Revised 2012 June 01

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ So You Want to Study Hula?
There are many ways to go about studying the hula. Not all of them are equally regarded as respectable. What follows are various factors for prospective students to consider. 1. Hula is a way of life to which many students and teachers dedicate their lives In Hawaiian culture, the hula is more than just dancing. The movements and gestures performed by dancers are just the surface. Underneath this surface is a cultural system that celebrates creation and procreation, a pantheon of gods and their descendants on earth, mythological and legendary exploits, historical events and places, ancestral beings and cherished relations, and natural manifestations of life forces that nurture and sustain Hawaiian people. Sacredness permeates much hula, and much of the work associated with creating, teaching, and performing hula. Not all students aspire to deep levels of knowledge and understanding. Likewise, not all teachers who offer lessons have achieved insight into the spiritual depths of hula. Prospective students who wish to undertake study of the hula should understand that hula is held by many to be a serious endeavor, and that respect for Hawaiian cultural lifeways is appropriate, and will be appreciated. 2. Prospective students should consider what level of commitment they wish to make The prospective hula student is faced with an array of choices. Classes are available for students who want a casual, relaxed experience that requires no commitment to perform. These classes are typically offered through community recreation centers. Students who aspire to performing on stage should seek out teachers experienced in presenting classes and soloists in public performances; these may range from amateur community exhibitions to professional entertainment venues. Those with a desire to probe more deeply into cultural knowledge must enter the world of hula schools, known as halau. 3. Hālau hula function as a family Becoming a haumana (student) in a halau usually requires a serious commitment. This is because halau run on cooperation. Haumana depend on each other to ensure success in all endeavors. Haumana consider each other as "hula sisters" and "hula brothers." Haumana learn quickly that those who do not pull their own weight are not to be entrusted with responsibility. 4. Not all knowledge is contained in only one school This is a famous proverb. It is also a fundamental truth. Different schools of hula stem from different lineages of teachers and teachings, and teachers bring their own individual creativity to their teaching and to their original choreography. This is why there are so many divergent styles of hula. And the beauty of it is that there is no one way to be right; rather, there are many ways to be right. Unfortunately, it also means that there are many ways to be wrong, too. ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ So You Want to Study Hula?
5. Not all teachers of hula have achieved comparable mastery of hula Hula teachers in the present are referred to using the title "kumu hula". This wasn't always the case, however. In .the old days, a kumu hula was an individual who had undergone extensive training that culminated in an ʻūniki graduation ceremony. Nowadays, anyone who teaches classes may call himself or herself a kumu hula. And anyone who directs a halau tends to be automatically called a kumu hula, regardless of whether or not the teacher considers himself or herself to be a kumu hula. 6. A kumu hula is a foundation for hula The term "kumu" means "source" or "foundation". Thus, a kumu hula is, by definition, a source or foundation for hula. This is why the title was closely guarded in the old days, and reserved for those who had mastered an understanding of how hula needed to be carefully maintained, presented, and passed on from one generation to the next. Delving deep into hula is a humbling experience. The more knowledge and experience one acquires, the more one comes to realize how much there is to know, and how little of that one can ever learn. Deep study instills humility (haʻahaʻa). The most respected kumu hula are also the most humble. They are the ones, too, who respect their peers, and they teach their students to respect the efforts of other kumu hula, other halau, and other haumana. 7. Deep knowledge is reserved for those who have earned it Teachers cherish what they have learned from their teachers. They hold their knowledge close, because it is special. It is shared when students are ready and receptive. This is why an ʻūniki ceremony is an ultimate achievement. The student has earned the teacher's trust. The teacher trusts that the student will care for what has been taught. The teacher trusts that the student can discern what is appropriate and what is inappropriate. The teacher trusts that the student understands why things are done they way they are. The teacher knows that his or her teacher's teachings will continue. So the teacher sends the student off on their own. They are free to create. What they must never do is disrespect the teaching, or betray the teacher's trust. 8. E nānā ka maka; e hoʻolohe ka pepeiao; e paʻa ka waha; e hana ka lima Watch; listen; keep the mouth closed and the hands busy. One learns by listening and observing. Ask questions only after you've tried to figure out something yourself. 9. Hula is to be enjoyed There is deep satisfaction to be derived from bringing joy to oneself or someone else through hula. May your journey to hula be a fulfilling one.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~

REGISTRATION FEE, ONGOING INSTRUCTION:
FOR NEW & RETURNING STUDENTS……………………………………..…$25.00
(Including students who have been inactive for more than one month and current Lanakila Residents)

HULA PAYMENTS, ONGOING INSTRUCTION :
SINGLE PLAN/per month: One (1) Person (or student) ……………………………………………….………… $10.00
Current Lanakila Community Member or Resident………………………………………………………………………….. FREE ***************************************************************************************************************

All hula fees should be paid by the first week of each month. Please make checks payable to:

Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama
All payments should be put in an envelope with the student’s name written on it.

