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By HEATHER FIORE

The Hopewell Sun


Five eighth-graders from the
Stuart Country Day School of the
Sacred Heart in Princeton recent-
ly were named winners in a na-
tional video game challenge.
The students Julia Weingaert-
ner of West Windsor, Sarah Lipp-
man of Pennington, Chloe Mario
of Princeton, Madeleine Lapuerta
of Montgomery and Emma
Froehlich of Montgomery were
five of the 28 middle school and
high school students who were
winners of the 2012 National
STEM Video Game Challenge.
They were the only girls who
won at the competition.
When I saw that all five of us
were the only girls out of all of
the winners, it felt really good,
Lippman said. I definitely didnt
expect to win, and I definitely did-
nt expect to be one of the only
girls there.
The girls games were two of
the 17 games chosen in total be-
tween middle school and high
school students. The Stuart Day
School sent 10 entries, and the
girls games were selected out of
the 3,700 entries that were submit-
ted this year.
The STEM Challenge is geared
toward improving STEM (science,
technology, engineering and
mathematics) education among
students and promoting youth in-
terest in STEM. It was created two
years ago as part of President
Obamas Educate to Innovate
campaign.
It required middle school and
high school students to create
computer-based video games on
any topic. There were eight sub-
categories under the middle
school category, and the one the
five girls competed in PBS KIDS
Ready to Learn Initiative chal-
lenged students to design games
to reinforce specific mathematic
skills in students ages 4 to 8.
This is the first year PBS KIDS
got involved with the challenge,
and the schools teams were cho-
sen as winners of the PBS KIDS
Ready to Learn Initiative category
for middle schoolers.
The school was also the only
school that had two teams of stu-
dents win.
Computer and math teacher for
the Middle and Upper schools and
technology integrator Alicia
Testa taught the students the ba-
sics of programming for the chal-
lenge and led students through
the entire creation process.
I was so impressed with all of
their hard work, she said. I
heard people say that it gave them
a chance to try something new
and it gave them a chance to build
teamwork because they really
needed to work together as a team
on brainstorming and what to do.
They had to listen to each others
voices and give themselves a
voice. It was great to see them all
work efficiently.
Weingaertner and Lippman
www.hopewellsun.com
JUNE 13-19, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Memorial brick sale
Township plans walkway for
Sept. 11 memorial. PAGE 2
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
R e s i d e n t i a l C u s t o m e r
Stuart team wins national challenge
HEATHER FIORE/The Hopewell Sun
Stuart Country Day School of the Sacred Heart eighth-graders Emma Froehlich, left, Madeleine Lapuer-
ta, middle, and Chloe Mario play their game, Math Racing Mania that was chosen as one of the winning
games at the 2012 National STEM Challenge. BELOW: From left, Julia Weingaertner, Sarah Lippman,
Mario, Lapuerta and Froehlich, were five of the 28 middle school and high school students that were cho-
sen as winners of the 2012 National STEM Video Game Challenge.
please see STUDENTS, page 7
Student
chosen
for music
program
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Ask Maura Tuffy if she was
nervous when she played the
piano at Carnegie Hall this
spring, and shell answer like
a seasoned professional.
No, not really. Ive gotten
used to it, the 15-year-old
freshman at Hopewell Valley
Central High School said.
Indeed, shes a veteran
Carnegie Hall performer, as
her presentation of
Beethovens 8th Piano Sonata
Pathetique Third Move-
ment, at the Golden Key Inter-
national Music Festival in
April, marked no less than her
fifth appearance at the hal-
lowed hall.
I just felt so much more
confident in myself than the
first time I did it, Tuffy said,
who initially played there
when she was just 13.
Such performances are all
in a days work for this young
musician, whose star is on the
rise. But classical piano is not
Mauras only talent, nor is
Carnegie Hall her only gig.
This July, she will spend two
weeks at the Eastman School
of Music Summer Jazz Stud-
ies program for high school
musicians at the University of
Rochester in New York.
