Volume XVIII Issue 5 ~ November/December 2009

November 20...
This past November 20 I was thinking about the amphibious assault on Betio, Island Tarawa Atoll some 66 wa years ago. On that day my father and a lot of other Marines boarded amtracs and Higgins boats which soon ns headed toward the beach under intense Japanese artillery bombardment and hails of machine gun bullets. Many men were killed, wounded, or maimed for life both physically and mentally. As all good reenactors do I dressed in my dungarees and laid out maps and books to explain to my family what their grandfather did thos those few days before Thanksgiving in 1943. They all paid close attention as we looked over Red Beach 2 and saw the steel curtain of Japanese defenses, the devastation of the island during the battle, and finally talked a about the e, vicious cost of war. Then I think I understood a little better why we are investing our time, effort, and tre treasure g into this endeavor called reenacting WWII. Yes there is in reenacting a measure of honoring the generation that t had to endure so much in their lifetime but with the end of this generation rapidly approaching soon there wil will dly be no one left to honor. Interestingly enough to me many reenactors scoff at this idea of honoring the WWII generation. Our job though, is to make sure the living and the generation to come will understand there was a ome time when people had something worth protecting. I think this is called freedom. In a small way if we can edom. persuade people of that idea, we are carrying on the burden of the greatest generation and actually many people before them. The main way to do this is make sure those who see 1939-45 as ancient history know the 45 war was a real event that happened to real people like my father. Fortunately for me, he made it through those 76 hours and the rest of the war. In any case, I hope that makes some sense and maybe a difference. Keep up aybe the good work. Please note this month we have another bylaw vote for a number of important issues for our organization. es The results of the previous by-law vote will be in the next issue of the Edge. See you at the next S&A formation! HRS Vice President, Jonathan Stevens n evens

December 2009
Dec 12, River Battle - General ETO, Ft Bellefontaine, MO. Contact: halfhourdoc@aol.com Dec 12, Christmas on the Ghost Front, Macomb, IL
(HRS logo marks HRS sponsored event.)

-13 Contact: mb_at_vburg@hotmail.com Dec 18, Stille Nacht Tactical, Ft. Benjaman Harrison -20 Fee: $10 Sign-up: stillenacht.eventbrite.com Dec 19, Battle of the Bulge, Big Lake, Minnesota. Fee: $15 Contact: travis17ss@yahoo.com

January 2010
Jan , Battle of the Bulge, Camp Clark, Nevada, MO 15-17 Fee: $20 Contact: dhruska@kc.rr.com Jan 26 , Battle of the Bulge, Ft. Indiantown Gap, PA -31 Rgstrn. Deadline: Dec 7 info@wwiifederation.org

February 2010
Feb 20, Tactical, Stone House Park, Earlville, IL Contact: Rich Russo vizsla25@sbcglobal.net

Pgs. 2 3 4 4 5-8 8-9 10 10-12 13 14-16 17-20 21 22

Title Open Letter to the HRS SNAFU Crossword Puzzle Fact or Farb?! Trivia & DVD Contest! A note about the HRS website. My Honor Flight Voyage In class... on Veterans Day Edge Ad Rates: Christmas Special! How to “Read” your Brass Another Semi-Auto MP44 Option? WWIIHRS Board Information Proposed By-Law Changes & Ballot The BackSpace 2010 HRS Membership App
And Much, Much More!

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www.w www.worldwartwohrs.org worldw wartwohrs.org
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An open letter to the HRS...
First, I wish someone would come up with a change that would allow for two classes of memberships. The Active and an Associate member. The Active is as now with one big change. I wish the requirement for the tedious method of renewal of having to have a signed statement from your unit commander to be 'Waived' for members of good standing after continuous membership in the WWIIHRS after five years. Then a new class of membership be added that being an 'Associate Member' for people with an interest but not those who participate in the actual battle reenactments. For wives, friends and perhaps people who enjoy just setting up displays or vending. This year I participated only in the last big battle on Sunday driving my 42 jeep about the rear of the Allied lines. I would like to comment from the viewpoint of one of the founders of the HRS and its first president that I was greatly moved by this year's Rockford, Ill. event. It was heartwarming to see how the hobby that I helped start has grown and improved, especially in regards to the authenticity and depth of the presentations. It was amazing also to see how the interest of the spectators particularly the young kids. I remember the very first WWII reenactment at J.B. in which Art Obermeyer and myself of the 38th Jagers were beset upon by about a half dozen GIs while being watched by some dozen spectators. So short were we that I handed my un-uniformed ten year old son who was sitting in the back seat of Art's Kubelwagen, my P38 loaded with a single blank round and told him to just point if out the window and pull the trigger. We did some pretty humble things back in those early days that I would not care to repeat now. When I began in earnest the task of jump starting WWII Reenacting my goal was simply that. To get it started. Clearly as I viewed that final battle on that day I could take solace that I had indeed attained one of my fondest wishes. I wish to express my thanks to every member of the HRS which in any way either small or large has contributed in the growth of "Our" endeavor. Additional: In closing though I would like to challenge the WWII reenacting community regardless of affiliation to stepping up and raising the bar even further. I would ask that all of us begin to refer to our unique activity as a "Sport" and not just a hobby. Many times I have reflected and tried to explain to the uninitiated that WWII reenacting is much like going deer or turkey hunting only much less boring and when we shoot our quarry we do not have to gut it or drag it out of the woods afterwards. Think about it. You have gear to buy, preparation, planning and a certain level of physical activity and yes, even skill involved. Today I no longer hunt live animals having found that I prefer either target shooting and reenacting to actually killing anything. But what difference would this make you might well ask? If the conception of our activity could be switched over to as a sport then perhaps many new venues might be opened up to our otherwise hobby. And consider how this might effect how the public and legislators might view the tools of our sport, namely the firearms used. Thanks again. Terry L. Johns 22 IPC

World War Two HRS Board of Directors 2009-10
President David Jameson, 2nd Inf. Division 15632 Polk Circle Omaha, NE 68135 (402)896-1345 dmjameson@frontiernet.net Vice President Jonathan Stevens, 9th Inf. Div. 0N349 Cottonwood Drive Wheaton, IL 60187 (630)221-1171 jstevensww2@sbcglobal.net Secretary Craig Dvorak, 2nd Mar. Division spartacus.3@juno.com Treasurer OPEN Allied Representative William Sheets, 505 PIR, 82 Abn. 6817 Everglades Court Indianapolis, IN 46217 (317)788-1836 jan@netdirect.net Commonwealth Representative Elliott James, No.11 Group RAF 497 Wagner Street Roseville, MN 55113 (651)489-1623 elliottwjames@comcast.net Axis Representative Scott Atchison, 6. SS "Nord" P.O. Box 61 Ossian, In 46777 (260)622-9153 ssnord1943@yahoo.com Website Staff Webmaster John Olsen, 9th Inf. Div. john.e.olsen@wheaton.edu Assistant Webmaster Joshua Olsen, 167th SPC wolfiejo@yahoo.com Newsletter Staff Editor Troy LaFaye, 167th SPC indieflmkr@aim.com Layout/Design Joshua Olsen, 167th SPC wolfiejo@yahoo.com Contributors
(No specific order)

167th Signal Photographic Co. Elgin/Hampshire Courier-News Terry L. Johns Tony Kelly Tim Scherrer Mike Bollow Melody Cook Robb Walters Renee Witkowski To submit articles/photos email edge_editor@167thspc.org

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Across
1. What was the largest and last amphibious assault in the Pacific? 3. Which was the last European capital to be liberated in May '45? 4. Who created "Willie and Joe"? 5. Which member of Hitler's inner circle was born in Alexandria, Egypt? 7. Where did the amphibious invasion "Avalanche" target? 8. Which country was "First to Fight"?