CLASS SCHEDULE:
Boys and Girls ● Ages 5 to 12 ● Saturdays 10 am - 12 noon Young Men & Women ● Ages 13 and up ● Thursdays 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm Ladies & Gentlemen ● Ages 45 and up ● Wednesdays 7:00 - 9:00 pm

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ CLASS SCHEDULES
Pōʻakahi, 6:30 - 8:30pm PAPA KANI KAPILA Jam Session with Hālau ʻOhana. Open to all who love music and open to learn. Bring own instruments (uke, guitar, bass, piano)

Pōʻalua, All Day Pōʻakolu, 6:30 - 9:00pm

NO HULA CLASSES (Boy Scout Meeting)

PAPA PUA KENIKENI Beginner - Intermediate Instruction for Gracious Ladies in Hula ʻAuana, and some Kahiko

Pōʻaha, 6:30 – 8:30pm

PAPA PUA KALAUNU Intermediate-Advanced Instruction in Hula Kahiko & Hula ʻAuana

Pōʻalima, 7:00-8:00pm

KMC (Kilauea Military Camp in Volcano) Hula Show Selected “Show Dancers” perform @ Crater Rim Cafe

Pōʻaono, 10:00-12noon

PAPA PUA LIKO LEHUA Beginner to Advanced Keiki Hula Instruction in Hula Kahiko & Hula ʻAuana

Group Ages: Papa Pua Kenikeni: ? and up Papa Pua Kalaunu: 13 & up Papa Pua Liko Lehua: up to 12 y/o

