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I n s i d e t h e I s l a n d C o n n e c t i o n . . .

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The House That Girls Built
N
ow in its fourteenth ofcial
year, the Habitat for Humanity
Women Build has constructed
more than 1900 homes nationwide,
with 12 of those homes built right here
in the lowcountry. Tis year marks the
thirteenth home built during Women
Build week, which took place this past
May 6 12 on James Island.
Located in a new Habitat community
just of Grimball Road Extension, the
Green Valley Lane neighborhood consists
of only fve homes, each of which were
designed by architect Kevan Hoertdoerfer
of downtown Charleston, who kindly
donated his services to the project.
Teyre diferent historically than
the homes weve built in the past, but
theyre very liveable, very sustainable, and
have a homey feel, said Steve Yeomans,
construction manager for the Habitat
afliate.
Designed to be long and narrow
because of the layout of the community
lots, each three bedroom, one and a half
bath home is LEED certifed and built
above code.
We found that if we spend just a little
more on materials, it ends up costing the
homeowner less to maintain and creates
a much more sustainable home, which is
the whole idea of Habitat, said Yeomans.
Consisting of 1100 square feet, the
homes feature nine foot ceilings to allow
for cooler spaces, high efciency HVAC
systems that completely change out the air
in the home every 45 minutes, low e-glass
windows, Tech Shield radiant barriers on
the roof, recycled fber carpets, tankless
water heaters, blown insulation in the
attics, and strategically placed vents to
allow for efcient air exchange through
all rooms.
Tese homes are about 25 percent
more efcient than most homes built in
Charleston, said Yeomans.
And theyre also very aesthetically
Volume 6 Issue 3 May 25, 2012 FREE
Since May 2007
House Girls Built continues to page 8
PHOTOS BY: F JOE FELDER
The Island
Connection
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Kristin Hackler
managing editor
kristin@luckydognews.com

Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee
sales manager
lori@luckydognews.com
Jerry Plumb
graphic designer
jerry@luckydognews.com
Contributors
Helen Legare
Dr. James T. Sears
Published by
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivans Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Future deadlines: May 30
for submissions
for the June 8 issue
Op-Ed articles and letters to the editor do not
necessarily refect the opinion of
Lucky Dog News or its writers.
Lucky Dog Publishing, LLC
Publishers of Island Eye News,
The Island Connection and
The Folly Current.
Ci v i c Cal endar
KIAWAH ISLAND TOWN HALL
21 Beachwalker Drive
Kiawah Island, SC 29455
Phone: 768-9166
Fax: 768-4764
SEABROOK ISLAND TOWN HALL
2001 Seabrook Island Road
Seabrook Island, SC 29455
Phone: 768-9121
Fax: 768-9830
Email:
lmanning@townofseabrookisland.org
JOHNS ISLAND COUNCIL
Meetings are held at the Berkeley Electric Co-op located at
3351 Maybank Hwy, Johns Island.
Chairman Chris Cannon: 343-5113
CHARLESTON COUNTY COUNCIL
4045 Bridge View Dr, N Charleston
958-4700
CITY OF CHARLESTON
75 Calhoun St.
724-3745
M
eet Jimmy Bailey. Te former
head of the Daniel Island
Property Owners Association
and administrator of the Daniel Island
Community Fund, Bailey took the reins
this past week as the new president of the
Kiawah Island Community Association.
Tis is such a great opportunity in my
business, said Bailey.
From managing a staf of eight to 115
employees and a budget ranging from $2.5
million to $10 million, Bailey will have his
work cut out for him as he steps into a role
thats been vacant for the past few months.
Im really excited to be working with
the staf at the Kiawah Island Community
Association. Teyve held it together for the
past several months and I feel as though
Im walking into a well-oiled machine,
said Bailey.
A native of Charleston, Baileys family
has owned property in Rockville on
Wadmalaw Island since before the Civil
War. He has fond memories of growing
up on the islands, and even proposed to
his wife at their family home in Rockville.
Baileys father, Jimmy Bailey Sr., was born
on Johns Island at the corner of Maybank
highway and Main road and was a proud
student of St. Johns High School.
He still sings the Islanders fght song
every time we drive by, Bailey laughed.
A former employee of NBSC on Daniel
Island, Bailey took the job as head of the
Daniel island Property Owners Association
seven years ago. In that time, he worked
with the Daniel Island Community
Fund, an organization that has given $1.5
million to date to area non-profts. In
2007, on behalf of the fund he was proud
to present the Charleston Fire Department
with a check for more than $235,000 just
months after the Sofa Super Store tragedy.
Te donation also kicked of the Funds
52 Weeks of Tanks, inviting island
residents to sponsor the fre department
for a week at a time throughout the year.
For all of his eforts with the Daniel
Island POA, Bailey received the Charleston
Regional Business Journals 40 Under
40 award in 2009, given annually to
Charlestons brightest entrepreneurs and
community activists.
Today, the 37-year-old is looking
forward to becoming a benefcial part of
Kiawah Island.
Te fundamentals [of Daniel Island
and Kiawah Island] are similar, but the
communities are diferent. Daniel Island
was mainly owner occupied while thats
a fip percentage with Kiawah. However,
the core of the job is working with people,
providing good customer service, and
maintaining good relationships to ensure
that everything is handled well, said
Bailey.
Over the next few weeks, Bailey plans
to meet with all of the island departments.
I want to get to know the people where
theyre most comfortable, said Bailey.
He also plans on dropping by the
Ki a wa h- Se a br ook
Exchange Club,
meeting with the
mayors of both
Kiawah and Seabrook
islands, and visiting
the Johns Island
Rotary Club.
Its so important to build up good
relationships with all of the diferent
community groups. Many of the things
that are important to Kiawah are what
make Johns Island special: preservation
and the protection of natural habitats,
said Bailey.
He also believes that, with the wealth
of talent and interesting people making
up Kiawah Island, together they can make
the island a better place and ultimately
make people feel like more a part of the
community as a whole.
Were all a part of this together and by
talking to each other and working together
we can do great things, said Bailey.
Jimmy Bailey, new president of the Kiawah Island Community Association
Kiawah welcomes Jimmy Bailey
J I MMY BAI L EY ST EPS I N AS NEW HEAD OF T HE
KI AWAH I SL AND COMMUNI T Y ASSOCAT I ON
BY KRISTIN HACKLER
Monday, May 28
Te Town ofces of Seabrook and
Kiawah Islands will be closed for
Memorial Day.