The summer program,
please see TEEN, page 5
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 13-19, 2012
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Special to The Sun
Hopewell Township Police Lt. Lance Maloney and Officer Louis
Vastola meet with Hopewell Deputy Fire Chief Will Mullen,
Hopewell Valley Emergency Specialist Josh Wilson and Penning-
ton First Aid Squad member Rich Gordon near the Hopewell Val-
ley Sept. 11 and Emergency Services Memorial. They are making
plans for a memorial brick sale, which may be purchased for $60
each with an inscription. Each brick will be placed on the Walk of
Heroes that will surround the memorial. Brick applications are
available at all firehouses and the Hopewell Township Municipal
Building. The application is also available at the Memorial web
site www.hv911memorial.org. If you have any questions, contact
Mike Chipowsky at 737-8869 or mchipowsky@comcast.net.
Memorial brick sale planned
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JUNE 13-19, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
which attracts applicants from
around the world, brings high
schoolers to its campus to learn
from its renowned jazz faculty.
Maura is one of only eight pi-
anists who have been chosen to
attend, and its unusual for a high
school freshman to win one of the
coveted spots, which usually go to
upperclassmen.
Im excited about it, Tuffy
said. Its work at a college level,
its really advanced and an ex-
tremely great program with the
top jazz professors in the world.
She practices her craft about two
hours a day during the school week
and even more on weekends.
Maura is a great kid with lots
of potential, and Im so excited to
have her in our program, CHS
teacher David Schwartzer said.
She has a rich musical back-
ground and is an accomplished
singer as well as piano player.
This spring, Tuffy was chosen
to represent Hopewell Valley at
the 2012 NJAJE Region II Junior
High Honors Jazz Ensemble for
the third year in a row.
Music is Mauras passion, and
we are very proud of her level of
commitment to all of her musical
endeavors, her dad, Tom Tuffy,
said. Its really impressive to see
how hard she works leading up to
her performances.
Beyond piano, she also sings in
the CHS womens ensemble, and
with the Trinity Episcopal choir
in Princeton, one of the oldest in
the country. The choir, which
sings from September to May, has
a rigorous schedule of practice
and weekend performances at
church services. They plan to
tour England next summer, in-
cluding a performance at St.
Pauls Cathedral, London.
Asked when she decided to pur-
sue music to this extent, Tuffy
said she started playing piano at
8, but said: I didnt know I would
go this far with it until fourth- or
fifth-grade. I did my first competi-
tion in fourth-grade, and decided
I wanted to compete more and be-
come a performer.
You might think her rigorous
music schedule would be exhaust-
ing. But Tuffy indicates to the
contrary.
Playing the piano really relax-
es me, she said. It really takes
me somewhere else, away from
school work, and things like
that.
In college, shed like to study
piano and voice. When shes not
doing music or school work, she
enjoys just hanging out with
friends. But she never tires of the
musical life.
I just love music, she said. I
love singing and I love the piano.
TEEN
Continued from page 1
Teen practices piano every day
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 13-19, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
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The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
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please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
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welcomes suggestions and comments from
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errors that may call for a correction to be
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Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
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tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
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ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
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ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
I
ts been about two months since
Atlantic Citys new slogan was un-
veiled. So, we have to ask: Will you
Do AC? Have you Done AC? Does
the new slogan Do Anything for
You?
We like it. We think it fits with what
has to be the citys future if theres
any hope of survival: transforming it-
self into something other than a gam-
bling destination.
You may have seen some of the com-
mercials. We like those, too. They de-
emphasize the gambling aspect. We
cant remember if theres even one
shot of a slot machine in the ads.
Instead, they highlight the beach,
nightlife, food, entertainment and
more.
If you want to gamble, you have
plenty of alternatives the closest
being the lottery at the convenience
store down the street.
Want to go to a casino? Theyre all
over the place these days.