Down
2. The name of Hitler's private train? 4. What was the fastest propeller fighter plane ever built? 6. Which German city was the "most bombed"? e

Now! Go to page 4, commplete the “Fact or Farb!?” ?” trivia questions and you u could win this DVD!!!

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A Good Secret: Socket.Net
A few years ago one WWII HRS board member had the foresight to take advantage of a great program from an Internet Service Provider called Socket based in Missouri. Their “Internet Grant Program” provides free webspace for non-for-profit organizations and Churches. This board member applied for the webspace grant and Socket awarded the WWII HRS 20 megabytes. Last month we renewed our participation in this free program and increased our webspace to 50 megabytes. If you know of a non-for-profit organization that could use some help with webhosting, we highly recommend that you visit www.socket.net and inquire about their Internet Grant Program! Thanks Socket!
To view a trailer of this movie go to: tinyurl.com/2008wwii
You Win T Could his D VD

1 1. In the US Military what was known as the Military, “Silent Service”? A. The Submarine Fleet B. Grave Detail C. The 25th Monk Division 2. What was the RAF’s plan to employ all available aircrafts against the Luftwaffe as it reached Coventry called? A. “Operation Belfry” B. “Operation Steeple” C. “Operation Cold Douche” 3. What was the seagoing version of the RAF Spitfire called? (And, No, it’s not drinkwater.) A. Spewfire B. Doubtfire C. Seafire 4. Name the only German aircraft carrier to approach completion. A. “Werner Klemperer” B. “Graf Zeppelin” C. “Peter Strasser”

Now! If you have completed both “Fact or Farb!?” AND the “SNAFU Crossowrd Puzzle” , send your answers in an email titled “DVD Contest” to: edge_editor@167thspc.org

The first correct entry* will win this spiffy DVD of 2008 Reenactment Footage from the 9th ID Photo Gallery!
All other correct entries will receive a $5 coupon towards the purchase of this DVD!!!
(Regularly $20)

FREE

ved! Dr. Farbs appro
Volume XVIII Issue 5 olume lume ~

*Contest Info: C Info: fo: Entry Deadline is Dec. 20. Entry In the event that no entry t is correct, the closest will win. Void if you live in Farbinia or you are a pirate. (Seriously)

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My Honor Flight Voyage
By Tim Scherrer, 84th Infantry Division "Railsplitters"
“Are you serious?” Cinnamon, my Australian Cattle Dog looked at me with this unusual glance. Normally she is raring to go for anything, but when the alarm went off at 1:15am, this caught her off guard and out of form. I flipped on the light, showered, and jumped into my pre-arranged clothes. They were laid out in such a way that even I couldn’t mess them up at this early hour of the day. My plan worked and I was out the door by 1:45 and driving to the Columbia, MO Marriot Courtyard. This would be no ordinary day. The day would be long. I’d be up and about for close to 24 hours before heading back to bed again. The one thing that kept running through my brain all day was this phrase: “it isn’t about you.” It’s about the vets. They were the focus and even though I paid my $300 guardian fee, this was not going to be a vacation or sight seeing trip. This had a very specific purpose: I was going to Washington DC with the Central Missouri Honor Flight. Our task was this: take 80 Veterans (nearly all of them WWII and one Vietnam vet) to the nation’s capital and back in one day. The youngest WWII vet was likely born in 1928 and the oldest during WWI. About half of them are wheelchair bound, and many had health issues. A few might not live to see 2010, and many won’t ever see 2011. I walked in the door by 0200 and the room was already abuzz. I got my blue guardian shirt and put it on. A rush of emotions hit me. I was about to embark on a duty that I consider sacred. This is a day that many have called life changing. I didn’t know if it would change my life, but I knew I would remember it for the rest of my time here on Earth. I had thirty minutes to eat my breakfast and find my veterans who I would shepherd for the rest of the day. I got in line for my food, and started looking for my two vets. I had spoken with them on the phone, but hadn’t been able to make the preflight meeting to actually met them in person. I sat down with my breakfast and struck up a conversation with an army nurse, who had served at a military hospital stateside in Springfield, MO. After chatting with the nurse (while gobbling down my breakfast), I quickly found Les, a former anti-aircraft gunner with the 389th Coastal Artillery Battalion who served in the pacific war. He was wheelchair bound so that helped me locate him. My second vet, whose daughter was dropping him off that morning, hadn’t arrived yet. I went into the 02:30 guardian meeting, which was short and to the point: “Take care of the vets in every way. Do what needs to get done. Work to keep us on time.” These seemed obvious, but also the immediacy of the trip pulled them back into focus. I walked out of the meeting and it was close to 3am, so I checked at the registration desk trying to find my remaining veteran. I finally found him -- Jerry, a stateside navy flight instructor. Jerry had flown mainly SNJ’s, teaching new pilots how to fly. He had crashed more than a few planes while teaching students. Shortly, we started moving towards the buses, and I was pushing Les to the door. I realized the enormity of the challenge that lie ahead when we loaded Les’ wheelchair onto the bus. It was heavy, and we were taking 40+ of them the entire trip. We got them loaded and rolled out on time, about 0320 to the St Louis Airport. The trip down was quiet but I felt anxious. We received more briefings from our bus captain, Steve Paulsell, and listened to 40s music. Steve’s father served in E Company of the 334th Infantry. A Railsplitter. He wears his father’s cap on these many trips as his own subtle reminder of what this was all about. His sister, Mary, was also on the trip, and they are very dedicated to the program, both serving on the Board of Directors. Their father passed before the program had started. They took his picture with them on the first flight, back in May 2009.

