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I n s i d e t h e I s l a n d Ey e

S u l l i v a n s I s l a n d I s l e o f P a l m s G o a t I s l a n d D e w e e s I s l a n d
Since May 2005
June 8, 2012 Volume 8 Issue 3 FREE
Carolina Girl continues on page 6
COURT
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BOATING
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O
n May 3, The Carolina Girl yacht
and Camp Happy Days hosted
the frst annual Champagne
Campaign to help raise money to send
kids kickin cancer to camp. The two
hour evening cruise around Charleston
harbor offered a full bar donated by
Snyder Bar, hors doeuvres graciously
provided by Duvall Catering, music,
dancing, and of course, complimentary
champagne.
Each year, approximately 170
children with cancer and their siblings
ages four to 16 arrive at Camp Happy
Days eager to leave worries of cancer
far behind as they enjoy a week flled
with fun, new friends, and unlimited
possibilities. To the casual observer,
Camp Happy Days is simply about
fun and new friends, but for children
fghting cancer it is so much more.
This is a powerful, life-changing
week where children discover strength
in the comfort of new friends, a
newfound confdence, and the will
to continue their fght, said Derrick
Demay, Chairman of Camp Happy
Days.
Camp Happy Days opens the door
to a world of hope and possibilities
for children who have been diagnosed
with cancer, and provides a supportive
atmosphere where children are
encouraged to look beyond their limits,
T
his past Wednesday,
May 23, offcials from
Sullivans Island
and the Mount Pleasant
Land Conservancy (MPLC)
gathered at the Old Dump
site at the marsh end of
Station 19 to participate
in a signing ceremony
that added two areas
(3.57 acres) to the Towns
protected green space.
This welcome event was
three years in the making
and due to the efforts of
many island residents and
Town Council members.
As stated in the deed restrictions now placed
on the property, the goal is Preserving and
conserving the two undeveloped areas due to
their aesthetic, educational, ecological, and
environmental value. Deed restrictions protect
these areas from future development and
guarantee continued use by the Towns residents
and visitors for enjoyment and appreciation of
the back beach and marsh portion of the island
as well as access to creek and wetlandsthat
is considered a public good of enduring value.
The larger of the two newly protected areas is
the three acre Old Dump site. This area has a
long history of community service. Station 19,
originally called Warf Street, served to transport
lumber from a barge landing to the local lumber
business. In the 1960s, this site was used for
the Town incinerator and dump. After Hurricane
Hugo in 1989, the area was used for disposal
of the islands downed trees and other detritus
(top) A paddle boarder slips by through the marsh near the Old Dump site during the
signing ceremony. (above) (left to right) John Girault, Executive Director, MPLC; Mayor
Carl Smith; Andy Benke, Town Administrator; Pat ONeil, SI Real Estate Committee
Chair; Alys Anne Wiedeke, MPLC Board of Directors, Gray Taylor, MPLC Board;
William Miller, Jr., Chair, MPLC Board of Directors; and Larry Dodds, Sullivans Island
Town Attorney. Since the signing was at the marsh, everyone was sure to bring a can of
bug spray!
A CITIZEN'S PERSPECTIVE
on Sullivans
BY SUSAN MIDDAUGH
Saving Some Green
Champagne
Campaign Benefts
Green Space continues on page 6
2 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
CIVIC
T
his year, the Isle of
Palms and Sullivans
Island will be hosting
the annual Disaster Expo
on Wednesday, June 13,
from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., at
the Isle of Palms Public
Safety Building. Storm
activity has already begun
before the offcial June 1
start of hurricane season,
so residents of the Isle of
Palms and Sullivans Island
are strongly encouraged to
attend the Expo to learn
important information
on how to prepare for
emergency situations.
During the event,
residents of the islands
will learn how to prepare
for disasters such as
hurricanes, earthquakes,
and fres, so that recovery
can take place both
quickly and effectively
while maintaining the
highest standards of safety.
Parents, feel free to bring
the kids! An infatable slide,
coloring wall, and crayons,
as well as face painting, will
be available for children,
and free drinks and hot
dogs will be provided for
all. Even island residents
who were here during
Hurricane Hugo will learn
new information and beneft
from this event.
Think you know all there
is to know about disaster
readiness? Test your
knowledge with questions
for residents available on
the City website at www.iop.
net and be sure to come out
on June 13!
For more information, call
the IOP Offce at 886-6428
or visit www.iop.net. The
Isle of Palms Safety Building
is located at 30 J.C. Long
Boulevard.
Isle of Palms and Sullivans Island residents learn how to prepare for emergency situations at the
2010 Disaster Expo.
PHOTO PROVIDED BY EMILY DZIUBAN
Beryl Could Be Just The Beginning...Are You Ready?
I O P A N D S U L L I VA N S I S L A N D WE L C O ME R E S I D E N T S T O T H E 2 0 1 2 D I S A S T E R E X P O
BY HANNAH DOCKERY
June 8, 2012
3
CIVIC
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Kristin Hackler
managing editor
kristin@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Jerry Plumb
graphic designer
jerry@luckydognews.com
Christian LeBlanc
Social Media
christian@luckydognews.com
Allison Young
allison@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee
sales manager
614-0901
lori@luckydognews.com
interns
Hannah Dockery
Caroline Stec
reporter
Jacob Flannick
resident photographer
Leo Fetter

Contributors:
CCPRC
Carol Antman
Bob Hooper
Dimi Matouchev
Mary Pringle
Susan Middaugh
Carl Jennings Smith
Sarah Diaz
Dr. John Nelson
Tim Smith
Charleston County
Katherine A. Saenger

Published by:
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivans Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
Future deadline: June 13 for our
June 22 issue
Lucky Dog PubLi shi ng
of sc, LLc
Publisher of the Island Eye News, The
Island Connection and The Folly Current.