Tuesday, May 29
Kiawah Ways & Means Committee
9 a.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Monday, June 4
Kiawah Environmental
Committee
3 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Tuesday, June 5
Kiawah Town Council
2 p.m.
Kiawah Island Town Hall
Wednesday, June 6
Kiawah Planning Commission
3 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
Seabrook Planning Commission
Work Session
2:30 p.m.
Seabrook Town Hall
Thursday, June 7
Johns Island Council
7 p.m.
Berkeley Electric Co-Op
Kiawah Arts Council
3 p.m.
Kiawah Town Hall
May 25, 2012 3
T
he Bohicket Marina Billfsh
Invitational dates back to the
inaugural tournament of the SC
Governors Cup, which took place at
Bohicket Marina in 1989. Other than
a brief hiatus in 2009, the tournament
has consistently brought fsh-loving
participants and spectators out to Bohicket
Marina year after year.
Boats have become larger and faster
since that inaugural competition, and the
Governors Cup tournaments have seen a
reduction in the number of participants
since the economic downturn a few years
ago, but the camaraderie and competition
at Bohicket has remained steadfast. Bryan
Richardson, Dockmaster at Bohicket
Marina & Market, has personally been
involved with 16 of the 22 tournaments
at Bohicket. In the SC Governors Cup
Series, weve built a reputation for our
high level of customer service with our
great dockhands. We enjoy promoting
blue water angling and conservation, so
we love it when tourists and spectators
come to Bohicket to see what this sport
is all about.
Tis year, the tournament brings
renewed energy and a new format
thanks to the vision of the tournaments
coordinators Danielle Snider, Bryan
Richardson, and Mark Macpherson.
Danielle Snider, who has been with the
marina for a few years, is excited about
this years event. With our dates moved
to June this year, we are putting more
attention into the shore-side festivities
so folks have even more reason to come
spend an afternoon at Bohicket Marina.
School is out, and both summer vacationers
and locals alike will have plenty to keep them
busy at the marina! Were also really excited
to be raising money to give back to our local
schools through Donorschoose.org.
Along with the new June dates,
Bohicket Marina & Market has also
expanded the tournament grounds to
make more room for sponsors to display
their products this year. We are excited
to have great sponsors onboard, such
as our exclusive boat dealer Longshore
Marine. Te marina grounds will be open
to the public as always, so folks can check
out the boats Longshore will have on
display, reel in a fsh at DNRs interactive
fshing game, and browse all our great
vendors booths. Tere will be other
vehicles on display including golf carts
courtesy of Garretts Discount Golf Cars,
and RVs courtesy of Camping World of
Charleston. says Macpherson.
Te Bohicket Marina Billfsh
Invitational will be held from Wednesday,
June 6 through Saturday, June 9. Te
marina will be open to the public every
day, and vendors will be set up Wednesday
through Sunday. Tursday night, the
Donorschoose.org Charity Silent Auction
runs from 7-9pm in the Captains Lounge
and is open to the public.
For more details please visit www.
bohicket.com. For more about the South
Carolina Governors Cup 2012, visit
govcup.dnr.sc.gov.
Governors Cup
Returns This June
ANNUAL BI L L F I SHI NG
TOURNAMENT TO TAKE PL ACE AT
BOHI CKET MARI NA STARTI NG J UNE 6
SPECIAL TO ISLAND CONNECTION
4 May 25, 2012
May 25, 2012 5
(COLUMN HEAD)
ROADTRIPS CHARLESTON
F
rom beach communities in
California to cottage-lined streets
in Cape Cod, seaside towns are the
ultimate places to live in natural beauty
and bliss. In a special 15th anniversary
issue, Coastal Living releases its frst-ever
ranked list of the 15 Happiest Seaside
Towns, an exclusive roundup naming
some of the best places to live along the
coasts of the United States.Coastal Living
ranks Kiawah Island, SC frst on the list.
If heaven had a zip code, it would have
to be 29455. Tis exquisite barrier island
is home to 10 miles of unspoiled fne-sand
beach; wild-growing palmetto, oak, and
magnolia trees; a veritable Noahs Arks
worth of mammals and rare birds; and
1626 lucky residents. With small-town
charms and proximity to the gracious
urbanity of Charleston, Kiawah makes
the ideal possible: a vacation-like lifestyle
with easy access to commerce and culture.
In honor of our 15th anniversary, we
are excited to share a list of the Happiest
Seaside Towns in America, said Editor-
in-Chief Antonia van der Meer. By
ranking the top 15 happiest seaside
communities, we draw attention to places
where life is good and the beach is close by.
Tese towns boast a blend of such criteria
as sunny days, walk-able neighborhoods,
easy commute times, healthy beaches,
and moreplus that indescribable coastal
vibe.
Coastal Living shares the secrets to
each towns award-worthy appeal in the
June issue, available on newsstands May
18.

Coastal Living chose the top 15


Happiest Seaside Towns from the
Dream Towns lauded in the magazine
over the past 15 years. Te brand also
placed a call for entries on its social media
channels. Additional factors included
ranking on the Gallup-Healthways Well-
Being Index, percentage of sunny and
clear days, healthiness of beaches, average
commute times, walk-ability, school and
crime ratings, education and fnancial
security of the locals, geographic diversity,
and coastal vibe.
For more information and the complete
list of the 15 Happiest Seaside Towns,
please visit coastalliving.com.
PHOTOS BY: SQUIRE FOX FOR COASTAL LIVING 2012.
Kiawah Island Happiest Seaside Town
COASTAL L I VI NG REL EASES F I RST- EVER RANKED L I ST
Introducing the Coastal Living
Top 15 Happiest Seaside Towns

1. Kiawah Island, SC
2. Naples, FL
3. Sausalito, CA
4. Lake Bluf, IL
5. Tiburon, CA
6. Laguna Beach, CA
7. Half Moon Bay, CA
8. Chatham, MA
9. Jupiter, FL
10. Lahaina, HI
11. Marblehead, MA
12. Stinson Beach, CA
13. Cohasset, MA
14. Duxbury, MA
15. Solomons Island, MD
6 May 25, 2012
T
he six-month Atlantic hurricane
season begins June 1, and despite
the appearance of tropical storm
Alberto the 2012 hurricane season is
predicted to be calmer than usual this
year, there is still a risk for a destructive
storm hitting the U.S. East Coast. Te
2012 forecast expects a total of two
(2) named storms in the 2012 Atlantic
hurricane season.
