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The 2012 phenomenon comprises a range of eschatological beliefs that cataclysmic or transformative events will occur on December 21,

2012. This date is regarded as the end-date of a 5,125-year-long cycle in the Mesoamerican Long Count calendar. Various astronomical alignments and numerological formulae related to this date have been proposed. A New Age interpretation of this transition postulates that this date marks the start of time in which Earth and its inhabitants may undergo a positive physical or spiritual transformation, and that 2012 may mark the beginning of a new era.[5] Others suggest that the 2012 date marks the end of the world or a similar catastrophe. Scenarios suggested for the end of the world include the arrival of the next solar maximum, or Earth's collision with a black hole, passing asteroid or a planet called "Nibiru". A far more apocalyptic view of the year 2012 that has spread in various media describes the end of the world or of human civilization on that date. This view has been promulgated by many hoax pages on the Internet, particularly on YouTube.[81] The History Channel has aired a handful of special series on doomsday that include analysis of 2012 theories, such asDecoding the Past (20052007), 2012, End of Days (2006), Last Days on Earth (2006),Seven Signs of the Apocalypse (2007), and Nostradamus 2012 (2008).[82] In his book 2012: It's Not the End of the World Peter Lemesurier has listed many misleading statements in these films.[83] The Discovery Channel also aired 2012 Apocalypse in 2009, suggesting that massive solar storms, magnetic pole reversal, earthquakes, supervolcanoes, and other drastic natural events may occur in 2012.
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Author Graham Hancock, in his bookFingerprints of the Gods, interpreted Coe's remarks

in Breaking the Maya Code[85] as evidence for the prophecy of a global cataclysm.

The predictions of doomsday or dramatic changes on December 21, 2012 are all false. Incorrect doomsday predictions have taken place several times in each of the past several centuries. Readers should bear in mind what Carl Sagan noted several years ago; extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. For any claims of disaster or dramatic changes in 2012, the burden of proof is on the people making these claims. Where is the science? Where is the evidence? There is none, and all the passionate, persistent and profitable assertions, whether they are made in books, movies, documentaries or over the Internet, cannot change that simple fact. There is no credible evidence for any of the assertions made in support of unusual events taking place in December 2012.