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
independent newspaper published every two
weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms,
Sullivans Island, Goat Island and Dewees Island.
Copies are mailed free of charge to every ac-
tive mailbox in our coverage area and are also
available at area businesses and by subscription
to non-islanders. Subscriptions are $39/year
for non-residents.. Contributions of information,
pictures and articles are welcomed and are
used according to space limitations and news
value and cannot be returned except by special
request. Op-ed articles and letters to the editor do
not necessarily refect the opinion of Lucky Dog
News, or its writers.
All advertising rates are listed at:
www.islandeyenews.com under advertising.
Letters to the Editor...
Isle of Palms
886-6428
www.iop.net

Tuesday, June 12
Public Safety Committee
5p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
City Council Special Meeting
6p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, June 13
Municipal Court
8:30a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Disaster Expo - IOP and SI
5p.m.
30 J.C. Long Boulevard
Thursday, June 14
Public Works Committee
5p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, June 19
Ways and Means Committee
5:45p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Wednesday, June 20
Municipal Court
8:30a.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Planning Commission -
NEW DATE
4:30p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883-3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.com
Tuesday, June 12
Municipal Court
6:30p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Wednesday, June 13
Planning Commission
6:30p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Thursday, June 14
Board of Zoning Appeals
7p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Tuesday, June 19
Regular Council Meeting
7p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Wednesday, June 20
DRB Meeting
7p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
* Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith Park
(2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments or questions.
Civic Calendar
Recycle - Wednesday, June 13 - Recycle

Letters continues on page 5
Kite Surfer Savior
Dear Editor,
On Memorial Day, two of my friends and I went
to Breach Inlet to hang out on the beach. I brought
along my kayak with all of the other usual beach
necessities. Around two oclock I had my friend help
push me off to kayak around. Everything was as
normal until an unusual wave capsized the boat,
and I found myself swimming with no life jacket
and clinging to the kayak. I found the sand bar that
I had seen many times when the tide goes out and
attempted to get out as much water out as possible
from the boat with little success due to the waves
crashing over my head and the boat. When that
failed I knew my only option was to hope someone
saw me or wait for the tide to subside. It felt like
an eternity with strong currents taking my balance
and the unusual waves coming from different
directions. I consider myself a decent swimmer,
but with the current, swells, distance, and no life
jacket, I was not going to attempt it. As if that was
not frightening enough, I would feel the occasional
large fsh bumping my legs.
That told, I owe a kite surfer a great deal. He
spotted me and came close enough to ask if I was
ok, which of course I replied no. He then guided me
by surfng off and coming in and letting his board
sink to the bottom to test the depth of the sand bar.
This process was repeated until it seemed there
was nothing left to do but swim. He explained to me
there was a channel with strong currents pushing
out to sea that was at least forty to ffty feet wide.
Stubbornly, I was still towing the kayak in hopes of
saving it as well. He said to me, Is that 200 dollar
piece of gear worth your life? I instantly realized
the stupidity of having it that long, and how lucky
I was to have made it that far. I let go of the kayak
and held on to his belt for dear life while he dragged
me to shore. I believe he said that his name was G,
but I may be mistaken. Whatever his name is, I owe
him big. Thank you. Something like this will never
be forgotten, and by the way you were right! The
kayak did wash up a little less than a mile away a
few hours later. Thank You to the kite surfer that
may have saved my life.
R. Currey
__________________________________
Flower Thief
Dear Editor:

To catch a thief? Well, not likely in this case, but
why would anyone steal four plumbago plants from
a beautifcation program? The misdeed occurred
sometime between sundown on
May 23 and the dawn of May
25. This was no random
act. The thief knew exactly
what he or she was doing.
The site is located at
Intracoastal Court and
Waterway Boulevard. It is
a voluntary contributive
project among property
owners and neighbors to
enhance the attractiveness of
the area.
The problem isnt so much
the cost and availability of the
plumbagos, a bushy plant with a
sky blue fower. They can
be purchased at Abide-A-
While and other nurseries
in the area. But why
would anyone stoop so
low to steal four plants? Perhaps he
or she just enjoys stealing things that
belong to others. They obviously believe they have
a right to do so, but it merely refects their lack of
conscience, moral standards, common decency and
respect for the property of others. Other than that,
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
4 June 8, 2012
I
n my thirty-three years of service to the
Town of Sullivans Island, I have always
worked to preserve and protect our historic
and unique community. It is for this reason
that I continue to believe the proposed new
Sullivans Island Elementary School (SIES) is
out of scale and out of character for Sullivans
Island, and I think there is a better solution
for an elementary school on the island.
I have witnessed the island change in the
last 40 years. Prior to Hurricane Hugo, the
houses were modest. The commercial district
was comprised of a bar and a few restaurants,
and it was generally very quiet. The buildings
in the commercial district between Station 22
and Station 22 1/2 ft the character of the
island as Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, the Dean
of the School of Architecture at the University
of Miami and a well-known architect and
land planner, noted on her post-Hugo visit
here. She also noted the ambient rural and
residential character of the island, which is
something that has always appealed to me.
In the period after Hurricane Hugo, new
houses were being built larger, so much
that ordinances were necessary to limit
their size, and neighborhood compatibility
became a desired goal to preserve the scale of
the existing neighborhoods. An unfortunate
result of not limiting the size of a structure,
as well as there being no requirement for
neighborhood compatibility, is apparent in
the recently constructed commercial building
between Station 21 and Station 22.
When the Charleston County School Board
(CCSD) discussed the idea of a new and much
larger school, I was concerned the emphasis
was changing from a school for Sullivans
Island and the Isle of Palms, as it always had
been, to one with a capacity of 500 students
to be bussed in from throughout the County.