History teaches that a lack of hurricane
awareness and preparation are common
threads among all major hurricane
disasters. By knowing your vulnerability
and what actions you should take, you can
reduce the impacts of a hurricane disaster.
Hurricane hazards come in many
forms: storm surge, high winds, tornadoes,
and fooding. Tis means it is important
for your family to have a plan that includes
all of these hazards.
To stress the importance of
preparedness and education, the Towns
of Kiawah Island and Seabrook Island
will be hosting their Annual Disaster
Preparedness Day on Tursday, June 7 at
the Kiawah Sandcastle from 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Tere will be a host of vendors,
demonstrations, prizes, and food.
Please plan to attend this years event
and learn how to better prepare your
family in the event of a hurricane or
natural disaster.
For questions, please contact Kiawah
Island Town Hall at 768-9166 or visit
the Kiawah Island website at www.
kiawahisland.org
Are You Ready If Disaster Strikes?
KI AWAH- SEABROOK DI SAST ER AWARENESS DAY
TO BE HEL D ON J UNE 7 AT T HE SANDCAST L E
SPECIAL TO THE ISLAND CONNECTION
May 25, 2012
7
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Ti de Char t

Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms, etc., are NOT included in the predictions.
Tidal current direction changes and tide time predictions can be
very diferent. Tide predictions are PREDICTIONS; they can be
wrong so use common sense.
May 25
May 26
May 27
May 28
May 29
May 30
May 31
June 1
June 2
June 3
June 4
June 5
June 6
June 7
Source: saltwatertides.com
11:47 am/11:54pm
12:30pm
12:39am/1:22pm
1:30am/2:19pm
2:27am/3:20pm
3:27am/4:21pm
4:29am/5:22pm
5:30am/6:22pm
631am/7:20pm
7:31am/8:17pm
8:29am/9:13pm
9:26am/10:07pm
10:23am/11:01pm
11:19am/11:53pm
11:47am/11:54pm
6:22am/6:28pm
7:07am/7:23pm
7:58am/8:25pm
8:52am/9:30pm
9:49am/10:36pm
10:48am/11:40pm
11:46pm
12:40am/12:43pm
1:37am/1:39pm
2:32am/2:33pm
3:26am/3:28pm
4:18am/4:22pm
5:10am/5:16pm
L
egare Farms is excited to announce
the addition of their Butchers
Club fon Johns Island. You may
join Legare Farms Butchers Club to
purchase top quality meats at discount
prices. Te Butchers Club will
work similarly to a vegetable CSA.
Basically you pre-buy the meat which
provides Legare Farms with resources to
raise the meat and in turn provides you
a share in the animal herd. You will be
able to use your club membership level
(investment)to purchase the meat of your
choice. Membership levels are available
for purchase by the quarter ($250),
biannually($500), or annually($1000).
How does it work?
Once the membership is paid you
will receive a card indicating the
total amount purchased. You will
be notifed when the meat is available
fresh from the processor and the meat is
always available frozen. Youcanuseyour
membership card until you have
purchased the total amount listed on
the card. Your meat purchases must be
completed within the timeframe of your
membership level (quarterly, biannually
or annually). Since the meat is being
purchased at wholesale prices, once you
have joined you will receive a wholesale
price list so you will know how much
you are spending and be able to keep up
with your total purchases. Because you
are locked into this price list, if prices rise
itwill notafect you.
What are the benefts?
Tere are lots of benefts to this program
but the two major ones that we see are:
1)Teprogram allowsyou to purchase
the cut and quantity of beef, chicken, or
pork your family enjoys.
2) Since freezer space can be an issue,
you pick up just what your freezer will
hold.
How do your order and pick-up?
In order for Legare Farms to cut down
on labor costs which keeps your cost lower,
wedoask that you purchaseaminimum
of$50 at a time and pick up no more than
once a month; however, we know there will
be exceptions that have to be made so dont
let this stop you from taking advantage of
this opportunity. Meat will be available
for pick-up at the farm during the store
hours of Wednesdays and Fridays 3 p.m.
- 6 p.m. and Saturdays 9 a.m. 12 p.m.
or by appointment. Let us know and
you can pick up from the CSA vegetable
drop locations during the season, or we
can make arrangements to meet you with
an orderduring ourrestaurant deliveries.
We are excited about the opportunity to
be able to provide this type of service to our
patrons. If you have questions contact Helen
Legare at 514-1218 or email legarefarms@
bellsouth.net.

Legare Farms Now Ofering Butcher Club
BY HELEN LEGARE
pleasing. Front doors open into living
rooms with vaulted ceilings and a master
bedroom to the right. An efcient but
roomy galley kitchen leads into a den or
dining room area that feels almost like
a sunroom due the number of picture
windows letting in the tree-fltered
sunlight. In fact, theres almost no need
to turn on the lights during the day due
to the amount of natural light in every
room.
Were real proud of what we build.
Tese are solidly built, efcient homes,
said Yeomans.
And that pride was refected in the
volunteer crew on duty this past Tursday,
May 10. Along with several people from
Charleston County, volunteers were
on hand from as close as James Island,
Kiawah Island, and Seabrook Island to
as far as Massachusetts and Pennsylvania.
We have one family that comes to
work on the home all week every year as
part of their family reunion. Tis year
they pulled up in a convertible with the
top down playing I Get By With A Little
Help From My Friends at full volume,
said Priscilla Quirk, Sea Island Habitat
for Humanity Outreach Coordinator.
Lisa Edelman, a volunteer for the
past two years, drives all the way down
from Pittsburg to participate in the
Women Build. A volunteer at Habitat for
Humanity in her hometown, Edelman
saw the Habitat Women Build sign on
her way to visit family in Seabrook a few
years ago and decided to sign up.
I thought it would be fun, to be able
to go on vacation and work with Habitat
at the same time, said Edelman.
Tis year she even brought her sister,
Susan Smith, from Harrisburg.
I love it! Its a great experience and the
people are so wonderful, said Susan.
More than anything, the women at
this years build said that its the sense
of love, companionship, and pride in a
job well done that brings them back year
after year.
Its just such a positive experience
overall, said Quirk.
Tis years Women Build home is
being constructed for Avis Williams, a
single mother of one daughter and two
young boys. Her grandchild will also be
living with them in the home. A recent
graduate of Trident Technical Academy
with an associates degree in Criminal
Justice, Williams was required to pass a
rigorous homeowner screening and put in
a minimum of 500 hours of sweat equity,
along with other standard requirements.