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ RULES AND REGULATIONS
This hālau is a school dedicated to mālama and hoʻonaʻauao students with Hawaiian language and history through chant and dance. When a student becomes an ʻolapa, he or she learns not to pantomime but to translate the dance through hand motions and feet movements shared with us through generations of hula greats. While learning the hula you will learn to appreciate and use Hawaiian traditions and Hawaiian values including lokahi, wiwo and haʻahaʻa. Through this we become a hālau ʻohana and part of the preservation of the Hawaiian Culture. HULA PĀʻŪ must be worn during all practices ALL STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO LOOK WELL GROOMED - Hair neatly combed & tied in a ponytail or bun. (up & away from face) - Wear t-shirt or tank top with shorts or sweat pants. (no jeans) - Excessive jewelry will not be allowed. (hālau is not responsible for any lost items) - Personal hygiene is very important. - Water bottles are encouraged. - Bring a towel to practice ARRIVE FOR CLASS 15 MINUTES BEFORE CLASS BEGINS - Have your implements with you. - Silence all cell phones. - Run through hula motions while you are waiting. - Bring the Hālau Handbook along with your Hula Binder; keep the Binder neat and organized.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ RULES AND REGULATIONS
NO ONE MAY ENTER THE HĀLAU WHILE CLASS IS IN SESSION - You are to wait outside quietly. - I will invite you in when we are ready. - Family and friends are to remain outside until class is finished. UPON ENTRANCE INTO THE HĀLAU - Footwear to be placed neatly against the wall to avoid blocking the pathway. - A Mele Kahea is required. We will respond with a Mele Komo. - No gum chewing allowed. RESPECT IS OF THE UTMOST IMPORTANCE - No talking is allowed unless you are asked a question. - Treat others the way you expect to be treated. - Stay focused… no playing around! KEEP THE HĀLAU CLEAN AT ALL TIMES - Close windows when class is done. - Sweep floors before leaving - Empty Trash Can. - Return Benches & Tables to their proper storage area PLEASE HAVE THE COURTESY TO CALL AND INFORM ME IF YOU WILL NOT BE IN CLASS. The hālau is a place of learning not only the hula, but the Hawaiian culture, the Hawaiian language, discipline and - of course - ALOHA for one another. Follow through on what you learn here and it will take you far in life.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ HĀLAU BIOGRAPHY
Uluhaimālama means to be enlightened or to offer inspiration; one literal translation is: “As the plants grow up out of the dark earth, so shall light come into the nation.” It is the name of Queen Liliʻuokalani's secret flower garden in Pauoa, on the island of Oʻahu. In this garden were grown the flowers which were brought to the Queen daily throughout her imprisonment in one corner of ʻIolani Palace after our Monarchy was overthrown in 1893. While the flowers brought cheer to her rooms, the newspapers in which they were wrapped brought her the latest available news about her land and its people - information which those who imprisoned her had forbidden her to receive from any conventional source. Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama was named in honor of the Queen's garden by my Kumu, Rae K. Fonseca of Hālau Hula ‘O Kahikilaulani, and established in September, 1996. Through the Queen Liliʻuokalani Children’s Center (QLCC) and the help of Kumu Rae we provided a FREE hula program for 30 children at the Lanakila Housing Complex here in Hilo. Our main goal was to perpetuate our Queen’s legacy through our Hawaiian Culture and the Arts of the Hula. Nearly one full year into this program, we opened the doors of the hālau to the general public as well. Eventually, we branched out to establish regular classes in Waimea, and then in Kailua (Kona). Once a month, we would combine all three hālau for a mass rehearsal. Once a year, everyone looked forward for an annual camp out at QLCC-Kona Papawai beach, near the old airport. At this huakahi, the students and their parents learned to oli; to make hau skirts; to make different kinds of lei; and to weave lauhala. In the year 2000, we closed our doors temporarily in order to concentrate on completing our own hula studies with Kumu Rae. Most of our ‘olapa followed us to Hālau Hula ‘O Kahikilaulani and became involved in this experience of learning, and of learning to teach. In January 2003, Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama was reopened to the people of Hilo with nearly one hundred students ranging from ages 3 years to very senior kupuna. Since then, we have been honored to be invited to participate in a wide variety of cultural celebrations including the annual Lei Day at the Palace, Kamehameha Day statue lei draping and Lei Haliʻa Aloha no Liliʻuokalani here in Hilo; the Moku O Keawe International Hula Competition in Kailua (Kona); and the Merrie Monarch Festival, renowned and broadcast worldwide. We also entertain on a regular basis - some three Friday evenings out of four throughout the year - at Kīlauea Military Camp in the active volcano's caldera. To date, we have entered four respected formal hula competitions: the Aunty ʻIolani Luahine Scholarship Competition in Kailua (Kona); the Queen Liliʻuokalani Keiki Hula Competition in Honolulu; Hula O Nā Keiki in Kaʻanapali, Maui; and the Moku O Keawe International Hula Competition in Kailua (Kona). Our participation in these competitions is governed by my philosophy that each offers my ‘olapa the opportunity to perpetuate our Hawaiian Culture in the Hula - a chance to share what we have learned together through research of a particular period in

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ HĀLAU BIOGRAPHY
history, of a person, or an event and creating motions to tell that story - and that coming in first isn't everything. To me, "winning" is simply being on stage to show the final outcome. On March 24, 2007, in the presence and with the blessing of Uncle George Naʻope, Kumu Hula Rae K. Fonseca and Hālau Hula O Kahikilaulani honored me and five other graduates at our ʻuniki graduation ceremony. Each of us is now formally recognized as Kumu Hula, having received both a Kumu Hula Nā Kumu Palapala certificate and a kīhei paʻa of white kapa to symbolize the purity of our achievements.