Want to vacation in a place where
there are not only all kinds of gam-
bling options, but also world-class en-
tertainment, food and accommoda-
tions, not to mention a ton of other
non-gambling things to do? Well, those
options are more limited.
And thats what AC has to become. It
has a lot of the essentials in place,
such as numerous casinos/resorts
grouped together with others only a
short drive away. All that has been
lacking is a coordinated vision and ef-
fort to have everyone pull together in a
drive to make visiting and staying in
AC a true event similar to what a
trip to Vegas is.
Think about it, those of you who
have visited Las Vegas. Theres a feel-
ing about that city. Theres an attitude.
Theres an anticipation as your vaca-
tion is about to begin.
And admit it: You do things in Vegas
you wouldnt do elsewhere. Or at least
you should.
Now the challenge is for AC to cre-
ate that same vibe so that people really
want to Do AC.
Will you Do AC?
The citys new slogan is a step in the right direction
Just do it
Atlantic Citys new slogan is a winner.
Now it will be up to the city, the casi-
nos and the tourism efforts to make
sure that Doing AC is a desirable
thing to do.
The following items were taken from re-
ports on file with the Hopewell Police De-
partment:
Officer Mandy Grey took a car burglary
report on May 29. Sometime overnight,
someone entered an unlocked car parked
in the driveway of a Maple Lane home and
removed an iPhone, prescription medicine
and a wallet containing $100. The loss was
estimated at $750. The wallet was later
found by a neighbor discarded in the
street.
Officer Mandy Grey took a car burglary
report on May 29. Sometime overnight,
someone entered an unlocked car parked
in the driveway of a Maple Lane home and
removed a change purse containing $10 in
quarters.
Officer Lincoln Karnoff took a car bur-
glary report on May 29. Sometime
overnight, someone entered an unlocked
car parked in the driveway of a Linden
Lane home and removed an iPhone, head-
phones and a wallet. The loss was estimat-
ed at $520. The wallet was later found by a
neighbor discarded in the street.
Officer Lincoln Karnoff took a car bur-
glary report on May 29. Sometime
overnight, someone entered two unlocked
cars parked in the driveway of a Maple
Lane home and removed $20 in cash.
Officer Robert Sparano responded to a
Birch Street address for the report of a car
burglary on May 29. Sometime overnight
someone entered an unlocked car parked
in the driveway of the home. An iPod val-
ued at $250 and $15 in change was taken
from the car.
Officer Lincoln Karnoff took a car bur-
glary report on May 30. Sometime between
7 p.m. on May 28 and 9 a.m. on May 29,
someone entered an unlocked car on Lin-
den Lane and removed $20 in cash.
Detective Daniel McKeown was on a
DWI patrol when he observed a Ford pick-
up truck tailgating another vehicle along
Route 29 on May 26. McKeown says he
stopped the truck and spoke with the driv-
er, who had the odor of alcohol on his
breath. After performing field-sobriety
tests, the man was placed under arrest and
transported to police headquarters for pro-
cessing. He was charged with drunken
driving, reckless driving and following too
closely and was later released to a relative.
This case will be heard in municipal court.
police report
Minds and Manners Preschool opens at
the Rambling Pines Day Camp, which is a
preschool that educates the heart as well as
the mind. Minds and Manners is a new
name in the area, but the staff has been
teaching in the area since 1993.
Bonnie Martin, formerly of Hopewell
Country Day School will be heading Minds
and Manners, which is located at the Coun-
try Day Schools former location in the
classrooms of Rambling Pines on Route
518, just off Route 31 at the Hopewell/East
Amwell border.
Minds and Manners offers developmen-
tally appropriate programs for full or half
day, with flexible schedules for children
ages 2 1/2 to 6.
Call to schedule a tour (609) 649-4214. You
can also email for more information at mind-
sandmanners@comcast.net or check out our
page on www.mindsandmanners. com.