And when we say sweat equity, we mean
it! said Quirk.
Te next Habitat for Humanity
subdivision is already being prepared in
Laurel Oak Grove of of Fort Johnson
Road. Te neighborhood is actually a
new zoning for the City of Charleston.
Dubbed cluster development, the zoning
allows for 50 percent of the subdivision
to be kept in a natural, undisturbed state.
Te rest of the subdivision will consist
of 22 homes, and house construction is
expected to begin in late July or early
August of this year.
For more information about our local Sea
Island Habitat for Humanity, visit www.
seaislandhabitat.org. For more information
about the Women Build program, visit
www.habitat.org/wb
8 May 25, 2012
Volunteers prepare to attach the roof to the habitat home.
Girls Built continues from Cover
May 25, 2012 9
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May 25
Island Connection Calendar June 17
Johns Island Regional Library
3531 Maybank Highway
Hours: Monday Tursday:10 8;
Friday & Saturday:10 6
(843) 559-1945
Wee Reads (under 24 months with adult)
Monday, May 28, at 10:30 a.m.
Time for Twos (2 3 years old with
adult)
Tuesday, May 29, at 10:30 a.m.
Preschool Storytime(3 6 years)
Wednesday, May 30, at 10:30 a.m.
*Keyboard Basics (adults/young adults)
Saturday, May 26, from 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
*Access Basics (adults/young adults)
Tuesday, May 29, from 10 a.m. 12:30
p.m.
All computer classes are free. For more
information please call 559-1945 and ask
for the Reference Department. Class space is
available for 8 participants per session.
SC Book Award Nominee Trivia
(grades 6-12)
May 1-31
Fun Friday (all ages)
Friday, May 25, from 3 5 p.m.
PLAY: Puppet Playtme (all ages)
Saturday, May 26, at 11 a.m.
Based on the Book Movie Series: Te
Boy in the Striped Pajamas (young adults/
adults)
Saturday, May 26, at 2 p.m.
Rated PG-13, 94 minutes.
Club Anime! (ages 12-19)
Saturday, May 26, from 4 5:30 p.m.
Teen Movie Time: Joyful Noise (grades
6-12)
Tuesday, May 29, from 4:30 6:30 p.m.
Rated PG-13, 118 minutes.
PLAY: Its National Bike Month! (all
ages)
Wednesday, May 30, at 6:30 p.m.
Display
Student Art Exhibit
May 1 31
St. Johns High School student artwork
will be on display.
FRI DAY, MAY 25
Spoleto Festival USA
May 25 June 10
www.spoletousa.org
Piccolo Spoleto
May 25 June 10
www.piccolospoleto.com
Susan Budnick Photography Exhibit and
Sale at Earth Fare
Te diverse works of award-winning
Kiawah photographer Susan Budnick will
grace the cafe walls of Earth Fare today
through the end of July. Both color and
black and white available. 74 Folly Road
Boulevard. 768-9498.
Freshfelds Memorial Day Concert Series
From 6 9 p.m., enjoy live music Friday
Sunday at the Freshfelds Village Green.
Tonight, launch your weekend with Skate
Rink Jukebox, a Charlotte band performing
dance, rock, country, reggae, beach music,
and more. For more info, visit www.
freshfeldsvillage.com or call Guest Services
at 768-6491.
Mullet Hall Open Trail Ride
Bring your horse, camping gear, and
supplies for two nights of camping and
trail riding on 20 miles of beautiful,
wooded trails. Departs 12 p.m. Friday. Pre-
registration required. Fee: $45. For more
info, call 795-4386 or visit ccprc.com.
Beachwalker Bird Walks
Te southwestern end of Kiawah Island
is an excellent place to spot seabirds and
shorebirds. Well hike nearly two miles
of pristine beach looking for a variety of
birds including raptors and songbirds.
8:30 a.m.-11 a.m. Course # 27001. Meet at
Beachwalker Park. Free. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit ccprc.com.
SATURDAY, MAY 26
Freshfelds Memorial Day Concert Series
From 6 9 p.m., enjoy live music Friday
Sunday at the Freshfelds Village Green.
Tonight, enjoy the music of Rum Punch
Bandits. Originally a Jimmy Bufet tribute
band, they now play jam-rock, gulf-n-
western and more. For more info, visit
www.freshfeldsvillage.com or call Guest
Services at 768-6491.
SUNDAY, MAY 27
Memorial Day Lawn Party at Te
Seabrook Lake House to Beneft Local
Veterans
Bring your blankets and chairs for a fun
afternoon of music, kids entertainment, and
BBQ. Te Club will be selling hamburgers
and hot dogs, as well as beer and wine. Our
speaker will be Colonel Tomas S. Clark III
and we will have a patriotic performance by
Te Palmetto Vocal Project. No reservations
necessary. A $5 donation is welcome to
help returning injured and ill SC military
personnel. 12 p.m. -3 p.m.
Freshfelds Memorial Day Concert Series
From 6 9 p.m., enjoy live music Friday
Sunday at the Freshfelds Village Green.
Tonight, Dance the night away with the
Shem Creek Boogie Band as they perform
hits from the 60s, 70s and 80s, plus beach
music and party tunes. For more info, visit
www.freshfeldsvillage.com or call Guest
Services at 768-6491.
MONDAY, MAY 28
Happy Memorial Day!
Freshfelds Farmers Market
Every Monday until August 27, enjoy
visiting a variety of vendors at the
Freshfelds Village green from 4 - 8 p.m.
Items include produce, prepared food,
packaged food, and Lowcountry crafts. For
more info, visit www.freshfeldsvillage.com
or call Guest Services at 768-6491.
TUESDAY, MAY 29
District 41 Primary Elections
Candidates include: Wally Burbage (R),
Sean Pike (R), John Steinberger (R), Paul
R. Turmond (R), and Paul Tinkler (D).
Seabrook Island voters will be able to vote at
the Lake House, 2319 Seabrook Island Rd,
and Kiawah Island residents will be able to
vote at St. Johns Fire Station #4 at 12 Sora
Rail Rd. Voting locations will be open from
7 a.m. 7 p.m. All forms and applications
can be downloaded online at www.vote.
charlestoncounty.org.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 30
Starlight Cinema on the Green
Every Wednesday through the end of
August, drop by the Freshfelds Village
Green for a free family-friendly movie
starting at 8:30 p.m. Tis Wednesday will
feature Karate Kid (2010), PG, 140 min. For
more info, visit www.freshfeldsvillage.com
or call Guest Services at 768-6491.