Accomplishments & Awards Accomplishments: Hawaiian Festival in Hawaiʻi, Yurihama, Tottori, Japan, July 2005 Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama was selected to represent Hawaiʻi at an Hawaiian Festival in Yurihama, sister city of Hilo. We held workshops in Hula, Lei Making, and Ukulele. Merrie Monarch Hula Festival, Hilo, Hawaiʻi, April 2011 Hālau Na Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama made itʻs debut in Hiloʻs own prestigious hula competition. Our mele in both hula kahiko and hula ʻauana honored Queen Liliʻuokalani. Awards: ʻOlelo Award, Aunty ʻIolani Luahine Hula Competition, November 2003 Aloha Award, Aunty ʻIolani Luahine Hula Competition, November 2003 Miss Nā Kamalei ʻO Kona: Alyxandra “Alika” Hopkins, Aunty ʻIolani Luahine Hula Competition, November 2003 1st Place Hula Palua, ʻOpio Division: Bianca Soriano & Kawika Huston, Hula O Nā Keiki, November 2005 Kawenaʻula Scholarship Award: Jaiden Butler, 32nd Annual Queen Liliʻuokalani Keiki Hula Festival, July 2007 Kawenaʻula Scholarship Award: Kelly Soares, 33rd Annual Queen Liliʻuokalani Keiki Hula Festival, July 2008 Kawenaʻula Scholarship Award: Marissa Hayashi, 34th Annual Queen Liliʻuokalani Keiki Hula Festival, July 2009 3rd Place Hula Palua, ʻOpio Division: Kylie Ann Andaya & Dason Fujimoto, Hula O Nā Keiki, November 2009 2nd Place Hula Palua, ʻOpio Division: Kianalei Kataoka & Dason Fujimoto, Hula O Nā Keiki, November 2010 ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ ORGANIZATION AND SUPPORT OF THE HĀLAU
The organization of a hula company was largely democratic. The kumu---in modern sense, the teacher---was the leader and conductor responsible for training and discipline of the company. He was the business manager of the enterprise; the priest, kahuna in the religious exercise, one who interpreted the will of the heaven, especially of the gods, whose favor determined success. He might be called to his position by the choice of the company, appointed by the command of the ali’i who promoted the enterprise, or self elected in case the enterprise was his own. He has under him a kokua kumu, a deputy, who took charge during his absence. The poʻopuaʻa was an officer chosen by the pupils to be their special agent and mouthpiece. He/she saw to the execution of the kumu’s judgments and commands, collected the fines, and exacted penalties imposed by the kumu. It fell to him/her to convey to the altar the presents of garlands, awa, and the like that were contributed to the halau. The paepae, also chosen by the pupils subject to confirmation by the kumu, acted as assistance to the po’opua’a. During the construction of the kuahu, the po’opua’a stood to the right, the paepae at his/her left. They were in general sense guardians of the kuahu. The ho’oulu was the guard stationed at the door. He/she sprinkled with sea-water mixed with tumeric everyone who entered the halau. He/she acted as sergeant-at-arms to keep order and remove anyone who made a disturbance. It was his duty each day to place a fresh bowl of awa on the altar of the goddess (hanai kuahu), literally to feed the altar. In addition to these officials, a hula company naturally required the services of a miscellaneous retinue of stewards, cooks, fisherman, hewers of wood, and drawers of water. LEVELS OF THE HULA according to the Lanakilakeikiali’i Hula Legacy Step One: Step Two: Haumana: one learns to become a student. Olapa: one learns to be a dancer. At this point, officers such as poʻopuaʻa, paepae, and line leaders are selected. They are also known as alakaʻi hula. Step Three: Step Four: Step Five: Hoʻopaʻa: one learns to be a chanter. Kōkua Kumu: one is designated by the Kumu as a special assistant. Kumu Hula: one has become a master; a source of knowledge. When determined by the Kumu to be ready to perpetuate tradition and teach knowledge received in the hālau, one undergoes ʻuniki (graduation) and receives the honored title kumu (master/source). ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ HAWAIIAN VALUES
1) ALOHA means LOVE A - Akahai: kindness, to be expressed with wisdom L - Lokahi: unity, to be expressed with harmony O - ʻOluʻolu: agreeable, to be expressed with pleasantness H - Haʻahaʻa: humility, to be expresses with modesty A - Ahonui: patience, to be expressed with perseverance 2) HAʻA HAʻA means HUMILITY 3) LOKOMAIKAʻI means GENEROSITY 4) HOʻOKIPA means HOSPITALITY 5) HAIPULE means SPIRITUALITY 6) WIWO means OBEDIENCE 7) LAULIMA means COOPERATIVENESS 8) MAʻEMAʻE means CLEANINESS 9) ‘OLUʻOLU means PLEASANTLESS 10) PAʻAHANA means INDUSTRIOUS 11) HOʻOMANAWANUI means PATIENCE 12) HOʻOKŪKŪ means COMPETITIVENESS 13) LEʻALEʻA means PLAYFULNESS 14) HOʻOHIKI means KEEPING PROMISES 15) HUIKALA means FORGIVENESS 16) NAʻAUAO means EDUCATE 17) KŪHAʻO means SELF-RELIANCE 18) KELA means EXCELLENCE 19) KOA means COURAGE 20) KŌKUA means HELPFULNESS 21) LŌKAHI means UNITY 22) HANOHANO means PRIDE 23) ALAKAʻI means LEADERSHIP 24) KUI KA NUʻU means ACHIEVEMENT 25) KŪPONO means HONESTY
ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ HULA TERMINOLOGY
HULA A specific style of telling a story with words and movements; To dance; One who dances Hula ~~~~~~~~~ In the days of our kūpuna, the hula was a religious service in which motion, voice and instrumental sound were combined as a form of dramatic art. In ancient times (“kahiko”), Hawaiians did not indulge in hula for personal amusement. The art and practice of Hula was an accomplishment requiring special education and training in dance, song and musicianship because of its religious subject matter and importance as a tool for teaching history. One who instructs others in proper performance of Hula One who drums and chants to accompany dance in performance of Hula One who dances to accompany chants in performance of Hula A large building or “long house” used for learning, practicing and performing Hula; building and sheltering canoes; or any other purpose for which a large number of people may gather under one roof Type of chant not intended to accompany dance ~~~~~~~~~ Oli are recited in stylized and prolonged phrases, with relatively few, carefully-timed breaths, often with a trill (“iʻi”) at the end of each phrase Type of chant intended to accompany dance; To sing ~~~~~~~~~ In modern times (“ʻauana”), the word “mele” may refer to any type of poetry or melodious song, whether intended to accompany dance or not The sound, beat or rhythm, as of a dance; To sound; To strike, or cause to make a sound, as one would strike a drum; To thump a gourd (“ipu”) down onto a pad (“pale”), with one quick slap of the fingers as the gourd is raised, as a means of keeping time; The signal to begin dancing Specific rhythmic marker in which the hoʻopaÿa thumps the ipu onto the pale three times in successions and marks the fourth beat by raising the ipu to slap with the fingers Rhythmic marker in which the hoÿopaÿa thumps the ipu once on the pale and raises it to mark second and third beats with two quick slaps of the fingers To make ready; Spoken instruction to get into position to dance To begin; The beginning