Minds and Manners Preschool scheduling tours
made up one team and both were
awarded for their game, Animal
Inequalities, which incorporates
a shark whose mouth can become
a greater than, less than or equal
to sign. The shark prowls around
the game in search of the correct
number of fish to eat, which each
player guides with the arrows.
We were brainstorming ideas
in class, and Sarah came up with
the idea of a shark who wanted to
eat a larger number of fish be-
cause thats how we learned it
when we were in elementary
school, Weingaertner said.
Mario, Lapuerta and Froehlich
were a part of the other team
and they created a game, Match
Racing Mania. Here, the player
drives a car and is lost on the way
home. In order to get home, the
player approaches a series of in-
tersections where he must solve
math problems to advance closer
to home. Once the problems are
correctly solved, the car takes the
player home safely.
We were talking about a lot of
different ideas for games,
Froehlich said. We had an ice
cream idea, and then we just
thought the car game would be
the best because theres a lot of
car games now, like Super Mario,
so we thought that itd be good to
have a game that could appeal to
both boys and girls.
To create the games, Testa in-
troduced the program, Scratch, to
the students. Scratch is designed
to help middle school students
learn programming concepts, and
takes away the strife of coding so
the students only have to focus on
the logic and design of the game.
Basically, Scratch does mini
methods, and all the girls have to
do is put them together in the
right area and they can change
them, like how far to move, Testa
said. What Scratch does, is it gets
away from the syntax of program-
ming. It allows them to focus on
the logic of the games and, to me,
thats the real programming.
Once you know an an statement,
an or statement, or looping, and
you understand conditions, you
can take that and learn any lan-
guage.
Testa also explained how the
girls did the majority of the work
without her help, which was a lit-
tle hard to get used to.
I just basically walked around
and explained the programming
as they got stuck, she said. It
was very hard for me, at first, to
kind of let go of the classroom
and just let them learn program-
ming on the fly and help them
when they needed it. But, once we
got into that groove, it was very
rewarding because all of the ah-
ha moments were happening.
Overall, it took the girls two
months to create the games. Testa
worked with the girls throughout
the duration of three class peri-
ods each week, with a total of 21
classes. The girls also worked on
their projects outside of classes
during their study halls, and even
brought them home.
All of the girls agreed that they
genuinely enjoyed the competi-
tion and are probably going to
enter into the STEM Challenge
again for next years high school
category. Until then, Testa made
sure to note that she will be con-
tinuing her efforts to teach pro-
gramming and will definitely be
entering more students from the
eighth grade into the competition
next year.
They havent seen the last of
us, she said. And, Im hoping
that more of the Upper schoolers
get involved as well.
JUNE 13-19, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
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STUDENTS
Continued from page 1
Students took two months
to create winning games
Walk at St. Michaels
Farm Preserve
Join other active older adults
for a walk at the St. Michaels
Farm Preserve in Hopewell on
Tuesday, June 19 at 10 a.m.
Meet in the parking lot off of
Princeton Avenue just outside of
Hopewell Borough.
All are welcome. There will be
a slower and a moderate paced
group.
No registration required.
For more information or direc-
tions, contact senior services at
737-0605, ext. 692, or
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
In case of poor weather, the
walk will take place on Thursday,
June 21.
Senior citizens: learn
summer safety tips
Learn about summer safety for
older adults on Wednesday, June
20 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the
Hopewell Valley Senior Center,
395 Reading St. in Pennington.
Suzanne Rose, health educator
with the Montgomery Health De-
partment, serving Hopewell and
Pennington boroughs, will be the
speaker.
The summer can be dangerous
if you dont take the proper pre-
cautions. Each participant will be
given a Summer Safety & Pre-
paredness Guide for Older
Adults.
No registration is required.For
more information, contact
Hopewell Valley Senior Services
at 737-0605, ext. 692, or
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
THURSDAY JUNE 14
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
Hopewell Public Library Board of
Trustees meeting: 7 p.m. in the
library building, 13 East Broad St.,
Hopewell. All meetings open to
the public. For more information
call (609) 466-1625.
