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Recommended
Readings
and
Activities
for
the
Classroom


On
Genocide,
Human
Rights,
and
More

Grade
Levels:
9th‐12th




Teaching
About
Genocide


Confronting
Genocide:
Never
Again?
(Available
for
purchase
online)

http://www.choices.edu/resources/detail.php?id=36

Created
By:
The
Choices
Program

Themes:
Traces
the
evolution
of
the
international
community's
response
to
genocide
and

examines
how
the
United
States
has
responded
to
five
cases
of
genocide.
The
evaluation
of

multiple
perspectives,
informed
debate,
and
problem
solving
strategies
that
comprise
this
unit

enable
students
to
develop
their
own
policy
suggestions
concerning
America's
response
to

future
genocide.

Includes:






Student
Text

Teachers
Guide

Five
Lesson
Plans

1. Day
One's
lesson
helps
students
to
define
genocide.


2. Day
Two
asks
students
to
examine
five
different
cases
of
genocide
from
the
twentieth

century,
followed
by
a
class
activity
on
The
New
York
Times
coverage
of
the
Armenian

Genocide
in
1915.


3. Days
Three
and
Four
are
devoted
to
a
simulation
in
which
students
act
as
advocates
of

the
four
options
or
take
on
the
role
of
members
of
the
Senate
Committee
on
Foreign

Relations.


4. Day
Five
asks
students
to
design
their
own
'Option
Five'
and
apply
their
views
to

hypothetical
cases.


5. An
optional
lesson
is
also
included
in
the
unit
which
asks
students
to
construct
a
model
of

a
public
memorial
to
a
genocide.


Teaching
About
The
Definition
Of
Genocide
And
Its
Development
Over

Time


Raphael
Lemkin:
Identifying
Lemkin’s
Outrage—Lesson
One
(Available
for
free
online)

http://www2.facinghistory.org/Campus/reslib.nsf/lessonsnew/3A35B5EA501C2779852572970
068F09A?opendocument


org/Campus/reslib. Summary:
This
lesson
focuses
on
how
Lemkin
turned
his
moral
outrage
into
action.
He
was
 inspired
to
act
by
his
own
outrage
when
he
learned
about
the
crimes
the
Ottoman
Empire
 committed
against
Armenians
during
World
War
I—
and
outraged
that
the
perpetrators
of
 these
crimes
went
unpunished.
Churchill
referred
to
Nazi
atrocities
as
 a
“crime
without
a
name.
students
will
explore
the
concept
of
sovereignty
that
made
it
difficult
 to
prosecute
perpetrators
of
genocide.
Identify
actions
that
can
be
taken
to
 .facinghistory.
recognition
that
in
1921
 there
was
no
legal
precedent
for
prosecuting
perpetrators
of
crimes
against
humanity.
Upon
 learning
about
the
trial
of
Tehlirian.
as
they
also
consider
their
own
 definitions
of
crimes
against
humanity
and
civilization.
 Summary:
In
his
early
adulthood.org/Campus/reslib.
Understand
the
limits
of
the
Genocide
Convention
in
 stopping
and
preventing
genocide. 
 Raphael
Lemkin:
Continuing
Lemkin’s
Legacy‐What
Can
We
Do
To
Stop
And
Prevent
Genocide
 (Available
for
free
online)
 http://www2.
did
not
have
sufficient
language
to
represent
 horrible
crimes
against
humanity
and
civilization.
 and
crimes
against
humanity
in
particular.
Indeed.”
Lemkin
took
it
upon
himself
to
invent
a
new
word—genocide—to
 represent
acts
committed
with
the
intent
to
destroy
a
group
of
people.
describing
basic
information
 about
the
Armenian
Genocide
and
the
trial
of
Soghomon
Tehlirian.
Lemkin
became
educated
about
international
law.
Gain
basic
 background
information
about
the
genocide
in
Darfur.
Lemkin
was
also
frustrated
by
the
fact
that
people.nsf/lessonsnew/D0E8FA7B9AAA6B0F8525729700 68374A?opendocument Created
By:
Facing
History
and
Ourselves Themes:
Understanding
the
concept
of
sovereignty
as
it
applies
to
international
law
in
general. 
 Created
By:
Facing
History
and
Ourselves
 Themes:
Understanding
the
phrase
"crimes
against
humanity".
He
could
not
believe
that
there
was
no
legal
precedent
for
 punishing
perpetrators
of
such
terrible
crimes
against
humanity.facinghistory.
Raphael
Lemkin
did
not
set
out
to
change
the
world.
 including
politicians
such
as
Winston
Churchill.nsf/sub/onlinecampus/lessonunit/lemkin_contin uing_legacy
 Created
By:
Facing
History
and
Ourselves
 Themes:

