You are on page 1of 48
July-September 2010 ISSue no. 43 www.haribon.org.ph The best of Philippine biodiversity WaterWater isis LifeLife

July-September 2010 ISSue no. 43

July-September 2010 ISSue no. 43 www.haribon.org.ph The best of Philippine biodiversity WaterWater isis LifeLife

www.haribon.org.ph

The best of Philippine biodiversity

WaterWater isis LifeLife
WaterWater isis LifeLife
July-September 2010 ISSue no. 43 www.haribon.org.ph The best of Philippine biodiversity WaterWater isis LifeLife

As Haribon’s media partner for creating public awareness on biodiversity conservation, The Manila Times generously provides Haribon a regular opinion column and free space for feature stories and announcements.

Read the “only in the Philippines” endemic species feature every Monday, “Haribon Corner” every Tuesday, “nature for Life” column every Saturday and the Green Revolution page every Sunday.

Haring ibon

The best of Philippine biodiversity

A quarterly magazine on biodiversity conservation by the Haribon Foundation for the Conservation of Natural Resources, Inc.

Haring Ibon is intended for its members, staff, networks and the general public. Its pages aim to heighten awareness and appreciation of our fragile ecosystems and threatened species, and how our ways - from national policies to individual lifestyles - impact on these. Analyses, views, researches, community stories and photo essays hope to offer

a reader-friendly resource.

EDITORIAL BOARD

Anabelle e. Plantilla Blas Troy R. Tabaranza Jr. noel A. Resurreccion Christine G. Cenal Belinda dela Paz Mithi Laya S. Gonzales Je-el C. ong Mike edrial

EDITORIAL TEAM

Managing Editor

Aira Simon

Layout & Design

Ryan G. Palacol

CONTRIBUTORS

Angie Adviento Alyansa Tigil Mina Andy L. Boncayao Athena Chua Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr. Denise Fontanilla Don Geoff Tabaranza

CIRCULATION

Membership

Lyn urriza

Networks, Corporate Partners and Donors General Public

Christine G. Cenal Yasmin Ponce

Haribon is the BirdLife International partner in the Philippines and a World Conservation Union member.

in the Philippines and a World Conservation Union member. Haring Ibon is registered with the national
in the Philippines and a World Conservation Union member. Haring Ibon is registered with the national

Haring Ibon is registered with the national Library Bibliographic Services Division, ISSn no. 0117-1259. Philippine Copyright © by Haribon Foundation for the Conservation of natural Resources, Inc. with the national office located at 2/F Santos and Sons Bldg., 973 Aurora Boulevard, Cubao, Quezon City, 1109 Philippines; Tel. (632) 434-4642 / 911-6089; Fax: (632) 434-4696; www.haribon. org.ph; e-mail: communication@haribon.org.ph.

We welcome contributions in the form of articles, photographs, artworks and letters to the editor. The opinions and views expressed by the writers and artists do not necessarily reflect the official views of Haribon and its partners or donors. For contributions and advertisements, membership and donations, call Haribon at 911-6089.

5 7 forest sustains life’s survival By Aira Simon sibuyan locals call for the protection

5

7

forest sustains life’s survival

By Aira Simon

sibuyan locals call for the protection of the galapagos of asia

By Alyansa Tigil Mina

protection of the galapagos of asia By Alyansa Tigil Mina 1 0 sexual dimorphism in birds

10

sexual dimorphism in birds

By Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr. & Don Geoff Tabaranza

13

declaring Water as a human rights

By Denise Fontanilla

38

A dAy In A lIfe

InsIde

Vol.43

rights By Denise Fontanilla 38 A dAy In A lIfe InsIde Vol.43 1 8 2 1

18

21

24

a haribon potting & nature trip

By Haribon Foundation

the 2nd asia-pacific coral reef symposium

By Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr.

advocacy updates

By Denise Fontanilla

dela Rosa, Jr. advocacy updates By Denise Fontanilla 2 7 3 0 kahirapan: hadlang din sa

27

30

kahirapan: hadlang din sa pagpapanumbalik ng kagubatan

By Rowena Mendoza-Matabang

quiz bee 2010: ecology & local history

By Andy L. Boncayao

3 VoIces & numbers 40 membershIp

4 GIft trees

32 people & eVents

44 punonG pInoy serIes

Photo by haribon
Photo by
haribon

message

from the Chief Operating Officer

message from the Chief Operating Officer  T here was no specific paragraph pertaining to the

T here was no specific paragraph pertaining to the

Environment in P-Noy’s first SONA. Somehow he

briefly mentioned two words, watershed and trees. For

environmentalists like us, this is a reason enough to

celebrate. He went further by saying, “Kasalukuyang pumipila ang mga tao para makakuha ng tubig. Pati po ang La Mesa Watershed ay hindi nila pinatawad. Para magkaroon ng tamang supply ng tubig, kailangan ang mga watershed. Sa watershed, puno ang kailangan. Pati po iyon na dapat puno ang nakatayo, tinayuan nila ng bahay!”

The relationship between forests and water is now better understood and the ecological benefits of forests are well accepted. Forests provide the best water quality since soil erosion in an undisturbed forest is extremely low. In China, flooding and droughts cause huge economic losses each year. Chinese traditional wisdoms had intuitively linked flooding and drought to loss of forest vegetation. Even scientists observed that restoring forest vegetation would enhance precipitation, occurrence of natural springs, augment stream flow and combat droughts and floods. According to FA0 (2004), China has the largest forest plantations in the world at 45 M hectares or ¼ of the world’s total. In Europe, forest is a major land cover type, and recent droughts and floods have drawn new interest in the role of forest in influencing river flow regimes.

In our country today, Filipinos are hanging tenaciously to our last 804,900 hectares of old growth dipterocarp forest and about 2.7M hectares of logged-over or residual forest. Because of this, we lost the luxury of having a stable water supply for people to drink, or for agricultural and industrial use. It’s either

we have too much water that results in disasters like floods or landslides, or we don’t have enough water and experience droughts, diseases etc. Most people are already aware of why we are in this kind of situation – deforestation! Take for example the Marikina Watershed, which is a protected area. How much forest is left in the watershed? The people greatly outnumber the trees!

However, it doesn’t help any of us if we would keep pointing fingers at those who we think are at fault. It’s about time we do something! Climate Change is now aggravating our situation. Let’s not wait for another Ondoy to happen.

We would like to thank everyone who joined us in our ROAD to 2020 campaign by participating in the Million Hectare Challenge. Together, we can make the restoration of 1 Million Hectares of our native tropical rainforest, a reality.

Hectares of our native tropical rainforest, a reality. Blas R. Tabaranza, Jr. Chief Operating Officer Haribon
Hectares of our native tropical rainforest, a reality. Blas R. Tabaranza, Jr. Chief Operating Officer Haribon

Blas R. Tabaranza, Jr. Chief Operating Officer Haribon Foundation

Haring ibon

368.8

MiLLiMeTeR oF RAinFALL on SepT. 26, 2009, DuRinG TypHoon onDoy.

(Narissma preseNtatioN,

2009)

75

peRcenT oF WATeR

WiTHDRAWALS FRoM

THe AGRicuLTuRAL SecToR in THe pHiLippineS.

(sauer & Klop 2004)

0.11

uS DoLLARS peR cuBic MeTeR oF WATeR FoR DoMeSTic uSe in MeTRo MAniLA.

(aDB, 1997)

674,000

MeTRic TonS oF eneRGy conSuMeD FRoM HyDRoeLecTRic poWeR pLAnTS in THe pHiLippineS.

(WorlD resources

iNstitute, 2003)

35,645

uS DoLLARS peR yeAR peR HecTARe oF ecoSySTeM SeRViceS pRoViDeD By TiDAL MARSHeS, MAnGRoVeS, LAkeS, RiVeRS, SWAMpS AnD FLooDpLAinS.

(costaNza et al. 1997)

68,404

HecTAReS iS THe ToTAL AReA oF THe WeTLAnDS unDeR THe RAMSAR conVenTion.

(ramsar 2010)

4

SiTeS DeSiGnATeD By THe RAMSAR conVenTion AS WeTLAnDS oF inTeRnATionAL iMpoRTAnce in THe pHiLippineS (AGuSAn MARcH WiLDLiFe

S A nc T u AR y, Tu BBATAHA

ReeFS nATionAL MARine pARk, oLAnGo iSLAnD Wi LDL i F e S A nc T u AR y, AnD THe nAuJAn LAke nATionAL pARk).

(ramsar 2010)

T u AR y, AnD THe nAuJAn LAke nATionAL pARk). (ramsar 2010) Do you agree with

Do you agree with uN's humaN right to water aND saNitatioN?

yes, i agree with un’s resolution on Human Right to Water and Sanitation. clean water
yes, i agree with un’s resolution on Human
Right to Water and Sanitation. clean water
and basic sanitation are essential to sustain
life. Without these, we are jeopardizing
people’s health and their right to live
decently.

AgnesLucente,hAribonmember

i agree 101%. Water is life and in order to sustain life, the source of
i agree 101%. Water is life and in order
to sustain life, the source of life should be
clean, healthy and safe. This is a 'human
right' that everyone must enjoy.

Jhe tAverA, hAribon member

yes, i strongly agree with the un's declaration that access to clean and safe drinking
yes, i strongly agree with the un's
declaration that access to clean and safe
drinking water and sanitation is a human
right because water is a very basic human
need and sanitation impacts the quality of
water sources and human health.

meLisAtherese mALingAn, hAribon member

Access to clean water means life, health and well-being. it is a basic human right that the state must recognize and protect. The state should be able to provide this access to all people within its territory without discrimination. protection of watersheds from illegal loggers and squatters; banning haphazard use of toxic chemicals to prevent pollution of rivers, lakes and coastal waters; regulating commercial extractive activities like mining and quarrying and massive tree planting in denuded forests are some of the measures being done by the state to protect our water resources. Haribon has been in the forefront of volunteer efforts to fast track tree planting nationwide with its Rainforestation program,

Road to 2020. Let us strengthen this advocacy with our whole-hearted support and cooperation.

gLoriA Q. cAccAm, hAribon member

yes, i agree with the united nations' right to water and sanitation. God has given everyone the right to live. With that right comes the right to all the basic necessities to preserve life, including, and most especially water. it is difficult to imagine life without water. But since people must not only sur- vive, but keep themselves healthy as well, there must be right to sanitation.

victor ArgueLLes,hAribon member

yes, i agree to un’s Human Rights to Water and Sanitation. As i understand it, this resolution provides the right to have a safe, clean, accessible and affordable drinking water and sanitation for all, specifically those proportions of people who are unable to afford a safe drinking water and half of people who have no access on basic sanitation. it also confirms that governments have obligations to ensure access to safe drinking water and sanitation under international human rights law.

LorrAine griJALdo,hAribon member

Definitely. The uS census Bureau estimates the world’s population to be around 6.8 billion at present and the un expects that it would reach 7 billion by 2011. The percentage of potable drinking water around the world is estimated at less than 1% of the world’s water. Some claim it is1-2%. either way, we all need to be more conscious of our consumption of this scarce resource. There might not be enough to go around in the coming years.

LizA rose FetALino,hAribon member

Haring ibon

Give Gift Trees PhP100 plants one seedling. Be part of the solution. Global problems may

Give Gift Trees

Give Gift Trees PhP100 plants one seedling. Be part of the solution. Global problems may be

PhP100 plants one seedling. Be part of the solution.

Global problems may be big but they can be tackled by individual actions. Each of us can do something about our degraded environment — from forests to the seas. Planting a native tree alleviates climate change and more importantly, it nurtures back to full health our natural ecoysystems.

With every tree planted, the beat of life continues.

are also our natural barriers against rising sea level, strong wave surges and storms.

against rising sea level, strong wave surges and storms. Over the past 20 years, our forests
against rising sea level, strong wave surges and storms. Over the past 20 years, our forests
against rising sea level, strong wave surges and storms. Over the past 20 years, our forests
against rising sea level, strong wave surges and storms. Over the past 20 years, our forests
against rising sea level, strong wave surges and storms. Over the past 20 years, our forests

Over the past 20 years, our forests have been destroyed through deforestation (roughly 100,000-150,000 has/year) and in doing so, we have risked our own quality of life, gambled with the stability of the climate and local weather, threatened the existence of other species and undermined the forests’ valuable products and ecological services.