KUMU HOʻOPAʻA OLAPA HĀLAU

OLI

MELE

PA

KUKU

KAHELA

HOʻOMAKAUKAU HOʻOMAKA

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ BASIC HULA STEPS
KAHOLO Basic, standard “vamp” hula step—more common in Hula ÿAuana (modernstyle) than in Hula Kahiko (ancient-style)—consisting of four counts: 1) One foot is extended to the side 2) The other foot is brought alongside the first 3) First foot is extended again in the same direction 4) Other foot is once again brought alongside 5) Entire process is then repeated in reverse, eventually returning dancer to original position With weight shifted to one hip, dancer lowers the waist by bending the knee on that side of the body while extending the opposite foot out and to the side at a 45-degree angle—then withdraws the extended foot and repeats entire process to the other side 1) One foot is lifted with dancer’s weight shifted to the opposite hip as the foot is lowered 2) Both knees are bent forward as dancer lowers the waist while quietly raising the heels 3) Knees are spread quickly to the sides and back together 4) Entire process is repeated beginning with opposite foot Combination of all three basic steps listed above: 1) One foot is extended to the side 2) Dancer shifts weight onto the foot just moved and bends that knee 3) Other foot is extended out and to the front at a 45-degree angle 4) Dancer returns extended foot to original position 5) Both knees are bent forward as dancer lowers the waist while quietly raising the heels 6) Knees are spread quickly to the sides and back together 7) Entire process is repeated beginning with opposite foot 1) One foot is lifted and extended to the side 2) Dancer’s weight is shifted and opposite foot is brought into position alongside 3) Both knees are bent forward as dancer lowers the waist while quietly raising the heels 4) Knees are spread quickly to the sides and back together 5) Entire process is repeated beginning with opposite foot Dancer steps out with one foot while, at the same time, turning in the opposite direction; taps heel of the extended foot once (“kaÿi”) while keeping the toes stationary; steps forward and back two or more times; and repeats entire process in opposite direction Dancer steps out with one foot while continuing to face forward; taps heel of the extended foot once while keeping the toes stationary; steps forward and back two or more times; and repeats entire process in opposite direction