Expand
their
knowledge
of
the
United
Nations
Convention
on
the
Prevention
and
 Punishment
of
the
Crime
of
Genocide.
In
this
lesson.
the
power
of
language
and
why
Lemkin
felt
the
need
 to
invent
a
new
word
to
describe
crimes
against
humanity.
Explore
the
politics
of
making
change.
Understanding
what
Lemkin
meant
 by
the
term
genocide.
gather
 information
from
primary
and
secondary
sources.
The
purpose
of
this
lesson
is
to
 help
students
understand
Lemkin’s
outrage
so
that
they
can
identify
what
motivated
Lemkin
to
 take
action.
 
 Raphael
Lemkin:
Exploring
Lemkin's
Actions‐
The
Invention
of
the
Word
"Genocide"—Lesson
 Two
(Available
for
Free
Online)
 http://www.
students
 will
begin
to
understand
Lemkin’s
notion
of
what
genocide
is.
 Following
Lemkin’s
path.


 Themes:
Understanding
the
concept
of
universal
human
rights.
Activists.
genocides
have
continued
around
the
 world.org
 Created
By:
Facing
History
and
Ourselves
 Themes:
explore.
1988). 
 prevent
and
stop
genocide.
Raphael
Lemkin’s
original
goal
was
realized.
 Summary:
Raphael
Lemkin
was
instrumental
in
the
drafting
and
the
adoption
of
the
United
 Nations
Convention
on
the
Prevention
and
Punishment
of
the
Crime
of
Genocide.
Part
I:
The
Individual
and
Society.
and
helps
students
relate
these
ideas
to
issues
and
 situations
in
their
own
lives.
With
the
 ratification
of
this
treaty.
SCDC
 Publications/The
Law
Society.
reflect
on
the
 significance
of
identity
and
on
the
influence
our
sense
of
our
identity
can
have
on
our
choices.
deepening
abilities
to
listen
and
respond
to
different
 views.facinghistory.
continue
the
struggle
for
genocide
prevention
that
 Lemkin
began
in
the
1920s.
 Terezin.
While
Lemkin
worked
to
create
a
law
when
one
did
not
exist.
 Explore
the
language
of
imagery
and
symbol
 .
 
 Teaching
About
Identity
 
 Individuality
and
Stereotyping:
“Hand”
Identity
Charts
(Available
for
free
online
if
member
of
 Facing
History
and
Ourselves)
 www.
 since
the
Genocide
Convention
was
adopted
in
1948.
Yet.
Now
there
was
an
 international
law
that
nations
could
draw
on
to
prosecute
and
punish
perpetrators
of
genocide.
Czech
Republic.
importance
of
consensus
building
 Summary:
This
activity
focuses
on
the
fundamental
concepts
embedded
within
the
Universal
 Declaration
of
Human
Rights
(UDHR).
illustrate
and
articulate
identities.facinghistory.
 today’s
activists
focus
on
pressuring
politicians
to
use
this
law
as
a
means
and
prevent
 genocide.
(Published
by
Edward
Arnold.
Gather
information
from
primary
source
documents
(a
United
 Nations
treaty
and
a
speech.
such
as
Rebecca
Hamilton.
reflect
on
the
differences
between
the
 ways
in
which
we
see
ourselves
and
the
ways
in
which
others
might
see
us.
who
introduced
it
at
the
International
Festival
of
Tolerance.org
 Created
By:
Facing
History
and
Ourselves
 Created
By:
Adapted
from
Understand
the
Law.
further
developed
by
Mike
 Pasternak
and
by
Susan
Patterson.
relating
principles
of
UDHR
to
 variety
of
situations
and
moral
dilemmas.
 
 Teaching
About
Human
Rights
 
 Human
Rights:
Where
do
you
stand?
(Available
for
free
online
if
member
of
Facing
History
 and
Ourselves)
 www.
 now
leaders
like
Mehmed
Talaat
could
be
brought
to
trial
in
International
Criminal
Court
and
 men
like
Soghomon
Tehlirian
might
not
feel
compelled
to
take
justice
into
their
own
hands.
1998‐2000.

Investigate
one
photo."
and
traces
its
legacies
to
the
eugenics
movement
in
the
United
States
during
the
early
 20th
century.teachgenocide. For
school
or
homework:
write
about
own
photograph
and
story
 
 
 .
 