Image © Stephan R. Brown 2009

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My Honor Flight Voyage (Continued)
As we crossed the Missouri River, we picked up a Missouri State Highway Patrol escort, and at the airport exit we added a Lambert Airport Police car to the parade. We arrived at the airport and began the process of unloading the vets and getting them ready to fly. The Transportation Security Administration was ready for our arrival, and had nearly shut down the regular passenger screening at the east terminal. To speed the process, the vets didn’t have to remove shoes. Les received the random full screening, which seemed so odd. This man, more than eighty years old, who fought in WWII, was being screened as a potential terrorist. He took it with a smile and soon we were at the gate. We loaded on the Southwest Airlines plane, and the baggage handlers loaded all of the wheelchairs. I got my guys on board and settled in for the flight. I took a seat next to my flying partners and new best friends, Bill and Ray. Every turn of an Honor Flight is an encounter with an amazing story, and this was no exception. Bill was a B-17 pilot who flew 31 missions over Germany. He started just before D-Day and ended by Christmas. He belly landed one B-17 in a beet field in Belgium, and his entire crew walked away from the crash. They spent a few days in Brussels until he made his way back to his unit to fly again. Ray served in the Navy as an undercover criminal investigator. He worked with the FBI on potential cases of sabotage in the South Pacific, mainly near Australia. It was already a long day, but the energy of the veterans is inspiring. I never thought about being tired. The opportunity of being with these 77 men and 3 women was precious, and fleeting. I wanted to take it all in. The flight was a quick -- two hours and we had landed at Baltimore. Two airport fire trucks shot their water cannons over the plane in an arch before we arrived at the gate. We let the regular passengers deplane, before the vet’s receive a special welcome from the Honor Flight Baltimore Ground Crew. I pushed Les up the jet way, and we entered into a room of applause, handshakes and everyone saying thanks. Most of the crowd was not Honor Flight staff, but were regular passengers who spontaneously joined the welcome. Jerry met some long lost relatives at the airport, and spent some time with them. Once we were reconstituted, we got them moving towards the bus for the trip into DC. Anytime we changed transportation, the arduous task of loading and unloading all of our gear, wheelchairs, and vets occurred. That meant some riding the wheelchair lift, some walking off their wheelchairs onto the bus, and some walked all day. Breaking the code of how to load the gear on the buses was a challenge early on, and loading out of Baltimore was probably the hardest task. Enroute, a video of the building of the WWII Memorial was shown, so we could all appreciate the effort that went into it. We drove around the mall, seeing the Smithsonian, the Capital, and a distant glimpse of the White House, which had a big tent in front that blocked the view. I was disappointed many of the vets who had never been to DC, didn’t get to see it. The moment had arrived to visit the WWII Memorial, so we pulled up and started unloading. I pushed Les through the Pacific Gate with Jerry in tow. We walked around and I took Les to the area near the fountain that had New Guinea on it, where he served. He posed for a couple of pictures, and we went looking at the plaques on the side walls, trying to find one similar to the 40mm Bofors he served on. We never found it, but we did tour much of the memorial, and both were deeply moved by it. We then posed for the group picture, in front of the gold star wall, each of which represented 1000 deaths. We did a group photo of the vets, and then one with guardians, followed by loading the bus. From the WWII Memorial, we crossed the Potomac River into Arlington National Cemetery. They had switched to hourly changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Unknowns, and we tried to sweet talk our way up the hill to the site. It didn’t work, and thus began the most arduous part of the day. We had to move the vets from the parking area, through the visitor’s center, and wait for the tour-mobile. This journey seemed overly long and completely unnecessary. I remember thinking that the only thing missing was a tire obstacle to step in, and barbed wire to crawl under. Because of this wait, we missed the changing of the guard. Fatigue was setting in for the vets and the long wait wasn’t helping matters. When we got our tour mobile, it was a high step, so we had to lift or brace most of the vets for boarding. We also loaded all the wheelchairs on it, which was a 3.5 foot lift for each chair. Continued Next Page

Image © Stephan R. Brown 2009

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We were dropped on the hill below the Tomb, so we reversed the order and physically unloaded most vets and their chairs. I pushed Les up the long hill. Jerry got around pretty well, but one of the doctors on the trip recommended he be put in a wheelchair. We all made it up to the Tomb and watched the guard march with precision. Staying for the next changing of the guard was not feasible, so we departed. The tour mobile delay also caused us to miss the Iwo Jima Memorial. The focus is always on the Memorials, so sometimes the less important stops get dropped, as in our case. Once the arduous work of returning back through the visitor’s center was completed, we loaded onto our regular bus for the next stop. The final stop in DC was the Korea and Vietnam Memorials. We parked near the Korea Memorial, so if someone wanted to see the Vietnam Memorial, they had a short walk to get to it. My guys wanted to stay on the bus, so I exited and walked with a Navy man and a vet from an armored division. The Korea Memorial was moving, and impressive. I had been to the Vietnam Memorial on my last trip to DC, so this time I skipped it. I did get to hit the souvenir stand at the site. They didn’t have much related to these sites, but I did get a Korea Memorial coin. We boarded the bus again and headed out of DC in rush hour traffic. We arrived at Baltimore and were met with the Honor Flight Ground Crew again, who helped us get them off the bus, and through TSA. We had dinner at the airport and I made sure my guys got fed. Jerry had some different relatives meet him, and they stayed with him until the flight left. I sat and talked more with Les and a few others before we left. We loaded onto the plane, and settled in for our flight back to Missouri. The length of the day was hitting all of us, but I found Bill and Ray, and we laughed and joked the whole way home. They told war stories, I told mine, and we talked about our lives. I got invited to dinner if I was ever in their towns, and we finished the bonding process that servicemen and women do. About half way to St Louis, we started mail call. The vets loved this, and they received letters from patriotic citizens, as well as their children, and grandchildren. I think this choked all of us up as we passed the letters around the plane. Mail Call remains a pleasant memory to these veterans after so many years. We landed in St Louis and loaded up for our final time. The pleasant clear skies unseasonably warm temperatures in DC were gone, and Missouri was cold and rainy. I watched the Southwest Airlines crew get soaked unloading our gear and wheelchairs. They also dried the chairs off, ensuring the vets were as comfortable as possible. It was 2130 and we still had a hundred miles to go. The cruise back was subdued but a feeling of accomplishment fell over the bus. Steve, our bus captain, played 40s music, read jokes and told funny stories. When we were 25 miles from home, a contingent of Patriot Guard Riders on motorcycles joined our buses in the 44 degree rain. They were wearing rain gear, but it still had to be cold. The sound of the bikes could be heard inside the bus and vets appreciated the escort. I have tremendous respect for the riders. They supported the funeral of a fallen soldier I knew. The brother was killed in action with the Army and buried at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery. The Riders shielded the family from protestors who wanted to make this funeral about their cause, distracting from the true fallen hero. We arrived at the Marriott at 1230am. A crowd of probably 200 waited in the cold and wet conditions, and applauded each vet as they came off. Most quickly moved out of the weather into the hotel, and I said my goodbyes. Les’ wheelchair hadn’t been seen since the St Louis airport, and for most of the day he had used one of the common user chairs borrowed from the VA hospital. I knew I had to find his chair. I went back out in the rain and crawled under three busses until I found the silver chair with the name Lester on the side. I took it into him, and he seemed relieved. His family wasn’t coming until the next morning to get him, so I took him to his room. He got settled in, and I knew my work was done. I got in my truck, drove home, and met my very confused dog. Her waggy tail and approving eyes had no idea of the journey I just completed. I got to bed at 0115. dea
Continued Next Page

Honor Flight Voyage (Continued) The next day I was up at 0530 to drive back to where I work, and give the Practice SAT exam to 55 juniors at the academy. I got the job done, and the quiet hours of proctoring the exam let me ponder the journey. We took 80 veterans, most of them over 80 years old, half of them in wheelchairs, 2000 miles to see their memorials for their service over a single day. None of them paid a dime to go, and the trip was a major logistical accomplishment involving buses, planes, TSA, medical personnel, the memorial staffs, and the volunteers. It was an amazing day and I think these quotes sum up the purpose and mission of Honor Flight. These are printed on the veteran and guardian shirts.
“Never in the history of warfare was so much owed by so many, to so few.” Winston Churchill” "We can't all be heroes. Some of us have to stand on the curb and clap as they go by." Will Rogers

In class... on Veterans Day
You know what's "bogish?"