HELA

UWEHE

LELE UWEHE

KAHOLO UWEHE

KALÄKAUA (KAWELU)

AE KAWELU

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ BASIC HULA STEPS
AMI AMI AKAU AMI HEMA AMI KŪKŪ ONIU ONIU KŪKŪ Hip revolutions Hip revolutions to the right Hip revolutions to the left Ami in either direction, with smaller, faster hip revolutions in groups of three: two slower ami are followed by three fast revolutions on a 1, 2, 1-2-3 count The “figure 8” hula step, in which hips sway in arcs from side to side while weight is shifted from foot to the other while feet remain in place The “figure 8” hula step, in which hips sway in arcs from side to side while weight is shifted from foot to the other while feet remain in place, with smaller, faster hip revolutions in groups of three: two slower oniu are followed by three fast cycles on a 1, 2, 1-2-3 count Dancer thrusts one hip quickly forward and out at a 45-degree angle and turns in the opposite direction, pivoting on the first foot Any interpretive hula since the days of Kaläkaua in which old and new steps are joined together An ancient fast dance with stoping, heel twisting, thigh slapping and dipping of the knees; originated on the island of Molokaÿi, this move is intended to evoke images of such pursuits as the dragging of fishing nets Dancer steps out with one foot while continuing to face forward; taps heel of the extended foot once while keeping the toes stationary; steps forward and back two or more times; STOMPS; and repeats process in opposite direction Dancer steps out with one foot while, at the same time, turning in the opposite direction; taps heel of the extended foot once while keeping the toes stationary; steps forward and back two or more times; STOMPS; and repeats entire process in opposite direction Generally concluding move of a hula ÿaÿalapapa (dance accompanied by chant with rhythm kept by striking ipu): 1) With knees bent and weight on left side, dancer extends right foot to the side 2) Dancer extends right foot forward 3) Right foot returns to starting position 4) Both knees are bent forward as dancer lowers the waist while quietly raising the heels 5) Knees are spread quickly to the sides and back together 6) Entire process is repeated beginning with opposite foot Modern step combining old and new to signify changing times. 1) Dancer steps forward with right kaÿi, then left kaÿi 2) Dancer takes four steps back, to starting position 3) While performing movements 1 & 2, dancer extends both hands, first to right and then to left, at a 45-degree angle while rotating palms in and up To stand or dance with bent knees; signifies humility ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

O KUʻI KUʻI MOLOKAʻI KUʻI I LOKO KALĀKAUA KUʻI KIʻI PA (E OLA)

KALA WAENA

AI HAʻA

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ HĀLAU CREED ʻO ka hula nō ka ʻuhane ma loko o nā kānaka A pākahi a pau ke kumu a me ka ʻolapa He pono ka piko o ka hula ʻO ia hoʻi kahi waenakonu o ke kaulike ʻO ia ke ola a me ka mana mai loko mai ʻO ka hula nō ka leo a ka naʻau ʻO ia hoʻi ka haʻaheo o ka poʻe Hawaiʻi

The hula is the purity of spirit Within each individual, kumu and dancer The hula must always have its piko, the center of balance It is the living energy and beckoning force The hula is the language of the heart Therefore, the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ MELE KAHEA Kūnihi ka mauna i ka laʻi ē (A)ʻo Waiʻaleʻale lā i Wailua Huki aʻela i ka lani ka papa ʻauwai o Kawaikini ʻĀlai ʻia aʻela e nounou Nalo kaipuhaʻa ka laulā ma uka o Kāpaʻa ē Mai paʻa i ka leo (A)he ʻole kaha mai ʻē