For a donation of Php100 per Gift Tree, you can support our tree planting activities. Any occasion, when you give a gift to plant native trees, you’ll delight your loved ones. A gift that endures a lifetime and helps make a lasting difference now and for future generations.

make a lasting difference now and for future generations. Your gift directly benefits Haribon’s ROAD to

Your gift directly benefits Haribon’s ROAD to 2020, a campaign that aims to plant native trees to restore 1 million hectares of forests in the Philippines by year 2020. Our forest restoration activities are in our project sites and watershed areas in Luzon and Mindanao. You are welcome to plant your seedlings with us.

The survival of each ecosystem means the survival of everything in our planet, including us.

Natural ecosystems (i.e forests, mangroves, coral reefs), which embrace everything you can lay your eyes upon, provide the very basics for life. We use nature’s products everyday (water, food, medicine, materials for clothing, shelter, commerical and industrial goods). Its services make it possible for us to stay alive: an intact forest prevents flood, filter our air and water, harbors watersheds, locks up large amounts of carbon released in the air; rivers and oceans are sources of fish we eat; mangroves nurse fish, prawns, crabs and shrimps and

we eat; mangroves nurse fish, prawns, crabs and shrimps and Plant Native Trees. Restore Our Forests.

Plant Native Trees. Restore Our Forests. Join the ROAD to 2020 campaign!

Visit www.haribon.org.ph for frequently asked questions.

I want to donate and  

I

want to donate and

 

adopt seedlings now!

 

200 pesos = 2 seedling 400 pesos = 4 seedlings 600 pesos = 6 seedlings 1,000 pesos = 10 seedlings

1,200

pesos = 12 seedlings

1,400

pesos = 14 seedlings

1,800 pesos = 18 seedlings 2,000 pesos = 20 seedlings

I will donate: (pls. specify)

I will donate: (pls. specify)

 

pesos

=

seedlings

i will join the tree planting activity.

i will join the tree planting activity.

i will not join the tree planting activity.

i will not join the tree planting activity.

To order, please fill-up this form and mail to Haribon Foundation, 2/F Santos & Sons Bldg., 973 Aurora Blvd.,

Cubao, Quezon City. For more details, visit to www. haribon.org.ph or call 434.4642 or email act@haribon. org.ph.

Date:

Name:

address:

landline:

Fax No:

mobile No:

e-mail:

my Gift trees for:

saving

habitats

Forest Sustains Life’s Survival

by aira simon

Photos by

haribon

the angat dam

W ater is essential to life on earth but it’s easy to overlook this fact
W ater is essential to life on earth
but it’s easy to overlook this fact
when we have running water
from our faucets, and available
drinking water from hundreds of water
purifying stations. Urbanization had paved
the way for man to build a network of tunnels,
dams, and plants to distribute water so when
we need to wash our clothes, do the dishes,
or cook, we can just turn on the nozzle, and
forget that what is so conveniently available to
us is a product of an ecological cycle taking
place in our rainforests.
According to an article, the sources of water
in Metro Manila are the following: Balara and
Novaliches Treatment Plants (supplies water
in east and west zones), La Mesa Dam (stores
water from the Angat and Alat Rivers) Angat
Dam (supplies 97 percent of Metro Manila's
water needs and most of Central Luzon's
irrigation needs, before flowing down to the
Ipo Dam) and Umiray Tunnel (diverts water
from Umiray River in General Nakar, Quezon,
toward Macua and Angat Rivers, which in
turn flow into the Angat Reservoir)(Inquirer
Data). It is important to understand that these
are merely water distribution systems. They
do not produce water but rather serve as a
network for water to reach different areas. So
where does water really come from? To arrive

Haring ibon

saving

habitats

on an answer, we need to recall our science class and remember that in nature, everything is interconnected.

Norzagay Bulacan draws energy from water turbines. Without a stable watershed, dams can dry up, be silted and lead to water crisis and energy shortages.

Through the sun’s energy and earth’s

gravity, water from lakes, rivers and oceans evaporates to form

water vapor. Plants also give off water in the form of moisture, or transpiration. Once in the atmosphere, the water vapor cools down to form clouds in the process

of condensation. When too much water is condensed in the atmosphere, precipitation or rain occurs. Forests absorb rainfall and store it as ground water before slowly releasing it through springs, rivers or watersheds. When excess water can no longer be absorbed by the spaces between the tree roots and the soil, a run off occurs. Excessive run-off in deforested area results in killer flashfloods. Watersheds not only supply water in dams but electricity as well. The Angat Hydroelectric Plant in

The Philippine forest is called tropical rain forests because of

the large amount of rainfall it receives annually. It is our most important source of water. The Sierra Madre Mountain Range in Luzon is the

largest remaining tract of rain forests in the country followed by the forests of Samar in the Visayas. Forests also serve as home to a rich variety of wildlife species. The Sierra Madre forest is considered as an Important Biodiversity Area according to the study conducted by Haribon and Birdlife International. However, forests in Southern Sierra Madre are under serious threat of illegal mining and logging, charcoal making, and kaingin in spite of it being a major source of water in Metro Manila. If the destruction of our forests continues, we can also experience food shortages and price hikes, because of deficient water supply.

and price hikes, because of deficient water supply. The ecological benefits we derive from our forests

The ecological benefits we derive from our forests are dwindling. Instead of having a ‘sponge’ to absorb rainfall, floods and landslides occur because of lack of trees to hold the water in the soil. Extreme weather conditions caused by global warming or having too much carbon in the atmosphere is also due to lack of carbon sequesters. Forests take in carbon and help regulate the climate.

If water is life, and forests provide water, then we can conclude that forest is life. When we live in the metro, surrounded by buildings and concrete roads, we hardly recognize the significance of forests in sustaining our survival. We need to be reminded that everything in nature is interdependent. The condition of our forests impact our daily lives.

The condition of our forests impact our daily lives. source: Philippine Biodiversity for Beginners “if water

source: Philippine Biodiversity for Beginners

“if water is life, and forests provide water, then we can conclude that forest is life.”

wATershed

conTinuum

INTERRELATIONSHIP OF THE FOREST ECOSYSTEM WITH THE COASTAL ECOSYSTEM IS BEST DESCRIBED BY A WATERSHED CONTINuuM. THIS REFERS TO AN AREA CONSISTING OF THE WATERHSED AND ITS DIvIDE INCLuDING ITS CONNECTION FROM HEADWATERS TO THE REEF.

source: DeNr

TO AN AREA CONSISTING OF THE WATERHSED AND ITS DIvIDE INCLuDING ITS CONNECTION FROM HEADWATERS TO
ITS CONNECTION FROM HEADWATERS TO THE REEF. source: DeNr A bout the Author Aira Simon is
ITS CONNECTION FROM HEADWATERS TO THE REEF. source: DeNr A bout the Author Aira Simon is
ITS CONNECTION FROM HEADWATERS TO THE REEF. source: DeNr A bout the Author Aira Simon is

About the Author

A bout the Author Aira Simon is Haribon’s Communication Assistant. For comments or inquiries you may

Aira Simon is Haribon’s Communication Assistant.

For comments or inquiries you may email her at:

haringibon@haribon.org.

ph

Haring ibon

saving

habitats

Sibuyan Locals Call for the Protection of the Galapagos ofAsia

mt. guiting-guiting natural Park is home to the world’s densest forest, and endemic sPecies of flora and fauna.

Photos by

haribon

by alyansa tigil mina

S ibuyanons will never succumb to mining

investors in their precious land. Today, they

continue to stand against threats to their

home island, and rich biodiversity area.

Local government officials from Sibuyan Island, province of Romblon, have recently issued two joint resolutions rejecting mining. The municipalities of Magdiwang, Cajidiocan and San Fernando issued Joint Resolution No. 1 and 2, reflecting over-all sentiments against mining.

The local legislators signed Joint Resolution No. 1 calling for President Benigno “Noy” Aquino, III to declare Sibuyan Island free of all metallic mining (all forms of mining except gravel and sand), while Joint Resolution No. 2 is the same request addressed to DENR Secretary Ramon Paje and to revoke all mining permits issued in the island. Sibuyanons assert their right to protect their rich natural resources.

Sibuyan Island, dubbed as the Galapagos of Asia, is home to a variety of flora and fauna. It has 123 species of trees, 54 of which cannot be found anywhere in the world, 700 vascular plant species, and 131 species of birds, and the many still yet to be catalogued mammals and rodents. All these rich biodiversity are found in Mt. Guiting-guiting (literally means “saw- toothed mountain” for its jagged ridges) Natural Park and the whole island itself.

Known also as home of the world’s densest forest and the Philippines’ cleanest inland body of water, the 44,500-hectare island is also rich in metallic minerals such as nickel and gold. This is why the locals fear that the island will be sold out to mining investors who apply for large- scale and small-scale mining permits. Because of the potential ecological impacts of mining in the island, mining has been widely opposed by the locals, which further led to the organizing of

Haring ibon

saving

habitats

“Known also as home of the world’s densest forest and the Philippines’ cleanest inland body of water, the 44,500- hectare island is also rich in metallic minerals such as nickel and gold.”

the Sibuyanons Against Mining/Sibuyan Island Sentinels League for Environment Inc.

rigth (toP-bottom): the sibuyan island maP; hon. domingo marin, shares memories of his son during the death anniversary of anti-mining activist armin rios-marin; and a Nepenthes sibuyanensis.

On October 3,2010, anti-mining advocates celebrated the death anniversary of then Municipal Councilor Armin Rios-Marin who was killed during a protest rally against mining. Three years after the killing of Marin, locals still stand firm—they will not trade their land for anything. “The fight against mining will never end. As long as these mining companies continue to come in, we will not sleep,” said Domingo Marin, father of Marin and now San Fernando municipality councilor.

In a recent Sangguniang Panlalawigan meeting held last October 4, Alyansa Tigil Mina Sites of Struggle Officer and local Sibuyanon Rodne Galicha presented the threats of mining in the island and the map of the island showing the many pending applications in the peripheries of the Mt. Guiting-guiting Natural Park. During the provincial board meeting, Galicha also lobbied for the issuance of a resolution to declare a moratorium on mining in the province.

In a study by the Working Group in Mining in the Philippines (WGMP) led by former World Bank environment advisor Dr. Robert Goodland and International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) member Clive Wicks, it was concluded that “no mining should be carried out on Sibuyan Island which deserves its label as a National and International treasure. It has important primary tropical forest, which is largely intact and is extremely rich in bio-diversity. Mining in the Natural Park and on coastal lands and in the sea, will displace and impoverish many people, including the islands indigenous peoples, on this Treasure Island and affect their human rights, damage water catchments, forests and pollute rivers and the ocean. Mining will undermine the island’s ability to feed itself or develop its significant eco- tourism potential.”

to feed itself or develop its significant eco- tourism potential.” www.Paradiseromblon.com www.sibuyan.com Haring ibon

www.Paradiseromblon.com

to feed itself or develop its significant eco- tourism potential.” www.Paradiseromblon.com www.sibuyan.com Haring ibon

www.sibuyan.com

Haring ibon

Photo from www.Paradiseromblon.com

saving

habitats

Further, the WGMP discovered that “no Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) has been carried out to manifest the cumulative impacts ofall the proposed mines targeting the island and

which the authors believe will be a disaster for this up-to-now remote island. Mining applications cover 42% ofthe whole island. The mining applications

lowland

overlap32% ofmangrove, montane, primary

and secondary lowland forests, 45% ofrice lands, and 56% ofcoconut lands.”

Thirty-four exceptionally clean rivers and 14 sq. kilometers of mangroves are fished in Sibuyan. Its coral reef cover is intact and coastal water shelter is rich in fisheries. “An average ofone million kilograms offish are harvested here annually. All these water systems will be affected ifthe island will be opened to mining,” said San Fernando Mayor DindoRios.

While some political figures in the province may be pro-mining, the locals will continue to push for legislations for the protection and conservation of their natural resources. In their advocacy, SAM/Sibuyan ISLE say, “Sibuyanons are human beings with dignity, they are not like lambs to be sacrificed by their own government for the sake ofeconomy dictated by greedy oligarchs”.

for the sake ofeconomy dictated by greedy oligarchs”. mt. guiting guiting, sibuyan island, romblon. A bout

mt. guiting guiting, sibuyan island, romblon.

About the Author

A bout the Author Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM), an advocacy group and a people’s movement that

Alyansa Tigil Mina (ATM), an advocacy group and a people’s movement that upholds the rights

of the present and future Filipinos against the persisting injustices related to mining, is an alliance of mining-affected communities and their support groups of NGOs/POs and other civil society organizations convened by HARIBON Foundation, Legal Rights and Natural Resources Center — Kasama sa Kalikasan/ Friends fo the Earth Philippines (LRC-KsK/ FoE Phils.) and Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA).