Article By Dave Gathman and Emily McFarlan, Photos by Michael Smart, reprinted courtesy Elgin/Hampshire Courier-News.

Taking the day off school for Veterans Day, according to 9-yearold Jordan Matthews of Carpentersville. It's a word the Parkview Elementary School fourth-grader said he made up that means "not cool." "I thought it was bogish to have the day off, because how are you going to learn about Veterans Day?" Instead, Jordan and other students across Community Unit School District 300 were in class on Veterans Day this year for the first time. Most schools celebrated by doing something with veterans, ranging from a World War II re-enactment with earth-shaking artillery at Hampshire Middle School to a flagtoting march at Parkview Elementary in Carpentersville.

Hampshire Middle School
At Hampshire Middle School, students from there and adjoining Hampshire Elementary filled the stands on both sides of the football field as 24 members of the World War II Re-Enactment Society -- half dressed as American or British troops, the other half as Germans -- reproduced a small battle. When the fight was over, the Allies had triumphed, but five GIs lay dead or wounded, along with the eight German soldiers who had not surrendered. The kids in the stands cheered wildly.

If you want to get involved with Honor flight, go to their webpage and find your local chapter. http://www.honorflight.org/

FIG Registration
Registration Deadline for the 65th Commemoration of the Battle of the Bulge at Ft. Indiantown Gap, PA is December 7, 2009. A Facebook page has been set up for any midwest-based reenactors to coordinate carpools, etc here:
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=195110015659

“[Ian Baker] talks to Hampshire Elementary School pupils Wedneday after the mock World War II battle.” Photo Michael Smart

The event itself will take place January 26th 31st, 2010. For more information on the event visit: www.wwiifederation.org (Note: This is a NON-HRS EVENT)

"Remember that in our battle, the dead get up and walk away," the announcer reminded. "In the real war, the dead stayed dead." The elementary kids then surged against a chain-link fence as the re-enactors passed out empty shell casings. But as 40year-old Tim Peters of Hampshire watched, he was thinking back to his Marine Corps service in Operation Desert Storm. Continued Next Page

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"It's good to show kids what it takes to ensure freedom," Peters said. "I remember being scared to death, knowing we were going up against the fourth-biggest army in the world. If we had finished the job then, maybe my two nephews wouldn t be over there now. now." ephews wouldn't
Photo by Michael Smart

Inside the middle school, children had been studying the 1944 airborne invasion of Holland for a special reason. Principal Jim Wallis's father, Hugh Wallis, had fought in that battle with the 82nd Airborne Division and had been wounded. Students read a book written by an officer in Wallis's unit, saw parts of the movie "A Bridge Too Far," got to talk with Hugh Wallis and viewed memorabilia from the 82nd Airborne. [Other schools in the area had their own Veteran’s Day events, several of which were also invited to watch the battle at Hampshire Middle School.]

(Above) Craig Dvorak demonstrates his Garand at Hampshire Middle School. (Below) Students watch the battle at Hampshire Middle School’s football field.

“World War II re-enactors stage a mock battle between the Allies and the Germans on Thursday at Hampshire Middle School. Featured at the event were Hugh Wallis, the principal's father, who was part of the 82nd Airborne during World War II; and a mock battle involving rifle and cannon fire with blank rounds.”

Photo Mic Michael Smart

Photo by Michael Sma el Smart

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Edge Ad Rates: Christmas Special! s: S
Through New Year’s Day ALL ar’s y ’ advertisement rates are HALF-OFF! e

How to "Read" your Brass
By Robb Walters of Atlantic Wall Blanks

Full-Page Ad: $75! Half-Page Ad: $50! Quarter-Page Ad: $37.5! As always, FREE limited space for members!
Need assistance designing an ad?

WE CAN HELP!
Email edge_editor@167thspc.org for more info!

any people often ask how they know if their blank adpated weapon is working correctly. Either the weapon seems to work fine but they are worried if they are doing it right or they are having problems getting the weapon to work properly. Quite often this can be determined by "reading" the brass that is ejected after firing.

M

Come and Celebrate a d Celebrate

How your fired brass should look. Once fired, the brass Just Right should be opened up completely at the crimp. This will either take the form of a straight walled case for stronger walled cases, (M82 on the left) or the more "rose" like shape as seen on the weaker 8mm case on the right. Both of these examples are of well blank adapted weapons with the BFA set for the correct operating pressure. If your crimp is not open as far as the rounds pictured above - generally the weapon is operating under optimal pressure. Carefully reduce the orifice in your BFA until you see the crimp looking like these examples. This will provide the proper amount of gas blow back to operate reliably. During the winter, the burn rate of the gunpowder will be suppressed causing weak extraction / jams on feeding and extraction / low cyclic rate on full auto weapons. A crimp that is not fully open due to a lack of pressure will make these problems worse. Examples of a case mouth with too large of a o blank orifice creating too little pressure can be seen below.
pressure < Severe underM82 Blank. sign in fired

FRIDAY DEC. 4th
...Walk thru the Fort and see how Soldiers lived & celebrated Christmas in each Era... 5pm - 10pm m
ADULTS - 6.00 * CHILDREN - 3.00 * VETS - 3.00 FOR INFORMATION AND TICKETS PLEASE CALL

215-685-4167 -685-4167

Fort Mifflin
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at Historic
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.30-06 rounds from an M-1 Garand

2 rounds on left - severe under pressure Middle 2 rounds - moderate under pressure Case on right - correct pressure.

Under pressure - too large of a blank orifice The round [in the picture on page 10] has been fired with a blank adaptor set for a far higher pressure round. The pressure was released out the crimped end of the blank, but since there was no / not enough pressure to blow back the case mouth was not forced open. The case was not ejected and the weapon had to be cleared by manually pulling the charging handle. While not damaging to the weapon, it defeats the purpose of semi / full auto function as it will not cycle the action reliably. In the rare cases where the weapon will cycle and still look like this, operation in the winter will be poor at best. Moderate under pressure. As seen in the picture (above right - middle) It is possible for a weapon to function with moderate under pressure. These cases will have partially open crimps. With moderate under pressure, you are almost tuned in. Carefully reduce the orifice size in your BGA by about 1 drill bit size and retest. (Example - most Blank adaptor orifice sizes are measured in standard index drill bit sizes 1/8, 9/64, 5/32 etc. So for this example if you are running a 3/16 BFA you would need to drop the orifice to 11/64) You should find that the weapon ejects the cases a little farther / sounds ej a bit louder / ru more reliably. runs pressure is a major cause of Moderate under p weapon malfunction in the winter. As stated weather before, the cold weathe will reduce the burn rate of the powder inside the blank. If you are te already running the blank / weapon - under optimal pressure, odds are that it will give you l t

problems with proper cycling in the cold winter air. Spent cases should eject 3-5 feet away in most weapons. If all the parts are in working order, weak ejection is usually a sign of under pressure. A temerpature drop of about 30 degrees will start to effect the pressure of the weapon. Moderate under pressure as a good thing - If your weapon works fine in the warm summer with the case mouth being all the way open, but shows signs of moderate under pressure in the winter you are safe to run that weapon / blank / BFA combination all year round. If you have an adjustable BFA you can reduce it in the winter to make sure the weapon is reliable. Just be sure to change the BFA back to the larger size in the summer. For this reason, many people will try to keep one orifice size with proper pressure in the summer and moderate under pressure in the winter. Over pressure - too small of a blank orifice. There are several ways to tell if the pressure is too high. Many times the weapon may jam quickly, bind, blow parts off or a dozen other malfunctions. Short of the weapon telling you that you are running the blank with too much pressure, you may also tell by the brass. Often weapons are run with moderate over pressure without weapon damage. Often you may get away with this for quite some time, but over pressure is still over pressure. Over pressure will cause small part damage and premature wear on all operating parts reducing the life of the weapon and causing many common minor operating problems in the field. Looking at the brass, it will be evident by the primer backing out of the primer pocket or ether. being blown out all together. If you see the y primer protrude slightly with no other signs of over pressure and see it rarely don't worry abou about it. If you see it often or with other signs you risk signs, pon damaging the weapon starting with the extrac-

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tor along with numerous other potential problems..