The 74,000 square foot size of the school was
not a part of the early discussion. Although
I was not pleased with the idea of building
such a large structure on our small island,
I agreed to the frst resolution by the Town
Council that stated support for the new SIES.
There was nothing in the frst resolution that
identifed the student numbers or square
footage for the new school. I remained silent
when the Town Council passed subsequent
resolutions concerning the school because I
knew some might think I was only looking out
for myself if I raised any objections. My family
and I have lived near SIES since 1978, and
we have never had a problem with it being
there. The school has been a good neighbor.
The CCSD told me it had to negotiate a
new land lease of at least 75 years to secure
the funding of the new SIES. Unfortunately,
the lease discussions took place in executive
sessions, which meant the public was not
privy to the details. The details included that
the school would require 500 students and a
74,000 square foot building.
Meanwhile, CCSD staff was working
with SIES staff and the Parent Teacher
Association (PTA) to develop conceptual
plans and ideas for the school, without
including the Sullivans Island Town Council
or its residents. The timeline compiled by
Cummings and McCrady, the architectural
frm hired by CCSD to design a new SIES,
illustrates this. The earliest meeting date
noted in the timeline was in May 2009 and
was located at SIES in Mount Pleasant. It
was attended by McGinley, Lewis, PTSA, and
Parents. Several meetings followed in 2010
and 2011, and they were attended by the
architects and the SIES PTA. It was not until
May 17, 2011, that a conceptual review of
the project was presented to the Sullivans
Island Town Council in a council meeting that
was attended by Sullivans Island residents.
This was the frst time island residents had
an opportunity to see and hear what CCSD
was proposing for the new school and was
two years from the frst documented meeting
of the CCSD with the SIES PTA and parents.
I could no longer be silent when Sullivans
Island residents, including talented
professional planners, architects, landscape
architects, successful businessmen and
women, retired teachers, retired principals,
doctors, and residents who have lived here for
60-plus years and some whose families have
lived on the island for several generations were
concerned about what the CCSD wanted to
build on the island. Everything unique about
the island that I had attempted to protect for
many years was in jeopardy, and residents
from all over the island felt the same way.
270 of these concerned citizens signed the
following petition to the Town Council in early
September 2011:
We, the undersigned, do hereby request
that no further action be taken by SI Town
Council on the approval of the proposed
lease for Sullivans Island Elementary
School. We emphatically support the
rebuilding of a new school, but only one that
will be of a more appropriate size and scope
for our historic, residential community. All
of Sullivans Islands residents deserve to be
heard on this issue with full transparency.
We ask that our Town Council stop any
action until:
1. The impact of any proposed school has
been evaluated (water, sewage, traffc);
2. The public has been fully informed of
the results of the evaluations;
3. It has been determined that any
proposed school complies with
established design guidelines for
neighborhood compatibility, as stated
in the public ordinances of the Town
of Sullivans Island (Article XII, Design
Review Board, Section 21-111);
4. All island residents have been provided
an opportunity for input at a public
forum.
Unfortunately, the Town Council dismissed
this petition and moved ahead with the
proposed SIES. I listened to the voters'
concerns and voted against the three readings
of the ordinance for the new school lease. On
the day this ordinance was to be ratifed, a
certifed petition for a referendum regarding
the school was submitted to the Town.
That evening at our regularly scheduled
Town meeting, I asked for a motion to defer
ratifcation of the ordinance for the lease
until a referendum was held. Regrettably,
the Council made no motion and ignored the
petition for a referendum.
Some supporters of the new school falsely
claim that only a few island residents oppose
the new SIES as it is currently planned. Island
voters often tell me they are opposed to what
is planned, but they are reluctant to say so in
public due to fear of being accused of being
against a school, children, or a detriment to
their business. Some members of
Town Council confronted signers
of the petition for a referendum
and vilifed them for signing the
petition, which is their entitled
right. A citizen can vote his or
her true convictions in the voting
booth, and maybe that is what
this Council does not want to
happen. If the Town Council
had set a date for a referendum
thirty days after the petition was
received, the issue would now be
over, and the voters of Sullivans
Island would have been heard.
However, it is now the frst of
June 2012, and our island is
fractured concerning a decision
OP-ED
Sullivans Islanders Should Have a Say in the New School
BY CARL JENNINGS SMITH, MAYOR OF THE TOWN OF SULLIVANS ISLAND
Op-Ed continues on page 5
I
sle of Palms residents soon will
receive several single-stream
recycling containers from the
county that will usher the island
into a countywide effort to boost
recycling participation.
The roving blue bins, turning
up in municipalities across the
county, will enable homeowners
and renters to discard a variety
of materials -- including glass,
aluminum, cardboard and all
plastics and paper products --
into a single receptacle before
wheeling it to the curb.
Islanders currently separate
materials into 22-gallon dual-
stream containers. But the
new 95-gallon bins, says City
councilman Michael Loftus, will
help residents maintain a track
record of doing the right thing.
Its going to be easier for
residents to recycle, says
Loftus, vice chair of the Citys
Public Works Committee, which
is primarily responsible for
launching the single-stream
program on the island. Now,
if you have a beer and you just
fnished reading the Sunday
paper, you just throw them into
the same bin.
While a majority of IOP
residents recycle regularly, trash
from vacation properties tend to
pile up during summer months
near the islands Marina, points
out Public Works director Donnie
Pitts.
Pitts, who called the majority
of vacationers recycling habits
conscientious, pins the
accumulation on lengthy intervals
between county collection times.
I think increased service [from
the county] will come; I just think
its going to be in increments,
he says. As the recycling
development grows, so will the
area that [the county] services.
