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The American Bar Association Section of Business Law and the ABA Center for Continuing Legal Education

Present

Psychological Employment Testing: Addressing Obstacles and Risks

American Bar Association Center for Continuing Legal Education 321 North Clark Street, Suite 1900 Chicago, IL 60610-4714 www.abanet.org/cle 800.285.2221, select option 2

DVDs, CDs, VIDEOTAPES, ONLINE COURSES, and COURSE MATERIALS Interested in ABA-CLE self-study products? Visit the ABA Web Store at www.abaclecatalog.org.

The materials contained herein represent the opinions of the authors and editors and should not be construed to be the action of the American Bar Association, the Section of Business Law, or the Center for Continuing Legal Education unless adopted pursuant to the bylaws of the Association. Nothing contained in this book is to be considered as the rendering of legal advice for specific cases, and readers are responsible for obtaining such advice from their own legal counsel. This book and any forms and agreements herein are intended for educational and informational purposes only. 2006 American Bar Association. All rights reserved.

This publication accompanies the audio program entitled Psychological Employment Testing: Addressing Obstacles and Risks, broadcast on February 8, 2006 (Event code: CEB6PET / Product code: CEB06PETC).

Table of Contents

1. When a Test Turns into a Trial: Things to Keep in Mind About Psychological Testing Larry R. Seegull and Emily J. C 2. Leadership Forecast Potential Report* 3. Leadership Forecast Challenge Report* * Copyright 2002 Hogan Assessment Systems. Reprinted with permission.

Reprinted with permission from Business Law Today, Volume 15, Number 3 January/February 2006

When a Test Turns into a Trial: Things to Keep in Mind about Psychological Testing
By Larry R. Seegull and Emily J. Caputo

Since the earliest days of testing, it has been the test taker who is nervous, tense or riddled with anxiety. Today, employers who administer tests to employees in the hiring or promotion process may find themselves feeling anxious or nervous. Why? The legal obstacles and risks to employment testing are significant. Most companies are realizing there is great value in using psychological tests as part of the employee selection and promotion process. A 2000 survey by the American Management Association found that 33 percent of employers surveyed used psychological testing with their applicants and employees. Psychological testing in the employment arena is also a booming $400 million industry and expanding annually at a rate of 10 to 15 percent. A case in point can be seen in the use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which is a popular personality test given to approximately 2.5 million people each year and is used by 89 of the companies listed on the Fortune 100. So, why is knowing what is going on inside an employee or applicant's head so important? The answer is actually rather simple: money. Pre-employment testing weeds out poor matches whose personality likely would not mesh with the company culture. When a company's turnover is high, it must spend precious time and money retraining new recruits. When administered properly, psychological testing of employees can offer many financial rewards to a company. An appropriate test can dramatically reduce the time HR personnel use to interview applicants by automatically eliminating a percentage of the applicant pool. Psychological tests are also a vital tool in the employer's arsenal of determining an employee or applicant's honesty and integrity. Integrity tests are written tests that predict whether an employee will engage in theft as well as their general trustworthiness and dependability. Employers have turned to written integrity tests for two reasons. First, former employers are more reluctant to provide detailed references for applicants for fear of being sued for defamation. Second, with the passage of the Employee Polygraph Protection Act in 1988, as well as comparable state laws, employers are substantially limited in resources for determining an individual's integrity.

The federal Employee Polygraph Protection Act and most state laws prohibit employers, except under very limited circumstances, from requiring or even requesting an employee or applicant to take a lie detector test as a condition of employment or continued employment. Under the federal law, a lie detector test includes everything from an actual polygraph exam to psychological stress evaluators. With these limitations, an employer is left with few options to investigate an applicant or employee's honesty. Enter integrity tests, which have already become commonplace in many companies. These tests are administered by an estimated 6,000 companies in the United States and are taken by as many as 5 million people each year. Employers realize the financial risks they take by not investigating an applicant or employee's honesty. Studies have estimated that employee theft costs companies $15-25 billion a year. In addition, experts suggest that employee theft accounts for up to 30 percent of all business failures. At this point, employers may be thinking that psychological testing of applicants and employees is definitely the way to go. One wishes it were that simple. The truth is that there are serious legal implications in administering psychological tests to employees and prospective employees. It is essential that employers thoroughly examine whether testing is appropriate and whether their testing violates the lawotherwise they test at their own peril. A case decided in 2005 in the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals, Karraker v. Rent-A-Center Inc., demonstrates one of the risks with psychological testing. The Rent-A-Center case held that administering certain psychological tests to employees violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Specifically, the court found that the employer's use of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) as part of its testing process for managers violated the ADA. The MMPI is a widely researched test for adult psychopathology and can measure such traits as depression, hysteria, paranoia and mania. High scores on the MMPI test can be used by medical professionals in the diagnosis of some psychiatric disorders. Congress originally enacted the ADA in response to findings in studies and national polls documenting that individuals with disabilities occupy an inferior status in the United States and are severely disadvantaged socially, vocationally, economically and educationally. Congress intended the ADA to provide a national mandate for the elimination of discrimination against individuals with disabilities. The ADA is relevant to psychological testing in the employment context because the act includes mental impairments in its definition of "disability." The court in the Rent-A-Center case particularly noted that people with psychiatric disabilities have suffered as a result of stereotypes, resulting in an employment rate that is drastically lower than people without disabilities. Congress enacted three specific provisions limiting the ability of employers from using "medical examinations and inquiries" as a condition of employment. First, an employer cannot use medical examinations as pre-employment tests or before an offer of employment 2

is made. Second, an employer cannot use medical tests that lack job-relatedness. Third, an employer cannot use medical tests that screen out or have the tendency to screen out people with disabilities. Under the ADA, the total prohibition against medical examinations is lifted once a conditional offer of employment is made. At that point, a medical test can be given provided that it is given to all similarly situated persons, the results are kept confidential, and the test is administered in accordance with the ADA. In the Rent-A-Center case, three brothers were applying for manager positions within the company. In order to be considered for a promotion at Rent-A-Center, an employee was required to take an APT Management Trainee-Executive Profile, which consisted of nine tests designed to measure math and language skills as well as personality traits. In testing an applicant's personality traits, Rent-A-Center chose 502 questions from the MMPI. Rent-ACenter scored the nine tests together, and any applicant with more than 12 "weighted deviations" was not considered for promotion. It was, therefore, possible for an applicant to be denied promotion solely because of his responses on the MMPI portion of the test. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission defines "medical examination" as "a procedure or test that seeks information about an individual's physical or mental impairments or health." The EEOC lists several factors to consider when determining whether a test should be construed as a medical examination, any of which could be enough to determine that the test is medical. One such factor is whether the test is "designed to reveal an impairment of physical or mental health." The issue that the court had to decide in Rent-A-Center was whether the MMPI was considered a "medical examination" under the ADA. Specifically, the court had to decide if the MMPI was designed to reveal a mental impairment. If such a determination was made, then Rent-A-Center would be liable for damages to the plaintiffs because it violated the ADA, which prohibits the use of medical examinations in a pre-employment context. The court decided to look at this as a pre-employment situation even though the brothers already were employed at Rent-A-Center because the brothers were essentially required to apply for new jobs within the company. The Rent-A-Center decision can be distressing to companies that test applicants and employees because the court considered the MMPI portion of the test to be a "medical examination," which could not be given in a pre-employment situation. The court came to this conclusion even though Rent-A-Center took affirmative steps that had been suggested by the EEOC to ensure that psychological tests used by companies were not classified as medical examinations under the ADA. In particular, the company did not have the MMPI portion of the managerial test administered by a psychologist nor was the test interpreted by a psychologist. In fact, there are two tools for interpreting the MMPI, a vocational measure and a clinical measure. RentA-Center specifically used the vocational measure rather than the clinical measure in grading the responses in order to prevent the appearance that it was administering a medical examination. 3