FRIDAY JUNE 15
Pat McKinleys Toddler Tunes:
Ages newborn to 5. 10:30 to 11
a.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Sing and dance to classic chil-
drens songs played on live guitar.
Just For Kids Book Sale: 9:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Hardcover books $1; paper-
backs 50 cents. All items donated
and proceeds benefit the sum-
mer reading program.
SATURDAY JUNE 16
Just For Kids Book Sale: 9:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Hardcover books $1; paper-
backs 50 cents. All items donated
and proceeds benefit the sum-
mer reading program.
SUNDAY JUNE 17
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY JUNE 18
Just For Kids Book Sale: 9:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Hardcover books $1; paper-
backs 50 cents. All items donated
and proceeds benefit the sum-
mer reading program.
Yoga: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Bring yoga mat
or large towel. Registration
required; call (609) 737-2610.
Tai Chi: 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
this ancient art to promote good
health and relaxation. No regis-
tration required.
Kids Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
Hopewell Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Hopewell Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Open to
the public. Visit www.hopewell
twp.org to confirm time or for
more information.
TUESDAY JUNE 19
Dream Big Summer Reading Kick-
off Party: All ages. 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Travel to space for this party. Play
games and win prizes. Make
paper rockets. Ritas water ice will
be served.
Yoga: 5 to 6 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Bring yoga mat or large tow-
el. Registration required; call
(609) 737-2610.
Just For Kids Book Sale: 9:30 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Hardcover books $1; paper-
backs 50 cents. All items donated
and proceeds benefit the sum-
mer reading program.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. A great way to introduce
your child to library story times
and reading. Age-appropriate
books shared. Songs, nursery
rhymes, puppets and felt board
figures create a rich audio-visual
and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Hopewell Township Environmental
Commission meeting: 7:30 or 8
p.m. at the Hopewell Township
Municipal Building, 201 Washing-
ton Crossing-Pennington Rd. the
third Tuesday of the month. Veri-
fy time at hopewelltwp.org.
Historic Preservation Commission
meeting: 7:30 p.m. in the Hopeell
Township Main Administration
Building the third Tuesday of the
month. For more information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JUNE 13-19, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
6/30/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
6/30/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Expires 6/30/12.
oooa/s Vaoyoy as/c/s
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vc-cooa/s -ccs
J/-o/s
lANDSCAPf lNSTAllATlON & RfNOVATlON:
PATlOS - WAlkWAYS - RfTAlNlNG WAllS - ClfAN-UPS - MUlCHlNG
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for pIanting!

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ller relii erl e|
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Cheryl Burke
Two-time Champion
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briefs
JUNE 13-19, 2012 THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
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Blue Garden Landscaping
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With a year contract. Exp. 6/30/12.
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Exp. 6/30/12.
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Asgazagus Tomatoes Lettuce
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609-737-6502
www.littleacresfarmmarket.com
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Sun 10am-5pm
zo% OFF BEDDING PLANTS
$5 off on $25 of bedding plants with this ad.
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Located a short distance from Albany, NY. All packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all
meals and accommodations at our newly remodeled lodge. Fall and
spring turkey, whitetail deer (archery, rifle, muzzleloader), pheasant
(field and tower), coyote, rabbit, waterfowl.
(888} 690-0041
20 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08542
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Hopewell
Lawrence
Montgomery
Princeton
Robbinsville
West Windsor
on campus
Armington named
a presidential scholar
William Armington, of
Hopewell, a senior majoring in
environmental engineering, was
named a presidential scholar for
the spring semester at Clarkson
University.
Farr graduates from
St. Lawrence University
Nicholas G. Farr, of Hopewell,
was among 584 students awarded
a degree at St. Lawrence Universi-
ty's Commencement ceremony,
held May 20 on campus in Canton,
N.Y. Farr was awarded a degree in
government and performance
and communication arts.
Farr graduated from The Pen-
nington School.