FRI DAY, JUNE 1
Outdoor Concert Series on the Green
Free outdoor concert series on the
Freshfelds Village Green every Friday in
June! From 6 - 9 p.m., enjoy the music of
Te Groove Train. Food and drink available
for purchase. Dont forget your blanket
and chairs! For more info, visit www.
freshfeldsvillage.com or call Guest Services
at 768-6491.
SATURDAY, JUNE 2
Wadmalaw Island Community Yard Sale
Time for spring cleaning! Reserve your
space at the annual Wadmalaw Island
Yard Sale for only a $5 donation. Bring
your own set up (tables, chairs, tent, etc.).
8 a.m. 2:30 p.m. at BBs Store, 5365
Maybank Highway, Wadmalaw Island. For
reservations, call Frances (559-5341), Bertha
(557-8408), or Martha (557-1345).
MONDAY, JUNE 4
Freshfelds Farmers Market
Every Monday until August 27, enjoy
visiting a variety of vendors at the
Freshfelds Village green from 4 - 8 p.m.
Items include produce, prepared food,
packaged food, and Lowcountry crafts. For
more info, visit www.freshfeldsvillage.com
or call Guest Services at 768-6491.
TUESDAY, JUNE 5
Charleston County Bookmobile
Te Charleston County Bookmobile willbe
at Freshfelds Villagethe frst and third
Tuesday of every month from 10 a.m. -
11:30 a.m. Te Bookmobile will be parked
behind Heges and Java Java. For more info,
call Guest Services at 768-6491.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
Starlight Cinema on the Green
Every Wednesday through the end of
August, drop by the Freshfelds Village
Green for a free family-friendly movie
starting at 8:30 p.m. Tis Wednesday will
feature Glory Road (2006), PG, 118 min.
For more info, visit www.freshfeldsvillage.
com or call Guest Services at 768-6491.
THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Yappy Hour at James Island County Park
Dogs and their owners are invited to join
in after work for a party at the James
Island County Dog Park! Live music by
Folk Grass. Free with regular park gate
admission. 4 8 p.m. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit ccprc.com.
Summer Entertainment Series
Tis exciting presentation about snakes,
turtles, and alligators that live in the
Lowcountry will be fun for your entire
group. Best suited for ages 3-12. Only 300
seats sold for each show at James Island
County Park Edisto Hall. Course # 27624.
$5. 10 11 a.m. Call 795-4386 for more
information or to register.
FRI DAY, JUNE 8
Outdoor Concert Series on the Green
Free outdoor concert series on the
Freshfelds Village Green every Friday in
June! From 6 - 9 p.m., enjoy the music of
Congdon & Company. Food and drink
available for purchase. Dont forget your
blanket and chairs! For more info, visit
www.freshfeldsvillage.com or call Guest
Services at 768-6491.

SUNDAY, JUNE 10
Boo Radley Foundation Dog Day game
night at the Joe
Join the Charleston Veterinary Referal
Center and the Boo Radley Foundation
for a Dog Day game at Joe Riley Stadium
to learn more about the Boo Radley
Foundation, meet the CVRC staf, and fght
human and canine cancer. For more info,
visit www.rileyparkevents.com.
MONDAY, JUNE 11
Freshfelds Farmers Market
Every Monday until August 27, enjoy
visiting a variety of vendors at the
Freshfelds Village Green from 4 - 8 p.m.
Items include produce, prepared food,
packaged food, and Lowcountry crafts. For
more info, visit www.freshfeldsvillage.com
or call Guest Services at 768-6491.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13
Starlight Cinema on the Green
Every Wednesday through the end of
August, drop by the Freshfelds Village
Green for a free family-friendly movie
starting at 8:30 p.m. Tis Wednesday will
feature Te Muppets (2011), PG, 103 min.
For more info, visit www.freshfeldsvillage.
com or call Guest Services at 768-6491.
FRI DAY, JUNE 15
Tat Summer Book Sale
Friday Sunday. Books, DVDs, and CDs
for sale with prices starting at $1 for paper-
backs and $3 for hardback books. 9 5:30
p.m. today at the Main Branch Library, 68
Calhoun Street, downtown Charleston.
Outdoor Concert Series on the Green
Free outdoor concert series on the
Freshfelds Village Green every Friday in
June! From 6 - 9 p.m., enjoy the music of
CoastRunner. Food and drink available for
purchase. Dont forget your blanket
and chairs! For more info, visit www.
freshfeldsvillage.com or call Guest Services
at 768-6491.
SATURDAY, JUNE 16
Tat Summer Book Sale
Friday Sunday. Books, DVDs, and
CDs for sale with prices starting at $1 for
paperbacks and $3 for hardback books.
9 5:30 p.m. today at the Main Branch
Library, 68 Calhoun Street, downtown
Charleston.
SUNDAY, JUNE 17
Tat Summer Book Sale
Books, DVDs, and CDs for sale with prices
starting at $1 for paperbacks and $3 for
hardback books. 2 4 p.m. today with
special Sunday pricing at the Main Branch
Library, 68 Calhoun Street, downtown
Charleston.
T
he annual Carolina Dirt Fair,
a celebration of local food and
agriculture, took place recently
at Mullet Hall Equestrian Center on
Johns Island. Te Dirt Fair, produced in
association with the Carolina Green Fair,
proved to be a successful conclusion to the
Lowcountrys Eat Local Month. Several
hundred eat-local fans from around
Charleston County, Kiawah Island and
Johns Island were in attendance.
Te Carolina Dirt Fair featured
workshops on gardening, food canning
and community-supported agriculture;
cooking demos from Kiawah Island
chefs and celebrity chef Hugh Acheson; a
farmers market sponsored by the Kiawah
Island Community Association (KICA);
and performances by local folk and
bluegrass musicians.
KICA and its members were
instrumental in providing volunteer
support through sponsorship, marketing
and public relations eforts, assisting in
planning and set-up for the Dirt Fair, and
also manning the information tent during
the event. KICAs support of the Carolina
Dirt Fair is part of the organizations
Kiawah Cares program - an ongoing
community outreach commitment to the
local Sea Island community.
Many people dont realize that farmers
on Johns Island provide both Charleston-
area restaurants and those on Kiawah
with fresh local produce, says Joan Avioli,
a member of the KICA Board of Directors
and a Kiawah Cares volunteer. Te
Carolina Dirt Fair provided an exciting
way to connect farmers, restaurants,
businesses and green organizations.