For comments or inquiries, you may call ATM at (632) 426.6740

Haring ibon

saving

species

Sexual Dimorphism in Birds

Photos by don geoff tabaranza

10

by gregorio dela rosa, jr. & don geoff tabaranza

I magine you are relaxing at your backyard under the shade of a tree. A small yellow- green bird just a bit smaller than a Maya (Passer montanus) with a curved bill,

and olive-to-violet-colored throat and breast perches on the tree. A resembling bird arrives but it has a yellow colored throat and breast instead. Upon perching on the same tree, the two birds started doing an aerial acrobatics that can be the envy of any dogfighter in World War II. They are hounding each other as if they're fighting over food. Without any bird guide for visual identification, you might conclude that they are not the same bird species. The truth is, they are actually from the same species. It’s a male and female pipit or olive-backed sunbird (Nectarinia

jugularis). The male bears the iridescent dark blue throat and breast and the female has the yellow-colored breast and throat. This slight difference in appearance is what scientists refer to as “Sexual Dimorphism”.

Sexual dimorphism is simply the differences in the morphology or form of males and females of the same species. Variation in form can be shown in terms of color (sexual dichromatism), size, and the presence or absence of body parts (such as tusks, horns, and display feathers or plumage). There are many examples of this phenomenon throughout the animal kingdom. In lions (Panthera leo), males are distinguished from females by their larger size and having a mane (thick fur around the neck). Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) live in groups or harems. The dominant male is the largest of the group while the females are relatively smaller in size. In amphibians, particularly frogs, females are relatively bigger in size compared to males. Male snakes are relatively larger than their female counterparts of the same species.

Haring ibon

Let's look at examples of sexual dimorphism in the aquatic world. One that's easily observed and accessible are fishes. Fishes

also exhibit this curious behaviour. The brightly coloured male basslets (Subfamily Anthiinae) can be easily distinguished from less colorful and smaller

“Males of dimorphic species are often more brilliantly colored and sometimes having elaborate plumage displays to attract more mates.”

females. Groupers or lapu- lapu, in which basslets are members, are females first upon birth until they reach the size a certain size and becomes a male. Hence, they are often called protogynous hermaphrodites. This is especially true for the Near- Threatened grouper, leopard coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus) where it becomes a male upon reaching a size of 32.1 cm and 16 years of age (IUCN 2010; Heemstra & Randal 1993). In clownfishes, from the ever popular Walt

far left: a male and a female olive-backed sunbird.

on this Page (toP- bottom): the clown anemonefish and a male and a female mallard.

Disney movie “Finding Nemo”, the female is the big one and has at least two to four males living with her on the anemone. If the female dies, then the biggest among the males will step up to the role of a female in a quirky process of Mother Nature called sequential hermaphroditism.

In birds, sexual dimorphism can be attributed to several factors. Size dimorphism is usually associated with same-sex competition for mates or differences in parental care. Charles Darwin hypothesized that males tend to be the larger sex when large size gives them an

saving

species

advantage in competition for mates. Further, Darwin also proposed that in cases where females are larger, large size gives them an advantage in the number of offspring produced. Thus, increasing size enhances the chances of birds to spread their genes around, ensuring that their “better” genes will be passed on to the next generation. A study by Björklund (2002) showed that polygynous birds or birds with several mates are relatively larger in body size compared to monogamous birds.

More than size dimorphism, plumage or color dimorphism is more easily observed in many species of birds. Males of dimorphic

plumage or color dimorphism is more easily observed in many species of birds. Males of dimorphic

Haring ibon

11

saving

species

s a v i n g species above (toP-bottom): a male (left) and a female (right)
s a v i n g species above (toP-bottom): a male (left) and a female (right)

above (toP-bottom):

a male (left) and

a female (right) tarictic

hornbill; and a female (left) and a male (right) Pied bushchat.

species are often more brilliantly colored

and sometimes having elaborate plumage

displays to attract more mates. It is usually the males of the species that are colorful such as the Tarictic Hornbill (Penelopides panini), Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and Philippine Trogon (Harpactes ardens) and perform garrish displays such as the Palawan Peacock Pheasant (Polyplectron napoleonis or emphanum). Females on the other hand usually have more drab or cryptic coloration. This type of coloration allows females to tend to their nest & brood without attracting attention from possible predators.

As part of an advocacy to save our remaining primary forests, Haribon offers Birdwatching for Beginners Course. Orientation on the basics (i.e. gear, ethics, importance of birds, etc.) is done with the membership department followed by a series of bird watching activities within and outside Metro Manila to develop the necessary skills of a novice birder and

to develop the necessary skills of a novice birder and further increase the birdlist of a

further increase the birdlist of a hardcore birdwatcher. An important part of the course is to develop the skills of participants in identifying bird species. Participants will soon realize that in some bird species males and females look entirely different to the untrained eye. As their observation skills sharpen, they will be able to distinguish them at a glance.

So the next time you see birds that look exactly alike but with different colors, it is a good chance that they're of the same kind or species. Try to bring a bird identification book or if you don't have one, a notebook and pencil will do. Draw a simple outline of the bird and its distinct characteristics (i.e. posture, coloration, tail and bill length) and save it for your future reference. Remember that good observation skills is the first step in becoming a bird watcher!

skills is the first step in becoming a bird watcher! A bout the Authors Gregorio dela

About the Authors

A bout the Authors Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr. is Haribon’s Marine Biologist. For comments or inquiries

Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr. is Haribon’s Marine Biologist.

For comments or inquiries you may email him at:

conservationscience@

haribon.org.ph

you may email him at: conservationscience@ haribon.org.ph Don Geoff E. Tabaranza is Haribon’s Marine Biologist. For

Don Geoff E. Tabaranza is Haribon’s Marine Biologist.

For comments or inquiries you may email him at:

conservationscience@

haribon.org.ph

1

Haring ibon

saving

species

Declaring Water

Declaring Water

s a v i n g species Declaring Water Declaring Water as a Human Right as
s a v i n g species Declaring Water Declaring Water as a Human Right as

as a Human Right

as a Human Right

Water Declaring Water as a Human Right as a Human Right by denise fontanilla O n
Water Declaring Water as a Human Right as a Human Right by denise fontanilla O n
Water Declaring Water as a Human Right as a Human Right by denise fontanilla O n

by denise fontanilla

O n July 28, 2010, the United Nations General Assembly declared for the first time
O n July 28, 2010, the United Nations
General Assembly declared for
the first time that water, along
with sanitation, is a human right.
The resolution was adopted around the time
when water crisis hit the country, but was
understandably ignored in favor of more
immediate concerns. With the water rations and
the long lines at the water tankers and pumps,
we did not need a UN resolution to convince
ourselves that water is running out.
Photos by
haribon

Haring ibon

1

saving

species

above: bolivia’s un ambassador Pablo solon-romero during a Press conference.

14

Now that the public attention to the water shortage is fading, maybe it’s time for the resolution to have its own share of the spotlight, and for us to consider it in the context of our water policy.

Behind the Scarcity The World Conservation Union (IUCN) in 2004 considered global overpopulation, increase in water consumption, climate change, dams and other diversions as major factors in the growing lack of water. It also counted mismanagement of water, which is probably the most-overlooked factor. Mismanagement refers not only to governance issues such as the need of strong water institutions and laws, but also the mismanagement of resources, as in deforestation, overgrazing, reclamation, pollution, and the wasteful use of water.

The UN Declaration Bolivia’s UN ambassador Pablo Solon introduced the draft resolution at the assembly. He said our rights to water and sanitation have yet to be recognized, despite the fact that a number of international legal instruments already refer to it. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, for example, specifically

Photo by Paulo filgueiras /un

mentions neither water nor sanitation.

Aside from recognizing safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as human rights essential for the full enjoyment of life, the resolution also called on states and international organizations to assist developing countries in improving the provision of these rights.

Recognizing the right to water may seem an obvious matter to agree upon, especially with Solon’s statement that “approximately 884 million people lack access to safe drinking water and that over 2.6 billion do not have access to basic sanitation.” But while no country voted against the non-binding resolution, 41 countries did abstain from voting. These include the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Japan, and South Korea, with their representatives citing mostly procedural issues as reasons, such as the lack of consensus and the possible undermining of the Human Rights Council’s related work. If you are wondering about the Philippines, our representative was absent during the voting, as 28 others were, while 122 countries voted in favor of the resolution.

Haring ibon

Implications So why is it so important for water to be formally recognized as a human right? One of its most important implications is that water belongs to the people and is not a commodity to be sold. It is interesting to note that many of the industrialized countries that abstained from voting are moving towards water privatization, and that water is listed as a “good” and “investment” in the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Barlow has also stressed the importance of water, and not “access to water”, as a human right. She said that if the latter were used in the phrasing, it would mean that governments would only be obligated to provide that access, not necessarily the water itself.

It is interesting to note that the Philippines did not need this declaration in the first place to incorporate water into policy. We long had the

1987 Constitution, the 1974 Philippine Water

Code (Presidential Decree 1067), and the

1995 National Water Crisis Act (Republic Act

8041), aside from countless other water-related policies.

Water Rights versus the Right to Water The IBON Foundation, however, takes care to differentiate between “water rights” and “right to water”. “The former allows private and profit- oriented monopoly control of water resources while the latter essentially means human right to access and use water,” it said on a 2005 primer.

“Water belongs to people and not a commodity ”

to be sold

True enough, the Constitution, the Water Code, and the National Water Crisis Act all focus on water governance. They all promoted the Regalian doctrine, introduced during the era of Spanish colonization, which stated that all resources belong to the

state instead of the people. The closest we have to a right to water is a Water Code provision in which the government allows for the use of waters for drinking, bathing, and other domestic uses even without a water permit.

The Water Crisis Act, on the other hand, led to the privatization of the Metropolitan Waterworks and Sewerage Systems (MWSS)

saving

species

Haring ibon

1

saving

species

s a v i n g species references: 2030 Water Resources Group. (2009). charting our water

references:

2030 Water Resources Group. (2009). charting our water future: economic frameworks to inform decision-making. Asian Development Bank. (2007, June). country water action: Philippines securing water rights for all. Cezar Tigno: Author. Retrieved from http:// www.adb.org/Water/actions/phi/

Securing-Water-Rights.asp#a3

Democracy Now! (2010, July 29). uN declares water a fundamental human right. Retrieved from http://www.

pacificfreepress.com/news/1/6713-

un-declares-water-a-fundamental-

human-right.html. IBON Foundation (2005). Water privatization: corporate control vs. people's control. As cited in Water for the People Network Asia, “Water privatization in the Philippines:

Creating inequity in people’s access to sufficient and potable water”. Retrieved from http://

www2.ohchr.org/english/issues/

water/contributions/civilsociety/ WaterforthePeopleNetworkAsia.pdf Population Reference Bureau (2009). 2009 World Population Data sheet. Retrieved from http://www.prb.org/pdf09/

09wpds_eng.pdf

Scanlon, John, Cassar, Angela and Nemes, Noémi (2004). Water as a human right? The World Conservation union (IuCN), Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, uK. united Nations Department of Public Information (2002). Water: A matter of life and death. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/events/water/ factsheet.pdf World Health Organization. (2003). The right to water. Zetland, David. (2010, April 12). Water rights and human rights. Forbes. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.

com/forbes/2010/0412/opinions-

sanitation-haiti-human-rights-on-my-

mind.html

1

since 1997. The privatization was supposed to lower water rates, but they climbed back just after a few years. Also, while there have been water shortages even before last July’s crisis, complaints about poor service, inefficiency, and mismanagement have yet to run out since MWSS was privatized.

On a 2006 feature, IBON tells how people in Bagong Barrio, Caloocan City paid water fees even though nothing came out of their faucets. The affected barangays and cause-oriented groups in Bagong Barrio held a rally in order for Maynilad to finally fix their pipelines and decrease the rationing. Even up to now we hear reports on how Maynilad and Manila Water lose 60% and 20% of the water they source from Angat Dam, respectively, because of leaks and theft. If these companies had made an effort to fix their pipelines, we would still have water supply even during the dry spell to say the least.

Looking beyond As the IUCN said, it is ultimately up to the political will of every state to ensure that these rights are respected and upheld. So far, our piles of legislation and web of regulatory agencies have not prevented 15% of Filipinos from lacking absolutely safe drinking water, as shown in the 2003 figures of the National Statistical Office.