IOP is among a handful of
municipalities at the forefront
of an effort by the countys
Environmental Management
Department to divert 40 percent
of county waste from entering
Bees Ferry Landfll and another
site in Dorchester County.
A single-stream trial run
offered a year and a half ago by
the county yielded a 70 percent
recycling rate from 4,600 homes
involved in the program in West
Ashley, James Island, Mount
Pleasant, and North Charleston --
a spike from the 39 percent rate
among dual-stream participants.
Environmental management
offcials, pleased with the results,
sought shortly thereafter to target
a total of 10,000 households
countywide, including the Isle of
Palms.
The program likely will prevent
a solid waste tax increase, says
County Councilman Dickie
Schweers, District 2.
Driven by escalating landfll
costs, taxes to home and business
owners rose fve years ago to $99
from $89, he says. Business
owners were assessed a slightly
higher fee.
Ill do whatever I can to make
certain these programs offset any
need to have an increase, affrms
Schweers, adding that the single-
stream program will not require a
tax levy.
The County, he says, now aims
to involve nearly every community
in two years on an incremental
timeline, excluding rural areas,
which use drop-off sites.
IOP, he remarks, was one of the
few municipalities that actually
called me and said, Hey, were
interested.
The project, scheduled to
roll out in phases, will begin on
the southern half of the island
before extending northward,
according to Public Works Pitts,
who consulted with offcials to
June 8, 2012
5
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
CIVIC
of great importance, not just for
the next fve or six years, but
for at least the next 75 years. If
the Town Council does not set a
date for a referendum within a
year from receiving the petition
last October, any signer of the
petition may fle a lawsuit for a
referendum. Many island voters
are now offering to donate funds
to that end.
In my years of service to the Town
of Sullivans Island, I have always
done what I thought was best for
the island, which is to maintain
its residential character, history,
and pride of place. I designed
many island projects without
charge, including the Town Sign
and playground equipment for
SIES. I spearheaded the funding
for the islands frst Survey of
Historic Architectural Structures,
a precursor to establishing
historic districts. This document
proved to be a valuable asset
after Hurricane Hugo. I organized
and raised the funds necessity
to procure, move, and restore
the historic bandstand in the J.
Marshall Stith Park. I supported
and was actively involved at all
levels of state government in the
rehabilitation of the Ben Sawyer
Bridge. In the dark days after
Hurricane Hugo, I worked with
our Town Staff and other Council
members to put our island back
together, often sacrifcing time
with my family and business. In
the aftermath of the hurricane,
I led a committee to provide the
islands frst disaster plan. My
record of dedication and service
to the island speaks for itself,
and anyone who would suggest
that my motives are self-centered
clearly does not know me. I was
elected by a greater majority than
anyone on this Council, and I was
elected by the voters of Sullivans
Island, not the Isle of Palms,
Mount Pleasant, or Charleston
County. The voters of Sullivans
Island are my only concern
regarding the proposed SIES.
The people of Sullivans Island
should have a say in the new SIES,
and a referendum is the means
for them to do so. My ancestors
fought for such rights in the
American War for Independence,
and I honor their sacrifce.
Op-Ed continues from page 4
IOP Poised To Slip Into Single-Stream Recycling
BY JACOB FLANNICK
he or she probably thinks they
are a decent person.
Some people are allergic to
certain plants. Maybe, and with
a little poetic justice, the thief
might contract a non-lethal rash.
If so, perhaps he or she will be
itching to repent and confess.
The IOP Police were called
and, of course, they were helpful.
They did say they would watch
the site on their patrols.
The best possible outcome
would be the hidden camera
which takes endless pictures.
In a future issue of the Island
Eye News maybe a picture of the
thief will appear. Who knows, it
may be someone you know.

Kara Melin and
Dick OConnell
Isle of Palms
Letters continues from page 3
Recycling continues on page 16
6 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.SC
face challenges, and achieve
things they never thought were
possible.
Members of the community
were able to take part in an
incredible Giving Back evening
on the Carolina Girl. Giving
back is essential to becoming
successful, says Captain Bob
Murray, owner and operator of
the Carolina Girl. Each year,
Carolina Girl, Charlestons
only exclusive special events
yacht, chooses a charity of its
choice to partner with and raise
money. Crew members enjoy the
opportunity to step aside from
corporate events and weddings
to take part in these non-proft
events.
Carolina Girl will be hosting
another Camp Happy Days
fundraiser on Thursday,
September 20, 2012. For more
details and ticket information,
please contact Camp Happy Days
at 571-4336. For more information
about the Carolina Girl, visit
www.carolinagirlevents.com,
call 818-2495, or email info@
carolinagirlevents.com
Carolina Girl continues from cover
before being covered with soil.
Over time, the former dump site
became an informal Town park.
Today, this passive park is a large
area of mowed grass, ideal for
picnics and frisbee, with natural
vegetation around the edges.
There is easy access to a marsh
creek for kayaks and paddle
boards. A special feature is a tall
telephone pole with a platform
on top that is, for the frst time
this year, the home of a nesting
pair of ospreys that were busily
feeding their young during the
signing ceremony on Wednesday
morning.
The smaller of the two newly
protected areas is a half-acre
Old Bridge site that served as
the landing area for the Pitt
Street Bridge connecting Mount
Pleasant to Sullivans Island.
The old bridge was replaced
by the Ben Sawyer Bridge and
dismantled in 1945. To fnd the
secluded Old Bridge site, drive
down Osceola Ave toward the
harbor. Just past Station 9, the
Benke-Lowe Boat Landing, and a
private dock, there is a sign on the
right that states: No Trespassing
after Dusk, SIPD. This marks the
start of a scenic wooded footpath
along the elevated embankment
that ends on the large stone
blocks of the former bridge
landing. There is a wonderful
view of the Inland Waterway and
the Mount Pleasant side of the
old Pitt Street bridge. It is evident
from a fshing pole and a tangle
of fsh bait spotted on a recent
visit that this is also someones
favorite fshing location.