 Teaching
About
20th
Century
Genocides
 Armenia:
1915‐1923
 iWitness:
Oral
and
Visual
Documentation
of
Survivors
of
the
Armenian
Genocide
(Available
 for
free
online)
 http://www.

 Themes:
Explore
the
evolution
of
“race”
as
a
social
construct.facinghistory. Investigate
one
photo
and
then
read
text
 3.
imagine
their
life
after
the
fact.htm
 (PDF
Version)
http://www.
examine
 the
role
of
science
in
shaping
ideas
of
race.
examine
how
“race”
evoloved
 into
a
justification
for
the
political
and
social
institutions
of
the
18th
and
19th
centuries.org/files/iwitness_Photo_Activity.org/teachingguides/index.
examine
how
preconceived
notions
and
judgments
 shaped
the
“scientific”
discoveries
of
the
late
18th
and
mid
19th
centuries.teachgenocide.
survivor
testimony. Identify
themes
in
all
photos
 2.pdf
 Artists:
The
Genocide
Project
‐
Ara
Oshagan
and
Levon
Parian
 Created
by:
The
Genocide
Education
Project
(www.org)
 Themes:
Armenian
Genocide.GenocideEducation.
the
power
of
photography
 Includes:
 Short
Introduction
on
Armenia
Genocide
 Explanation
of
photo’s
by
the
Artists
 8
Survivor
photos
and
brief
stories
from
their
point
of
view
 Student
Activities:
 1.
examine
the
influence
of
the
 Enlightenment
era
on
the
creation
of
modern
definitions
of
race. 
 
 
 Teaching
About
Race
 Race:
Origins
and
Legacies
of
a
Modern
Construct
(Available
for
free
online
if
member
of
 Facing
History
and
Ourselves)
 www.
questions
for
survivor
 4.org
 Created
By:
Facing
History
and
Ourselves
 Summary:
This
lesson
outline
explores
the
complicated
philosophical
roots
of
the
concept
of
 "race.

htm
 (PDF
Version)
 http://www.ushmm.com/2004/05/23/opinion/23READ. 6
New
York
Times
newspaper
articles
during
the
Armenian
Genocide
 6.
by
Thomas
Feyer
 www.

 5.teachgenocide.com/talk/content/?040503ta_talk_bass
 Themes:
Examines
the
issues
around
calling
the
Armenia
a
“Genocide”
and
The
New
 York
Time’s
reluctance
to
use
the
word.
US
complacency
during
the
Armenian
 genocide.
 The
New
Yorker.teachgenocide. Overhead
for
Class
Discussion:
Definition
of
Genocide
 4.newyorker. 
 The
New
York
Times
and
the
Armenian
Genocide:
A
Lesson
Plan
for
High
School
Students
 (Available
for
free
online)
 http://www. The
International
Definition
of
Genocide
and
the
Armenian
Case:
Student
Worksheet
 One
 Asks
students
to
compare
the
definition
with
the
facts
included
in
a
New
York
Times
 article
during
that
time.org/files/The%20New%20York%20Times%20and%20the%20Armeni an%20Genocide.
Updated.nytimes.
 3.pdf
 Created
by:
The
Genocide
Education
Project
 Themes:
Armenian
Genocide.
the
definition
of
genocide. Additional
Resources:
 Committee
on
Conscience
at
the
United
States
Holocaust
Memorial
Museum
 http://www.
 
 Genocide
and
the
Human
Voice:
An
interactive
online
classroom
for
students
 .
a
little
background
on
the
creation
of
the
term
including
 about
Raphael
Lempkin.org/conscience/alert/
 Themes:
Keeps
tabs
on
current
situations
around
the
world
where
genocide
could
or
is
 occurring.
“Dept. “The
New
York
Times
and
the
Armenian
Genocide”
reading
and
guided
questions
 Reading:
Describes
how
New
York
Times
covered
the
Armenian
Genocide. Worksheet
Two:
Writing
a
Letter
to
the
Editor
 Asks
students
to
write
a
letter
to
the
New
York
Times
telling
them
the
role
that
media
 can
play
in
stopping
genocide
and
uses
a
current
reference
from
ushmm
Committee
on
 Conscience.html?ex=1127534400&en=f60bee04cf c9046c&ei=5070&oref=login
 Themes:
Answers
frequently
asked
questions
about
Letters
to
the
Editor.
 2.
of
Style:
Word
Problem”
 Issue
of
2004‐05‐03
 Posted
2004‐04‐26
 www.
media
as
an
advocacy
tool
 Includes:
 1.org/teachingguides/index.
 The
Letters
Editor
and
the
Reader:
Our
Compact.
a
little
 background
on
the
genocide.