The good news is that we have civil society groups that work to address the factors that restrain our right to water. But the even better news is that you do not need to be a human rights activist or environmentalist to conserve water. Making sure the faucets are off is already good start. You can also help Haribon conserve water by restoring Philippine forests, which are important parts of watersheds.

Declaring water as a human right truly is a step towards the right track, but we all have to do our own part if we want to use and enjoy this right to the fullest.

part if we want to use and enjoy this right to the fullest. A bout the

About the Author

A bout the Author Denise Fontanilla is Haribon’s Advocacy Assistant. For comments or inquiries you may

Denise Fontanilla is Haribon’s Advocacy Assistant.

For comments or inquiries you may email her at:

rainforestation@haribon.

org.ph

Haring ibon

Haring ibon
Haring ibon

1

working people with

A Haribon Potting

& Nature Trip

by haribon foundation

Photos by

haribon

1

gaile tabaranza, haribon’s hr officer and volunteer sifting sand mixture for Potting.

A n internship and volunteer work in Haribon will not be complete until you go
A n internship and volunteer work
in Haribon will not be complete
until you go on a fieldwork. That’s
what the three of us did on July 23.
Sir Djop, Miss Gaile, Kuya Bonjo and our
driver, Mang Rene headed to Brgy. Lewin in
Lumban, Laguna to do potting for tree and
plant seedlings that will be used in planting
activities of Haribon together with its partners.
The trip was a memorable experience as we
not only discussed the difference of plants,
seeds and habitats, we also learnt firsthand
how to make our own plant compost and
growth chamber to recreate the plant’s
original environment.

Haring ibon

working people with Athena AthenA I t was a day packed full of fun and
working people with Athena AthenA I t was a day packed full of fun and

working people with

Athena

AthenA

I t was a day packed full of fun and learning. Helping out in the

Caliraya nursery has been an enjoyable experience. It made my

day. It was a time of bonding, working for the environment and

losing a couple of pounds. Going to the Caliraya Nursery had given me the chance to experience things that I never thought I would be able to do. I learned the right way to pot soil and the usefulness of a growth chamber to wildlings. I loved getting dirty and working with my hands. I was able to have fun as well as exercise in the process. Through this field work I was able to feel nature all around me and see its beauty and wonders. It was an experience in which I would never forget. It's now stored in my memories and what made it all wonderful was because of the people with me, working with me, laughing with me and sharing these fond memories with me.

laughing with me and sharing these fond memories with me. Angie Angie T he potting activity
laughing with me and sharing these fond memories with me. Angie Angie T he potting activity

Angie

Angie

T he potting activity in Haribon's nursery in Caliraya, Laguna

is sure to turn out as best memories with the Foundation.

I never had any experiences with manual work such as

potting in my entire life and I wondered how I would fare in such

activity. Contrary to my slow and lazy disposition, I was actually amazed by how I was able to transport soil, sand and fertilizers from one place to another without relative delay. I also had a rare chance to know various types of plants/seedlings one of which is the very peculiar dipterocarp that looked like a helicopter (with its twin wings). Thanks to the brief lectures given by sir Djop, candid pictures taken by Mei and Miss Gaile and comic relief coming from kuya Bon Jo, we were able to learn something from the activity and enjoy at the same time. The potting activity gave the interns and some of Haribon’s employees a time to bond and a time-out from office work. I really felt happy having the quality time to talk to Athena and Mei who are my fellow interns. This experience taught me that volunteerism could reap benefits beyond financial

or material compensation. People who truly wish to conserve our rainforests should actively participate in activities such as this.

Haring ibon

1

working people with

working people with Mei Mei O k, not too long, not too short. I was a
working people with Mei Mei O k, not too long, not too short. I was a

Mei

Mei

O k, not too long, not too short. I was a bit reluctant to join this activity since I have been exposed to these kinds of

things already. However, I guess not all things

you think you do a lot will mean it will all be same. I learned a lot about the difference of seeds and pretty much how to prepare them for planting. From the whole experience, I liked learning about the dipterocarps and how they can manage to grow using their wings. It was an eye opener and since I am doing my thesis about environmental policies and sort of also with advocacy. The fieldwork gave me a glimpse of the realities on the ground.

0

Some valuable points we learned from the fieldwork, courtesy of Sir Djop.

1. The formula in making homemade garden compost comes in these steps. First is to gather all the materials: 2 buckets of garden soil, 1 bucket of sifted sand, 1 part ipa (rice husk) and animal manure. Experimentation with how much part per item is totally up to anyone. Then mix it thoroughly with a shovel or a rake. The mix must be able to reach the bottom. 2. Dipterocarps seeds such as apitong, have leaves formed as wings to enable them to find a suitable place to grow once they fall from the main tree. Usually, they grow in the shade and may grow far bigger than narra trees. 3. Narra, on the other hand, has two types of seeds: smooth and prickly. Although different as seeds, they will both look the same when they mature. Growth chambers are used to recreate the forest environment for seeds and plants to grow. It’s also used to help sickly-looking plants to recover as the temperature inside the growth chamber is the same as the forest.

At the end of the day, all of us were dead tired with all the work we did. We thought this was an event that we will never forget. Thanks to Haribon and its partner, Coca-Cola Foundation for this nursery project!

its partner, Coca-Cola Foundation for this nursery project! A bout the Authors Mei Manuel, Athena Chua

About the Authors

A bout the Authors Mei Manuel, Athena Chua and Angie Adviento are Haribon’s staff. For comments
A bout the Authors Mei Manuel, Athena Chua and Angie Adviento are Haribon’s staff. For comments

Mei Manuel, Athena Chua and Angie Adviento are Haribon’s staff.

For comments or inquiries you may email them at: communication@haribon.org.ph

Haring ibon

working people with

working people with The 2 n d Asia-Pacific Coral ReefSymposium by gregorio dela rosa, jr. O

The 2 nd Asia-Pacific Coral ReefSymposium

by gregorio dela rosa, jr.

O nce upon a balmy January night

during a planning session, we were

informed about a conference to be

held somewhere in Thailand with

coral reefs as the main topic. The deadline for submission of abstracts was one week away.

Although I was excited, I doubted if I’d be able

to send an abstract. I took my time studying

the data we had on the Marine Protected Areas

(MPAs) in Surigao del Sur. I consulted a friend

of mine back in college on how to present

the data sets. I also asked my co-workers to

comment and critique the abstracts I did. After

all the hard work, I was able to submit two

abstracts for oral and poster presentation.

the asia Pacific coral reef symPosium was held in Phuket, thailand.

Photos by gregorio dela rosa, jr.

Now came the long wait to whether the abstracts you submitted are accepted or not. I waited until the deadline, March 25, but no notice came. I was a little disappointed and considered it as one of my failed attempts.

A couple of weeks after March 25 th , a friend

advised me to e-mail the convenor about

my submission. His co-worker was accepted

as a delegate but was only informed one

week after the date they were supposed to notify the applicants. I sent a short e-mail to the convenor, inquired about the status of

my abstract submissions

accepted for both oral and poster presentation. Accommodation, food and registration costs will be covered by organizers. I made my presentation and drafted my manuscript to be included in the peer-reviewed proceedings.

and Voila! I was

The Asia-Pacific Coral Reef Symposium (APCRS) was the brainchild of several coral reef scientists from Singapore, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Philippines, Malaysia, Japan, Thailand and Indonesia. This small group of marine enthusiasts founded the APRCS during the 10 th International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS) in Okinawa, Japan. It was created to develop the capabilities of coral reef researchers in the Western Central Pacific region. It is held every four years, in between the ICRS. The first APCRS was held in Hong Kong at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, with roughly 200 participants. This year, it was in Phuket, Thailand and it was

Haring ibon

1

working people with

toP to bottom:

traditonal thai dance during the welcome Party; and PhiliPPine’s exhibit area on aPcrs.

hosted by the Ramkhamhaeng University with

a stunning turn-out of roughly 400 participants from Malaysia, Australia, American Samoa, Indonesia, Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Taiwan, Japan and Tanzania to name a few.

eight people when I started my presentation.

I was halfway through my presentation when

some of my co-presentors and audience started

filing the seats. At the end of my presentation, I kept thinking “have I delivered my presentation correctly or was it a

garbled mess that nobody understood what I was talking about?” It lingered on my mind for the rest of the day. To get out of my mental rut, I took the 15-minute walk back to our accommodation before the welcome night festivities. I did a little site-seeing on the way. I passed by the old part of town, looked at some of the Sino-Portuguese architecture, and inhaled that sweet-spicy smell of Thai food.

I was scheduled at 3:30 pm

for an oral presentation on the first day of the symposium, June 20, a Sunday. Our mini- symposium was about Marine Protected Areas (MPA). My presentation was about Haribon’s experiences on how to improve a monitoring tool for MPAs managed by fisher organizations

that are members of the Pambansang Alyansa ng

Maliliit na Mangingisda na Nangangalaga ng Sangtuwaryo at Karagatan sa Pilipinas (Pamana Ka Sa Pilipinas). Pamana Ka Sa Pilipinas was organized by Haribon in 1999 with an initial membership of 33 MPAs which grew to122 members coming from all the 22 bays of the country.

“Pamana Ka Sa Pilipinas was organized by Haribon in 1999 with an initial membership of 33 MPAs which grew to122 members coming from all the 22 bays of the country.”

The welcome party was the usual “hand-me- your-calling-card-and-I'll-give-you-mine”, aka networking night. Some of the attendees were famous names in reef restoration, coral disease, monitoring, etc. Some attendees are people you’d only read in scientific journals. I was listing them down in my mental notes and scouting potential advisers while some were introduced to me by my friends and fellow researchers from the Philippines. Everybody formed their own little groups. Some got down to business while others did some small talk before the evening's festivities. We had free- flowing drinks throughout the night, and were entertained with traditional Thai dances.

The rest of the symposium, from Monday, June 21, to Thursday, June 24, was just a matter of choosing which mini-symposium you’d like to go to, or what topic piqued your interest.

I listened to the keynote speakers during the

start of the day and at three o’clock. The speakers were from various organizations, institutions, and projects such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States, The Nature Conservancy/Coral Triangle Initiative, Global

Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN), the Global Environment Facility-funded Coral Reef Targeted Research Centers of Excellence (COE), and the United Nations Environment Programme/Global Environment Facility

However, there had been a slight confusion on the schedules of the main and mini-symposia, and the timetable of keynote speakers and mini-symposia got mixed up. There were only

and mini-symposia, and the timetable of keynote speakers and mini-symposia got mixed up. There were only

Haring ibon

working people with

right: grouP shot of the symPosium’s delegates.

(UNEP/GEF) South China Sea Project.

If you are interested in pursuing graduate

studies and/or PhD, this is one of those perfect occasions where you can look for prospective adviser/s. During this time, there are two things that can happen to you. First, you come prepared with your research questions and rehearsed speeches that would make your prospective adviser take you under his/her wing immediately. Second, you were too focused on your oral and poster presentations and at the same time excited that you’re going to meet-and-greet this motley group of men and women that you got tongue-tied. The latter happened to me. Fortunately somebody

smacked me out of my blinders and gave me

a heads-up. I collected the topics that interests me and zeroed out on who’s working with what. I received pointers from friends I met during the symposium on the do’s and don’ts of approaching a potential adviser. Then, I got hold of my nerves and talked to some people.

I got their e-mail addresses and calling cards.

Now all I have to do is follow up on scholarship applications and have a regular correspondence with these people.

The organizers scheduled a tour for interested participants. I went with the friends I made at the symposium and rented a taxi (read:

multi cab) for six hours and gave directions on where we’d like to go. There was a banquet on our last night and everybody got the chance to unwind and go crazy. Those who had the guts to dance, did for a couple of

hours. There was even a karaoke and a singer who sang catchy songs. Halfway through the night, the Philippine contingent took over the microphone and sang. The young and not-so-young went up the stage barefoot, and danced Thai dances, while some just went plain ‘dancing’: rolling, tumbling, and did their own Michael Jackson and YMCA thing.

The last day was still about networking. The Asia-Pacific Coral Reef Society was formally created. As a bonus, all the participants were given free membership for one year. It was announced that the next venue will be in Taiwan for June 2014. Before the closing, winners for the top five student papers were revealed. Everybody said their goodbyes, others prepared for a last night-out and dinner. The Philippine contingent couldn’t resist having a group picture, so we all went up the stage. Everyone said the same thing while saying goodbye: “See you on the ICRS in Cairns, Australia on 2012.”