Edge Deadlines
Submit your Articles/Photos BEFORE these dates!:

Over pressure signs at the case mouth. The picture above shows signs of over pressure at the mouth of the case. If the crimp is damaged, mangled or twisted over itself, the pressure is too high and the blank orifice should be gradually increased until the case mouth looks closer to the picture at the top of the page and the weapon functions reliably. Continued use of the weapon with pressure this high will cause excessive wear or damage to the weapon. Case mouth dents. Below is a picture of case mouth damage from ejection - not pressue. This is not to be confuzed with over pressure. Note that the case mouth is not completly open but close enough to consider it well within acceptable limits. The dent on the case mouth is from the weakend case hitting the weapon on as it is being ejected. Often with live ammunition this will be a small dent. With blanks - the crimp creates a weak spot and the usual dent will form a fold. This is pretty common and should not be be a concern. The pictured case was fired in a M-1 Garand with a .171 (11/64) BFA at 75 degrees F. Continued use at .171 or increasing the orifice to .187 (3/16) and watching for under pressure signs are in the cold winter a both reasonable options.
Note, not all weapons are the same. These are general guidelines. For further detail or additional questions de please contact us at atlanticwallblanks@sssnet.com ase atlanti or call Robb. Monday - Thursday noon -7:00pm. l Thu www.atlanticwallblanks.com www.atlanticwallb

Jan-Feb Issue: 15 Dec. 09 Mar-Apr Issue: 15 Feb. 10 May-Jun Issue: 15 Apr. 10
Send them to: edge_editor@167thspc.org

Think Something in the bylaws should be different?

ANIDEA?
Have A Comment?
And
That's what you're

GOT

allied, Axis
Representatives are here for! o t Here's how to contact them:
Allied Axis

Commonwealth

Scott Atchison, William Sheets, Commonwealth ealth 6. SS "Nord" 505 PIR, 82 Abn. Elliott James, mes, P.O. Box 61 6817 Everglades Court No.11 Group RAF roup Ossian, In 46777 Indianapolis, IN 46217 497 Wagner Street agner (260)622-9153 (317)788-1836 Roseville, MN 55113 ille, ssnord1943@yahoo.com ssnord1943@ya jan@netdirect.net (651)489-1623 51)489-1623 elliottwjames@comcast.net wjames@comcast.net

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Another Semi-Automatic MP44 Option?
The ingenuity of WWII reenactors is remarkable and you never know what will turn up at the next event. This time another semi-automatic version of the MP44 Strumgewehr has been created that is made in the USA by a WWII reenactor. This version is called the MP44K8 and is built by Kaitlyn Lemmons proprietress of the Diva Arsenal in Evansville, Indiana and is a modified HK93 rifle in .223/5.56mm. Interestingly the HK91 and 93 rifles could be considered descendants of the MP44, which brings the HK93 seemingly full circle back to its WWII heritage. At first glance the HK93 characteristics of the weapon have been well disguised but with limitations. All the parts are newly made using 1040 steel with no original MP44 parts used on the weapon. HK93 magazines are used but look similar to MP44 magazines although the HK93 holds 40 rounds of .223 compared to the original magazine with 30 rounds of 8mm kurz. For some t reenactors, especially Soviet reenactors, this may be a problem however the somewhat less expensive .223 3 blanks than 8mm kurz blanks s and 10 more rounds per r magazine should put a smile e on a soldat’s face. In the e future a version may be e made that is 7.62x39 but an n actual 8mm kurz seems s unlikely. The main physical limitations of this rifle in relation to an original MP44 are the grip, the cockf f ing handle, and magazine well. The grip is still the original HK93 part that is very different from an original MP44 grip. Reportedly a more authentic looking grip will be produced in the future using the HK fire control group and selector. The cocking handle and magazine well from the HK93 are more of a hurdle to visually modify to MP44 standards and probably will not be able to be adapted to a more original configuration without significantly reengineering the HK93 base rifle. With the change to the grip the weapon may become more appealing to the WWII German reenactor. The weapon can of course be blank adapted. Full-length .223 blanks work better than the short crimped type blanks however modification to the HK magazines are needed to correctly feed short blanks according to Kaitlyn. So far I am not aware of any reenactor feedback on this weapon beyond this brief overview. I would be interested in a full report from the field from those reenactors well versed with the d MP43/44 series rifle for future publication and submission to the Safety and Authenticity Comthenticity mittee. A couple problems exist but the MP44K8 is an interesting concept especially if a more p correct looking grip were to be developed. The retail price is $3495 for a rifle and one magazine. w fle A couple of other inte interesting projects from the Diva Arsenal are a semi-auto PPSH41 and repmi-auto lica BA64b Soviet armored cars along with oxy-propane simulators of Soviet machine guns. For more information see their website at www.DIVAArsenal.com or email them at nformation om t K8lyn2u@aol.com. 2u@aol.com.

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WWIIHRS Board Meeting Minutes: August 20, 2009
The meeting was opened at 7:05 with roll call. Those attending: Tim Scherer, Scott Atchison, Chuck Roberts, Lydia Roberts, Craig Dvorak, Jonathan Stevens, Elliott James, David Jameson, Bill Sheets, and Alan Militch. Old Business: The July minutes were read and no objections were noted. A motion was made to accept the minutes and the vote was in favor of accepting. Chuck Roberts asked to have discussion on the insurance included in the minutes. PAHA Allegations: A statement was approved by the board and forwarded to the PAHA attorney via our attorney. Defunct Units: 116th Panzer and 3 Commando will be checked by the representatives. The discussion was tabled until more information was available. By-Law Proposal: Two proposals exist, unit sponsor proposal from Doug Loge and an anti-nepotism proposal from Tim Scherer. David Jameson suggested that the host unit for an event already do this. Doug will be contacted for more information. The anti-nepotism proposal stated the relatives or members of the same household could not serve on the board at the same time. A motion was made to include this proposal in the Edge and seconded. The vote was unanimous. Edge Content: Troy LaFaye was not available so the discussion was tabled. Outstanding Bills: Reimbursement for secretary expenses needed to be paid to Jonathan Stevens and would be mailed out. Robert’s Armory accident: Information from Robert’s Armory insurance was that the bill would be split between Nautilus and Robert’s insurance. David Jameson would check with Nautilus. New Business: Unit Charters: 501st charter was incomplete. The unit commander was informed that more information was needed to complete the charter. Treasurer Report: Savings - $16,221.37; Checking $7,924.09; Interest was $1.27 with $16.61 for the year. Bills paid were Rochelle Printing $1560.26; Constructors $25.75; and Brown and Brown attorney fees $500. One check received from a member had insufficient funds and the HRS was charged $7. Secretary Report: 34 cards were issued in the previous month. 60 hard copies of the Edge were sent out. David Jameson stated we should end the paper Edge and go all electronic. Commonwealth Report: No report. Allied Report: No report. Two members of the 30th were missing cards. Axis Report: Scott Atchison asked about the SPR Tiger. David Jameson replied there was nothing to report yet as no one had seen the tank. /12th PAHA /12 Podolian Lancers at Rockford: On advice from the attorney the 12th Podolian Lancers should not ers attend Rockford. Some discussion ensued and a vote was called and seconded. The result was unanimous that Rockfor as the 12th Podolian L Lancers should not attend Rockford. Open Comments: 1 Alan Miltich asked about 16-17 year olds with weapons. David Jameson replied that the insurance did state ed 1. that any person must be 18 t use functional weapons. to The meeting was adjourned at 8:47