Chadwell receives
bachelors degree
Cynthia Chadwell, daughter of
Karen and Steele Chadwell of
Pennington, received her bache-
lors degree in philosophy from
the College of William and Mary
in Virginia on May 13.
Cynthia served as Panhellenic
Representative of the Gamma
Alpha Chapter of Phi Mu Frater-
nity.
A member of The
Lawrenceville Schools class of
2009, she will pursue her studies
at American University Washing-
ton College of Law, in Washing-
ton, D.C., in the fall.
Nowicki graduates from
Widener University
Brian Nowicki, of Hopewell,
received a bachelor's degree in po-
litical science during the com-
mencement ceremony at Widener
University on May 12.
The university presented de-
grees to graduates from August
2011, December 2011 and May dur-
ing the ceremony.
Smith receives
degree in psychology
The following Hopewell resi-
dent graduated from Marist Col-
lege the weekend of May 18.
Kerri Smith received a bache-
lors degree in psychology.
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Pet Friends Grief
support for pet owners
(800) 404-7387
PSA
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN JUNE 13-19, 2012
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0 FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
www.tricountyexteriors.com
ug to
10 OFF
Any roof or siding repair
With this coupon. Not valid with
other offers or prior services.
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
ug to
$2S0 OFF
Any complete roofing or siding job
With this coupon. Not valid with
other offers or prior services.
FREE
Roof Accessories
with every roof!
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Come Dance With Us!

Pennington Shopping Center Route 31 South, Pennington


609-737-7338 www.B4NCLwBRkSHLRCLR.CBH
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Starting 1une 11th
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!
YMCA recognizes
family, market for
community service
Hopewell Valley would not be
the community it is without the
compassion and generosity of
local residents and businesses.
This year, the Hopewell Valley
YMCA is proud to recognize the
Rothwell Family and Pennington
Quality Market for years
of community service and out-
reach.
Join the Y at on Friday, June 15,
at 7 p.m., as it honors their contri-
butions to the Hopewell Valley
area at a spring into summer gala
at Princetons TPC Jasna Polana.
It will include cocktails,
hors doeuvres, dinner and danc-
ing.
Tickets are $125 each and char-
itable donations are welcome.
The evenings proceeds benefit
HVYMCA.
The Rothewell family has sup-
ported nearly every community
event and organization in
Hopewell Valley.
Through special fundraising
events at The Pennington Market,
donated foods and services, and
permitting groups to conduct
fundraising efforts at the market,
the Rothwells has been an inte-
gral part of the communitys vi-
brant success.
For more information, contact
Hopewell Valley YMCA at (609)
737-3048, or info@hvymca.com or
visit www.hvymca.org.
The Hopewell Valley YMCA is
a charitable organization which
operates offices at 62 South Main
St., in Pennington and provides
numerous community-based pro-
gramming for children, men,
women and families of all ages,
races and religions.
NJ AIDS/STD Hotline
(800) 624-2377
PSA
NJ Ease Senior
Services Helpline
(877) 222-3737
PSA
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JUNE 13-19, 2012 PAGE 11
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 Add color to any box ad for $20. Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun West Windsor Sun
EIectricaI Services
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Editing & Writing
Roofing
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Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
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or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
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or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 6/30/12.
FREE
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Must present coupon at time of estimate.
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Offer expires 6/30/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
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MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
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Call Mila
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Email:
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HIGHEST PRICES PAID for GOLD DIAMONDS SILVER
can be damaged in any condition
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time to turn broken or unwanted
Jewelry Sterling Silver Silver Coins Flatware
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SPRING VALLEY ESTATES
Quick occupancy, New
Construction in Mt. Laurel by
D.R. Horton. Only 2 ready now
in a beautiful, wooded commu-
nity. Great schools. 1 ready for
September and all have plenty
of upgrades including Gourmet
Kitchens, Side Entry Garages
and Large Wooded Lots.
Priced from the mid $600s.
Call (856) 912-1975 for your
Personal Tour!

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