In the end, none of this mattered to the Seventh Circuit. Instead, the court articulated a distinction between psychological tests that are designed to identify mental disorders and impairments and those that measure personality traits like honesty; the former in the court's eye being classified as a medical examination under the ADA. Because the MMPI was designed, at least in part, to reveal mental illness, the Seventh Circuit found that it qualified as a medical examination that could not be administered in a pre-employment context regardless of whether the company took affirmative steps to ensure that it was used vocationally rather than clinically. In contrast, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals decided differently when it examined the use of the MMPI in the context of testing police officer applicants. The plaintiff in Miller v. City of Springfield was a female applicant who applied for an officer position with the Springfield Police Department. The department required officer applicants to pass agility and psychological tests. On the MMPI portion of the psychological test, Miller received a score of 66, which indicated above-normal depression. Based on these results, she was denied employment as a police officer. Miller sued the police department claiming she was screened out in violation of the ADA because of her psychological evaluation results. Unlike the Seventh Circuit in Rent-A- Center, the court in Miller found for the employer and determined that the MMPI was an appropriate job-related psychological screening tool that was consistent with a business necessity. The differences between the Rent-A-Center and Miller decisions may simply be explained by the fact that courts may be more willing to accept certain psychological tests for applicants and employees when such tests serve a business necessity or are in the public interest. There is little doubt that a strong argument can be made that it is more necessary to determine the psychological well-being and honesty of an individual applying to be a police officer versus an individual applying to be a department store manager. This business necessity/public interest reasoning is right in line with how federal and state governments regulate employers who wish to polygraph applicants or employees. Generally, such examinations are prohibited; however, police officers and those applying to become police officers are commonly exempt from federal and state polygraph protection statutes. Though the Rent-A-Center and Miller cases only dealt with an employer's liability under the ADA, an employer who administers the wrong psychological test could face further legal action under varying federal and state laws. For instance, an employee could challenge a psychological test under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Title VII prohibits testing designed to, or that has a tendency to, discriminate based on race, gender, religion or national origin. Therefore, to the extent that a psychological test has a disproportionate adverse effect on minorities or women, the employer could face additional litigation under Title VII. In addition, employers could face suits from employees who claim that confidentiality laws 4

were violated in the handling of their test results. Employers have an obligation to maintain confidentiality of the test answers and to avoid providing information that could be deemed confidential without the employee's consent. Certain states also have placed laws on their books prohibiting the psychological testing of employees. For example, Massachusetts has broadened its polygraph-protection law to prohibit employers from using any written examinations, which are used to render a diagnostic opinion regarding an individual's honesty. California and Rhode Island's polygraph-protection laws require that honesty and integrity exams not be the primary basis for making hiring, firing or promotion decisions. While less overt, Wisconsin has a statute in place that allows employees to challenge "unfair honesty tests." Moreover, while some states have tightly worded statutes banning the use of lie-detector testing, other states have somewhat vague bans on such testsDelaware and Idaho, for example. Ambiguous statutes could be interpreted to ban written psychological exams as well as polygraphs and other types of lie detector tests. It is fair to say that increased use of any kind of testing of employees or applicants means an increase in the potential for litigation. An employer, however, can take special precautions in order to minimize the risk of litigation. Some things employers should consider before administering psychological tests to employees or applicants include:

Never using tests as the sole criterion for hiring or promotion decisions. Avoid using tests that require analysis by a psychologist, psychiatrist or social worker. Review existing tests to ensure that they do not include a psychological diagnostic component. In other words, make sure the test does not contribute to a finding of a particular mental impairment or psychological disorder. Make sure that the test is statistically valid, reliable and devoid of cultural and ethnic bias. Use tests that are job-related and of a business necessity. For example, tests for extroversion might be justified for people seeking sales positions, but not for people seeking positions that do not focus heavily on interaction with others. Similarly, an integrity test might be more justifiably job-related for financial and security positions. Administer the test in a standardized fashion that ensures that all job applicants or employees are assessed in the same way. Monitor the test results to ensure that there is not a disparate impact on women and minorities. Take active steps to ensure the confidentiality of test responses. Monitor workplace statistics on attrition, theft, turnover and production to determine whether the use of these tests has resulted in a reduction of identified counterproductive behaviors. Consult a lawyer with expertise in the area of employment testing before going ahead with any test. At a minimum, an employer must comply with federal requirements, as well as additional requirements imposed by the particular state where the test is being 5

administered. Deciding whether to implement psychological testing with applicants and employees does not need to be an anxiety-riddled experience. With careful planning and execution, an employer should be able to use psychological testing as a way of efficient hiring and promotion without violating federal and state laws. Seegull is a partner at DLA Piper Rudnick Gray Cary US LLP, in Baltimore. His e-mail is larry.seegull@dlapiper.com. Caputo is an associate at the same firm. Her e-mail is emily.caputo@dlapiper.com.

The Leadership Forecast Series

p o t e n t i a l

| report

Leadership Forecast Potential Report

Report for:

John Sample

ID #:

DC178490

Date:

January 27, 2006

CONFIDENTIAL

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

NTRODUCTION

I
The Leadership Forecast Potential Report describes your strengths and developmental needs as a manager and executive. The report is based on the Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI), and is organized in terms of seven dimensions; each dimension addresses a different component of leadership performance. Leadership concerns building and maintaining a high-performing team, while getting people to forego individual goals to take on group goals.

Page 3 defines the dimensions of the HPI; once again, this report is organized in terms of these seven dimensions.

Page 4 presents your HPI profile. The pages following the profile describe the behavioral and leadership implications of your scores on each HPI dimension. The last section of the report provides developmental recommendations associated with your competencies. This information will be helpful as you move forward in your career.

There are some points you should keep in mind while reading this report.