“See you on the ICRS in Cairns, Australia on 2012.” A bout the Author Gregorio dela

About the Author

A bout the Author Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr. is Haribon’s Marine Biologist. For comments or inquiries

Gregorio dela Rosa, Jr. is Haribon’s Marine Biologist.

For comments or inquiries you may email him at:

conservationscience@

haribon.org.ph

Haring ibon

working people with

working people with SSMN Plans Sierra Madre Ondoy Awareness Day July 27 and August 4, 2010

SSMN Plans Sierra Madre

Ondoy Awareness Day July 27 and August 4, 2010 | St. Anthony Building, Cubao, Quezon City

The Save Sierra Madre Network (SSMN), an alliance of indigenous peoples, church groups, environmental institutes, and other civil society organizations working throughout the Sierra Madre mountain range, met last July 27 and August 4 to plan the first ever Save Sierra Madre Day (SSMD).

SSMD aims to raise awareness on the importance of the Sierra Madre mountains, provide a venue for the active participation of citizens on their reforestation and conservation efforts, and generate hope in the future, especially on the face of climate change and natural disasters. SSMD was agreed to be held on September 26, the first-ever anniversary of typhoon Ondoy, to put a spotlight on how the degradation of the mountains have aggravated the impacts of the typhoon.

Representatives of the member organizations during the first meeting drafted a letter to President Benigno Aquino III to declare SSMD. They also planned to hold a media event at Miriam College on September 22 to build up public interest in the actual SSMD.

An exhibit and a press conference with SSMN chair Fr. Pete Montallana, former Isabela governor Grace Padaca, an indigenous person, and representatives of Haribon and Agham Partylist will also take place on the media event. The SSMN members will organize tree planting, exhibits, church-based commemorations, and other activities among the local communities on the day itself.

However, during the media committee meeting last August 4, it was suggested that the media event be held on September 26 to ensure that the day itself will be the most significant. Press releases and mentions in editorial columns would then provide the

build-up.

The committee agreed to hold an Ondoy memorial service, preferably in Marikina, as its mountains form part of Sierra Madre and

it is one of the cities in Metro Manila that

was worst affected by the typhoon. Some plans were to hold the commemoration in a church inside or near Provident Village, hold an exhibit on Sierra Madre and Ondoy on site, and to invite Ondoy survivors from Marikina, Quezon, Isabela, and other provinces within the range to talk about their experiences.

provinces within the range to talk about their experiences. NFR formulates fisheries agenda for Aquino climate
provinces within the range to talk about their experiences. NFR formulates fisheries agenda for Aquino climate

NFR formulates fisheries agenda for Aquino climate change action plan

August 2, 2010 | PhilDHRRA Partnership Center, Quezon City

The NGOs for Fisheries Reform (NFR), a national policy advocacy coalition working towards fisheries policy reforms and sustainable fisheries management, convened its members in a forum last August 2 at the Philippine Partnership for the Development of Human Resources in Rural Areas (PhilDHRRA) Partnership Center in Quezon City.

The forum was organized primarily to start off the formulation of NFR's indicative plan on fisheries for the national climate change agenda of the civil society for the current administration.

Jovelyn Cleofe of the Center for Empowerment and Resource Development (CERD) presented an introduction to climate

change. Ed Santoalla of Oxfam followed with

a call for the convergence of both Disaster

Risk Reduction (DRR) and Climate Change Adaptation (CCA), plus an additional meeting on adaptation and mitigation measures in climate change. He also discussed the need to prioritize adaptation (evacuation of disaster-prone settlements, developing new crops) rather than mitigation measures (renewable energy, greenhouse gas reduction).

Dinna Umengan of Tambuyog Development Center (TDC) discussed how to make the Kyoto Protocol operational in our country. The Philippines ratified or formally approved the United Nations agreement for industrialized or rich countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and for developing countries like ours to be possible sites for the rich countries’

4

Haring ibon

emission reduction projects. Umengan said the problem lies with the governance of the adaptation fund and the lack of an implementing institution.

Rowena Bolinas of Aksyon Klima briefed the NFR members on the Climate Change Act and the Climate Change Commission (CCC). She remarked that the CCC has yet to reconvene despite the fact that the National Climate Change Action Plan is due this December.

Zeena Manglinong with Dinna Umegan, both from TDC, presented afterwards their Fisheries Coastal Climate Change Framework and Assessment Tools. They stressed that the impacts of climate change only complicates the prevailing problems in coastal zone management and conservation. They said adaptation must lower human threats to the coastal ecosystem, and at the same time build coastal communities resilient to climate change.

Manglinong and Umegan also presented the Southeast Asian Fisheries for Justice Network (SEAFish) position on Climate Change. SEAFish counts TDC and CERD among its member NGOs working in fisheries and fisherfolk organizations. Among the main calls of SEAFish is for the recognition of the common but differentiated responsibilities (CBDR) and capacities principles. This means rich countries should make the most reductions in emissions and should bear the cost of mitigation and adaptation measures of developing nations. This is because they have contributed the most greenhouse gas emissions and have superior capacity for clean development.

Another main position of SEAFish is for the recognition of the different impacts of climate

working people with

change, as well as to identify capacities to mitigate and adapt to climate change, among communities, genders, and sectors. Marie Madamba of Oxfam illustrated this with her experiences with coastal communities, adding that womens concerns should be prioritized in adaptation and mitigation options.

Abbie Dulay of the NFR secretariat followed with her presentation of NFR’s own initiatives and assessment tools. She said that NFR conducted studies last January 2008 and conducted tool pretesting and development in Camiguin last March 2009. Lack of funds has halted the research.

NFR executive director Dennis Calvan proceeded with the drafting of the NFR’s own position on coastal climate change. The attendees agreed that the CBDR principle should be recognized, and consider the different responsibility and previous conservation efforts per sector. Children were added to the list of vulnerable sectors, which also includes fisherfolk and women. The goal of building resilient communities was also defined.

goal of building resilient communities was also defined. Mining officials meet environmental advocates in ALG policy
goal of building resilient communities was also defined. Mining officials meet environmental advocates in ALG policy

Mining officials meet environmental advocates in ALG policy forum

August 23, 2010 | Institute of Social Order, Ateneo de Manila University, Quezon City

Two officials from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources’ Mining and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) attended the Alternative Law Groups’ (ALG) Luzon and National Capital Region Policy Forum on Mining last August 23 at the Ateneo de Manila University.

right: national caPital region’s Policy forum on mining was held in ateneo de manila university.

Haring ibon

working people with

Engr. Glenn Noble, MGB’s Mineral Economics, Information and Publication chief, presented a global and national minerals industry situationer to the convened representatives of local governments, non- government organizations (NGOs), indigenous people, and mining communities.

ALG is a coalition of NGOs providing legal assistance for the marginalized sectors

of society. It has been working with the Foundation for the Philippine Environment in

a policy advocacy campaign to help shift the

mining-friendly policy environment in favor of the environment and affected communities.

In the open forum which followed his

presentation, Noble said that they are still following President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo’s mining policy because President Benigno Aquino III has yet to hand his own mining policy to MGB. He also shared that there are currently no data on the environmental impact of mining, and that the geohazard maps are already partially available and nearing completion.

Atty. Grizelda Mayo-Anda of the Environmental Legal Assistance Center, a member of ALG, proceeded next with an

overview of the alternative mining situation

in the country, while Rovik Obanil and Atty.

Minerva Quintela, both from the Legal Rights and Natural Resources Center, presented the Alternative Mining Bill (AMB).

Atty. Marlon Manuel, ALG’s national coordinator, next presented their draft policy proposals on mining before the moderators divided the participants into groups to tackle small-scale mining, the Environment Impact Assessment, local government authority, free and prior informed consent, and the AMB. The comments and recommendations of the participants on the proposals are to be incorporated in the formulation of a common mining agenda which will be promoted throughout the Aquino administration.

will be promoted throughout the Aquino administration. A bout the Author Denise Fontanilla is Haribon’s

About the Author

A bout the Author Denise Fontanilla is Haribon’s Advocacy Assistant. For comments or inquiries you may

Denise Fontanilla is Haribon’s Advocacy Assistant.

For comments or inquiries you may email her at:

rainforestation@haribon.

org.ph

Haring ibon

saving

sites

Kahirapan:

Hadlang din sa Pagpapanumbalik ng Kabundukan

below: local government official ParticiPating on the forest Planning sessions.

Photos by rowena medndoza- matabang

by rowena mendoza-matabang

N andito ako ngayon sa Public Consultation ng Barangay Bantocaling kasama ang mga kawani ng lokal na pamahalaan

ng Mangatarem at mga kinatawan ng Haribon Foundation. Ipinepresenta namin sa mga residente ang binubuong Forest Land Use Plan ng Mangatarem. Ika labindalawang barangay na ito sa labintatlong barangay na kailangan naming puntahan. Sa halos 2 linggong pagba- barangay namin, napagtanto ko na hindi pala ganun kadaling muling pakapalin ang gubat. Hindi simple ang muling pagtatanim at pagpaparami ng mga puno sa bundok. Lalong hindi madaling bantayan ang buong proseso nito.

Katulad ng iba pang problema sa ating bansa, sa kahirapan din nag-uugat ang pagkakalbo ng mga kagubatan sa Mangatarem. Dahil kulang ang kita ng mga residente mula sa pagsasaka, nangongolekta ang ilan ng mga produkto mula sa gubat. Nanghuhuli sila ng mga hayop upang magsilbing pagkain. Wala silang kaalam- alam na ang ilan sa mga hayop na ito ay nanganganib nang maubos ang populasyon. Pumuputol sila ng mga kahoy upang magamit sa pagpapatayo ng bahay o bilang panggatong. Sa kasamaang palad, hindi nila napapalitan ang mga puno na tinitirahan ng mga hayop.

Madalas kahit kayod-kalabaw na ang mga magsasaka sa amin, kapos pa rin ang pera nila

Haring ibon

saving

sites

kaya nagpapatuloy ang pag-abuso sa gubat. Kaya ang masakit nito, kahirapan din ang humahadlang sa pagpapanumbalik ng mga kabundukan.

“Hindi rin lingid sa kaalaman ng marami na mayroong mga namumutol ng bulto bultong bilang ng puno.”

Sa unang 6 na taon ng buhay ko ay nanirahan ako sa Mangatarem. Lumipat kami ng aking pamilya sa siyudad ng Dagupan nung mag-aaral na ako, ngunit madalas pa rin akong pumupunta sa Mangatarem para magbakasyon. Sa dalas kong bumiyahe paroo’t parito ay lagi kong napapagmasdan ang mga kabundukan ng Mangatarem. Nakakalungkot dahil

sa aking pagdadalaga, napansin kong mas nagiging manipis ang gubat. Sa pagdaan ng panahon, may mga parte nang nakakalbo.

below: rowena matabang conducting the biodiversity orientation.

Hindi rin lingid sa kaalaman ng marami na mayroong mga namumutol ng bulto-bultong bilang ng puno. Sila ang mga taong wala sa bukabolaryo ang paghingi ng permiso mula sa DENR. Walang pakundangan kung mamutol sila ng mga punongkahoy, at hindi nagtatanim ng kapalit na puno. At dahil makapangyarihan o di kaya’y malapit sa mga makapangyarihan, walang gustong magsumbong ukol sa kanilang ilegal na gawain.

walang gustong magsumbong ukol sa kanilang ilegal na gawain. Habang dumadami ang aking kaalaman, napagtanto ko

Habang dumadami ang aking kaalaman, napagtanto ko na sa pagpapatuloy ng mga pangyayaring ito, maaaring magkaroon ng pagkatibag ng lupa. Kung malawakan ito ay maaaring matabunan ang madaming bahay, at kahit isang buong barangay. Naalala ko tuloy ‘yung nangyari sa Southern Leyte noong taong 2006, kung saan gumuho ang lupa ng bundok at natabunan ang humigit-kumulang isang barangay. 200 ang namatay at 1,500 ang hindi matagpuan sa insidenteng ito.

Tulad nito, isa sa mga barangay na aming napagdausan ng public consultation ay ang Barangay Malabobo kung saan matatagpuan ang isang minahan. Sa mahigit 10 taon ng pag-o-operate ng naturang minahan, unti-unti nang nararamdaman ng mga residente ang madaming masasamang epekto ng ganitong industriya. Konti na ang mga puno sa parteng iyon ng bundok kaya halos wala nang humahawak sa lupa. Nagiging mas madalas ang mga pagtibag ng lupa. Ang pinangangambahan nila ngayon ay ang pagguho ng lupa kung sakaling umulan ng malakas. Hindi na raw sila nakakatulog nang mahimbing dahil baka matabunan sila nang buhay. Gumawa at nag-sumite sila ng petisyon para sa pagsasara nito, ngunit nalulungkot sila dahil tila hindi sila pinapansin ng mga kinauukulan.