Te mission of the fair was to
bring information about sustainable
food practices to the masses, stated
Suzie Webster, executive director of the
Carolina Green Fair to Te Post and
Courier following the event. Te idea
of the Carolina Dirt Fair was to have
a family-friendly event that attracted
all kinds of people. Tere is an interest
and excitement around the local food
movement, but a large number of people
have not been touched by it.
KICA Cares volunteers at information tent (left) Carol Tittel, Kiawah Cares volunteer; (right) Joan
Avioli, KICA board of director and KICA Cares volunteer.
Kiawah Cares Lends a Hand
at Carolina Dirt Fair
BY CAITLIN RAMSEY
May 25, 2012
13
U
S News and World Report identifed the 10 top retirement spots last year; seven
of those were in Central and South America: Central and South America ofer
the unbeatable combination of warm weather and inexpensive real estate. In an
International Living analysis of the worlds top retirement havens in 2012, six of the
top ten locations were also in this region of the world.
What in the world is going on and why would anyone wish to live outside the United
Stateseven part time? I have spent the past 18 months researching and traveling to
seek answers, which I hope to share with readers here from time-to-time.
Many persons at or nearing retirement age are experiencing a deterioration of their
investment funds, an increase in health care premiums (along with taxes), and the
certainty of increases in taxes and commodity prices. Some are thinking outside the
box and beyond our national borders.
When people learn I invest and work with clients in Central America, the most often
spoken questions are those concerning property prices, health care, safety and security,
and the process of acquiring overseas property.
Generally, this retirement and investment sector is focused on resorts, condominiums,
and gated communities along the coasts, in select mountain areas, and upscale or
gentrifying urban neighborhoods. From the white sand beach of Roatan, Honduras,
to the unparalleled breaking surfs near San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua, to the Aspen-
like village of Boquette, Panama, to the laid back beachfront of Costa Ricas Manuel
Antonio, to the Charlestonesque-charm of the colonial enclave Casco Antiguo in
Panama City or a high-rise unit in the newly built Trump Tower overlooking Panama
Bayall of these are just a three or four hour fight from Atlanta.
Along with uncertainties in the global economy, the real estate downturn has resulted
in lower prices and increased inventory in many regions within emerging international
property markets. Te prospect of acquiring residential real estate at an afordable price
within an emerging real estate market with favorable conditions (e.g., cheap cost of
labor, government retirement/investment incentives for foreigners), and then selling
property for maximum proft (assuming a 10 year outlook) is good.
Tere are terrifc opportunities (as well as a myriad of potential landmines) for
the intrepid buyer. Beachfront homes near Leon, Nicaragua can be bought for under
$150,000, a hundred acres with 200 meters of beachfront and all ocean views are in the
$750,000 range, and a ffty-fve acre piece of close ocean goes for around $250,000.
Similarly, mountain land with stunning views (even of the Pacifc on a clear day) can be
found in Boquete for about $25 per square meter, and the list goes on.
In todays market, constructing a high-end home in Central America should run
between $60 and $80 square foot. And, for those who simply want the convenience of
walking into their new home, there are a wide range of excellent gated communities
under development, such as Monte Cristo overlooking on Nicaraguas Pacifc coastline
with its golf course, or Bahia Lomas Estates with its Marina at Bocas del Toro on
Panamas Carribean side.
Some countries, like Nicaragua and Panama, also provide signifcant incentives for
individuals retiring. Perks may include purchase of a vehicle tax-free every other year,
$50,000 tax-free purchase of building materials, a 20-year property tax holiday, along
with discounts for travel, utilities, etc. Tese incentives are open to persons with only
modest verifable income (e.g., Panamas pensiado program is $1400 a month) and do
not require home ownership.
Central America: Real Estate Haven
BY DR. JAMES T. SEARS
View of downtown Panama City and Panama Bay from the Casco.
From the infnity pool to the Pacifc, Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica
Real Estate Haven continues to page 18
14 May 25, 2012
www.islandconnectionnews.com
Computer Corner
D
rivers arriving on Johns Island from the Stono
Bridge always enjoy the passage from hot concrete
to the cool shade of overarching oaks. But with
the opening of the new Southern Brews at the corner of
River and Maybank, theyll also be greeted with the warm
smell of fresh cofee and hot-from-the-oven pastries.
Opening just last week in the old Island Cash Advance
location, owner Michelle McMahan is bringing a little bit
of her home state of Washington to the sunny shores of
Charleston.
When I moved to Charleston, I drove all over the
place looking for a drive-thru cofee shop. We have
thousands of them back home, but I couldnt fnd one
anywhere, said McMahan.
A commercial realtor by trade, McMahan was still
trying to fnd just the right job after moving to Charleston
with her boyfriend, an employee at Boeing in North
Charleston. Confounded by the lack of drive-thru cofee
shops in the area, McMahan approached Charleston
County to see if there were any in Charleston and found
that theres only one in Mount Pleasant.
And I think shes from Washington, too, McMahan
smiled.
With this in mind, McMahan began thinking past
the need for fnding a drive-thru cofee shop and began
considering how to open one instead. So setting aside her
realtors hat, McMahan picked up a baristas apron and
began researching the business of slinging cofee.
I was originally thinking about opening a concessions
trailer, but then I saw this building and it all fell into
place, said McMahan.
Te old Island Cash Advance building was just the
right size for drive-thru and would even allow for outdoor
seating.
Five months later, McMahan was moving in boxes of
cofee cups and putting the fnal touches on her menu.
Its something I thought about doing before, but it
just wasnt the right timing, said McMahan.
When she frst considered going into the cofee
business back in Washington, she studied under several
experienced baristas, including a good friend of hers who
owns a drive-thru in Seattle called Cofee Driven.
I worked with her for a while and she taught me all
about espresso-based drinks and the art of cofee, said
McMahan.
Today, the menu at Southern Brews refects much of
what she learned in cofee country, as well as what shes
learned about local tastes in the South.
We try to get as many of our products from local
companies as possible, said McMahan.
Tis includes the cofee itself, roasted by Island
Cofee in Ravenel, and the produce used to make the
six signature sandwiches on the menu. From the TLC
(Turkey, Lettuce, Cranberries, and Pesto) to her favorite,
the ABC (Apples, Bacon, Cheddar Cheese, and Honey
Aioli), McMahan plans to keep the menu simple and the
ingredients fresh from area farms.
I like to eat healthy and be healthy, and I wanted to
be able to provide that option to others, said McMahan.
