schwarzenfeld /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
23 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250165
The following person is doing business
as: VAM Design, 855 Jenevein Ave.,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Victoria
Morawietz, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 12/21/2007.
/s/ Victoria Morawietz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250393
The following person is doing business
as: Fidelity Brokers Real Estate, 465
Convention Way, #2, REDWOOD CITY,
CA 94063 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Fidelity Brokers, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
05/14/2012.
/s/ Albert Valdez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250087
The following person is doing business
as: Wendy H. Bowman Consulting, 1641
Sixth Avenue, Apt. #1, BELMONT, CA
94002 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Wendy H. Bowman, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
02/01/12.
/s/ Wendy H. Bowman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250098
The following person is doing business
as: Ambassador Senior Referral Agency,
2844 Hillside Drive, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Mark Tandoc, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Mark Tandoc /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250385
The following person is doing business
as: Bovet Road Surgery, 66 Bovet Road,
Suite 101, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Joel B. Beck, M.D., Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 04/29/2003.
/s/ Joel B. Beck, M.D. /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250383
The following person is doing business
as: Nomnomnom, Inc., 1700 Seaport
Blvd., #110, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94063 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Nomnomnom, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 04/09/2012.
/s/ Young Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/14/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250493
The following person is doing business
as: 1)24 Hour Batteries, 2)24 Hour Bat-
tery, 851 Burlway Rd. Ste. 211, BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Dream 2 Vision,
Inc., CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
01/01/2012.
/s/ Alan Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250620
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Dragon Vending, 659 Hunting-
ton Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: David Seward, 1166 Maple Ave.,
San Bruno, CA 94066 and Xi Luo, 34855
Starling, #4, Union City, CA 94587. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ David Seward /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250231
The following person is doing business
as: Palm Liquors, 116 South Blvd., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Carolyn Furtado,
149 13th Ave., San Mateo, CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/28/2006.
/s/ Carolyn Furtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250635
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Arco Building Maintenance,
1359 San Mateo Ave., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Norma
Angulo & Nadia Ventura, 124 Southwood
Ct., #4, So. San Fran., CA 94080. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Norma Angulo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250514
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Kerouac Construction, 1575 Ox-
ford St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Karina Alexanyan & Stephan Fitch,
988 Godetia Dr., Woodside, CA 94062.
The business is conducted by Husband
& Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/12.
/s/ Stephan Fitch /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250564
The following person is doing business
as: The Tiny Jungle, 169 First Avenue,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Christine
Mende, 1255 Sanchez St., San Francis-
co, CA 94114. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/26/2012.
/s/ Christine Mende /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250279
The following person is doing business
as: Bad Wolf Press, 501 Seaport Court,
#205, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bad Wolf Press, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
02/14/2012.
/s/ Lisa Adams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250408
The following person is doing business
as: Diamond Motors, 1710 S. Amphlett
Blvd., Ste. 117, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: D Motors, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/13/2002.
/s/ Armen Sadakian/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250611
The following person is doing business
as: Yume, 889 Ralston Ave., BELMONT,
CA 94002 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Mike Meng, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Yan Meng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250725
The following person is doing business
as: Yesenias Fashions, 570 Kains Ave,
Apt. 2, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Ol-
ga Aceituno, 33 Buena Vist Ave., Apt 2,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Olga Aceituno/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/05/12, 06/12/12, 06/19/12, 06/26/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250742
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hair Service, 1662 Palm Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ping
Lee & Jui Lan Liang, same address. The
business is conducted by Husband &
Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Ping Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250304
The following person is doing business
as: Final Touch, 2827 Hosmer St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Marcos Ramos,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Marcos Ramos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250743
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe Baklava, 680 Laurel St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Serende
Corp., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Ilker Yuksel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250746
The following person is doing business
as: Brad Zucker Consulting, 814 Sover-
eign Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sportsnet, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Bradley Evan Zucker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250637
The following person is doing business
as: Smiling BBQ, 189 El Camino Real,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jingjing
Gong, 234 S. Figueroa St., #1631, Los
Angeles, CA 90012. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jingjing Gong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250701
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Health Center, 1600 El Ca-
mino Real, #C, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Qun Wang, 707 Capital St., San Francis-
co, CA 94112. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Qun Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 16, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
TASTE! WINE AND CHEESE LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
890 LAUREL ST
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070-3915
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 23, 30, 2012 & June 6, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 24, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
CALEB MICHAEL ENTERPRISES, LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