CALL FOR PERMISSION TO ENTER The mountain stands steep in the calm Mount Waiʻaleʻale seen from Wailua The ditch-spanning plank is yanked up to the heavens to the top of Waikini View obstructed by Nounou hill Kaipuhaʻa, the wide expanse of land uphill from Kapaʻa disappears Don’t hold back your voice; There is no call to enter.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ KA PULE A KA HAKU
E kō mākou Makua i loko o ka lani E hōʻano ʻia kou inoa E hiki mai kou aupuni (E) mālama ʻia kou makemake ma ka honua nei E like me ia i mālama ʻia ma ka lani la E haʻawi mai iā mākou i keia lā i ʻai mākou no nēia lā E kala mai hoʻi iā mākou i kā mākou lawehala ʻana Me mākou e kala nei i ka poʻe i lawehala i kā mākou Mai hoʻokuʻu ʻoe iā mākou i ka hoʻowalewale ʻia mai E hoʻopakele nō naʻe iā mākou i ka ʻino No ka mea, nou ke aupuni A me ka mana A me ka hoʻonani ʻia a mau loa aku. ʻĀmene. THE LORD’S PRAYER Our Father, Who art in Heaven Hallowed be Thy Name Thy Kingdom come Thy Will be done On Earth as it is in Heaven Give us this day our daily bread And forgive us our trespasses As we forgive those who trespass against us Lead us not into temptation but deliver us from evil For Thine is the Kingdom,and the Power And the Glory forever. Amen.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ HOʻONANI I KA MAKUA MAU Hoʻonani i ka Makua mau Ke Keiki me ka Uhane nō Ke Akua mau hoʻomaikaʻi pū Ko kēia ao, ko kēlā ao. ʻĀmene.

THE DOXOLOGY Praise God from Whom all blessings flow Praise Him all creatures here below Praise Him above, ye Heavenly Host Praise Father, Son and Holy Ghost. Amen.

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ NĀ ʻAUMAKUA Nā ʻaumakua mai ka lā hiki a ka lā kau, Mai ka hoʻokuʻi a ka halawai! Nā ʻaumakua iā ka hina kua, iā ka hina alo, Iā kaʻa akau i ka lani. O kīhā i ka lani, Owē i ka lani, Nūnulu i ka lani, Kaholo i ka lani! Eia ka pulapula a ʻoukou, ʻo (*see below). E malama oukou iā mākou (#1 & 2) / iaʻu (#3). E ulu i ka lani, E ulu i ka honua, E ulu i ka pae ʻāina o Hawaiʻi. E ho mai ka ʻike. E ho mai ka ikaika. E ho mai ke akamai. E ho mai ka maopopo pono. E ho mai ka ʻike pāpalua. E ho mai ka mana, e.
*This prayer is said three (3) times: 1st time: “Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama” 2nd time: “ka ʻohana” 3rd time: “(your name)”

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ CALL TO THE ANCESTRAL DEITIES Ye ancestral deities from the rising to the setting of the sun, From the zenith to the horizon. Ye gods who stand at our right hand! Ye ancestral deities who stand at our back and at our front! A breathing in the heavens, An utterance in the heavens, A clear, ringing voice in the heavens, A voice reverberating in the heavens! Here I am your child, (*see below). Safeguard all of us. May the heavens expand, May the earth continue to grow, May Hawaiʻi continue to grow! Grant me wisdom. Grant me strength. Grant me knowledge. Grant me righteous thoughts. Grant me the deeper meaning. Grant me the power.
*This prayer is said three (3) times: 1st time: “Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama” 2nd time: “ka ʻohana” 3rd time: “(your name)”

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ KA MŌʻĪ WAHINE O HAWAIʻI He kukui ka ʻolelo a ke akua He mālamalama ia no kou aupuni, e ka lani Ko kukui a i ke awakea Nā kukui o Iwikauikaua Nānā hoʻi ka moʻopuna ʻo Liliʻuokalani i ke kapo Ka mō’ī wahine o ko Hawaiʻi paeʻāina Eō Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama HAWAIʻI’S QUEEN God’s word is a kukui A light for your government, on heavenly one Your light burning at noonday The light for Iwikauikaua Ancestor of Liliʻuokalani the sacred one The Queen of the Hawaiian Islands We are Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~ OLI ULUHAIMĀLAMA Aloha kuʻu ʻāina ʻO Hilo nani ē Kaulana ʻoe Me ka maile Me ke Kilihune ʻua ʻO Hilo nani ē Kuʻu ʻāina hanau ē Haʻaheo wale ʻoe Uluhaimālama e ʻiē ʻiē ʻiē ULUHAIMĀLAMA NAME CHANT My love for my land Beautiful Hilo You are famous For the maile And for the Kilihune rain O beautiful Hilo This is the land of my birth So proud Of Uluhaimālama…

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

~~~~~~~~ Hālau Nā Pua ʻO Uluhaimālama ~~~~~~~~

ʻAʻohe Pau ka ʻIke i ka Hālau Hoʻokahi
All Knowledge Is Not Taught In A Single School - One can learn from many different sources -

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