Te healthy options dont just stop at the sandwiches.
Even the milk choices dont stop with the option of skim
or whole. Cofee fans can also pick from soy milk, almond
milk, breve (half & half ), or even coconut milk.
Need dessert? Southern Brews has small and large
portions of gelato, with favors such as banana split,
caramel praline, mixed berry, and chocolate raspberry.
And if its too early for dessert or lunch, the cofee shop
also has fresh pastries for sale, including breakfast bagels,
mufns, scones, and hot cinnamon rolls.
Southern Brews ofcially opened in early May, but
McMahan hopes to hold a grand opening celebration
before the end of the month. Hours for the shop are
Monday through Friday 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Saturdays
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. As the company is Christian-based,
it will not be open on Sundays, though McMahan hopes
in the future to hold fundraisers on Sundays with profts
from going to area non-profts.
Were not just here to make money, we also want to
give back to the local community, said McMahan.
Southern Brews is located at 2812 Maybank Highway on
Johns Island. For more information and to view their menu,
visit southernbrewscofee.com. If you have a non-proft or
cause that needs help, email McMahan at nonprofts@
southernbrewscofee.com
Local Cofee Without Leaving your Car
SOUT HERN BREWS DRI VE- T HRU COF F EE OPENS ON J OHNS I SL AND
BY KRISTIN HACKLER
Southern Brews owner Michelle McMahan
May 25, 2012 15
E
njoy tastes and crafts of the
Lowcountry at Freshfelds Villages
annual Farmers Market, which will
take place Mondays from 4 to 8 p.m. from
June 4 until August 27.
A variety of food items and wares
will be available for purchase, including
produce, packaged food, prepared food, and
Lowcountry crafts. Fill your produce sack
with seasonal, local fruits and vegetables, or
bring your appetite to enjoy fsh tacos, local
sweets, and more.
Participating vendors for 2012 Summer
Season include (* indicates new for 2012):
Ambrose Family Farm: Fresh
Produce from Wadamalaw Island
(no pesticides or fertilizers used)
Carolina Soaps: Handmade soaps
and lotions
Charleston Festival Foods:
Snocones, funnel cakes, and frozen
lemonades
Charleston Spice Company: fresh
packaged spices & spices mixes
Falling Waters Jams: Jams, jellies,
and relishes*
Fields Farms: Fresh, certifed organic
produce from Johns Island
Great Food Co-Op: Jams, jellies,
relishes, salsa, and ciders
Great Harvest Bread Company:
Fresh baked breads
King of Pops: Popsicles made from
seasonal ingredients, favors include
raspberry lime, coconut lemongrass,
and chocolate sea salt*
Mary Anns Sweetgrass Baskets
Molly & Me Pecans: Flavored
pecans and homemade cookies*
Nellies Farm: Local arugula, salad
mixes, and fresh cut fowers*
Lowcountry Olive Oil: Local olive
oils*
Stella di Mare Designs: Handmade
ornaments and dcor with local
starfsh and seashells*
Sweet Charities: selling locally
made produces from Nicoles Nutty
Goodness, Charleston Candy
Company, Benne Wafers, and more
T & T Kettle Korn
Te Seafood Lady: Fresh, local
seafood*
Tess Jones: Homemade sweet breads,
cakes, and pies*
Te Taco Spot: Fish and chicken
tacos, quesadillas, and burritos
Freshfelds Village is located on Johns
Island between Kiawah and Seabrook islands.
With over 55 locally owned shops, galleries,
restaurants, services and businesses, Freshfelds
has something for all ages and price ranges.
Visit www.FreshfeldsVillage.com or www.
facebook.com/FreshfeldsVillage information
on new stores, events and other announcements.
Farmers Market Hits the
Village Green
F OODS, CRAF T S, AND MORE
G
ather your friends, family and anyone who likes to kick up their heels because
Music on the Green is back for the summer! Tis free, outdoor concert series
will take place every Friday beginning June 1 from 6 until 9 p.m. Guests can
boogie to the sounds of funk, beach music, rock, jazz, disco and more!
June 1- Te Groove Train: Groove to the sounds of rock-n-roll, R&B and pop from
the 60s to today.
June 8- Congdon & Company features heart stopping rock and roll, easy listening
jazz, beach music, disco hits of the eighties, R&B, and Top 40 hits.
June 15- CoastRunner: Tis premiere party and dance band will perform a mix of
beach, funk, R&B and soul music with a little extra boogie.
June 22- Coconut Groove Band: Tis four-man band performs easy listening, soul,
island music, funk and blues.
June 29- David Landeo Band: Take part in an interactive experience while enjoying
the sounds of dance, country, reggae and beach music.
Food and drinks will be available for purchase. Guests are encouraged to bring a
blanket or beach chairs. Te series is sponsored by the Town of Kiawah.
Freshfelds Village is located on Johns Island between Kiawah and Seabrook islands.
With over ffty-fve locally owned shops, galleries, restaurants, services and businesses,
Freshfelds has something for all ages and price ranges. Visit www.FreshfeldsVillage.com
or www.facebook.com/FreshfeldsVillage for information on new stores, events and other
announcements.
Fresh Tunes at
Freshfelds
F REE, OUT DOOR CONCERT
SERI ES ON T HE VI L L AGE GREEN
Computer Corner
16 May 25, 2012
D
espite the early appearance of
tropical storm Alberto, the 2012
Atlantic basin hurricane season is
expected to be calmer than it has been over
the past 20 years. According to William
Gray of Colorado State University and
Philip Klotzbach, two of the most highly
regarded hurricane forecasters in the
United States, the tropical Atlantic has
anomalously cooled over the past several
months and the chances of a summer/fall
El Nio event are relatively high.
Based on 29 years of past data, Klotzbach
and Grays most recent forecast released
on April 4 predicts that the probability
of a major hurricane landfall is 80% of
the long range average. However, they are
quick to point out that it only takes one
hurricane making landfall to make it an
active season and coastal residents should
prepare themselves the same as every season,
regardless of how much activity is predicted.
Te climatologists estimate that we will
have about 10 named storms (average is
12), 40 named storm days (average is 60.1),
4 hurricanes (average is 6.5), 16 hurricane
days (average is 21.3), 2 major (category
3-4-5) hurricanes (average is 2.0), and 3
major hurricane days (average is 3.9).