2655 BROADWAY ST.
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063-1532
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
May 30, 2012 & June 6, 13, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 11, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
PIZZA MY HEART INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
235 PRIMROSE ROAD
BURLINGAME, CA 94010-4207
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 6, 13, 20, 2012
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # M-232252
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ma-
mas Vietnamese Cuisine, 2456 S. El Ca-
mino Real, San Mateo, CA 94403. The
fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 03/25/09.
The business was conducted by: Li
Qiong Ao, 127 Cora St., San Francisco,
CA 94134.
/s/ Li Qiong Ao/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/15/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/16/12,
05/23/12, 05/30/12, 06/06/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 248289
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ta-
queria San Agustin, 3 N. Kingston St.,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 01/05/12. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Elaine G Barra-
za, 813 Jefferson Ct., Apt. 3, San Mateo,
CA 94401.
/s/ Elaine Barraza/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/15/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/30/12,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
203 Public Notices
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 245332
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: 24
Hr. Emergency Locksmith Inc., 922 Ter-
minal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070.
The fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 06/17/11.
The business was conducted by: Shay
Ben Simon, same address.
/s/ Shay Ben Simon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/29/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/30/12,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others CLAIMED!
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST SILVER BRACELET - Lost on
5/18, possibly in Millbrae, off El Camino,
Reward, (650)343-7272
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
296 Appliances
DRYER HEAVY Duty electric, like new,
Roper, all instructions $40.00.
BURLINGAME. SOLD!
HEATER, ELECTRIC Radiator, top per-
fect $15.00 SOLD!
ICE CREAM Maker, Electric, Perffect, all
instructions $10 Burlingame,
SOLD!
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 SOLD!
LARGE REFRIGERATOR- Amana
Looks and runs great. $95 OBO,
(650)627-4560
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TOWER FANS Lasko, like new, 2 availa-
ble. $25, Burlingame SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new $49, (650)494-1687
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, Retails at $3,900, new.
$1,000/obo. (650)627-4560
296 Appliances
WINDOW A/C, still in box. Soleus 6200
BTU $75, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK - Roof mounted, holds 4
bikes, $65., (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 See print: http://i.mi-
nus.com/ibeJMUpvttcRvW.JPG
(650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COLLECTIABLE DOLLS MADAME
ALEXANDER Dolls. $20 each or best of-
fer.(650)589-8348
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, SOLD!
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
GIANTS BOBBLEHEADS -(6) Barry
Bonds, Lon Simmons, etc., $15. each
obo, SOLD!
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MUCH SOUGHT after Chinese silver Fat
Man coin $75 (650)348-6428
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
303 Electronics
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLAT SCEEN Monitor and Scanner, mint
condition; HP monitor 17in; Canon Scan-
ner 14 x 10 flatbed, SOLD!
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout matches the
your fingers naturally movement, avoid-
ing RSI. Num pad, $20 (650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40 See:
http://i.minus.com/ibd8yOhavekIiv.JPG,
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
See:
http://i.minus.com/ibd8yOhavekIiv.JPG,
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$50 (650)589-8348
SONY TRINITRON TV, 27 inch, Excel-
lent picture Quality, SOLD!
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ALL WOOD Kitchen Table 36 plus leaf,
William-Sonoma, $75 OBO, (650)627-
4560
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53X66, SOLD!
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, (650)589-8348
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921,
650-245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
SOLD!