Haring ibon

above: PeoPle listening at the Public consultation. Kakulangan naman sa irigasyon ang idinudulog na problema

above: PeoPle listening at the Public consultation.

Kakulangan naman sa irigasyon ang idinudulog na problema ng mga taga-barrio Bantay. Konektado rin ito sa kakulangan ng mga puno sa bundok. Isang gabi bago kami nagsagawa ng public consultation sa barangay nila ay bumuhos ang malakas na ulan na may dalang tubig at putik mula sa bundok. Binaha ang kanilang barangay hall at ilang kabahayan. Patunay ito na konti na rin ang puno sa kanilang bundok. Bukod sa kulang sa irigasyon dahil sa pagkaubos ng mga puno, kulang din sila sa kagamitang pang-irigasyon. Hinaing nila na tila ba ang mga mayayaman lamang ang naaambunan ng biyaya sa tuwing may namimigay ng mga makinang pang-irigasyon. Idagdag pa rito ang epekto ng El Niño na lalo pang nagpabawas sa kanilang kinikita bilang mga magsasaka. Wala na silang ibang kabuhayan bukod sa pagsasaka.

Sa iba pang barangay ay kulang naman sila sa kamalayan na mas dapat itanim ang mga katutubong uri ng puno o native trees tulad ng lauan, palosapis, atbp. Nauso ang mahogany kaya’t ito ang naging pangunahing tanim nila. Sa pamamagitan ng public consultation ay nalaman nilang ang mga exotic trees ay mababaw lang ang ugat at matakaw sa tubig. Kaya’t imbes na tumulong mag-ipon ng tubig ay pinapatay ng mga ito ang iba pang halamang malapit sa kanila. Naging daan din ang public consultation para makita nila na napakaraming katutubong hayop na dito lang sa Pilipinas matatagpuan kaya’t marapat lamang silang alagaan at huwag kainin. Madami sa mga hayop na ito ay kakaunti na ang bilang kaya’t hinikayat namin silang huwag huhulihin bagkus

saving

sites

ay paramihin ang mga nilalang na ito.Matagal ko nang hinahangaan ang Canadian duck. Ako ay namangha nang malaman kong mayroon palang Philippine Duck na kahawig nito na matatagpuan sa ilog ng Baracbac sa bayan ng Mangatarem.

May iba pang kabundukan sa Pangasinan, ngunit ang nasa Mangatarem lamang ang nananatiling makapal kaya’t nagpupursigi ang lokal na pamahalaan at ang Haribon upang mapangalagaan ito. Nangalahati na kami sa proseso ng pagbuo ng Forest Land Use Plan at malapit na itong ipatupad. Hindi mawawala ang mga spekulasyon kung ito ay tunay na maisasagawa, kung mababantayan nga talaga ang bundok. Ngunit tiwala ako na anumang pinagpapaguran ay may magandang ibubunga.

ako na anumang pinagpapaguran ay may magandang ibubunga. A bout the Author Rowena Mendoza- Matabang is

About the Author

A bout the Author Rowena Mendoza- Matabang is an employee of Mangatarem LGU. For comments or

Rowena Mendoza- Matabang is an employee of Mangatarem LGU.

For comments or inquiries you may email her at:

purple_valley04@yahoo.

com

Haring ibon

saving

sites

QUIZ BEE 2010:

Ecology & Local Hist

by andy l. boncayao

above: the first ecology and local history Quiz in general nakar, Quezon.

Photos by

nove

calawigan

I n connection with the 61 st Foundation Day of Gen. Nakar, Quezon, the Office of the Municipal Environment and Natural Resources (MENRO) headed by Jing F.

Astejada, the HARIBON Foundation and the Luntian Youth Environmental Organization launched the first ever Ecology and Local History Quiz Bee 2010 last July 24, 2010 at the Gen. Nakar Sports Complex. The event aimed to raise awareness about the local history and environment of Gen. Nakar.

The Ecology and Local History Quiz Bee was attended by high school students from Mount Carmel High School of Gen. Nakar, Batangan National High School and Paaralang Sekundarya ng Gen. Nakar. Most of the participants were members and officers of the Luntian Youth Environmental Organization. Nine teams composed of three members competed in the event. Each team had a specific name of flora and fauna found in the area. Haribon Foundation also conducted a presentation, which featured endemic and

endangered species found in Gen. Nakar during breaks between rounds.

The Quiz Bee was categorized into easy, average and difficult round. In each round the participants were required to answer 12 questions prepared by the faculty of participating schools, MENRO and HARIBON. In order to proceed to the next round the participants had to answer more than 50% of the questions correctly. During the easy round, only one team was eliminated and the eight teams proceeded until the final elimination.

In the end, three teams had equal scores. Clincher questions were given until there were two teams left. Team Rafflesia emerged as the First Place winner, Team Haring Ibon as the Second Place Winner and Team Philippine Deer as the Third Place Winner. The participating schools and students were given certificates of participation. The winning teams were awarded trophies and cash.

0

Haring ibon

ory The organizers reminded us that the Quiz Bee is not about winning trophies but

ory

The organizers reminded us that the Quiz Bee is not about winning trophies but the inculcation in our minds and hearts of our role in the protection and conservation of the environment for the benefit of the present and coming generations.

The real winners were those who pledged to become stewards of our Mother Earth now and forever.

to become stewards of our Mother Earth now and forever. A bout the Author Andy L.

About the Author

A bout the Author Andy L. Boncayao is the adviser of Luntian Youth Environmental Organization and

Andy L. Boncayao is the adviser of Luntian Youth Environmental Organization and a teacher at Mt. Carmel High School.

For comments or inquiries you may email him at:

siteaction@haribon.org.ph

saving

sites

may email him at: siteaction@haribon.org.ph saving sites above (t-b): students from ParticiPating high- schools
may email him at: siteaction@haribon.org.ph saving sites above (t-b): students from ParticiPating high- schools
may email him at: siteaction@haribon.org.ph saving sites above (t-b): students from ParticiPating high- schools

above (t-b): students from ParticiPating high- schools stressed over the difficult round; and winners gladly Pose with teachers and haribon staff.

Haring ibon

1

people & events

people & events GMA Network Re-launches Kapuso ng Kalikasan & Holds Concert to Celebrate Earth Day
people & events GMA Network Re-launches Kapuso ng Kalikasan & Holds Concert to Celebrate Earth Day

GMA Network Re-launches Kapuso ng Kalikasan & Holds Concert to Celebrate Earth Day

Haribon together with Greenpeace and WWF were invited to set-up exhibits during the re-launching of Kapuso ng Kalikasan volunteer program on April 16. The event coincided with GMA Network's General Assembly. The aim of the re-launch was to get the interest of the employees to support the environmental projects of the 3 organizations.

The Haribon booth manned by its junior ambassadors, Bea Binene and BJ “Tolits” Forbes, gave away information materials on forest restoration and encouraged the employees to join the forthcoming tree planting activities of their network.

In the evening of the same day, the 3 environmental groups joined the employees and guests for a concert that had various popular bands and artists play and sing their environmental songs. One of the artists that performed at the concert was Noel Cabangon who is a Haribon ambassador. Greenpeace, WWF, the Earth Day Network and Haribon were given segments that explained their respective advocacies. Richard Gutierrez hosted the event.

GMA Network's contribution to the Earth Day celebration further illustrates their commitment to accelerate public support for sound environmental programs.

GGLPC Looking Forward to Rainforestation

Gracious Group Lending Philippines Corporation (GGLPC) headed by Arch. Jefferson L. Tomas partnered with the Haribon Foundation in planting 1,000 trees, giving particular attention to barren areas along Tanay, Rizal with the Program called Road to 2020.

along Tanay, Rizal with the Program called Road to 2020. At 9:30 am on 28 t

At 9:30 am on 28 th August 2010, GGLPC officers and staff, Haribon Officials and Officials from Tanay, Rizal assembled at the site – Brgy. Cuyambay, Tanay, Rizal. Ms. Christine G. Cenal of Haribon Foundation oficially started the program and congratulated the Gracious Group for their services and contribution to the ROAD to 2020, Haribon’s flagship campaign for Rainforestation. The team from Haribon Foundation talked briefly about forest restoration and explained how “native species are the best for our land and waters” since they are attuned to our local environment and ecology.

The attendees proceeded to the mini – forest of Brgy. Cuyambay. Employees from GGLPC planted 1,000 seedlings of native species which were expected to grow into tall trees with lofty straight trunks.

Tree guards were also built around the seedlings to protect them from being trampled on. The activity ended with the partaking of CPA meals – the Chicken, Pork Adobo with rice at the Department of Agriculture-Tanay, Rizal.

Haring ibon

SMART Hosts Environment- theme Party for Kids

On April 15, as part of Smart's Earth Day activities, the Public Affairs team and employees who are actively engaged in participating in environmental activities hosted a kiddie party, the aim of which was to inform them of various issues related to the environment like deforestation; threatened animals; native trees and climate change. The event was organized with the assistance of Haribon Foundation. The party was a mixture of music; storytelling; and games. It was in the question and answer portion that Smart and Haribon came to know of Eurick Evardone , a grade 3 pupil of Mother Maria Luisa of Jesus School in Sucat, Paranaque. He is the son of Eugene (a seaman) and Ma. Cristina Evardone (a Smart employee of 5 years) who impressed us with his knowledge of climate change. We gathered that Eurick loves science books, soccer and nature trips.

The party's stage area featured Haribon's Save our Forests and Save our Seas colorful banners. It was also decorated with some animals and plants native to the country. The event was made more memorable with the participation of one of Haribon's junior ambassadors, Rita Iringan, who not only co-hosted the program but also rendered a song.

Smart's other activities for Earth Day included a discussion on climate change by Haribon (Anabelle Plantilla) and Earth Day Network (Voltaire Alferez). Smart was also instrumental in gathering public support through the web for the 10 Million Movement which was an Earth Day Network and DENR initiative to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle.

to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle. IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020 Last August 20
to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle. IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020 Last August 20
to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle. IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020 Last August 20
to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle. IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020 Last August 20
to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle. IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020 Last August 20
to encourage everyone to live a “green” lifestyle. IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020 Last August 20

IBMC Supports ROAD to 2020

Last August 20 2010, employees of IMARFLEX BATTERY MFG. CORP. (IBMC) conducted a tree planting activity at Bgy. Cuyambay, Tanay, Rizal. This was headed by their Managing Director, Mr. Herbert D. Yu, and in cooperation with HARIBON FOUNDATION in support to the “ROAD to 2020” campaign. The IBMC Management considered the activity as a way of contributing to the preservation and enhancement of our forests which had been greatly denuded as a result of illegal logging and mining.

As part of its corporate social responsibility, IBM considered this activity as a continuing program to help in the protection of lives and properties from devastating floods. The Management has now planned to extend its tree- planting activity in other areas particularly in Mindanao provinces where its depots are located in Cagayan de Oro and Davao. We feel the need for our employees to actively participate in this program considering the greater good that it will bring to us and for the country, as well.

The IBMC Management applauds this worthy campaign of HARIBON FOUNDATION and offers to be one of their partners in achieving their goal of restoring 1M hectares of rainforests by the year 2020.

Haring ibon

people & events

people & events St. Paul University- Quezon City Signs MOA for 15,000 Trees St. Paul University-Quezon
people & events St. Paul University- Quezon City Signs MOA for 15,000 Trees St. Paul University-Quezon
people & events St. Paul University- Quezon City Signs MOA for 15,000 Trees St. Paul University-Quezon
people & events St. Paul University- Quezon City Signs MOA for 15,000 Trees St. Paul University-Quezon

St. Paul University- Quezon City Signs MOA for 15,000 Trees

St. Paul University-Quezon City has committed to plant 15,000 seedlings of native tree species under RT 2020 for this year's tree planting season. The seedlings will be planted in various locations under Haribon's forest restoration sites. This project was made possible through the assistance of Dr. Manuel Martinez, faculty club chairman, and various department heads: Dr. Rosalie Marcelo (Biology); Dr. Reynilda Salandanan (Psychology); Wendy delos Santos (Nursing); Dr. Antoniette Lacerna (Business & Management Association) and Dr. Ronel dela Cruz (General Education and Advocacy Center coordinator).

Dr. Ronel dela Cruz who has been championing Haribon's cause in this university says that this is only the beginning of a continuing partnership with Haribon.

JCI Phils. Supports Haribon Activities

The Junior Chamber International Phils signified its intention to partner with Haribon to empower and encourage the youth to actively participate in environmental projects. Haribon through its Trustee Anabelle Plantilla was invited as guest speaker during its annual induction ball and turnover ceremmonies last March 13 at Casino Filipino. Plantilla spoke of the youth being a key factor in developing projects that will help conserve and protect our natural resources. She enjoined JCI officers and members to be part of the ROAD to 2020 movement by adopting native seedlings to be planted in the country's denuded forests. And to enable its members to fully understand how their contribution will make an impact on the program, information materials on forest restoration were given during the event. Native tree species were placed on all tables in the venue to get the interest of the audience in tree planting activities.

JCI Paranaque Pambato and JCI Paranaque Asinderas were instrumental in forging ties with Haribon.

JCI Paranaque Asinderas led by outgoing president, Jen Raymundo, and incoming president, Cherry del Rosario, and its members have been working alongside Haribon in its other activities related to the celebration of Earth Day. They volunteered as staff for the registration committee in 4 events: The Re-Launch of Kapuso sa Kalikasan during the April General Assembly of GMA Network; the Smart Kiddie party; the Green Re-Fashion exhibit opening; and the Earth Day exhibit opening at the Little Theater of the Cultural Center of the Philippines.

Currently, the JCI Paranaque Asinderas are busy helping raise funds for Haribon through its adopt-a-seedling campaign. They are looking at raising a thousand seedlings to be planted at the Caliraya watershed.

4

Haring ibon

F.A.S.T. LABORATORIES: GOING GREEN AT 13

“He that planteth a tree is a servant to God; he provideth a kindness for many generations and faces that he hath not seen shall bless him.” - Henry Van Dyke

In celebrating its 13 th foundation anniversary in 2010, The First Analytical Services and Technical Cooperative (F.A.S.T.) Laboratories took a different route in expressing its gratitude for the company’s continued business growth. Its management and staff, headed by President & General Manager Reynaldo A. Kangleon and Chairman of the Board Romeo S. Garcia, eagerly took a hike on the mountain slopes of Barangay Cuyambay, Tanay, Rizal last July 3, 2010 to plant no less than 300 narra, agoho and apitong wildlings on the 1,000 hectare reforestation site. The Cooperative joined hands with Haribon Foundation for this tree-planting activity, which was further supported by the provincial government of Rizal.

This event is a significant shift from the usual but equally important anniversary celebration the Cooperative held every year and marked by an indoor program with songs, dance and food for the enjoyment of the management and employees.

Employees from F.A.S.T. Cubao and Calamba spent the day away from the stress and pressure of work as everyone got the chance to enjoy the road trip going to the highlands of Tanay, one of the biggest towns (in land area) of Rizal. With the trip came the early morning scenery of green lush and mountainous surrounding as a backdrop to a pleasant and relaxing tour of the countryside. Such rare experience gave the participants

excitement as they walked up the slope of the target area where the tree seedlings were planted on previously prepared holes on the soil. The employees broke healthy sweats as they took turns in properly anchoring the young trees on the ground.

Tanay Mayor Lito Tanjuatco gave a day of his weekend to grace the occasion and expressed his warm appreciation of the efforts of the employees. Some employees of Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf and L’oreal Professionel and student members of San Beda Junior Marketing Association also joined the initiative to care for the environment.

also joined the initiative to care for the environment. As said by the caretakers of the
also joined the initiative to care for the environment. As said by the caretakers of the

As said by the caretakers of the Tanay reforestation site, a year or two from this day, the wildlings that were planted will grow as trees and provide habitat to our local birds and other wildlife. This is the vision of Haribon, a vision which ordinary people like F.A.S.T. Laboratories employees share and hope to become a part of its fulfillment.

P&G Continues Its Promise on Environmental Sustainability by Planting Additional 4500 Trees This Year

By: Theluin Maningas

Additional 4500 Trees This Year By: Theluin Maningas Year 2010 marks Procter and Gamble (P&G) Philippines’

Year 2010 marks Procter and Gamble (P&G) Philippines’ 75th year anniversary. In line with this milestone, P&G Cabuyao plant in collaboration with General Office (GO) and Global Business Services (GBS) sites commit to plant 7500 trees.

Recall that in 2009, P&G Cabuyao plant in partnership with Haribon Foundation were able to plant 1,000 native trees in January, followed by additional 2,000 in June. This year, P&G were able to complete the target of 7500 trees. This was made possible via donation of 1,500 trees to Light Industry Science Park (LISP) that were planted along the Diezmo River last June 25, 2010 by the Safety & Pollution Control Association. This was funded by GO and GBS sites headed by Anama Dimapilis and Tina Alvarez respectively.

The remaining 3,000 trees were planted by more than 40 volunteer employees of P&G-Cabuyao plant in Brgy. Cansuso Cavinti Laguna, in partnership with Haribon Foundation. The activity was led by Thelvin Maningas, assisted by Health, Safety and Environment (HS&E) Leaders - Bernie Caparas, and Garry Obog. P&G plant manager Fanny Wu, enjoyed planting native trees such as igyo, narra, molave and bitaog.

What made the tree planting activity significant was because of the area being recently devastated by forest fire. With the plant’s commitment to keep P&G’s promise on environmental sustainability, we are on our way towards achieving a greener Philippines.

Haring ibon

people & events

people & events MJN PLANTS 1,200 NATIVE TREES IN TANAY Article Reprinted from Editorial Tonight Delivering

MJN PLANTS 1,200 NATIVE TREES IN TANAY

Article Reprinted from Editorial Tonight

TREES IN TANAY Article Reprinted from Editorial Tonight Delivering on an agreement signed with Haribon Foundation
TREES IN TANAY Article Reprinted from Editorial Tonight Delivering on an agreement signed with Haribon Foundation

Delivering on an agreement signed with Haribon Foundation for the conservation of Natural Resources by Mead Johnson Nutrition Philippines, 100 managers, employees and support staff of MJN trekked to the hills of Tanay town in Rizal province recently and successfully planted 1,200 indigeneous tree seedlings.

The agreement signed by the two organizations is intended to enhance public support and awareness for Haribon Foundations program called ROAD to 2020.

ROAD to 2020 is Haribon's strategic program to accelerate recovery of the Philippines authentic forests cover. It is an environmental conservation movement to restore by the Year 2020 one (1) million hectares of rainforests, using native tree species. ROAD, which stands for Rainforestation Organizations and Advocates, aims to plant native tree species to recover and conserve biodiversity, to optimize supply of forest benefits and eco- system services and to enhance options for sustainable livehood.

The MJN-Haribon Memorandum of Agreement was signed by Haribon Foundation Chief Operating Officer Blas R. Tabaranza, Jr. and by Paul Andrew Richards, President and General Manager of Mead Johnson Nutrition.

The two signatories agreed that the MOA manifested a shared concern for a better

agreed that the MOA manifested a shared concern for a better tomorrow, particularly for the children

tomorrow, particularly for the children of today. Haribon’s COO Tabaranza said the planting site, which forms part of the Marikina Watershed, would contribute to reducing incidence of floods whose ferocity was witnessed in the past with devastation wrought on people and places.

Haribon identified the tree-planting site in Barangay Cuyambay in Tanay, prepared the area for the tree planting and provided the seedlings. Mead Johnson funded the costs for the seedlings.

The MJN contingent planted (9) different species of native trees: narra, igyo, balubo, tuay, silisilihan, dulit, molave, agoho and calumpit.

Haribon’s advocacy of rainforestation, as distinguished from plain reforestation, promotes the use of native trees which are more adaptive to the forests being restored. Such native trees have greater chance of survival. Aside from reviving the life support system of a degraded forest, native trees ensure the flourishing of native plants and animals.

Haribon said that a rainforested area can provide ecological benefits which are linked to human survival. As a strategy, rainforestation provides economic benefits which Haribon said has worked in Leyte provinces and is now being adopted in provinces such as Antique, Bukidnon, Mindoro island and Surigao del Sur.

A significant attribute of rainforests is that their trees act effectively as carbon sequesters and thus mitigate the ill-effects of climate change. -DOMINADOR SIANGKO CANEDA

Dominador Siangko Caneda is Environmental, Health and Safety Coordinator of Mead Johnson Nutrition. Before this work engagement, he held various positions in Trust International Paper Corporation (TIPCO). He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from Cebu Institute of Technology.

Haring ibon

Green Re-Fashion Competition Names La Salle College International Students as Top Winners On April 22,
Green Re-Fashion Competition Names La Salle College International Students as Top Winners On April 22,
Green Re-Fashion Competition Names La Salle College International Students as Top Winners On April 22,

Green Re-Fashion Competition Names La Salle College International Students as Top Winners

On April 22, Lloyd Arceo, Tina Daniac and Veronica Gonzales, judges of Green Re-Fashion competition named Erica Reyes and Claudine Enriquez of La Salle College International as top winners. Second and third prize winners went to Daniel Lozano and Renz Reyes of FEU College of Fine Arts; and Sarah Ko and Karl Hans Sutterlin from La Salle College International. Special prizes went to Miest dela Cruz and Jeanet Yap of TUP for Most economical design and Yra Zusha Zafe and Jonathan Domingo for Most Ecological design. Another special prize, a trip to Boracay, was won by Pauline Maniego of Quezon City.

Green Re-Fashion was a design competition among students using scrap or recycled clothing materials. The event was conceptualized and organized by CPM Events Management (Club Posh Manila) and supported by Haribon Foundation. This event formed part of the series of activities of Haribon in promoting sustainable use of resources and drumming up support for its forest restoration campaign. The event also coincided with the celebration of Earth Day and the International Year of Biodiversity.

Prior to the finals night, Green Re-Fashion exhibited all the competing entries from April 16 at the atrium of SM City Marikina. A simple ribbon cutting ceremony was held on opening

day with Dr. Tony Manila of the Protected Areas and Wildlife Bureau; Ms. Bernadette Velasco, mall manager of SM City Marikina and movie and television actress Angelu de Leon as special guests. Dr. Tony Manila gave a short message on the crucial role of the public in conserving and protecting natural resources.

At the finals night, Anabelle Plantilla of Haribon spoke on how we can all take part in taking care of the environment. Assisting the judges in giving the prizes to the winners were Paul Tan of Aquabest, one of Haribon's corporate partners and teen celebrity Bea Binene, a Haribon junior ambassador and GMA Network talent.

CPM Events Management (Club Posh Manila) and Haribon Foundation would like to thank those that provided support to the event: Kadangyan Band; Joy Porca and Jersey; JCI Paranaque-Asinderas led by Jen Raymundo; SM City Marikina; Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf; L'Oreal Professionel; Forerunner Technologies; Aquabest; Eleana Mineral Make-up; Patio Pacific; Kentucky Fried Chicken; GMA Network, Inc.; Argon Animation; Webber Website; Kaiko Video Productions; and Mannequin Incorporated.

Kaiko Video Productions; and Mannequin Incorporated. Turning 40 Has Never Been This Meaningful By: Ching Roldan

Turning 40 Has Never Been This Meaningful

By: Ching Roldan

Buddy Caramat, Philippine Educational Theater Association (PETA) senior member, celebrated his 40 th birthday with a bang at the PETA Theater Center last May 22, 2010. Attended by colleagues, loving friends and family, the night was filled with songs and stories shared with the celebrant and the guests as well.

Never ceasing to care for Mother Earth, Buddy, through his small yet worthwhile conservation efforts, invited the Haribon Foundation to be a part of another milestone in his life. Buddy feels the need to always give back to Nature, what with the current crisis in the environment such as global warming. The Haribon Foundation booth sold native seedlings which cost P100 per piece. These seedlings will be planted in Pili, Camarines Sur, a location chosen by the celebrant, him being a Bicolano.

Haring ibon

a day in a life

9:00 A M 8:45 A M 5:10 10:15 5:00 A M A M P M
9:00
A M
8:45
A M
5:10
10:15
5:00
A M
A M
P M
5:45
4:30
A M
A M
4:15
A M
3:30
7:30
A M
A M
P M 5:45 4:30 A M A M 4:15 A M 3:30 7:30 A M A
P M 5:45 4:30 A M A M 4:15 A M 3:30 7:30 A M A
P M 5:45 4:30 A M A M 4:15 A M 3:30 7:30 A M A
P M 5:45 4:30 A M A M 4:15 A M 3:30 7:30 A M A
P M 5:45 4:30 A M A M 4:15 A M 3:30 7:30 A M A
P M 5:45 4:30 A M A M 4:15 A M 3:30 7:30 A M A

Of A Geomatics II

by iver datinginoo

AM :30 Attempted to wake-up Trudged out of bed and took

3

a bath and get dressed.

4 :15 Grabbed my bag and headed out and walked, no tricycle around at this hour.

4 :30 Travel to Haribon, Plate, number and name of taxi noted.

5

5

:10 Arrived at Haribon, equipment check, GPS check, field receipts check, cash double check.

:45 Time check, need to be in Infanta at 9:00 A.M for the meeting.

11 :10 We headed to the site and passed over the Infanta- Marikina road. Discussed the purpose of the activity to the

farm lot owners. They gave us permission to do survey. Checked for

denuded area suitable for restoration.

PM

1

on top.

:12 Lunch time. Rice toppings for lunch, sardines and dried fish

2

:02 Water check. Turned my GPS on. Mark the first point.

Climbed 50 meters. gasped

climbed

gasped. Descended

gasped

point. Area noted, farm lot owner noted, present use of land noted. Calories burned noted!

gasped. Traversing the kaingin area. Arrived at the first

7 :30 Arrived at Famy and had breakfast.

8 :45 Arrived at Infanta Staff House.

9 :00 Rushed to MENRO Office. We discussed the delineation and demarcation activity with MENRO.

10 :15 After discussing the activity, we proceeded to meet with the Barangay Captain and asked for assistance for the 3-day

delineation activity. He said that he has already informed the farm lot owners of today’s agenda and appointed few residents to assist us.

3 :00 Delineated another kaingin area.

4 :34 Headed back to Infanta, met with MENRO and discussed the result of the first day activity.

5 :00 Assessment of the activity. Plans for the next day activity.

the result of the first day activity. 5 :00 Assessment of the activity. Plans for the

Haring ibon

membership

membership JUL 29 Elisa Garcia JUL 30 Ray Simon Roderos JUL 31 Chito Atienza Happy July
JUL 29 Elisa Garcia JUL 30 Ray Simon Roderos
JUL 29
Elisa Garcia
JUL 30
Ray Simon Roderos

JUL 31

Chito Atienza

Happy

Garcia JUL 30 Ray Simon Roderos JUL 31 Chito Atienza Happy July JUL 6 Bianca Marika
Garcia JUL 30 Ray Simon Roderos JUL 31 Chito Atienza Happy July JUL 6 Bianca Marika

July

JUL 6 Bianca Marika Pedrosa Sharon Alindayu

Happy July JUL 6 Bianca Marika Pedrosa Sharon Alindayu JUL 8 Jude Sanchez Birthday! JUL 18

JUL 8

Jude Sanchez

Birthday!

JUL 18 Jan Van der Ploeg Arthur Estrella
JUL 18
Jan Van der Ploeg
Arthur Estrella

JUL 20 Roberto Habaluyas Ma. Chesed Vallejos

JUL 10

Lorraine Grijaldo

JUL 22 Hans Georg Ruthenberg

JUL 27

Aimee Malingan

JUL 28

Alvin Tabanag

JUL 16

Xavier Banes

27 Aimee Malingan JUL 28 Alvin Tabanag JUL 16 Xavier Banes AUG 7 Vicente Mills Jr.

AUG 7 Vicente Mills Jr.

Grace Blancaver

AUG 3 Teodulo San Juan Abigail Reduble

AUG 8

Rowena Garana

Antonio Picazo

AUG 11 Edmundo Chavez, Jr. Geraldine Carpizo Gladys Maneja

Emilio Climaco

August

Jr. Geraldine Carpizo Gladys Maneja Emilio Climaco August AUG 14 Midori Mitsuhashi Agnes Braza-Lucente AUG 15

AUG 14

Midori Mitsuhashi

Agnes Braza-Lucente

Climaco August AUG 14 Midori Mitsuhashi Agnes Braza-Lucente AUG 15 Indira Dayang Widmann Alfonso Martin Plantilla

AUG 15 Indira Dayang Widmann Alfonso Martin Plantilla

AUG 17

Lilian Bellen

Dayang Widmann Alfonso Martin Plantilla AUG 17 Lilian Bellen AUG 21 Amelia Valdez Grace Maningo AUG
Dayang Widmann Alfonso Martin Plantilla AUG 17 Lilian Bellen AUG 21 Amelia Valdez Grace Maningo AUG

AUG 21

Amelia Valdez

Grace Maningo

AUG 27

Danilo Filarca

AUG 28

Hazel Consunji

AUG 29 Maria Luisa Mendoza

AUG 18

Elena Salinas

Charlene Manese

AUG 19

Elizabeth Diaz

AUG 20 Philip Camara Himerio Jose Garcia IV

AUG 23 Cherie Marjorie McCosuer

AUG 24

Carmelita Hansel

IV AUG 23 Cherie Marjorie McCosuer AUG 24 Carmelita Hansel AUG 30 Maryanne Therese Novales September

AUG 30 Maryanne Therese Novales

AUG 24 Carmelita Hansel AUG 30 Maryanne Therese Novales September SEP 7 Marnet Ruthenberg Lolita Magno

September

SEP 7 Marnet Ruthenberg Lolita Magno Torres

SEP 11

Jerico Tavera

SEP 13 Germelina Salumbides

SEP 15 Rudy del Rosario Yolanda Deveza Ryan Palacol

SEP 18 Claire Balgan
SEP 18
Claire Balgan

SEP 19

Benedict Cervania

SEP 20

Christina Alejandro

Cristina Castaneda

SEP 21 Joseph Patrick Britanico

Cristina Castaneda SEP 21 Joseph Patrick Britanico SEP 23 Shinju Cawis SEP 25 Antonio Alberto Banzon

SEP 23

Shinju Cawis

SEP 25 Antonio Alberto Banzon Charissa Ronque Rogelio Vinluan

SEP 27 Jenny Chua - Medina

SEP 30 Abigail Barros-Wagner Liezl Jose

Banzon Charissa Ronque Rogelio Vinluan SEP 27 Jenny Chua - Medina SEP 30 Abigail Barros-Wagner Liezl

40

Haring ibon

November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE!

November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City

November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE! www.haribon.org.ph
November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE! www.haribon.org.ph
November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE! www.haribon.org.ph
November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE! www.haribon.org.ph
November 21, 2010 McKinley Hill, Fort Bonifacion, Taguig City BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE! www.haribon.org.ph

BECOME A MEMBER or DONATE ONLINE!

www.haribon.org.ph

Mozcom PayEasy Online Payment System or PayEasy is now makes online payment process simple by providing a secure, unified interface for donors and potential members. PayEasy can process major credit cards, ATM debit cards, mobile payments and proprietary currencies like PayPal and UCPB 1 Time payments.

Anybody can now donate and pay membership fees through PayEasy! Just check out www.haribon.org.ph.

O n l I n e P A y m e n t S y
O n l I n e
P A y m e n t
S y S t e m
and pay membership fees through PayEasy! Just check out www.haribon.org.ph . O n l I n
and pay membership fees through PayEasy! Just check out www.haribon.org.ph . O n l I n
Haribon’s Biodiversity Information Center Enriching green advocates and enthusiasts THE SERvICES • Open (Monday to

Haribon’s Biodiversity Information Center

Haribon’s Biodiversity Information Center Enriching green advocates and enthusiasts THE SERvICES • Open (Monday to

Enriching green advocates and enthusiasts

THE SERvICES

• Open (Monday to Friday) from 9:00 am – 12:00 nn and 1:00 – 4:00 pm except during holidays.

• Free access and use of the library facilities for Haribon members with a minimal donation of 40 pesos per day only. Non-members and student donations are 60 and 50 pesos per day respectively. The BIC also encourages individuals and institutions for membership. BIC members enjoy an unlimited access to the library for a year.

• An electronic information service via On-line Public Access Catalogue (OPAC) is available for easy and fast searching.

User terminals are provided for internet and online researches. Other services includes, photocopying, file printing and document scanning.

Biodiversity Information Center | Haribon Foundation, Inc. 2/F Santos and Sons Bldg., 973 Aurora Blvd., Cubao, Quezon City Philippines, 1109 Phone No. : (632)434-4642 | Fax No. (632)434-4696 E-mail : bic@haribon.org.ph

| Fax No. (632)434-4696 E-mail : bic@haribon.org.ph In the Philippines, the concept of a library as
| Fax No. (632)434-4696 E-mail : bic@haribon.org.ph In the Philippines, the concept of a library as
| Fax No. (632)434-4696 E-mail : bic@haribon.org.ph In the Philippines, the concept of a library as

In the Philippines, the concept of a library as a conservation organization and the practice of green librarianship is being used by Haribon Foundation through its Biodiversity Information Center (BIC). BIC’s main objective is to meet the information needs on environmental awareness of Haribon as an organization, its members and the general public. The BIC makes Haribon’s wealth of information on Philippine biodiversity available to researchers, visiting academe, students and anyone curious about the unique natural wealth of the Philippines.

Green libraries maybe new to some but the concept and the call for action has been around for quite some time. Majority of the libraries in the world right now are looking forward to greening. That is, developing a green library environment, enriching the green library collection and employing conservation techniques on library operations like recycling wastes and saving energy.

The Collection The BIC houses print (Haribon publications, project studies, periodicals, etc.) and non-print (maps, posters, multimedia) materials on biological and physical sciences, agriculture, forestry, social sciences and the development sector with emphasis on biodiversity and the environment. These materials serve as a gateway of recorded information and knowledge to its own network’s partners and different communities in the Philippines and abroad.

Library Links BIC is linked with partner academic institutions, Academic Centers of Excellence (ACEs), namely: De La Salle Dasmarinas, Camarines Sur State Agricultural College, Mindanao State University – Iligan Institute of Technology and Silliman University. Researchers can come to Haribon’s BIC and access information and materials that are available in the ACEs’ BIC’s. In connection to this, the BIC also accepts library donations, library exchange and interlibrary loan proposals from other institutions.

SPONSORS 3M Aquabest Atty. Antonio A. Picazo Business World Discovery Suites Figaro Coffee - Mckinley

SPONSORS

3M

Aquabest Atty. Antonio A. Picazo Business World Discovery Suites Figaro Coffee - Mckinley Fitness GMA 7 GTC Joint Venture Jesus P. Francisco John Lesaca LANDBEES CORP. L’Oréal Mega Magazine Meralco Meralco Energy Merck Sharp & Dohme MIESCOR MIESCOR Builders Inc. Mizuno Pascual Lab San Miguel Super Coffeemix Co., Inc. Sol Gelato Spoof Limited Sun Coast Brands International Corp. Tai Chi The Manila Times The Radio Partners Times Trading Veepo Venice Piazza

Limited Sun Coast Brands International Corp. Tai Chi The Manila Times The Radio Partners Times Trading
Limited Sun Coast Brands International Corp. Tai Chi The Manila Times The Radio Partners Times Trading

44

44 Toog petersianthus quadrialatus The Toog is endemic to the philippines and is found in primary
44 Toog petersianthus quadrialatus The Toog is endemic to the philippines and is found in primary
44 Toog petersianthus quadrialatus The Toog is endemic to the philippines and is found in primary
Toog
Toog

petersianthus quadrialatus

The Toog is endemic to the philippines and is found in primary lowland forests.

Toog is a large tree growing up to 30 meters tall. The stem is straight and branchless for up to 20 meters. The outer bark is reddish-brown and flaky. its leaves are simple and spirally arranged. The flowers are white.

The timber of Toog is used for the production of veneer and plywood and for general construction. The seeds are said to be edible and the leaves have been used medicinally.

Source; E.S. Fernando. B.Y. Sun, M.H. Sun H.Y. Kong and K.S. Koh (2004). Flowering Plants and Ferns of Mt. Makiling.

Haring ibon

ROAD to 2020 UPDATE

Bring back our natural forests. Plant Native Trees.

TargeT: 1,000,000 hectares

PLanTed:

282.36 hectares (as of July 31, 2010)

Legend Forest Cover Closed canopy Data source: Open canopy Forest Cover of 1988 - DENR
Legend
Forest Cover
Closed canopy
Data source:
Open canopy
Forest Cover of 1988 - DENR
Haribon Foundation, Inc.

999,717.64

hectares to GO!

For more information about ROAD to 2020 or how you can donate online or adopt a seedling, visit www.haribon.org. ph or email: act@ haribon.org.ph.

You can also call at (632) 434.4642/ 911.6089, (+63)

922.815.1941.