Specifcally for Charleston County,
Klotzbach and Gray predict a 4.2%
probability of hurricane impact compared to
an average of 5.5%, and a 1.2% probability
of a major hurricane impact, compared to
an average of 1.6%. Regional predictions
include a 32.9% chance of a named storm
making landfall in our area, and a 22.9%
chance of one or more hurricanes making
landfall. Over a period of 50 years, it is
more than 99.9% likely that one or more
hurricanes will make landfall in our region,
and with Hugo striking land more than 20
years ago, its time to start thinking about
your personal plan of action in the event of
a hurricane.
Despite the great amount of research and
analysis that Klotzbach and Gray introduce
into their predictions, however, even they
say that it is impossible to accurately predict
with any certainty what the Atlantic has in
store for us this early in the season.
To view Klotzbach and Grays 2012
hurricane season predictions in full, visit
http://typhoon.atoms.colostate.edu
Calmer Seas Ahead This Hurricane Season
CLI MATOLOGI STS PREDI CT A
QUI ETER- THAN- AVERAGE STORM YEAR
Name that Cane 2012
T
here are six lists of names that rotate every year for naming hurricanes.
Names are typically removed from the lists each year as signifcant storms
names are retired, like Hazel (1954), Fif (1974), Hugo (1989), Andrew
(1992) and Katrina (2005). Since there were no signifcant hurricanes in 2006
the last time this list was used the 2012 hurricane name list remains the same.
Te only hurricane name to be retired last year was Irene, to be replaced with the
name Irma.
Since tropical cyclones were frst named in 1953, 76 names have been retired,
the frst two being Carol and Hazel in 1954. Te naming of hurricanes has
been traced back to a tradition in the West Indies that is still practiced today,
where storms were named for the Catholic Saints Day on which they landed. For
example, hurricane San Filipe struck Puerto Rico on September 13, 1876. When
another storm struck exactly ffty years later, the storm was christened San Filipe
the Second.

Hurricanes are named alphabetically, although the letters Q and U are always
left out and the lists only go to W. If the list is used up for the year and storms are
still forming, the storms are then named alphabetically from the Greek alphabet,
Alpha to Omega.


Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
Hurricane Katrina
2012 Hurricane Names
www.islandconnectionnews.com
18 May 25, 2012
Personal safety in any country is dependent on various factors, ranging from where
you are (or should not be), to just plain luck. However, despite the violence associated
with drug cartels in Mexico and those countries bordering it, personal and property
safety in Panama, Costa Rica and Nicaragua is less of an issue. In fact, a recent article
in the Economist (Jan 2012) reported: Nicaragua, the poorest country in mainland
Latin America, is remarkably safe. It is now less violent than booming Panama, and
may soon be safer than Costa Rica, a tourist haven. And, last years Crime and Safety
Report, issued by the US Department of State, observed: Panama remains relatively
safe when compared to other Central American countries. A similar report on Costa
Rica noted that crime is on the uptake in the capitol city of San Jose and that violent
home invasions and express kidnapping are also prevalent in certain areas of Costa Rica
but not rampant.
Tus, owning or even leasing property in Central America requires a diferent
approach to home safety than in the Charleston area. For instance, unless one lives
within a gated-community, it is advisable in any of these countries to have someone
residing or guarding your home if you are gone for an extended period of time. Many
homes have live-in maid quarters and the cost for this service (or for a night guard) is
negligible$35 week for the former and $25 for the latter.
Health care in countries where I currently work with clientsPanama, Costa Rica,
and Nicaraguais excellent. All three countries do a brisk business in medical tourism
with outstanding hospitals (with US/European trained, English-speaking doctors)
such as Vivian Pellas in Managua and Hospital Punta Pacifca, in Panama City, which
is afliated with the Johns Hopkins Medicine International and maintains the same
high-end standards in facilities, services and staf. Health insurance can be easily
purchased for a fraction of the cost in the US. For example, using Costa Ricas national
health care system, El Caja, members pay just $40 a month or nearly full coverage is
ofered through the Club de Salud at Vivian Pellas for less than $700 annually. And, the
actual prices for procedures (including dentistry) can be a third of that in the United
States.
Cost of living is also low. For example, in the picturesque colonial city of Granada,
Nicaragua (where I own a home), even with its large expat community and a thriving
tourist business, I can go to one of the best restaurants for dinner and (with wine and
tip) pay less than $20. Te cost of rum, cofee, and beer (which are thriving exports) is
also embarrassingly cheap. Nearby Panama has earned the title as the Dubai of the
Americas due to its signifcantly lower cost of living with food and commodities only
slightly more expensive than in Nicaragua.
Te process of acquiring property (and foreigners can own property without being
residents of the country) is diferent than what buyers experience in the United States.
For example, licensing laws in these countries are generally loose, not enforced, or
non-existent (e.g., Nicaragua has no licensing requirement to sell another persons
property or represent a buyer). Te concept of fduciary duty requiring confdentiality,
due diligence, loyalty, and accountingamong other dutiesis generally absent in
any meaningful manner. Further, an important element of a competitive market
transparencyis absent as there are no centralized market system such as the Multiple
Listing Service. Many countries also have diferent processes for a real estate transaction
(e.g., countries which observe Civil Law rather than Common Law). And, while title
insurance is generally available through reputable international companies, the past
history in some countries of agrarian reform and bureaucratic inefciency requires
extreme diligence on the part of buyers (and their agents).
Although there are recognized real estate franchises operating in these countries,
their agents are bound by their countrys laws, or lack thereof, and cultural expectations.
In the United States, fewer than 8% of all Realtors work in the international markets.
Even fewer are certifed as international specialists, which is in part, due to the enormous
learning curves and the absence of professional overseas relationships with competent
and honest attorneys, real estate agents, and others commonly needed for a successful
real estate transaction.
Despite these drawbacks, whether it is for a change in lifestyle, to enjoy an excellent
standard of living for less money, or for investment purposes, when someone asks,
What in the world is going on, you may now have a better response.
James T. Sears (property@searspartners.com), a Realtor and Real Estate Investment
Analyst, and Broker Associate with AgentOwned Realty, lives in Seabrook Island, South
Carolina and Granada, Nicaragua. As an Accredited Buyer Representative and a Certifed
International Property Specialist, he works clients interested in second homes and real estate
investment (including real estate tours) in the Charleston area and Central America. More
information can be found at www.searspartners.com
Granada
Real Estate continues from 13
www.islandconnectionnews.com
May 25, 2012 19
First Flush Tea Festival
CHARL ESTON T EA PL ANTAT I ON, WADMAL AW I SL AND
MAY 2 0 , 2 0 1 2