Preserving these valued
public sites has not been easy.
Conservation groups such as
The Lowcountry Open Land
Trust primarily protect large
tracts of land. Fortunately,
The Mount Pleasant Land
Conservancy (MPLC) - a relatively
new, independent organization
with a focus on the East Cooper
community - was willing to work
with the Town of Sullivans Island
to protect these small, but valued,
public spaces. The process,
very simplifed, is that the Town
deeded the land to MPLC for $10.
MPLC placed mutually agreeable
deed restrictions on the property
and then deeded the land back
to the Town for the same amount
with the deed restrictions in place.
The Town has donated $3000 to
the stewardship fund of MPLC to
defray the costs associated with
preparing a documentation report
of the current, baseline condition
of the properties and periodic
inspections to ensure that the
deed restrictions are adhered to.
So, go visit the Old Dump
and Old Bridge sites, which are
there for you to enjoy now and
in the future. And say thanks
to Mayor Carl Smith, chair of the
Real Estate Committee Pat ONeil,
other Town Council members,
the MPLC, and island residents
who value conservation and
preservation of our green spaces.
Green Space continues from cover
O
n June 16 at 10:30 a.m., the Edgar Allan Poe Library will
host a book club meeting to discuss Unbroken: A World
War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption by
Laura Hillenbrand. Embark on a journey back to May, 1943. An
Army Air Forces bomber has tumbled into the Pacifc Ocean and
seemingly disappeared, leaving behind
nothing more than a few pieces of rubble
and a trail of oil, gasoline, and blood.
Suddenly, a face appears on the ocean
surface. The planes bombardier, a
young lieutenant, struggles to pull
himself onto a life raft. What lies
ahead for this young survivor? What
stories does he have to share? All are
welcome to discuss Unbroken. Coffee,
treats, and great conversation will be
provided.
The Edgar Allan Poe Library
is located at 1921 IOn Avenue,
Sullivans Island. For more info, call
883-3914.
Coffee, Conversation,
and a Great Read
P O E L I B R A R Y H O S T S A B O O K C L U B T O
D I S C U S S H I L L E N B R A N D S U N B R O K E N
Camp Happy Days kids eating complimentary donuts from Krispy Kreme.
PHOTOS BY CAROLINA GIRL EVENTS
T
he basketball and tennis
courts of Sullivans, located
in J. Marshall Stith Park,
are in the process of undergoing
major refurbishments. The courts,
originally constructed in 1966, are
in desperate need of replacement
due to severe drainage and
foundation problems. In October
2011, the Town hired the
engineering frm of Thomas and
Hutton to move forward with the
required maintenance. On May
10, 2012, the Town received two
bids for the removal of the old
courts and construction of the
new courts. According to Town
Administrator Andy Benke,
project engineer Thomas and
Hutton determined that both
submissions were qualifed bids.
The low bid was placed by Gulf
Stream Construction. Since the
placement of the bids, the Town
is in the process of reviewing
contractual options and expects
to craft a plan for moving forward
in the coming weeks.
Stay tuned to the Island Eye
and the Sullivans Island Town
website, www.sullivansisland-
sc.com, for further updates
concerning this project.
Extreme Court Makeover
T O WN A D VA N C E S P L A N S T O R E F U R B I S H
T E N N I S A N D B A S K E T B A L L C O U R T S
BY HANNAH DOCKERY
Grass grows through the large cracks of the Stith Park tennis courts due to failing
foundations.
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O
n Saturday, May 25, the First United Methodist Church on
Isles of Palms held its biannual Fish Fry. The fundraiser
featured Southern favorites such as hushpuppies, grits,
coleslaw, and of course, fried fsh to
complete a meal sold for $6 - a bargain
in todays economy.
The United Methodist Mens group
that organized the event not only
catered to diners who dropped by the
church, they also facilitated a drive-
through lane that has quickly become
a popular option.
The Fish Fry, which is open to both
community members and town visitors
alike, has proven to be a successful
fundraising endeavor, with proceeds
going toward East Cooper Community
Outreach, Meals on Wheels, and other
area non-profts.
Fried Fish
for the Masses
BY CAROLINE STEC
8 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.SC
COMPUTER CORNER
A
s a professional, my ears
perk up when I hear about
a big break in security for
computers and the internet, and
the past couple of days have
been doozies! A piece of
malware, which is the
umbrella name for all
types of viruses, named
FLAME was detected
and analyzed
by several
big named
security
vendors,
including
Karpersky
Labs. It
stated that the
virus had been
running for fve- plus years
on networks and computers in
Iran, Israel, and throughout the
Middle East. The software virus
is much larger than your average
virus and can collect data, turn on
microphones and video cameras,
and record voice, data, and video.
It compresses recovered data
and streams it on the internet to
another site for retrieval. It sounds
scary and it is.
Something else that came out
of this story that I did not know
is that Karpersky is a Russian
company with possible
ties to the Russian
government. There
are conficting stories
about this, but
enough to give one
thought about
the virus
software.
As for
FLAME, it
brings into
focus what we
should all
realize, that
anything on the
internet is subject to
compromise and you need to be
aware of that. Some information
is not sensitive enough to bring
out the big boys such as your
personal banking info, but if you
are not running simple malware
protection software, the smaller
thieves can and will attack you
and steal your data, name, and
cash.
Wireless security is protecting
the signal you are broadcasting
around your house to keep
anyone from getting onto your
local network, whereas malware
protection is to keep bad guys
from entering your computer or
network from the internet. Please
make sure you are protected both
ways and keep the software up to
date! A software package used for
malware that is not updated at
least once a day is an invitation
for exploitation. As always, if in
doubt, ask a professional to assist
you.
I look forward to some good
questions and helping you out. If
you need immediate assistance,
you can always call me, Rent-
A-Bob, at 822-7794 or email
rentabob@live.com.
Computer Security in the News
BY BOB HOOPER, A.K.A. RENT-A-BOB
SARAH'S BIRDS
T
he Tricolored Heron is a small heron which can be found
throughout the Atlantic and Gulf coasts as well as in
Central and South America. Adults have white bellies and
dark blue upper parts. During the breeding season, the irises
change to a purple color, the beaks turn bright blue, and they
grow attractive plumes. This species is often confused with adult
Little Blue Herons, which are a solid blue with a purple-tinted
head and neck. Tricolored Herons diet consists almost entirely
of small fsh, although they will occasionally feed on frogs and
small invertebrates. They feed in wetlands and have a variety of
foraging behaviors, often running frantically in shallow water
while fapping their wings and then stabbing at feeing fsh.
They may crouch and move slowly or they may fold their wings
around their heads like an umbrella (canopy feeding). Tricolored
Herons frequently breed in large, mixed colonies which may
include other herons, egrets, and anhingas. Males begin to
build rudimentary platform nests out of twigs and females help
with the fnishing touches. Females lay three to seven eggs, and
both sexes aid in incubating the eggs and feeding the young.
Tricolored Herons hatch out covered in down and can only lift
their heads up for a few seconds, but they fedge in as few as 35
days. Juveniles are distinguished by their brown necks.
Tricolored Heron
BY SARAH DIAZ
PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ
Tricolored Heron.
June 8, 2012 9
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.SC
DAILY
T
his summer, the Town of
Mount Pleasant and the
Charleston County Park and
Recreation Commission present
a series of free family movies
outdoors on the Charleston
Harbor. Held at the Mount
Pleasant Memorial Waterfront
Park and Pier, the frst of the
series will be presented on Friday,
June 15. Bring chairs and spread
out on the parks Great Lawn to
enjoy an evening movie on the
giant infatable screen.
Best of all, its free! Drinks,
treats, and snacks will be
available for purchase at the
piers Riverwatch Cafe, and on-
site vendors will sell kettle corn,
hot dogs, funnel cakes, Italian
Ice and beverages. At the foot of
the Arthur Ravenel, Jr. Bridge
on Charleston Harbor, the
scenic Mount Pleasant Memorial
Waterfront Park and Pier will be
a great spot to bring the family to
enjoy an evening under the stars
in the cool harbor breeze!
Movie listings are available
online at www.ccprc.com/movies.
All movies begin approximately
at sunset on select Fridays
throughout the summer. Parking
fees on site at the Memorial
Waterfront Park still apply.
Movie dates at the Mount
Pleasant Memorial Waterfront
Park and Pier are June 15, July
20, and August 24.
The Memorial Waterfront Park
is located at 71 Harry Hallman
Blvd.
For further details on Movies
at the Pier, or for a listing of the
family-friendly flms presented,
visit www.ccprc.com/movies
or call 795-4386. This event is
sponsored by Cinebarre, and is
brought to you by the Charleston
County Park and Recreation
Commission and the Town of
Mount Pleasant.
Summer Fun for
the Whole Family
C AT C H F R E E MO V I E S T H I S S U MME R AT
MO U N T P L E A S A N T S WAT E R F R O N T PA R K
BY CCPRC
W
ild Dunes Resort is
pleased to offer a special
golf offer to active,
reserve, and retired military
personnel to honor and thank
them for their selfess service.
Harbor for Heroes celebrates
returning veterans and military
personnel, allowing these service
men and women to enjoy award-
winning golf on Wild Dunes
Resorts Harbor Course at
preferred rates.
The promotion is available
each day between Memorial
Day, May 28, 2012 and Labor
Day, September 3, 2012, offering
Americas heroes the opportunity
to relax and relish the unique Tom
Fazio-designed Harbor Course for
just $42 per person between the
hours of 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Any
and all military personnel with
a valid military ID are welcome
to take part in this special offer
guests of Wild Dunes Resort,
visitors to the Charleston area, as
well as locals.
"We're fortunate to have such
a beautiful course here at Wild
Dunes Resort," said Frank
Fredericks, Managing Director at
Wild Dunes Resort. "And we want
to be able to share the course
with the many local heroes
right here in our backyard, or
who plan to visit our beautiful
area. It's our pleasure to show
our sincere appreciation to our
brave military personnel, and we
hope it provides an opportunity
to unwind and enjoy one of the
best courses the Lowcountry has
to offer."
For more information, or to book
a tee time, call 877-221-0901 or
visit www.wilddunes.com.
Harbor for Heroes
N E W PA C K A G E F R O M C H A R L E S T O N S
I S L A N D R E S O R T H O N O R S V E T E R A N S
PROVIDED BY WILD DUNES
A
llison Horan, a Sullivans
Island resident, was
awarded a special
recognition medal at Furman
University last week for her
combined SAT scores of 1610.
Allisons reading score of 640
places her in the top 92 percentile
of college bound South Carolina
high school seniors - quite the
feat for a girl who is supposed
to be in the sixth grade. Allison
graduated ffth grade from
Sullivans Island Elementary
School last year and currently
attends University School of the
Lowcountry in Mount Pleasant.
Allison was also awarded the
South Carolina Silver key award
this year in the Scholastic
writers contest.
For more information about
the University School of the
Lowcountry, visit www.
uslowcountry.og.
Allison Horan receives a recognition medal
for her high SAT score at Furman University. PHOTO BY MICHAEL HORAN
One Smart
6
th
Grader
10 June 8, 2012
A
s we enjoy the summer
months with our families,
it is important to be aware
of how to avoid some common pet
related emergencies.
Question: We will be retiring
soon and plan to move on to
our boat full time. Of course,
we will take our dog Salty with
us. Salty is a four year old Cairn
terrier who loves the boat, but
we have never taken him on long
trips. How do we get him used to
extended stays on board?
Answer: There are several things
to consider when traveling on the
water with a pet. The frst is to
be sure that your pet does not get
seasick. If Salty has spent time
on the boat before, you should
be okay, but sometimes long
offshore trips can still result in
motion sickness.
Before you head out across the
Gulf Stream, make slow, short
trips and watch for drooling or
loss of appetite as early signs of
seasickness. It is best to dock
or anchor in a quiet harbor
immediately if these signs
occur, but if you cannot do this,
medicate before vomiting or
diarrhea begin. Common motion
sickness drugs like Dramamine
and meclizine (less drowsy
Dramamine) can be used in dogs.
Ask your veterinarian if these
would be safe for your pet and
for appropriate doses. He or she
may recommend a newer drug,
called Cerenia that is labeled
for motion sickness in dogs and
it works really well. Try to give
these drugs two hours before
travel and on an empty stomach.
Gradually increase the length of
your trips as your pet gets used
to the motion.
For those who have never taken
your pet on the boat, spend time
with him while the boat is still
tied at the dock. Run the engine
and make the boat rock a bit. Do
this several times before you take
your frst short cruise.
Once your pet is okay with
the motion of the boat, you must
consider what you are going to do
when he has to relieve himself.
Cats are easy because you can
have a litter box on board, but
dogs may require a different
solution. If you cannot get ashore
at least three times a day, you may
need to train your dog to eliminate
on the deck. Try purchasing a
piece of astro-turf, place it on the
bow and encourage him to use it.
Sometimes placing a potted plant
in the area helps. Simply hose it
off afterwards. Smaller dogs can
be trained to use dog litter (paper
pellets instead of sand) or pee
pads. You might want to practice
with these at home before you go
to sea.
It can get very hot on a boat,
especially if one is inside the
cabin. Be sure to provide lots of
fresh water for your pet. He will
consume more water at sea than
at home. Provide plenty of shade
and never leave your pet locked
inside the cabin in the summer
unless the AC is running. This
is just like leaving a pet locked
inside a hot car.
If your pet has a special bed or
crate, be sure to make space for
this on the boat. This helps them
feel comfortable in a different
environment.
You should have a way for the
pet to get back on the boat if he
should fall or decide to go for a
swim. Nets, like small hammocks,
can be hung overboard for cats.
Be sure to show him or her where
this is. Dogs prefer ramp type
devices. I recommend that the pet
always wear a life jacket when on
the dock or deck of the boat. Pet
life jackets have handles on the
back that make it easier to pick
the pet up and out of the water.
When traveling across state
and country lines, you will need
to have up-to-date rabies and
health certifcates. Be sure to
contact countries where you
expect to go ashore before you
arrive so you will know their
specifc regulations. Rabies free
islands are the ones you really
have to watch.
Congratulations on your
retirement and enjoy the boat!
Katherine A. Saenger, DVM is
one of fve veterinarians at Bees
Ferry Veterinary Hospital, an
AAHA certifed practice located at
3422 Shelby Ray Court in West
Ashley, Charleston. For more
information, visit www.bfvh.net or
call 769-6784.
Salty Dog And The High Seas
HOW TO TRAVEL BY BOAT WI TH YOUR FURRY FRI END
BY KATHERINE A. SAENGER, DVM
F
or ladies who are football
fans or football widows,
this fun event provides
instruction by The Citadel
Football Coaches in basic football
plays, offense, defense, and
player positions. Wearing your
custom t-shirt, youll go behind-
the-scenes to visit the weight,
training, and equipment rooms.
The highlight of the evening
takes place on the Johnson
Hagood Stadium feld, where you
get to pass and catch the ball and
run to the end zone for your score.
Spiking the ball and doing your
Victory dance are encouraged!
The evening winds up with a
catered supper in the exclusive
Club Level of the stadium.
Citadel coaches wives will be
there to visit with you and Kay
Higgins, wife of Head Coach Kevin
Higgins, will talk about her life as
a coachs wife. There will be an
auction for unique Citadel items,
plus some Clemson and Carolina
specialties. Also included is a
tour of the stadium press box
and private suites. Goody bags
include a notebook with football
basics information, even the
offcials signals you see in a
game. You get two free tickets to
a specifed Citadel football game
($50 value) when you wear your
t-shirt and you will get to see
highlights of the evening on the
scoreboard.
Friday, July 27, is the date
at The Citadel. Pre-registration
through July 20 is $50 for one or
two for $85. Late registration is
$75. Registration is from 5-6 p.m.
and the evening ends at 9 p.m..
Go to cfabulldogs.org, Spotlight
Event for the registration form.
All proceeds support the Citadel
Football Association Athletic
Scholarship.
Ladies Ditch Heels for Helmets
3
R D
A N N U A L WO ME N S 1 0 1 F O O T B A L
June 8, 2012 11
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
NATURE & WILDLIFE
O
n a windy Memorial Day weekend,
The Center for Birds of Prey got a call
from the Gardner family who were
having a family reunion on Abalone Alley in
Wild Dunes. They had found a nestling or
baby hawk on the ground at the base of a live
oak there. As a volunteer for the Center in
Awendaw, I was called to respond and assess
the situation. What I found was a downy
little Coopers hawk who had been blown or
jostled out of the nest by a sibling still in the
nest. The adult Coopers hawks could be seen
fying frequently into the tree. Even though
the nest was at least thirty feet up, the young
bird appeared to be in good condition, well
fed, and with no broken bones after the fall.