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WWIIHRS Board Meeting Minutes: September 17, 2009
The meeting opened at 7:05 and a roll call was taken. Those attending: Rhea Murwin-Jeske, Elliott James, Chris Kissinger, Tim Scherer, Craig Dvorak, Jonathan Stevens, Scott Atchison, Don Pitchers, Mike Blazejack, Ian Baker, Bill Sheets, Todd Machin, Richard Sobczak, and Ron Kapustka. Old Business: August Board Meeting Minutes: The minutes were summarized and a motion was made to accept them and 2nded. The vote was unanimous to accept the August minutes. PAHA Allegations Report from Attorney: No new information. Report on Defunct Units: 116th Panzer had no membership for three years. A motion was made and seconded to dissolve the unit. The vote was 5 votes to dissolve the unit. 3 Commando will be checked by Elliott to see if they still exist. Bylaw Proposal: The bylaw proposal from Tim Scherer regarding qualifications for board positions, removal of board members and removal of the Emergency Powers will be in the next Edge. Edge: will next be published approximately Sept 19. Rockford Age Questions: Information regarding the under age 18 no weapons policy will be in the Edge and on the website. Also at Rockford registration a “No Weapon” stamp will be used on S&A cards. New Business: Unit Charters: The 501st PIR unit has been contacted requesting more information. There may be a 508 PIR unit interested in forming. Treasurer Report: No report. It was noted a new Treasurer is still needed. Don Pitchers said he would be interested and is going to send a letter with his particulars to the board. Secretary Report: 13 more cards were sent out since the last meeting. The total is about 800 members. Commonwealth Rep: No report. Allied Rep: Bill Sheets reported that a 508th unit may be forming. A question was asked if Soviet units fall under Allied. Yes they currently do. Axis Rep: Scott Attchison reported that the SPR Tiger tank owner had some movies available on the internet showing the tank gun firing with propane. Safety and Authenticity Committee Report: The S&A rules update was complete and they are listed on the website and will be in the Edge. The update involved removing some contradictory language, clarified some rules, and added a few rules however they were substantially similar to the previous S&A rules. Open Comments: 1. Don Pitchers reported that he was an explosives expert and would be glad to offer help in regards to safety and other issues. 2. “Zak” Sobczak was making identifying armbands for the S&A inspectors. Rhea Murwin-Jeske was making similar button type S&A identification. 3. Mike Blazejack had asked if the PAHA individual members were allowed at the Rockford event this year. Jonathan Stevens replied they are not. 4. Ron Kapustka mentioned that more German units were needed for the woods battles at Rockford. 5. A question was asked if the Wade House tactical was happening this year. Rhea Murwin-Jeske replied it was Nov 7-8. A motion was made to close the meeting and seconded. The meeting was adjourned at 7:56pm. The next meeting will be Oct 15, 2009.

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WWIIHRS Bo Board Meeting Minutes: October 15, 2009 ber
The meeting opened at 7:04 and a roll call was taken. m aken. Sch Atchis Those attending: Tim Scherer, David Jameson, Craig Dvorak, Jonathan Stevens, Scott Atchison, Bill s, ott Do Sheets, Shari Tabor, John New Newton, Bryce Seyko, Rob Coffman, Gary Adkins, Scott Bacon, Michael Dollinger, Ed Godi, and Doug Loge. Old Business: minu September minutes were read. A motion was made to accept the minutes and was seconded. ne ve PAHA: No new information. A letter was sent to J. Stevens by Tom Wood, a representative of the PAHA from the attorney stating that technically they did not have a “lawsuit” against the WWIIHRS. PAHA leadership also contacted D. Jameson however no conversation could take place with attorney client privilege. Defunct Units: Some units to check on for the next meeting were 35th Div MPs and L Co., 1st Inf Div. Proposed ByLaw: The bylaw regarding nepotism and removal of the Emergency Powers Act was in the Edge for a vote. Edge: New deadlines were being drafted by the editor. Due to the expense of the printing and mailing the Edge would most likely be discountinued to be sent through the mail. Outstanding Bills: Two Edge bills needed to be paid. Also a reimbursement for J. Stevens needed to be sent. New Business: Unit Charters: 501st PIR decided to recall their charter and ask for a refund as they thought the process took too long. Their information was incomplete. 2/25 Austrailian unit commander Ed Godi explained his unit. He did have 5 people. His charter was sent to the PO box by mistake. Treasurer Report: No report Secretary Report: 136 people signed up at Rockford making a total pf 932 members. Commonwealth Rep: No report Allied Report: There was a 508th unit possibly looking to charter. B. Sheets would talk with them. Axis Rep: No Report. Safety and Authenticity Committee Report: About 8 S&A cards were pulled at Rockford for violations. All violations were corrected quickly. John Newton suggested that the under 18 no weapons rule be included in the S&A regulations. Regional Battles: Events were needed to qualify as regional events. “Seed” money would be available for certain items at events. Open Comments: 1. Mike Dollinger reported he was planning an event at Ft. Benjamin Harrison in Indianapolis for December. 2. Doug Loge requested that the S&A Committee receive the information regarding the insurance policy and the under 18 no weapons rule. At 8:27 the meeting was adjourned after a unanimous vote.

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PRO PROPOSED BY-LAW CHANGES GES
(See Page 20 for Voting Ballot.)

These changes were proposed by Doug Loge, and are approved by VP, Jonathan Stevens and following se nathan follow unit commanders: Rick Pennington, 709th Infanterie Division, Don Coffman, Herman Goring Flak Rgt. 1 mmanders: Penni an,

CHANGE #1
UNDER FAMILY MEMBERSHIP ER Minors, under the age of 16, will have no voting rights nor may they participate in tactical or public battles in any ctical capacity. They may, however, participate at Living History and Static Displays providing the portrayal is age-correct howeve he and non-political in nat nature. Minors, under the age of 16 shall not be allowed to handle any weapons, including edged weapons, ammunition, non-functioning reproduction armaments or ordinance of any kind or nature. am (Participation of under-18 members is covered in Safety rule #3.) REWRITE Minors, under the age of 16, will have no voting rights nor may they participate in tactical or public battles in any capacity. They may, however, participate at Living History and Static Displays providing the portrayal is age-correct. Minors, under the age of 16 shall not be allowed to handle any weapons, including edged weapons, ammunition, non-functioning reproduction armaments or ordinance of any kind or nature.