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6 x 2.5, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FRENCH PROVINCIAL COUCH - gold,
7 long, good condition, $40., San Bruno,
(650)583-8069
24
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Reason for a flight
delay
4 Part of EST: Abbr.
7 Basic ballroom
dance
14 Give __ whirl
15 __ de coeur:
pained outburst
16 Grainy cracker
17 Silky-coated dogs
19 Served, as ice
cream
20 Short coat for a
Spanish 51-
Across
22 A-list
23 Hydrating cream
brand
24 Most junk mail
27 Ten, for openers?
28 Cut of ones jib,
so to speak
29 Very, in music
31 Garment for a
French 51-Across
33 Cheerleaders
accessory
37 Pain-relieving drug
38 Shoes for a Latin
American 51-
Across
42 Piebald mount
43 __ mater
44 Wall St.
happenings
48 Word on a
Chicago cap
49 Pierres
possessive
50 60s-70s TV
Guide critic
51 Young and
sweet, only
seventeen ABBA
title girl
54 Bit of the Big Apple
57 Supple
58 Shelter denizen,
potentially
59 Well-used pencil
60 Ending with chlor-
61 Showy shower
phenomena
62 Lapsang
souchong, e.g.
63 Scoundrel
DOWN
1 Was a little false
2 The Lion in
Winter co-star
3 Appetizing
dinnertime smell
4 Make notches in
5 Quartet with an
absentee
6 Prevent the union
of
7 Region of central
Italia
8 Nutso
9 Great Plains tribe
10 Many a bagpiper
11 Make use of
12 Barely make, with
out
13 Crosswalk user,
briefly
18 Letter on a
sweater
21 Novelist Waugh
24 Giant pandas
continent
25 It has a sticking
point
26 Online
destination
28 Dolls word
29 Slithering
symbols of the
pharaohs
30 Manage moguls
31 West Coast
salmon
32 Superdome
home, briefly
33 HMO doctor
designations
34 Columbuss
home
35 Tailless feline
36 Inc. tax rate, e.g.
39 Concocts, as a
scheme
40 The Time
Machine race
41 Distinguished
44 Brash radio host
45 Flowery, in a way
46 Golden Crinkles
maker
47 Matched up, as a
laptop and a
smartphone
49 Infuriate
50 Jordanian
seaport
51 Lowdown
52 Geo or Reo
53 Krazy __
54 Impact sound
55 Coleridge wrote
one to dejection
56 Go bad
By Janie Smulyan
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/06/12
06/06/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
304 Furniture
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SIDECHAIR, WOOD arms & legs, Euro
sleek styling, uphol. seat cushion NICE
$50 OBO text homessmc@yahoo.com
for foto
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
(650)343-4461
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $35 each or both for $60. nice
set. (650)583-8069
304 Furniture
VINTAGE WING back chair (flowery pat-
tern) great condition $100 (650)853-8069
WOOD PLANT stand, unused, 45 inch
wide, 22 high, 11 deep, several shelves
$15.00, SOLD!
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
SOLD!
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
307 Jewelry & Clothing
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DELTA 15 amp. 12" Compound meter
saw excellent condition $95. SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
SOLD!
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS vintage
drinking glasses, 1970s, colored etching,
perfect condition, original box, $25.
(650)873-8167
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others SOLD!
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (7) mint condi-
tion, hard cover, eclipse, solar systems,
sun, fundamentals, photos $12.00 all,
(650)578-9208
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
BOOK SELECTION, 200 Mystery, sus-
pense, romance, fiction, many famous
authors, hardback and soft, 50 cents
each OBO, (650) 578 9208
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm,
(650)344-8549
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
310 Misc. For Sale
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unopened, Plate
set of 4 William Sonoma white/black/red
$12.00 SOLD!
MOTHER'S DAY Gift, Unused, Hard
covered Recipe book, marinades, cook-
ing, BBQ, SOLD!
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $65. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PATRIOTIC BLANKETS (2) unopened,
red, white, blue, warm fleece lap throw.
$10.00 both. (650)578-9208
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $8. each (12 available), while sup-
plies last, Bill (650)871-7200
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES, sealed
book Past Campaigns From Banners to
Broadcasts, insight on politics, $10.00
SOLD!
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea (650)871-7200
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
310 Misc. For Sale
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WALNUT ARMOUR with 2 drawers on
bottom and brushed gold knobs. Good
condition for $85. Kim Pizzolon
(650)455-4094
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - cage,
tunnels, 30 pieces approx., $25.,
(650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $30
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SEARSUCKER suit size 42 reg.