BACKGROUND
First, there is no such thing as a "good" score. There are positive and negative implications for both high and low scores, although certain scores are more important for some competencies than others. Thus, you should interpret your scores in terms of your own career aspirations and goals rather than in absolute terms.

Second, you can change your typical behavior, but change depends on three things. First, you need to know what you want to change. Second, you must decide to change it. And third, you need to know how to change it. The information in this report will be important for any effort toward change and development.

Third, the results in this report are based on leadership research conducted over the past 20 years with samples of working adults and leaders. In addition, your scores are compared to those of an international sample of over 4,000 executives, and not on the general population. The point is that the report compares you with your peers and not with your staff.

Finally, as noted above, the most essential feature of leadership is the ability to build and maintain a high-performing team. The various parts of the report all concern your potential for doing this.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

DEFINITIONS
The seven scales of the Leadership Forecast Potential Report are defined as follows:

Adjustment

The Adjustment scale reflects the degree to which a person is calm and even tempered or conversely, moody and volatile. High scorers seem confident, resilient, and optimistic. Low scorers seem tense, irritable, and negative.

Ambition

The Ambition scale evaluates the degree to which a person seems leaderlike, seeks status, and values achievement. High scorers seem competitive and eager to advance. Low scorers seem unassertive and less interested in advancement.

Sociability

The Sociability scale assesses the degree to which a person appears talkative and socially self-confident. High scorers seem outgoing, colorful, and impulsive, and they dislike working by themselves. Low scorers seem reserved and quiet; they avoid calling attention to themselves and do not mind working alone.

Interpersonal Sensitivity

The Interpersonal Sensitivity scale reflects social skill, tact, and perceptiveness. High scorers seem friendly, warm, and popular. Low scorers seem independent, frank, and direct.

Prudence

The Prudence scale concerns self control and conscientiousness. High scorers seem organized, dependable, and thorough; they follow rules and are easy to supervise. Low scorers seem impulsive and flexible. They tend to resist rules and close supervision; however, they may be creative and spontaneous.

Inquisitive

The Inquisitive scale reflects the degree to which a person seems curious, adventurous, and imaginative. High scorers tend to be quick-witted and visionary, but they may be easily bored and not pay attention to details. Low scorers tend to be practical, focused, and able to concentrate for long periods.

Learning Approach

The Learning Approach scale reflects the degree to which a person enjoys academic activities and values education as an end in itself. High scorers tend to enjoy reading and studying. Low scorers are less interested in formal education and more interested in hands-on learning on the job.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

EADERSHIP POTENTIAL PROFILE

L
This Report is Valid and Interpretable
Scale Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

ADJUSTMENT

72

AMBITION

100

SOCIABILITY

59

INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY

83

PRUDENCE

75

INQUISITIVE

69

LEARNING APPROACH

79

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

DJUSTMENT

A
ADJUSTMENT
Concerns composure, optimism, and stable moods.
72 100 59 83 75 69 79

AMBITION SOCIABILITY INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Handle pressure well Not take criticism personally Expect to succeed Be hard to coach Overlook their mistakes Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you usually maintain a

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

positive attitude, stay in a good mood, remain patient with staff errors and mistakes, and persist in the face of challenges, frustration, and reversals. On the other hand, you may not realize when others are stressed, and may be reluctant to listen to negative feedback.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

COMPOSURE:You tend to remain calm even when provoked, or faced with deadlines and heavy external pressure. You are perceived as confident and self-assured, and you express your emotions in a mature and socially appropriate manner.

LISTENING:You are so confident in your judgments that you may sometimes seem not to take others views seriously. As a result, others may see you as arrogant, regardless of the merit of your views.

LEARNING AND PERSONAL COACHABILITY:You are open to and may even solicit feedback. At the same time, because you are so self-confident, you may tend to focus on the positive and ignore the negative. This can make you hard to coach.

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS:Your positive mood and predictable demeanor should make you a rewarding person to deal with; you should have good success building and maintaining relationships when you choose to do so.

STRESS MANAGEMENT:You seem to deal comfortably with frustrations, delays, and the pressures of deadlines and heavy workloads. In fact, you appear to thrive under pressure, perhaps taking on more than you should. Others admire and count on your resilience.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

MBITION

A
ADJUSTMENT
Concerns taking initiative, being competitive, and seeking leadership
72 100 59 83 75 69 79

AMBITION SOCIABILITY

roles.

INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Enjoy taking charge and making decisions Accept difficult challenges Enjoy public speaking Intimidate younger or more junior people Seem eager to advance Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you are active, hard

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

working, competitive, and eager to get ahead. You like leadership positions and enjoy being in charge. With the appropriate experience and interpersonal skills, you will be able to assume lead roles on complex projects. On the other hand, you may tend to compete with or intimidate colleagues without intending to do so.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

ACTION ORIENTATION:You are hard working, competitive, and want to succeed. People can depend on you to take initiative, solve problems, and get things moving.

CAREER ADVANCEMENT:You have a sense of what you can accomplish, and you have the energy and confidence to make things happen. You seem willing to push projects through to completion.

INITIATIVE:You have the confidence and desire to lead during a crisis. Others often look to you for direction and you like to provide it. Others expect you to do what needs to be done when problems arise, without being asked.

ACHIEVING RESULTS:You take pride in getting things done; others expect that you will push yourself and your staff to finish projects and exceed goals.

DECISION MAKING:You are not afraid to make decisions, even when all the information isnt available. However, you may need to practice delegating decision making when it is appropriate.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

OCIABILITY

S
ADJUSTMENT
Concerns seeming talkative, socially bold, and entertaining.
72 100 59 83 75 69 79

AMBITION SOCIABILITY INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Seem approachable, not distant Be comfortable either working alone or with others Prefer formal rather than casual meetings Provide staff relevant feedback Balance listening with talking Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you are flexible with

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

your time, and don't mind working either alone or as part of a team. You meet the public well, but you don't need to be the center of attention or constantly on stage.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

INITIATING INTERACTIONS:You are able to initiate and build good relations with others in your organization, including people you don't already know.

ENERGY:Others see you as having appropriate energy and enthusiasm for new people and projects.

APPROACHABILITY:Your ability to initiate interactions with new people is an important skill for leaders. Continue developing contacts in the organization, and include your staff in the interactions.

INTERPERSONAL NETWORK:Your networking skills are sufficient to keep you in touch with the organization.

TEAM ORIENTATION:Others see you as participating appropriately in team tasks.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

NTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY

ADJUSTMENT AMBITION SOCIABILITY

72 100 59 83 75 69 79

Concerns being agreeable, considerate and skilled at maintaining relationships.

INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Be pleasant and rewarding to deal with Be socially appropriate and good team players Read social and political cues easily Promise more than they can deliver Avoid confrontations Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you dislike conflict, and

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

try to maintain cordial relations with others. You are a good team player and value encouraging and helping others. Your staff should like and trust you, but just might try to take advantage of your good nature.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

COMPASSION:You are a thoughtful and considerate person, you appreciate how your actions will affect others, and you avoid offending people unnecessarily.

COOPERATION:You value cooperation, you are a great team player, and you provide a model for your staff and others regarding how to accomplish goals through collaboration.

SEEKING INPUT:You respect others and seek their input, especially regarding issues that will affect them personally.

CONFRONTING SUBORDINATES:Because you value cooperation and you dislike upsetting people, you may find it difficult to confront problem performers.

STANDING ALONE:You seem uncomfortable taking unpopular positions, especially when doing so may annoy others, and you tend to avoid confrontations.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

RUDENCE

P
ADJUSTMENT
Concerns being conscientious, dependable, and rule-abiding.
72 100 59 83 75 69 79

AMBITION SOCIABILITY INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Work hard for the company Follow company rules and procedures Plan work in advance and anticipate changes in the workload Have trouble delegating, and tend to micromanage their staff Get bogged down in details Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you are a hard working

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

and solid organizational citizen. You are concerned about rules, procedures, and task clarity. You value doing things right and try to meet high standards of performance. Others will see you as careful and conscientious, but perhaps also as inflexible and needing a lot of structure.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

HANDLING AMBIGUITY:When starting new projects, you prefer to have the expectations, rules, and guidelines spelled out carefully in advance, so you will know how you are doing and how you will be evaluated.

FLEXIBILITY:You prefer to use established methods and procedures in your work, especially when the stakes are high, rather than experimenting with new techniques that might not work.

PLANNING:You tend to plan your work carefully in advance, estimating time, steps, personnel, and resources required for tasks. You are most comfortable when goals, timetables, and a firm understanding of obligations are in place.

ATTENTION TO DETAIL AND TIMELINES:You want your work to be technically accurate and completed on time. Others see you as organized, conscientious, and punctual.

RULE ORIENTATION:You respect the rules of the organization, you follow them carefully, and you expect others to do so as well.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

10

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

NQUISITIVE

I
ADJUSTMENT
Concerns being curious, imaginative, visionary, and easily bored.
72 100 59 83 75 69 79

AMBITION SOCIABILITY INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Be seen as visionary about business Think quickly on their feet and help solve problems Understand and talk about the "big picture" Be seen as worldly and sophisticated Become easily bored with implementation or repetitious tasks Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you think quickly on

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

your feet, generate lots of ideas, and are curious about how things work. You understand the big picture and can be creative and even visionary. Others will see you as original and imaginative, but easily bored, especially with the details of implementation.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

CREATIVITY:You should be a resource for your organization when it needs to solve problems that require thinking outside the box.

MANAGING INNOVATION:You seem interested in trying new technology, processes, and problem-solving methods to improve the speed and quality of your work.

CURIOSITY:You are an open-minded person with a wide range of interests; as a result, you like to have more than a superficial understanding of how things work.

VISION:You think about the future of the business and enjoy reviewing strategies for getting there.

PROBLEM SOLVING:Your ability to think "outside the box" and in terms of the big picture is a competency that should enhance your career within the organization.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

11

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

EARNING APPROACH

ADJUSTMENT AMBITION SOCIABILITY

72 100 59 83 75 69 79

Concerns enjoying formal education and actively staying up-to-date on business and technical matters.

INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY PRUDENCE INQUISITIVE LEARNING APPROACH

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Leaders with similar scores tend to:

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

Value training for themselves and their staff Stay up-to-date with recent developments in business and technology Be self-disciplined and conscientious about goals Take action before others are on board Have an opinion about everything Compared to other leaders, your scores suggest that you like to learn and

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

acquire new knowledge. You will value training for yourself and others and will want to apply the latest relevant knowledge to your work. Although your friends may think of you as bright and well-informed, others may think you sometimes show off your knowledge.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

STAYING CURRENT:You should find it easy to stay up-to-date on recent business trends and relevant developments in your industry.

LEARNING QUICKLY:You should also find it easy to learn new techniques and procedures, because you remember new material easily.

LEARNING STYLE:You seem to enjoy traditional forms of education, including lectures and reading.

COMMUNICATING ACCURATELY:Your written communications should be clear and accurate.

INTELLECTUAL MOTIVATION:Others see you as bright, hard-working, and achievement-oriented.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

12

EVELOPMENTAL RECOMMENDATIONS

D
ADJUSTMENT
Because many people don't handle frustration and setbacks as well as you do, share

COMPOSURE
with others the tips and techniques that you have found to be helpful when things don't go well. Because you are so confident, you may not realize when others are feeling stressed. As a leader, be sure to convey to your staff an appropriate sense of understanding of their problems.

LISTENING

Use active listening skills and positive body language remember to paraphrase, reflect on what others have said, and don't interrupt them. Try to display a genuine interest in what is being said by others--people can sense when you are "going through the motions" rather than actively listening to them.

LEARNING AND PERSONAL

Don't ignore criticism, particularly if you receive the same message from various sources. Ask your coworkers and colleagues for feedback. Ask yourself, "What do others keep

COACHABILITY
telling me?" Pay attention to recurring themes in what you hear. Identify a trusted colleague who can give you honest feedback, and regularly ask him/her for this information. Before meetings, presentations, or customer contacts, ask your colleague to observe your performance and provide a later critique (this will help your colleague focus on your behavior, and he / she will be able to give you more useful feedback).

People will appreciate your calm, steady demeanor. Because others become stressed

BUILDING
when you don't, step up and use your skills to calm and motivate them.

RELATIONSHIPS
Because you are probably good at building relations with others, become a mentor in this area.

STRESS MANAGEMENT

You seem to handle pressure and stress so well that others may not believe you are as "concerned" as you should be. As a leader, it is important that you convey an appropriate level of involvement to your staff. Try not to pile work on others because you are not feeling any pressure, or because you feel that others can handle as much as you can.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

13

AMBITION
Part of being a leader involves developing the skills of other employees. Be careful

ACTION
not to compete with your staff, or even seem to do so.

ORIENTATION
Although being action-oriented is desirable, careful planning frequently leads to better decisions. As a leader, be careful not to treat every issue as urgentuse rapid responses in situations that require it.

CAREER ADVANCEMENT

Given your intensity and competitiveness, be careful not to alienate your peer group. When possible, gain consensus on your plan(s), communicate with your peer group, delegate to others, and share successes with all. Ask someone whom you trust for feedback about your work as a team member. If the feedback is not positive, create an action plan for improvement. Support the careers of your staff and colleagues. Involve others in projects, delegate tasks when possible, and look for opportunities to partner with other groups on projects.

INITIATIVE

Don't take on more than you can handle. Unfulfilled promises can erode others' trust. Realistically evaluate what your team can accomplish and resist the tendency to over-commit your team's resources. Remember that not everyone has your level of intensity. Be careful not to burn out your staff. Being goal-oriented is desirable, but be aware of signs of disengagement and/or burnout on the part of others.

You have high expectations for staff performance, but not everyone shares this

ACHIEVING
orientation. Be sure to let others know what your expectations are, and then manage

RESULTS
them accordingly. Be careful when pushing others--their capacity and/or skills may not equal yours.

DECISION MAKING

Before making a decision, make sure you review all the relevant information regarding the decision. Remember the carpenter's adage: "Measure twice, cut once." You probably make decisions quickly and confidently. As a result, others may rely on you to make decisions, which won't enhance their skills. Therefore, delegate down, make your subordinates responsible for the decisions in their work area.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

14

SOCIABILITY
Be sure to talk with each member of your staff everyday in his/her work place.

INITIATING INTERACTIONS

ENERGY

You seem to be an active person who can energize the work group, which is an important quality for leaders. Maintain your energy during interactions, particularly if you tend to become bored or disengaged.

APPROACHABILITY

Make sure that you are accessible to all members of your team, and that you don't unconsciously "play favorites" with some team members.

Be sure that your network covers the relevant portions of your organization.

INTERPERSONAL
Even though you may have a good organizational network, try to establish a

NETWORK
relationship with at least one new department or work unit each quarter. Recognize that your network is changing, and that it needs to be nurtured to be sustained. If you havent talked to a particular person recently, call him/her. Don't let relationships become stagnant or distant.

TEAM ORIENTATION

You seem to be comfortable either working as part of a team or by yourself. This balance is healthy because some tasks are best done as part of a team, while others are best done individually.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

15

INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY
As a leader, you will sometimes have to make tough decisions. Learn that although

COMPASSION
you may have to confront others, you can still remain friends. Because you are a considerate and tolerant person, some people will try to take advantage of your good nature.

COOPERATION

In trying to be helpful, don't promise more than you can deliver. Evaluate your current situation before taking on additional tasks or requests from others. Management by consensus is not always appropriate. Learn when to consult your staff and when to make independent decisions.

SEEKING INPUT

When asking others for feedback, don't focus solely on the positives or the negatives--try to walk away with 2-3 of each. Be selective about whom you ask for feedback, because giving feedback can be an emotionally draining task for others.

Giving your staff timely feedback will produce better results. Not giving it causes

CONFRONTING
inefficiencies and can create perceptions of favoritism.

SUBORDINATES
Make your performance expectations clear up front. That way, you will set standards and feel comfortable addressing future shortcomings.

STANDING ALONE

Your staff counts on you to express their concerns to the senior management in the organization. If you don't, then your work group will begin to doubt your leadership. Stick up for your staff. Your tendency to avoid confrontations and contentious situations may undermine your effectiveness as a leader. Be prepared to endure occasional unpleasantness.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

16

PRUDENCE
Even the most careful plan will change, and change is an inevitable part of

HANDLING
organizational life. As a leader, you must be able to deal with changes. Identify

AMBIGUITY
someone in your organization who adapts well to change and try to learn from this person. You will never have enough information to make the best possible decision; life is about making decisions with the information you have. Make a list of what you need to know and then act.

FLEXIBILITY

You may try to complete every task equally well; if so, learn how to prioritize your work. You are well-organized and planful, and this involves using rules and procedures; but what may seem like a good rule today can become an obstacle tomorrow. Therefore, be selective about introducing new rules and procedures. Be sure you delegate decision making to those persons who will have to live with the decision, and do not make it yourself.

PLANNING

You have strong planning and organizing skills. Help others who are not as planful to achieve their goals, and ensure that they remain responsible for completing their own work. Tell others about your schedules, plans, and deadlines. If they know what you expect, they will be better able to meet your targets.

Your strengths include thoroughness and attention to detail. Such strengths can

ATTENTION TO
become weaknesses if you micro-manage your staff. Give your staff freedom to succeed

DETAIL AND
and encourage them to approach you with questions.

TIMELINES
Challenge existing rules if they are no longer appropriate. Don't blindly follow rules just because they are on the books; review them in terms of business necessity. You should remember that "rule breakers" sometimes have ideas and/or insights that others may lack. Stay objective and listen to their side of the story.

RULE ORIENTATION

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

17

INQUISITIVE
You are likely to be good at developing novel approaches to solving problems.

CREATIVITY
However, not every problem requires a new solution. Try to determine whether an acceptable solution to the problem at hand already exists. Innovation and creativity have a price--namely, the time needed to develop unique solutions is time away from other duties. Keep track of the ROI for any rework, changes, or new strategies you adopt. Set a time and dollar limit for new projects and when you exceed them, learn to move on.

MANAGING INNOVATION

Technology may not be the answer to every problem. Identify the best practices on a topic before adopting new technology as a solution. Don't become so taken by technology that you miss straightforward logical solutions.

CURIOSITY

Effective leaders like to understand how things work, and they ask lots of questions. You probably do this, too. At some point, however, further questioning has little ROI. Therefore, continue seeking information about "hows" and "whys", but put some limits on your investigations, so that you have sufficient time to complete projects.

You probably enjoy thinking about long range issues and problems. Be sure that you

VISION
also spend time on important current problems. Make sure that you have a sound rationale for your ideas, and present it carefully--you need to "sell" your ideas to others to ensure their commitment and support. Ask colleagues for feedback on your ideas and how well you are communicating them.

PROBLEM SOLVING

Be sure that your organization is aware of your strengthsvisioning and strategic planningand be a resource to other groups in these areas. Understand when a problem can benefit from a down-to-earth solution.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

18

LEARNING APPROACH
Your interest in remaining up-to-date will enhance your effectiveness. You also tend

STAYING CURRENT
to have an answer or opinion on most topics, and you are usually right. However, when appropriate, let others solve problems on their own. Doing so is an essential development experience for them. Share with others your techniques for staying up-to-date. Build a learning environment within your own team, perhaps by holding information sessions or group Q&A sessions, discussing topical books and publications, sharing your vision of the companys future, and so forth.

LEARNING QUICKLY

Remember that others may not learn as fast as you do. As a leader, your learning speed may intimidate othersbe aware of this, and try to make others feel comfortable as they learn at their own rate.

LEARNING STYLE

You are likely to be comfortable in a classroom environment and may even prefer this style of learning. Learn to profit from hands-on and demonstration-style experiences, too. As a leader, do not assume that all of your team members learn as you do. Get to know your people, and try to match their developmental experiences with their individual learning styles.

Your staff probably finds your memos and instructions easy to read and understand.

COMMUNICATING
Use your strengths in this area to mentor and coach others who do not write as well as

ACCURATELY
you. Remember to use tact when correcting others.

INTELLECTUAL MOTIVATION

Continue to set high standards for yourself and your staff regarding both job-specific and managerial/leadership training. Create a learning environment within your work group. Pursuing training for yourself and others is laudable, but training costs money. Therefore, do not go to training programs simply because they are available. Instead, review the contents of the course, and only attend programs or seminars that are likely to be worthwhile for you and/or your team.

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

19

Leadership Potential Coaches Report

Scales

Percentiles
10 ADJUSTMENT 72 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

AMBITION

100

SOCIABILITY

59

INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY

83

PRUDENCE

75

INQUISITIVE

69

LEARNING APPROACH

79

LOW

AVERAGE

HIGH

Subscale Scores
Adjustment 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Empathy Not Anxious No Guilt Calmness Even Tempered No Complaints Trusting Good Attachment

(No. items endorsed / No. items in subscale) Ambition 3 /5 4 /4 5 /6 3 /4 4 /5 5 /5 3 /3 4 /5 Prudence 5 /5 3 /4 4 /4 6 /6 3 /3 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. Moralistic Mastery Virtuous Not Autonomous Not Spontaneous Impulse Control Avoids Trouble 1 /5 4 /4 3 /5 3 /3 3 /4 4 /5 5 /5 Inquisitive 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. Science Ability Curiosity Thrill Seeking Intellectual Games Generates Ideas Culture 1/ 5 3/ 3 3/ 5 2/ 3 4/ 5 4/ 4 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Competitive Self-Confident Accomplishment Leadership Identity No Social Anxiety 5 3 6 6 3 6 /5 /3 /6 /6 /3 /6 Sociability 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Likes Parties Likes Crowds Experience Seeking Exhibitionistic Entertaining 3 /5 3 /4 5 /6 1 /5 2 /4

Interpersonal Sensitivity 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. Easy To Live With Sensitive Caring Likes People No Hostility

Learning Approach 39. 40. 41. 42. Education Math Ability Good Memory Reading 2 /3 1 /3 4 /4 4 /4

John Sample

DC178490
Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

20

The Leadership Forecast Series

c h a l l e n g e

| report

Leadership Forecast Challenge Report

Report for:

John Sample

ID #:

DC178490

Date:

January 11, 2006

CONFIDENTIAL

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

NTRODUCTION

I
The Leadership Forecast Challenge Report is designed to help you develop as a leader. It will provide insights about your behavior that could potentially undermine or inhibit your performance. It then offers suggestions for leading people more effectively. Leadership involves building and maintaining a high-performing team. Anything that detracts from your ability to build a team also detracts from your performance as a leader.

This report is based on the Hogan Development Survey (HDS). The results are based on an international sample of over 4,000 executives who participated in leadership research conducted over the last 10 years.

When under pressure, most people will display certain counterproductive tendencies. We refer to these as "risk factors." Under normal conditions these characteristics may actually be strengths. However, when you are tired,

BACKGROUND

pressured, bored, or otherwise distracted, these risk factors may impede your effectiveness and erode the quality of your relationships with customers, colleagues, and direct reports. Others may be aware of these tendencies but may not give you any feedback about them. Your boss may even ignore them.

This report is divided into three sections. First, there is a graphic representation of your profile. Second, you will find a scale-by-scale interpretation of your scores. Scores between the 90th and 100th percentile are in the High Risk Zone, scores between the 70th and 89th percentiles are in the Moderate Risk Zone, scores between the 40th and 69th percentile are in the Low Risk Zone and scores between the 0 to 39th percentile are in the No Risk Zone. The third section provides developmental recommendations for areas where you scored in the Moderate and/or High Risk Zones. No developmental recommendations are provided for scores in the No Risk and Low Risk Zones.

This report is designed to help you understand your potential leadership challenges, provide ideas for moderating them, and give you some insight regarding how you affect others. As you read this information, please keep in mind three things. First, it is possible that not every statement will accurately describe you. Second, almost all working adults have at least one challenge. Third, focus on the overall themes in your profile rather than the details. Some details may seem to contradict others, but in actuality, they probably will not because different issues are important in different situations.

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Research indicates that leaders develop risk factors while learning to deal with

HOW DO RISK FACTORS DEVELOP? WAYS TO USE THIS INFORMATION

parents, peers, relatives and others early in life. Behavior developed while you were young may become habitual and you may be unaware that you behave in certain ways.

First, read the report carefully and decide which developmental suggestions apply to you. Mark those items with a plus (+), and put a minus (-) by those items to which you cannot relate. Second, invite feedback from peers, direct reports, and even family. Discuss your insights with them, and ask for reactions. A key ingredient for developing new leadership skills is enlisting the support of your direct reports, peers, and boss. Finally, study the developmental suggestions provided at the end of the report. These suggestions are offered for scores in the Moderate or High Risk Zones (i.e., scores at or above the 70th percentile).

DEFINITIONS
Excitable

The eleven scales for the Leadership Forecast Challenge Report are defined below. Concerns being overly enthusiastic about people or projects, and then becoming disappointed with them. Result: seems to lack persistence.

Skeptical

Concerns being socially insightful, but cynical and overly sensitive to criticism. Result: seems to lack trust.

Cautious

Concerns being overly worried about being criticized. Result: seems resistant to change and reluctant to take chances.

Reserved

Concerns lacking interest in or awareness of the feelings of others. Result: seems to be a poor communicator.

Leisurely

Concerns being independent, ignoring others' requests, and becoming irritable if they persist. Result: seems stubborn, procrastinating, and uncooperative.

Bold

Concerns having inflated views of one's competency and worth. Result: seems unable to admit mistakes or learn from experience.

Mischievous

Concerns being charming, risk-taking, and excitement-seeking. Result: seems to have trouble maintaining commitments and learning from experience.

Colorful

Concerns being dramatic, engaging, and attention-seeking. Result: seems preoccupied with being noticed and may lack sustained focus. Concerns thinking and acting in interesting, unusual, and even eccentric ways. Result: seems creative but possibly lacking in judgment.

Imaginative

Diligent

Concerns being conscientious, perfectionistic, and hard to please. Result: tends to disempower staff.

Dutiful

Concerns being eager to please and reluctant to act independently. Result: tends to be pleasant and agreeable, but reluctant to support subordinates.

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

EADERSHIP CHALLENGE PROFILE

L
Scales
10 20 30

Percentiles
40 50 60 70 80 90

EXCITABLE

68

SKEPTICAL

73

CAUTIOUS

74

RESERVED

21

LEISURELY

19

BOLD

63

MISCHIEVOUS

48

COLORFUL

85

IMAGINATIVE

29

DILIGENT

63

DUTIFUL

76

10

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90

NO RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

HIGH RISK

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

XCITABLE

E
Concerns being overly enthusiastic about people or projects, and then becoming disappointed with them.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the LOW RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Usually seem in a good mood. Handle frustration without getting upset. Usually seem enthusiastic. Usually seem calm in emergencies. Rarely get angry with others.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

Your composed and steady demeanor will enhance your ability to maintain relationships and manage others. Your steadiness should also be an asset in fast paced environments. Your optimism and emotional maturity should facilitate your ability to manage your career, gain the support of others, and motivate them to produce results. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

COMPOSURE: Your team will appreciate your even temper, your predictable and calming influence in situations, and your tendency to hold things together in stressful times.

FAIRNESS TO OTHERS: As a leader, you won't tend to get down on people, and your staff will respond to your even-handed treatment.

PERSEVERANCE: As a leader, your coworkers will appreciate your persistence and ability to complete projects regardless of frustrations, roadblocks, and challenges. You are not likely to give up when the going gets tough, but to keep working until the job is done.

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

KEPTICAL

S
Concerns being socially insightful, but cynical and overly sensitive to criticism.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the MODERATE RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem insightful about others' motives and about office politics. Take criticism personally. Tend to hold grudges. Can be argumentative. Can be hard to coach.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You are good at evaluating the talents and motives of others and this is a potentially valuable leadership skill. However, your skepticism regarding others' intentions may inhibit your ability to build and maintain relationships. People may perceive you as argumentative, and the feedback you provide subordinates may focus on their flaws, which could affect your impact. Your business strategy may tend to reflect a 'worst case scenario' and you may plan your career from a similar perspective.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

INFLUENCING AND PERSUADING OTHERS: At times, you may seem suspicious and spend more time thinking about politics than core business issues. As a result, others may find you hard to deal with and it may be difficult for you to persuade them to cooperate with you.

OPENNESS TO IDEAS: When presented with new ideas or suggestions, you tend to raise doubts and to bring the underlying political issues to the surface. At times this could cause you to seem resistant to new ideas. Others may see you as being better at identifying problems than finding alternative solutions.

OBJECTIVITY: On certain issues, you may seem somewhat inflexible and set in your views. Others may not realize that you have reasons for your views and that you can be objective and see things from multiple perspectives.

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

AUTIOUS

C
Concerns being overly worried about being criticized.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the MODERATE RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem to make good, low-risk decisions. Tend to need reassurance. May be reluctant to try new technologies. Fret over their mistakes. Worry about their staff's mistakes.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

Because you dislike making mistakes and being criticized, you may tend to watch your staff closely to ensure that they get things right. Doing so may undermine their confidence. You may also be slow to make decisions, which could frustrate an action-oriented staff. You tend to avoid taking chances, which may prevent you from accepting difficult assignments. You may also manage your career so as to minimize mistakes. As a leader, you may develop a cautious and conservative vision of the future.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

DECISIVENESS: Your concern about making good decisions may cause you to gather more information than you need. Ultimately, this could prevent you from making timely decisions.

ACTION ORIENTATION: You may tend to avoid taking action when you don't have all of the information. This could slow down processes, especially in times of crisis.

LEADING WITH CONFIDENCE: Your concern about making the right decisions is a strength. However, others may see your deliberations as a lack of confidence in your own ability.

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

ESERVED

R
Concerns lacking interest in or awareness of the feelings of others.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the NO RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem outgoing, friendly, kind, and understanding. Meet strangers well. Communicate effectively. Seem concerned about problems. Seem to understand others' feelings.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

Your tact and responsiveness suggest that you will be a good listener, which will enhance your ability to manage subordinates. In addition, your pleasant and approachable manner will help enroll others in the strategic direction of the business. Because you are responsive to the needs of others, you should be willing to give them feedback and opportunities to develop. You should perform well on team assignments, and interact well with a variety of bosses. Your interpersonal style suggests that your career should not be hindered by quarrels or disputes. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

MOTIVATING OTHERS: You seem responsive to others, which should allow you to recruit them to your ideas and strategies.

RELATIONSHIP BUILDING: You should find it easy to build relationships. You will understand the social impact of your actions, and are able to build rapport with peers, subordinates, and others.

APPROACHABILITY: You tend to be accessible even when under stress and heavy workloads.

John Sample

DC178490

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

EISURELY

L
Concerns being charming, but independent, stubborn, and hard to coach.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the NO RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem helpful, positive, and responsive to criticism. Solicit performance feedback. Support their organization in private. Willingly take suggestions. Don't mind being interrupted.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You tend to be a positive person who should be interested in, and receptive to coaching and feedback. You will work well with a variety of people and in general be seen as a good corporate citizen. You honor your commitments and support your boss. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

FOSTERING TEAMWORK: You tend to be cooperative and understand the importance of working together towards common goals and supporting your colleagues.

COOPERATION AND TIMELY RESULTS: Your colleagues will appreciate your efforts to meet commitments and deliver timely results.

BUILDING TRUST: Your willingness to openly express your honest disagreements and objections will make you appear trustworthy.

John Sample

DC178490

10

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

OLD

B
Concerns having inflated views of one's competency and worth.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the LOW RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem confident in their abilities. Have a realistic view of their competencies. Have reasonable career goals. Seem willing to listen to negative feedback.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You seem to be an appropriately confident person who makes reasonable demands on staff and subordinates. You will participate in team tasks without demanding leadership positions. In the process of managing your career, your easy going style may cause you to hold back unnecessarily. You may not actively promote a vision or strategy for the organization, preferring to wait until others ask for your opinion. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

SEEING PERSPECTIVE: Although you have ideas about how to expand and improve the business, you may not push them aggressively.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT: You will listen to feedback and ask others (peers, stakeholders, etc.) to evaluate your performance. Your openness will facilitate your development.

DRIVE FOR RESULTS: Your natural modesty may cause you to underestimate your capacity and to set your aspiration level too low.

John Sample

DC178490

11

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

ISCHIEVOUS

M
Concerns being charming, risk-taking, and excitement-seeking.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the LOW RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem dependable and self-disciplined. Think before they act. Communicate through the appropriate channels. Maintain commitments. Rarely take unnecessary chances.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You tend to avoid taking unnecessary risks and others see you as trustworthy. This will enhance your ability to build a team and manage others. You will be a planful mentor, and will manage your own career in a way that minimizes risk. Your boss should respect your judgment and appreciate your reliability. You don't press the limits and you will tend to make high quality, low risk decisions. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

DECISION QUALITY: You don't take unnecessary risks, and can be counted on to make decisions that optimize outcomes and minimize mistakes.

RISK TAKING: You will not take on speculative projects without appropriate consideration and analysis. At the same time, you may tend to avoid taking appropriate risks, and this could cause you to miss opportunities to enhance your career.

LEARNING FROM EXPERIENCE: You pay attention to the consequences of your actions and reflect on past experience as a guide to future decisions and behavior. You may be reluctant to take action in situations where you have no experience from which to draw.

John Sample

DC178490

12

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

OLORFUL

C
Concerns being dramatic, engaging, and attention-seeking.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the MODERATE RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem clever, interesting, and expressive. Make a strong first impression. Seem unconcerned with details. Seem flirtatious and fun. Enjoy leadership positions.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You are a talkative and interesting person who performs well in public. You will be a high profile participant in teams, but you may not actively listen to others. As a coach, you may tend to "shoot from the hip" when offering advice. People will find you engaging and entertaining; however, you may change focus quickly and not always follow through on the details of projects. If so, then this may put extra burdens on your team.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

CELEBRATING SUCCESS: You like the recognition you receive from being in charge, but you also need to share credit. Celebrate team successes both big and small.

BUILDING MORALE: As a leader, the morale of the group will increase as you provide your staff with opportunities to demonstrate their competencies.

SELF-DEVELOPMENT: You should understand the development needs of both yourself and your staff. Although others will see you as interesting and fun, you need to expand your management skills over the long term--which involves listening, sharing credit, and letting others take charge.

John Sample

DC178490

13

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

MAGINATIVE

I
Concerns thinking and acting in interesting, unusual, and even eccentric ways.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the NO RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem practical, steady, and sensible. Stay on task. Don't show off. Make realistic decisions. Seem sensible, level-headed, and task-oriented.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

As a leader, your staff will appreciate your businesslike, 'no surprises" style. As a coach and mentor, you will offer advice that is practical and grounded. You should work well with a variety of bosses who will appreciate your steady work and sensible problem-solving style. You will plan your career in a practical, deliberate manner. However, you may not be especially helpful on issues of vision or long-range planning when they require radical departures from previous strategies. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

PROVIDING CLEAR DIRECTION: You should communicate intelligibly no matter how much pressure you are under.

CREATIVITY: You should be able to provide practical solutions to problems even when you are pressured. In addition, you will be a good resource for evaluating the plausibility of new ideas and initiatives.

STAYING FOCUSED: You should be able to stay focused on the relevant problems and issues, even in the midst of distractions.

John Sample

DC178490

14

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

ILIGENT

D
Concerns being conscientious, perfectionistic, and hard to please.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the LOW RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Seem flexible about rules and procedures. Prioritize work and activities appropriately. Delegate tasks to others. Seem comfortable working without explicit directions.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You seem flexible about rules and standards, know how to delegate and prioritize, and give your staff opportunities to learn. Your boss should appreciate your ability to empower and not micromanage your staff. You will approach the issue of strategic planning with a mid-to-long term view. You have no leadership development issues in this area.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

DEALING WITH AMBIGUITY: You seem able to remain flexible and keep your options open, even when you are being pressured for results.

ADAPTABILITY: You seem able to change directions and methods even when faced with challenging problems.

DELEGATING DOWNWARD: You seem willing to delegate problem-solving authority to the appropriate level, even though the pressure to solve a problem may be intense.

John Sample

DC178490

15

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

Scales

Percentiles
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90

UTIFUL

D
Concerns being eager to please and reluctant to act independently.

EXCITABLE SKEPTICAL CAUTIOUS RESERVED LEISURELY BOLD MISCHIEVOUS COLORFUL IMAGINATIVE DILIGENT DUTIFUL

68 73 74 21 19 63 48 85 29 63 76 10
NO RISK

20

30

40

50

60

70

80

90
HIGH RISK

LOW RISK

MODERATE RISK

BEHAVIORAL IMPLICATIONS

You scored in the MODERATE RISK ZONE on this scale. Leaders with similar scores: Are agreeable, pleasant, and cooperative. Seem eager to please. Keep their boss informed. Seem to always support corporate policy. Are good team players.

LEADERSHIP IMPLICATIONS

You are a pleasant and accommodating person who does not like controversy. As a leader, you will be polite and attentive, but you may be reluctant to push or advocate on behalf of your staff. You are a good team player who works well with a variety of bosses; they will appreciate your loyal and cooperative attitude. You will seek advice and assistance for managing your career, and will be reluctant to make decisions without first consulting others.

COMPETENCY ANALYSIS

CONFRONTING CONFLICT: You probably prefer to avoid conflict and confrontations and may be uncomfortable giving others negative feedback.

ACTING INDEPENDENTLY: You may not make your views known on important and/or controversial issues and instead go along with the group.

SUPPORTING YOUR STAFF: You may focus more on getting along with your boss than getting along with your staff, which can erode your credibility with your subordinates.

John Sample

DC178490

16

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

EVELOPMENTAL RECOMMENDATIONS

D
The following developmental recommendations concern the dimensions where your score was in the MODERATE or HIGH RISK ZONE.

SKEPTICAL

When you are at your best, you are a perceptive and insightful judge of people and you have a superior understanding of organizational politics. You are a good resource for identifying potential hidden agendas and for analyzing and solving social and political problems.

You will tend to distrust your coach; you should suspend judgment and give your coach a chance to try to help you. The same is true for others who care about you--you need to make an extra effort to appreciate what they are telling you and why.

Be careful how you communicate with others. When you believe you are expressing honest opinions, others may see you as being argumentative. Be open to other points of view. You should try to be less critical and judgmental. Tell a trusted friend that you are trying to become more tolerant. Ask him/her to tell you when you are being excessively critical, defensive, or sensitive--and listen to his/her feedback.

CAUTIOUS

You are deeply concerned about doing things right; others will appreciate your commitment and know they can depend on you to give projects your very best effort.

You do not like to take the initiative in activities for which you feel you lack sufficient talent or information. These tendencies can cut you off from valuable developmental experiences and, in the long run, although you will make fewer mistakes, your career will not advance as rapidly as it might.

Your habit of making careful decisions may sometimes cause you to miss opportunities and could cause others to see you as not being action oriented. You need to develop the willingness to experiment. Trusted friends can help you evaluate the merit of new ventures.

When people ask for your opinion during a meeting, they usually think you have something useful to contribute. You need to speak your mind in such circumstances. Some sort of assertiveness training might be helpful.

John Sample

DC178490

17

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.


COLORFUL

You probably use displays of emotion as a way of making a point. There are better ways to make a point and repeated emotional outbursts may annoy others. Practice active listening--don't interrupt. When others have finished, try to paraphrase what they have said as a way of showing that you were listening. This will enhance your credibility and show respect for the opinion of others.

Beware of confusing activity with productivity, and don't waste people's time with unnecessary meetings. At your best, you are an interesting and entertaining person who can do several things at once, and who can galvanize others to action with your ideas and your ability to sell them.

DUTIFUL

You are a cooperative, congenial person who works well as part of a team. You are good at resolving disputes and soothing ruffled feelings, and you are a loyal supporter of good people and admirable causes.

Remember that if you want your staff to be loyal to you, then you must be loyal to them, even if that means sometimes annoying superiors. When asked for your opinion, take your time, decide what you believe, and be prepared to defend it when challenged. Although you dislike conflict, there will be times when you must confront others and disagree with them. In the long run, your credibility depends on doing this.

John Sample

DC178490

18

Copyright 2002 by Hogan Assessment Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.