CHANGE #2
Section 2. RECOGNIZED CHARTERED UNITS 1. Qualifications for a charter: 1. Five (5) or more individuals of REGULAR or FAMILY membership. 2. Apply to the Board of Directors for a charter. 2. Charter application must include: 1. Full unit designation title (division, regiment, etc.). 2. Purpose and goals for re-enacting. 3. Complete history of unit. 4. List of authorized uniforms, weapons, equipment, and vehicles. 5. List of all awards, medals and ribbons worn by members of the unit and the unit's criteria for the wearing of the above mentioned. 6. List of names, addresses, and phone numbers of unit commander, safety, authenticity, and relations officers. 7. A statement of intention for following the Society's by-laws, safety, and authenticity. 3. This information must be submitted in writing with any required documentation. 4. The unit charter must be approved by the Authenticity Committee and ratified by the Board of Directors. Upon full review and approval Charter certification shall be awarded. 5. Members may form a unit comprising of less than five (5) members for the purpose of an impression that is supportive in nature, to wit: non-combative. The variance is for units that shall be non-tactical in nature or support related who wish to honor the non-combative services of all nations of WWII. This variance shall also allow for a support related impression to not be bound by authenticity requirements in regards to rank-structure as historical accuracy so requires. 6. The Unit Commander, Unit Co-Commander and/or Acting Unit Commander MUST be a member in good standing of the World War II Historical Re-Enactment Society, Inc. at all times. (10-2005) The proposed unit shall submit to the board a short and concise statement of the unit to be represented to include, but not limited to: 1. Unit designation, nationality, occupation or specialty, size, rank structure, uniforms and equipment needed. 2. Names and addresses of originating members, other units that members may belong to. 3. Whether other units in the society are currently a like kind impression, if so, how or why this unit should be separate. 4. Unit Commanders shall have the responsibility to substantiate, upon request, any questionable portrayals

within the support unit. d bmission 5. The board must approve or deny the variance within thirty (30) days of submission to the vice-president. If a denial of the grant is so passed, the reason must be stated specifically along with a recommendation for am amendth th ments to the submission. REWRITE 1. Qualifications for a charter: 1. Seven (7) or more individuals of REGULAR or FAMILY membership. ind . Charter application m include: must 1. Full unit designation title (division, regiment, etc.). d 2. Pu 2 Purpose and goals for re-enacting. 3. Complete history of unit. 4. Unit picture 5. List of authorized uniforms, weapons, equipment, and vehicles. 6. List of all awards, medals and ribbons worn by members of the unit and the unit's criteria for the wearing of the above mentioned. 7. List of names, addresses, and phone numbers of unit commander, safety, authenticity, and relations officials. 8. A statement of intention for following the Society's by-laws, safety, and authenticity. 9. Names and addresses of originating members, other units that members may belong to. 10. Whether other units in the society are currently a like kind impression, if so, how or why this unit should be separate. 11. The rank structure of the proposed unit should fit the actual # of members of the unit applying for a charter NOT the structure of the unit the being portrayed at full strength. Rank structure at events should always reflect the amount of members participating in that particular event. 12. This information must be submitted in writing with any required documentation. 13. Units may apply for a “Living History” charter which #6 and #11 does not apply. A living history charter prohibits the unit from attending any tactical events and from engaging in any battlefield activities whatsoever. 14. The unit charter must be approved by the Authenticity Committee and ratified by the Board of Directors. Upon full review and approval Charter certification shall be awarded. 15. Chartered units must submit a letter to the VP by January 30th each year detailing their activities for the previous year. Failure to do so may result in the charter being dropped by a majority vote of the BOD for abandonment or inactivity.

CHANGE #3
ARTICLE IV: UNIT RECOGNITION Section 3. OTHER GROUPS Other recognized re-enactment groups, approved by the Board of Directors, must abide by all SOCIETY By-Laws and Safety and Authenticity Rules to participate in Society events. Recognized re-enactment groups shall be defined as those groups that can provide evidence of current insurance coverage, whose safety and authenticity guidelines, by-laws and unit rosters have been reviewed by the SOCIETY's Board of Directors. A list of all recognized units will be published in the Society's publication(s) by the end of the first quarter annually. REWRITE ARTICLE IV: UNIT RECOGNITION Section 3. OTHER GROUPS Other recognized re-enactment groups, approved by the Board of Directors, must abide by all SOCIETY By-Laws and Safety and Authenticity Rules to participate in Society events. Recognized re-enactment groups shall be defined as those groups that can provide evidence of current insurance coverage, whose safety and authenticity guidelines,

by-laws and unit rosters have been reviewed and approved by the SOCIETY's Board of Directors. Individual units o y-laws oard of these re-enactment groups must be sponsored by a HRS unit in order to participate in an HRS sponsored event. Indie ate vidual units of these re-enactment groups will represent the sponsoring HRS unit in regards to safety, authenticity it auth and conduct for that event. Any inf infractions caused by the sponsored unit will be treated as if the sponsorin unit had sponsoring ct eated committed them itself. A list of all recognized reenactment groups will be published in the Society's publ publication(s) by hem d the end of the first quarter annu annually.

CHANGE #4
ARTICLE XIII: WWII H.R.S., INC. ETIQUETTE All members of the W WWII HRS shall, in keeping with our goals and objectives, be governed by and subject to the following code of ethics: o 1. The use of any item that does not belong to you without permission is prohibited. The theft of any item, no matter 1 u how small, is grounds for prosecution and dismissal from the Society. 2. While in a camp or barracks area, respect the right of privacy of other campers. 3. The use or possession of illegal drugs/narcotics is cause for immediate expulsion. 4. Failure to follow event posted or announced rules can and will lead to expulsion from the Society and from future Society events. 5. Keep safety and authenticity in mind at all times. 6. Do not use profanity, slander, libelous statements in correspondence to convey any threat, implied or real, to any member. 7. Members of the WWII HRS cannot use WWII HRS publications or events for any political purpose. 8. Proprietary Society membership information cannot be released without the Board of Directors as well and the individual member's approval. 9. It is the responsibility of all members and units present at any event to stand safety and authenticity inspections. 10. As a point of etiquette, keep late night activities reasonable. 11. Unit Commanders shall be responsible for the control and behavior of all minors in their unit. 12. Keep all campsites and barracks policed and secure. 13. Do not leave campfires unattended. 14. Do not argue over the calling of hits. 15. No flag other than the United States, and the British Commonwealth flags are ever to be saluted. The Nazi or Fascist salute is never to be used. No goose step marching by Axis troops. 16. All non-political flags may be displayed, however only American and commonwealth flags may be flown from a pole or staff. 17. Black SS, Brown SA, and political uniforms and Hitler Youth uniforms and any WWII German uniform that uses a swastika arm-band may not be used at any WWII HRS event. 18. When traveling to or from any event, do not display weapons or WWII German uniforms where they may be seen by the public. REWRITE 15. The Nazi or Fascist salute is never to be used. Goose step marching is not allowed. 16. a) All American units may use, display, or fly the US flag. The event host may designate only 1 non-US unit from each nationality to use, display, or fly only 1 flag/banner at events. -German units may only use, display, or fly a battle flag/standard no larger than 3x5. - Any German unit may use or display a non-political company standard. - Non US flags/banners may not be flown or hung higher than 9 feet nor higher than the main U.S. flag at the event. - Non US flags must always be raised and lowered without ceremony and may never be saluted. - National Socialist party flags are never ever to be flown, displayed or used at any event except as a captured flag or war prize. 17. Political black SS, SD, or brown SA uniforms may not be used at any WWII HRS event. 18. DELETE THIS