$30 650 245-3661
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
25 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
317 Building Materials
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8x4x2 $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
PROFESSIONAL STEEL LUMBER
RACKS for 8 foot bed. Will go over
camper shell, $85., Mike Pizzolon
(650)455-4095
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19.
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45
(650)365-1797
LAT PULL machine, with accessories,
$50 OBO, (650)589-8348
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
PROFESSIONAL DART BOARD with
cabinet, brand new, $50obo (650)589-
8348
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
320 Spas & Hot Tubs
SUNDANCE SPAS HOT TUB - Cameo
model, 5-6 people, purchased 2000, new
cover, new motor in 2010, SOLD!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
REDWOOD CITY
255 Belmont Ave.
(x-st. Woodside Rd.)
Sat. & Sun.
June 9 & 10
8 am - 4 pm
THE THRIFT SHOP
ALL CLOTHING ON
SALE 50% OFF
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
345 Medical Equipment
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1450. 2 bedroom $1795.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
LOOKING FOR independent 1 bedroom
apt. in Belmont, San Carlos, Redwood
City or Menlo Park, (650)533-1908
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
BMW 530 95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, SOLD!
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC 93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
1979 CLASSIC OLDS CUTLASS SU-
PREME. 81K orginal miles, new paint,
excellent condition. $4500 OBO
(650)868-0436 RWC.
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - 88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, $2,700.,
(650)593-3610
635 Vans
1995 FORD Cargo Van 130K
6 Cylinder, good condition, SOLD!
DODGE 99 1/2 ton van V6 runs $100
(650)481-5296
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $2,000. Owner fi-
nancing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
670 Auto Parts
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
THULE CAR rack load bars, with locking
feet. $100 (650)594-1494
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
MENAS
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
Move in/out
Steam Carpet
Windows & Screens
Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
Cleaning Concrete
Construction
Construction Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
26
Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
FLAMINGOS
FLOORING
14086 Washington Ave
San Leandro
510-895-5400
Gutters
ESTATE SHEET METAL
Lic.# 727803
Rain Gutters,
Service & Repairs
General Sheet Metal,
Heating,
Custom Copper Work
Free Estimates
(650)875-6610
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing
Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, All types of Roofs.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
General Home Repairs
Improvements
Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
B BROS
HAULING
Free Estimates
Junk & Debris Removal
(650)619-5943
10% Off with this ad!
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$50 & Up HAUL
Since 1988 Free Estimates
Licensed/Insured
A+ BBB rating
(650)341-7482
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO
ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
Sprinkler systems New fences
Flagstone Interlocking pavers
New driveways Clean-ups
Hauling Gardening
Retaining walls Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Fisher Garden
& Landscape
Since 1972
New Lawns
Lawn Renovations
Sprinklers
General Clean-Up
Commercial/ industrial
(650) 347-2636
www.sher-garden-
landscape.com
FREE ESTIMATES
QAC. Lic. C24951
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BATH, SINK, &
TILE GLAZING
Refinishing
Some Interior Painting
(650)720-1448
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Workmanship
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
LEMUS PAINTING
650.271.3955
Interiors / Exteriors
Residential / Commercial
Free Estimates
Reasonable Rates
Lic#913961
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks, tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona

,
VelaShape IIand
VASER

Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
27 Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Low Cost
Divorce
We handle Uncontested
and Contested Divorces
Complex Property Division
Child & Spousal Support Payments
Restraining Orders
Domestic Violence
Peninsula Law Group
One of The Bay Areas Very Best!
Same Day, Weekend
Appointments Available
Se Habla Espaol
(650) 903-2200
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Table Showers now available
One hour $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
CALIFORNIA
FORECLOSURE
ASSISTANCE
FREE Workshop & Seminar
1331
Old County Rd Ste C,
Belmont, CA 94002
(650) 922-2444
dean4cafa@gmail.com
Registered &
Bonded with
California Attorney
General, Secretary
of State &
Department of
Justice
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
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Wednesday June 6, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL