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2008 ARIZONA NEWSPAPERS ASSOCIATION 69TH ANNUAL MEETING AND

FALL CONVENTION

OCTOBEr 10-11, 2008

program

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2008 ANA FALL CONVENTION

Board of Directors 2009 Arizona Newspapers Association, Inc. ANA Advertising Services, Inc.
Board of Directors 2009
Arizona Newspapers Association, Inc.
ANA Advertising Services, Inc.
Dick Larson Pam Mox John Wolfe Rick Schneider Adv. & Promo. Director Publisher VP News Development
Dick Larson
Pam Mox
John Wolfe
Rick Schneider
Adv. & Promo. Director
Publisher
VP News Development
Publisher
Western News&Info, Inc.
Independent Newspapers
Eastern Arizona Courier
Green Valley News and Sun
Tom Arviso, Jr.
Ginger Lamb
Don Rowley
Teri Hayt
Publisher
VP & Publisher
Publisher
Managing Editor
Navajo Times
Arizona Capitol Times
Arizona Daily Sun
Arizona Daily Star
Elvira Espinoza
Nicole Carroll
Jody VandenHeuvel
John Naughton
Publisher
Executive Editor
VP Mktg. & Bus. Dev.
Publisher
La Voz
The Arizona Republic
East Valley Tribune
Payson Roundup

ANA FALL CONVENTION 2008

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RETURN TO

THE FUNDAMENTAL QUESTION

As newsrooms across America continue to shrink, the only hope for traditional media is to let go of old models and embrace the potential of challenging multidisciplinary approaches.

By Chakris kussalanant

Many are the pressures on traditi onal

media these days, parti cularly on newspapers

in the U.S.

An example is a study released this summer by journalist Tyler Marshall and the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, which describes the news industry as confused by the contradictory forces shaping newsrooms, namely fi nancial pressures vs. the accelerated boost of digital tools online. The study based on 295 newspapers across America and in 15 citi es paints a grim picture in which 85% of those surveyed with circulati ons over 100,000 have cut newsroom staff in the last three years. Recent announce- ments of further newsroom staff reducti ons at large papers, coupled with current economic conditi ons, suggest the decline of newspapers will accelerate greatly in the next two years. However, a problem that arises with many studies and criti ques is that most are descripti ve, not explanatory. We know that newspapers are shrinking, but we don’t dis- cuss why. We understand editors and publish- ers are anxious, but we never get down to the reasons why. Newspapers are shrinking because they are unable to engage a broad audience (namely people 35 and younger). Newspapers have now offi cially become the medium of audiences above 55, and as these audiences decline, newspapers shrink further. The situati on can best be exemplifi ed by observing young people walking on the Ari- zona State University (ASU) Tempe campus, which is one of the largest universiti es in the country with over 67,000 students. Nearly all students go around with an MP3 player or multi media phone in hand, but few carry a newspaper. In other words, if young people are not investi ng in your product, you got no future. Moreover, compare a newspaper as a product to a multi media phone, and well,

Chandler Square Mall on July 12: People waited in line for four hours just to get a chance to buy an Apple iPhone.

there’s really no comparison. Newspapers haven’t changed much for the last 50 years, while digital technologies double their capac-

ity every year and exponenti ally every fi ve

years.

These are the true forces shrinking news- rooms across America. As for the ethical concerns many people have, they are mostly a dangerous distracti on from the fundamental questi on journalism as a practi ce is meant to answer: How do we help people stay informed? Under the weight of this simple ques- tion, any proclamation by news industry

leaders that journalism’s future needs to be a multi -platf orm acti vity is nothing short of an aft erthought to the Informati on Revoluti on. If

not the worst “duh” moment ever recorded in the industry’s history… In a world where anyone, from any- where and at any ti me can be a reporter with the click of a button, reporting on what’s happening can no longer be the focus of a newspaper. When the most iconic events of our ti me (9/11, the Southeast Asia Tsunami, Hurricane Katrina and the Iraq War) have been captured pristi nely by passersby with a small camera or mobile phone, is no wonder the average editor in America feels a litt le anxious. The result: newspapers get all ti ed-up in knots because they can’t fathom the idea that regular people could be generati ng the con- tent of their newspapers, but technology has

ANA FALL CONVENTION ■ 2008 ANA FALL CONVENTION ■ 2008
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ANA FALL CONVENTION ■ 2008 ANA FALL CONVENTION ■ 2008 7 Maria Konopken Candace Begody Foundation

Maria Konopken

ANA FALL CONVENTION ■ 2008 ANA FALL CONVENTION ■ 2008 7 Maria Konopken Candace Begody Foundation

Candace Begody

Foundation awards scholarship recipients

The Arizona Newspapers Foundati on is

Begody interned at the Tucson Citi zen and

pleased to announce that Maria Konopken

and Candace Begody are the two recipients

of its 2008 scholarship program. Each bud-

ding journalist received a $1,000 award for

tuiti on and books.

the Missoulian.

Begody is a founding member of the

Nati ve American Journalists Associati on stu-

dent chapter at UA and its former president.

In additi on to her journalism pursuits, she

Maria Konopken is a junior at Arizona

regularly helps coordinate student acti viti es

State University majoring in Digital Journal-

ism.” communiti es.
ism.”
communiti es.

at the Offi ce of Nati ve American Student

ism. She began her college career studying

Aff airs on campus. She is the recipient of

business, but was inspired by the immigra-

numerous awards, including the UA B.P.

ti on marches in downtown Phoenix last year.

Campbell Award for Outstanding Junior.

Konopken is very positi ve about the future

As a fi rst-generati on college student, she is

of the news industry. She loves storytelling,

honored by her awards, both scholasti c and

whether she’s writi ng or photographing the

professional, but feels “awards are merely a

story, and is conti nually honing her multi -

sign that I am on the right path in journal-

media skills.

She is a member of the Nati onal Asso-

Both Konopken and Begody show

ciati on of Hispanic Journalists and Toastmas-

remarkable talent and potenti al in the jour-

ters Internati onal. Konopken has interned at

nalism fi eld, and are a true asset to their

Lati no Perspecti ves Magazine. Her dream?

“I want to shed light on issues that aff ect

ANF sincerely thanks the following

people and the environment we live in,” she

newspapers for their contributi ons to the

says in her applicati on essay.

future of Arizona journalism: Arizona Capitol

Candace Begody is a senior at the Uni-

Times, Arizona Jewish Post, Eastern Arizona

versity of Arizona majoring in Journalism and

Courier, Fountain Hill Times, Green Valley

minoring in Indian Studies. She has worked

for the Detroit News as a metro reporter

and is a freelance writer for The Navajo

Times and RezNetNews.org. Prior to that,

News and Sun, Inside Tucson Business,

Navajo Times, Nogales Internati onal, Payson

Roundup, Sahuarita Sun, Sierra Vista Herald,

Tucson Weekly and the Vail Sun.

□ Check enclosed. □ Bill Me.
□ Check enclosed.
Bill Me.

Arizona Newspapers Foundation

- PLEDGE CARD -

Your pledge will fund scholarships as well as provide resources to train Arizona’s next generation of journalists.

This is my pledge for the 2009 campaign.

3 cents per subscriber, circulation:

__________

x .03 =

$

__________

This is the target amount recommended by the foundation board. We hope you’ll consider this amount but feel free to choose one of these alternatives:

5 cents per subscriber, circulation:

7 cents per subscriber, circulation:

x

_________

.05 = $ ___________

x

_________

.07 = $ ___________

Other - $ Charge to:

__________________

VISA MasterCard AMEX Discover

Card No

Exp. Date________

._________________________________________ Your name________________________________________Signature__________________________Date___________

Newspaper/Organization_____________________________

Address ___________________________________________

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8 2008 ■ ANA FALL CONVENTION Welcome to the Digital Age, where today’s publishers are facing
8 2008 ■ ANA FALL CONVENTION Welcome to the Digital Age, where today’s publishers are facing

2008 ANA FALL CONVENTION

Welcome to the Digital Age, where today’s publishers are facing enormous challenges.

Here are four inexpensive tools your newsroom MUST have in this changing media climate.

8 2008 ■ ANA FALL CONVENTION Welcome to the Digital Age, where today’s publishers are facing
8 2008 ■ ANA FALL CONVENTION Welcome to the Digital Age, where today’s publishers are facing

Must have: zoom H2 Handy recorder

What is it: Digital sound recorder

Where to fi nd it: www.amazon.com

MSRP: $199

Going out to cover the county commis-

sion meeti ng? As exciti ng as they can be,

it’s possible to miss a thing or two. That’s

where the Zoom H2 Handy Recorder

comes in. The Zoom records in brilliant

stereo on a memory card in .mp3 or

.wav formats. Just copy the fi les from the

card onto your computer and you have

sound. It’s also great for recording your

daily podcast.

Must have: Audacity

What is it: Digital audio editor soft ware Must have: The Flip Ultra Where to fi
What is it: Digital audio editor soft ware
Must have: The Flip Ultra
Where to fi nd it: www.audacity.com
What is it: Digital camcorder
MSRP: FREE!
Where to fi nd it: www.thefl ip.com
MSRP: $150
Audacity is a cross-platf orm audio editor that won the
SourceForge.net 2007 Community Choice Award for
It’s compact size, built-in USB port and
Best Project for Multi media. It allows you to remove
soft ware, plus high-quality video makes
noise, mix tracks, adjust speed and pitch and even pro-
The Flip a must-have! While it is a
vides a large array of digital eff ects. Tutorials are posted
stripped down version of a digital cam-
on the Web site at no charge to the user. And at this
corder, it’s simplicity and price has man-
price
How
can you not take advantage of what Audac-
aged to capture 13 percent of the video
ity has to off er?
recorder market in just one year.
Must have: Soundslides
What is it: Slideshow editi ng soft ware
Where to fi nd it: www.soundslides.com
MSRP: $40
Soundslides, which has both Mac and Windows versions, uses a very
simple drag and drop interface to arrange your image fi les along a
ti meline. Images can be arranged by simply reshuffl ing them into the
order you wish them to play, with an intuiti ve click and drag. Each
image can be expanded or contracted along the ti meline so that your
visuals are in perfect sync with the audio fi le you have added to the
presentati on. It is possible to drag these slide durati ons in real ti me
as you play through the audio track, so that it takes litt le more than
a few minutes to put together a polished presentati on.

ANA FALL CONVENTION 2008

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The Next ANA President

Dick Larson HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER The Daily Courier HIS PET PrOJECT ANA Marketi ng Committ ee HOBBIES
Dick
Larson
HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER
The Daily Courier
HIS PET PrOJECT
ANA Marketi ng Committ ee
HOBBIES
Home projects, exercise
and reading
Why he values his association
With the support of member
newspapers, the association is a
unifi ed, powerful voice in support
of newspapers, the public, our read-
ers and advertisers. The association
has infl uence that can’t be equaled
by individual newspapers.
The road to the presidency I was
an independent contractor at age 13.
I cut lawns and pulled weeds.
The future of the newspaper
industry We’re changing — there-
fore, we won’t die. Though the form
may change, the printed page will
always have an important role. I’m
most excited that our industry has
people with great knowledge, skills
and dedication. We have what it
takes to be great.
Double threat? Readers aren’t just
readers anymore. They’re unique
visitors, too.
Coming up in 2009 ANA will con-
tinue a process of re-assessing and
re-positioning itself for the future
and even greater service to mem-
bers. I think there will be change
and new directions within the
association.
A special thanks to our convention sponsors: Gold Sponsors: W estern news&info, inc. Silver: Bronze:
A special thanks
to our convention sponsors:
Gold Sponsors:
W
estern
news&info, inc.
Silver:
Bronze:

Please visit with our vendors:

Arizona State library

Ted Hale

(602) 926-3736

thale@lib.az.us

Associated Press

Michelle Williams

(602) 416-5090

mwilliams@ap.org

Cronkite News Service

Steve Elliott

(602) 496-0686

Steve.Elliott @asu.edu

Cronkite Innovati on lab

retha Hill

(602) 496-3908

retha.Hill@asu.edu

HJ Trophies & Awards

rick DeWolf

(602) 955-0812

hjtrophies@yahoo.com

JC Printi ng

Tom rich

(602) 955-8130

tom@jcprinti ng.net

Media Print

Atti la veres

(602) 256-6113

Shoom

John kephart

(323) 359-6748

jkephart@shoom.com

TownNews

linda rowlee

(866) 236-6382

lrowlee@townnews.com

U.S. Census Bureau

Megan kindelan

(301) 763-1766

megan.c.kindelan@census.gov

verican

Eric Buskirk

(800) 888-0470

ebuskirk@verican.com