PROPOSED BY-LAW CHANGES: December 2009 WWII HRS Member Voter Ballot
PLEASE FILL IN ALL FIELDS

I, , Hereby approve/disaprove the (Print Name Here) following proposed by-law changes: Change #1: (Check One Box with an “X”) I Approve I Dissaprove Change #2: (Check One Box with an “X”) I Approve I Dissaprove Change #3: (Check One Box with an “X”) I Approve I Dissaprove Change #4: (Check One Box with an “X”) I Approve I Dissaprove My HRS Number is ______ Sign Here: X___________________ Send this Ballot to HRS Vice President, Jonathan Stevens at:

0N349 Cottonwood Drive Wheaton, IL 60187
BALLOTS MUST BE SUBMITTED BEFORE DECEMBER 31!!!!

Affordable

I IN THE NEXT EDITION OF THE

EDGE

The beginner’s Vintage Camera and how to use it. Events for the 2010 Reenacting Season. Submit your articles NOW! edge_editor@167thspc.org

Blank Ammo!

In the future this area will serve as an outlet for Dr. Farbs various rants. But, seeing as our beloved mascot is currently on a research expedition in the backwoods of Farbinia, we will leave you with the following photo:

The BACKSPACE

www.gophermunitions.com
Official publication of Battle of the Bulge 65th Commemoration, Ft. Indiantown GAP

Over 1500 reenactors! ATTENTION Submit articles and REENACTORS photographs for the List items for FIG 2010 newspaper sale in FIG "FIG LEAVE" related to LEAVE 2010 past FIG events or Battle of the Bulge! FREE ATTENTION REENACTING GROUPS
Recruit or or just toot your horn! - Submit articles or ads for your group for FIG LEAVE 2010 - Both Allied and Germans Welcome! Send submissions to - Don Sweet donsweet@verizon.net
Deadline for submission of articles, ads or photographs for FIG LEAVE 2010 December 31, 2009.

p g

Can you spot the farb?
Please email your random thoughts or rants to Dr. Farbs at: drfarbs@167thspc.org

SEE YOU IN THE NEXT EDGE EDGE

KNOCK IT OFF With them negative waves?!
~ Nov/Dec 2009 21

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Volume XVIII Issue 5

Calendar Year 2010 Application for Membership
1. Please print legibly – ALL INFORMATION MUST BE PROVIDED. Only ONE member per application. Family members must have a separate application. 2. All membership applications require primary unit and CO’s signature. Your application will be returned if it has not been completed properly. Only 2010 application forms will be accepted. 3. A signed and notarized PARENT/GUARDIAN FORM must accompany applications for applicants under 18. 4. Members’ unit MUST be chartered or in ‘Unit Forming’ status only. No other exceptions allowed.

LAST NAME: _____________________________ FIRST NAME: ____________________________MI: _______ STREET ADDRESS: _______________________________ CITY:_____________________ STATE:__________ ZIP CODE: _________________ TELEPHONE: _(_____)____________________ D.O.B: ____/______/_______ EMAIL: _______________________________________________________________________________ PRIMARY UNIT: __________________________________________________________________________ SECONDARY UNIT: ________________________________________________________________________ UNIT CO: _____________________________ UNIT CO SIGNATURE: ___________________________________ DUES: (Check one) _____$20.00 Single Membership _____$25.00 Family Membership (Two Members) _____$30.00 Family Membership (Three Members) _____$35.00 Family Membership (Four Members) _____$40.00 Family Membership (Five Members) Family members must reside at the same household address. I agree to follow the World War Two Historical Re-Enactment Society By-Laws, Safety and Authenticity rules and I understand that there are dangerous circumstances in re-enacting and do so at my own risk. I also certify that I am at least eighteen years old. (If under eighteen years of age, a Parent/Guardian Consent form must be submitted with application. The applicant acknowledges that, although membership is not denied to those less than eighteen years of age, certain restrictions apply. These can be found in the Society’s By-Laws.
APPLICANTS SIGNATURE: _________________________________________________ DATE: ____/ ____/______

___ I do ___ I do not give consent to publish the above information in a WWII HRS Membership Directory. Make your check/money order payable to: WWII HRS Mail your completed forms with payment to: CRAIG DVORAK HRS SECRETARY 5734 S. Peck Ave. Countryside, IL 60525

WORLD WAR II HISTORICAL RE-ENACTMENT SOCIETY, INC. RE-ENACTMENT PERMISSION/ACKNOWLEDGEMENT FORM FOR MEMBERS UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE The World War II Historical Re-Enactment Society, Inc. requires that all members under the age of 18 submit a signed and notarized Permission/Acknowledgement Form to the Society with their annual membership dues form. This is to ensure that the parents or legal guardians of underage participants are aware that their children are participating in a hobby that can present hazardous conditions and that may present a risk of bodily harm. Please read the following carefully and affix the proper signatures where noted. This document MUST be submitted along with the annual dues membership form. Any underage membership form received from an applicant under the age of 18 not accompanied by this form will be returned to the sender. We/I, the undersigned parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of ___________________________ ____________, a minor who is currently at least 16 years old, but not yet 18 years of age, understand he/she is desirous of becoming a member of, and participating in events sponsored by the World War II Historical Re-Enactment Society, Inc. We/I, the parent(s) or legal guardian(s) of the World War II re-enactment participant under the age of 18, acknowledge, understand and recognize all risks relating to World War II re-enacting, and understand that World War II re-enacting involves risks to the participant’s person including bodily injury, partial or total disability, paralysis and death. These risks and dangers may be caused by the negligence of the participant or the negligence of others. The parent(s) or legal guardian(s) warrant that the participant under the age of 18 agrees to abide by, and be bound under, the By-Laws and Safety & Authenticity Rules of the World War II Historical Re-Enactment Society, Inc. The above being understood and acknowledged we/I do hereby give our/my full approval and consent for such participation and membership. __________________________________ Parent/Guardian Date______________________________ The State of ___________________________ ______________________________County ______________________________ Parent/Guardian Date__________________________

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Sworn and subscribed in my presence this ___________ day of _____________, 200___ (Seal) My Commission Expires __________________ Notary Public_____________________

Nick Witkowski of the 4th ID Do Co. wonders what is next while others try to pass the time while waiting for battle. Taken at Operation Mystic Granite held at the Wade House in Greenbush, Wisconsin on Nov. 7, 2009 Photo courtesy: Renee Witkowski
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