Nicole’s
real
life
journey
to
the
village
of
her
grandmother.com/Zlatas-Diary-Zlata-Filipovic/dp/0140242058 Author: Filipovic. Zlata. this collection of diary entries from an eleven year old gives an important perspective on life in Sarajevo.php?content=2007‐01‐ 05&menupage=Central+Africa
 Themes:
Definition
of
genocide. Penguin Books.
 student
activism
 Includes:
 15
minute
DVD
 Preparation
and
Debriefing
Resources
and
Activity
Questions
 1. or passages from it could easily supplement a general discussion of the former Yugoslavia.
now
in
Eastern
Turkey.
Teachers
will
be
able
to
create
classrooms
 within
this
interactive
plan
where
they
will
list
their
students
(not
personal
information
about
 students
will
be
collected)
obtaining
for
each
a
user
name
and
password
to
access
the
lesson.org
 Created
By:
The
Genocide
Education
Project
 Summary:
This
interactive
online
classroom
provides
students
a
background
to
the
history
of
 the
Armenian
Genocide
and
the
effects
of
the
denial
of
the
Genocide
on
subsequent
 generations. Debriefing
Questions
 6. Preparation
Activities
 5.
Each
section
includes
an
assignment
composed
of
short
 answer
questions
and
a
writing‐based
assignment.

 As
students
progress
through
the
plan.org/conscience/analysis/details. 1995.
rescuers.ushmm.
 The
tutorial
is
divided
into
five
sections.
 illustrates
the
continued
pain
that
genocide
brings
and
the
fortitude
of
those
searching
for
 truth. Organized by entry.LearnGenocide. (Book available for purchase online) http://www. Summary: Almost a parallel to The Diary of Anne Frank. ISBN: 0140242058.
aftermath
and
reconstruction. Timelines
 3. What
is
Genocide?
 2.
Rwanda
genocide. 
 Rwanda:
1994
 
 Defying
Genocide:
Movie
and
Classroom
Guide
(Movie
and
guide
available
for
free
online)
 Created
By:
Committee
on
Conscience
of
the
United
States
Holocaust
Memorial
Museum
 http://www. Historical
Background
 4.
the
assignments
they
complete
will
automatically
be
 saved
under
their
user
name
for
teachers
to
view
at
a
later
date. the book is a great read for junior high to high school students.amazon. Rwanda
and
Genocide
Today
 . 
 “Nicole’s
Journey”
(Available
for
free
online)
 
www.
 Bosnia:
1992‐1995
 
 Zlata's Diary: A Child's Life in Sarajevo.


Students
will
also
have
the
opportunity
to
learn
about
 both
the
International
Military
Court
of
Justice
and
the
gacaca.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/teach/ghosts/
 Movie:
http://teacher. Picture
and
Slideshow
with
audio
commentary
by
Jerry
Fowler
 .
and
 diplomatic
failures
that
enabled
the
slaughter
of
800.
to
the
UN
peacekeepers
stationed
 amid
the
carnage
who
were
ordered
not
to
intervene. Pre‐Viewing
Lesson
Plan:
 Learning
about
Rwanda
 Students
will
learn
about
key
events
in
Rwandan
history.shop.ushmm.
to
those
holding
positions
of
power
at
 the
White
House.
lesson
plan
 available
for
free
online)
 Lesson Plan: http://www.
They
will
discuss
the
meaning
of
genocide
 and
explore
different
points
of
view
in
reporting
an
historical
event. Post‐Viewing
Lesson
Plan:
 The
Big
Picture
 Students
will
explore
the
different
actions
and
reactions
of
people
and
groups
who
 were
involved
in
Rwanda. Ethnicity
in
Rwanda
 Ghosts
of
Rwanda:
Movie
and
Lesson
Plan
(Movie
available
for
purchase
online.
the
grass‐roots
level
courts
for
 those
who
participated
in
the
genocide
but
were
not
leaders.jsp
 Created
By:
PBS
Teachers
Center
 Summary:
In
addition
to
interviews
with
key
government
officials
and
diplomats.
 2. Viewing
Lesson
Plan:
 Student
Viewing
Guide
 Students
will
be
assigned
to
take
notes
from
a
particular
perspective
while
viewing
 the
film.
Through
these
accounts.
FRONTLINE
illustrates
the
social.
and
 the
basic
principles
of
the
United
Nations.pbs.
 
