Ilbert Bill From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Ilbert Bill was a bill introduced in 1883 for

British India by Viceroy Ripon that proposed an amendment for existing laws in the country at the time to allow Indian judges and magistrates the jurisdiction to try British offenders in criminal cases at the District level, something that was disallowed at the time. It was named after Courtenay Ilbert, the recently-appointed legal adviser to the Council of India, who had proposed it as a compromise between two previously suggested bills. However, the introduction of the bill led to intense opposition in Britain and from British settlers in India that ultimately played on racial tensions before it was enacted in 1884 in a severely compromised state. The bitter controversy deepened antagonism between the British and Indians and was a prelude to the formation of the Indian National Congress the following year. The Ilbert Bill: The single most important factor that strengthened the growing bonds of fellowship among the Indians was the agitation of the European community in India against the Ilbert Bill. The Ilbert Bill case was as follows: In 1873, the British government by an Act had proclaimed that in criminal matters no Indian judge could try a European accused. This discrimination between the Indians and the Europeans appeared to be inhuman and unjust to the liberal Viceroy Lord Ripon. Under his instruction Sir Ilbert, The Law Member of the Council, introduced a Bill who sought to abolish the discrimination between the Indians and the Europeans. This Bill of 1883 is popularly known as the 'Ilbert Bill'. With the publication of the bill the European community in India burst out in violent protest. b. Counter-Movement: The Indian Association under the leadership of Surendranath Banerjee started a vigorous movement against the European agitation opposing the Ilbert Bill. The fact of the case was that in 1873 the British government by an act created great discrimination between the Indians and the Europeans which appeared to be inhuman and unjust to Lord Ripon, the then Viceroy. Under his instructions Sir Ilbert, the Law Member of the Council, introduced a bill which sought to abolish the publication between the Indians and the Europeans. This bill was popularly known as the 'Ilbert Bill'. With the publication of the bill the Europeans community in India burst out in violent protest. The Europeans residing in India even organized themselves into an association to protect the right and privileges they had been enjoying.

The Indians, on the other hand, came forward in support of the Ilbert Bill. The Indian Association under the leadership of Surendranath Banner organized a counter-movement against the European opposition. But Ripon had to concede to the pressure of the European community. The new Act that was passed modifying the Ilbert Bill virtually signified victory for the European community.