 Darfur:
2003‐Present
 
 Sudan:
Staring
Genocide
in
the
Face
(Available
for
free
online)
 http://www.
 4.
 3. Lesson
Extension:
 The
Aftermath
of
Genocide
 Students
will
read
articles
and
consider
what
happens
after
genocide.org/home/index.
the
class
will
discuss
the
impact
of
the
film.pbs.
political.
the
two‐hour
 documentary
offers
groundbreaking.
 Includes:
 1.
As
a
large
group.org/conscience/alert/darfur/staring_genocide_in_the_face/
 Created
By:
United
State
Holocaust
Memorial
Museum
 Includes:
 1.
eyewitness
accounts
of
the
genocide
from
those
who
 experienced
it
firsthand:
from
Tutsi
survivors
who
recount
the
horror
of
seeing
their
friends
and
 family
members
slaughtered
by
neighbors
and
coworkers.
terms
used
in
the
film.000
people
to
occur
unabated
and
 unchallenged
by
the
global
community. 
 7.

Questions
about
Slideshow:
 1.
and
whether
or
not
it
is
a
“genocide.
Analyze
the
conflict
 through
a
human
rights
lens.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/congojournal/
 Created
By:
United
States
Holocaust
Memorial
Museum:
Committee
on
Conscience
 .takepart.
To
identify
 rape/sexual
violence
as
a
tool
of
war.
To
encourage
students
to
brainstorm
conflict
resolution
options
that
 could
translate
into
action
 Includes:
 •
Lesson
1
is
an
introduction
to
the
conflict
 •
Lesson
2
examines
how
the
conflict
affects
women
and
girls
 •
Lesson
3
examines
how
the
conflict
affects
refugees
and
internally
 displaced
persons
(IDPs)
 
 Congo

–Present
 
 Ripples
of
Genocide:
Journey
Through
Eastern
Congo
(Available
for
free
online)
 http://www. What
feelings
do
these
photos
conjure
up?
 2. What
happened
to
them
before
they
reached
the
camps?
 
 Darfur
Now:
Movie
and
Lesson
Plan
(Movie
available
for
purchase
online. 
 Shows
photos
from
Darfur
and
Chad
from
a
trip
Jerry
Fowler
took
their
in
2004.”
 4.
Lesson
Plan
 available
for
free
online)
 Lesson
Plan:
http://www.
To
demonstrate
an
understanding
of
the
situations
and
 needs
of
refugees
and
IDPs.To
examine
personal
accounts
of
the
conflict
by
women
and
girls. Sudan:
Death
by
Designation
by
Jerry
Fowler
 Audience:
Students:
7th‐12th

 Discusses
the
issues
surrounding
the
naming
of
Darfur
as
a
“Genocide. In
what
ways
have
the
Darfurians
demonstrated
strength
and
 hope
for
the
future?
 4.com/darfurnow/studyguides_darfur.html
 Created
By:
Melissa
Robinson
and
Take
Part
 Themes:
origins
of
the
conflict
taking
place
in
Darfur
and
eastern
Chad.
Identify
the
major
players
of
the
conflict.takepart.
 and
by
refugees
and
IDPs. What
kinds
of
struggles
do
Darfurians
have
to
deal
with
in
the
 camps?
 3.
Demonstrate
an
 understanding
of
the
human
rights
violations
being
committed
in
the
conflict. Possible
Activities
 a.
Jerry
 explains
the
photos
and
gives
us
a
look
into
the
daily
lives
of
Darfur
refugees.html
 Movie:
http://www.”
 3.com/darfurnow/index.
 2. In
Sudan:
Staring
Genocide
in
the
Face
by
Jerry
Fowler
 Article
that
gives
some
historical
context
to
the
current
situation
and
talks
about
the
 necessity
of
action
to
end
the
conflict.


child
 soldiers.
causes
of
genocide.
efforts
to
prevent
genocide
elsewhere.
role
of
human
rights
organizations
in
addressing
genocide.
how
students
can
raise
awareness.
attacks
on
villages/collapse
of
coping
systems. News
and
Watch
Journal
 . Discussion
Questions
 5.
 challenges
to
preventing.
rape
and
 counseling.
displacement
and
hunger.
first
hand
accounts
and
 photographs.
militias
and
armed
groups. Alternative:
Poster
to
inform
students
about
DRC
 4.
 Includes:
 




Activities
based
on
web
resources
provided
by
Ripples
of
Genocide
at
USHMM
website
 1. 
 Themes:
Events
in
DRC. Comparing
Accounts
 2. Interpreting
Images
 3.