Even though it was a busy holiday weekend,
I called the Isle of Palms Fire Department to
see if there was any way they could assist in
getting this little hawk back into its nest. In a
very short time, two fre engine ladder trucks
arrived along with Captain Richard Hathaway,
Trent Buzille, Chris Puckhaber, and Trevor
Speelman. By this time the neighbors had
come outside to see what the commotion
was about and were looking at the little bird.
These brave frefghters had responded on
one of the busiest days of the summer season
to help. Trent Buzille donned full
protective gear in case the adult
hawks saw him as a threat and
climbed an extension ladder
holding the little chick since the
bucket on the long ladder would
not ft between the branches. He
gently placed the bird back in the
nest while the onlookers watched
in amazement. The children, of
course, were delighted to see
fremen and fre trucks doing such
a good deed. We are lucky to have
such a caring and capable group
in the Isle of Palms Fire Department, all of
whom are willing to help residents whether
they are people or the islands wildlife.
Many people feel that if you touch a young
bird, the parents will abandon it. This is not the
case. Most birds do not have a sense of smell
and the best place for very small young ones
is back in the nest if you can fnd it and reach
it. The parents will continue to care for them.
As their adult feathers grow in, they reach an
intermediate stage where they are out of the
nest but not yet fying. This is called branching,
and is a normal but very dangerous time for
them. If you fnd a brancher, try to put it back
up into a safer place, such as a bush or tree
where the parents will continue to feed it until
it can fy. If all else fails or if the young bird
appears injured, call a local veterinarian for the
name of a songbird rehabilitator who may be
able to help. If the bird is a raptor (hawk, owl,
osprey, etc.) call the Center for Birds of Prey at
971-7474.
SEA TURTLE NESTING UPDATE:
As of May 30 there are 16 Loggerhead nests on
the Isle of Palms and two on Sullivans Island.
This is the largest number of May nests weve
ever found. More about sea turtles next issue!
IOP Fire Department
to the Rescue
B Y MA R Y P R I N G L E
Firefghter Trent Buzille help's a Cooper's hawk fedgling back into its
nest.
PHOTO BY MARY PRINGLE
June 27 June 8 Is l and Eye Cal endar
Friday, June 8
Charleston County Water Parks
Now Open daily. Through August
17. For more info, visit ccprc.com
World Oceans Day
Celebrate World Oceans Day by
paying a visit to the Aquarium!
Explore the aquatic exhibits of
the Aquarium, including North
Americas tallest tank, the Great
Ocean Tank. Cost is general
admissions ticket. For more info,
call 577-FISH (3474). 9 a.m.
5 p.m. at the South Carolina
Aquarium. www.scaquarium.org
Saturday, June 9
Darkness to Light - Stewards of
Children Workshop
The public is welcome to attend a
free prevention training program
that teaches adults how to prevent,
recognize, and react responsibly to
child sexual abuse. The program
is designed for organizations that
serve youth and for individuals
concerned about the safety of
children. 8:30 a.m. breakfast and
registration. Class runs 9:30 - 11
a.m. Isle of Palms Exchange Club
Building, 201 Palm Blvd. Isle of
Palms. For more info, call Barbara
Harrington at 886-9887 or email
harrington6786@bellsouth.net
Sunday, June 10
High Thyme
Sunday Afternoon Music
From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every
Sunday, enjoy live music at High
Thyme restaurant on Sullivans
Island. This Sunday will feature
Derek and Rik Cribb. 2213 C
Middle St. For more info, visit
highthymecuisine.com or call 883-
3536.
Boo Radley Foundation
Dog Day Game Night at the Joe
Join the Charleston Veterinary
Refferal Center and the Boo Radley
Foundation for
a Dog Day game
at Joe Riley
Stadium to learn
more about
the Boo Radley
Foundation,
meet the CVRC
staff, and
fght human
and canine
cancer. For
more info, visit
rileyparkevents.com.
Oak Ridge Tennessee
Youth Choir in Concert
The 35 voice Youth Choir from the
First United Methodist Church of
Oak Ridge, Tennessee will perform
at both the 8:30 and 10:45 worship
services at First United Methodist
on Isle of Palms. They will offer
anthems by Craig Courtney, Allen
Pote, Robert Ray, and Douglas
Wagner. 21st Avenue and Palm
Boulevard, Isle of Palms. For more
info, visit www.iopmethodist.com.
Monday, June 11
SKY - Vacation Bible School at
First United Methodist Church IOP
Kids participate in teamwork-
building games and crafts, and test
out Sciency-Fun Gizmos that they
can take home. SKY kids will also
collect childrens books for Book
Worm Angels. For Kindergarten -
5th grade from 9 a.m. to 12 noon,
June 11 15. To register, visit
www.iopmethodist.com/Youth/
Children or call the Church Offce
at 886-6610. 21
st
Avenue and
Palm Boulevard, Isle of Palms.
Adventure Camp at Palmetto Islands:
Mountain Bike and Rock Climb
Campers learn necessary skills for
safe handling of a mountain bike,
then practice on fat trails around
James Island County Park. This
week also includes rock climbing
and an overnight trip on Thursday,
returning on Friday morning.
June 11-15. 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Age:
10-12. Fee: $220. For more info,
call 795-4386, or visit ccprc.com.
tueSday, June 12
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
Every Tuesday from 7 - 10 p.m.
enjoy the sweet acoustic sounds of
Jim and Whitt Algar as they cover
a wide variety of popular songs
from Elvis to Eric Clapton. 2063
Middle Street Sullivans Island.
For more info, call 883-9452 or
visit www.atlanticville.net.
Friday, June 15
That Summer Book Sale
Friday Sunday. Books, DVDs,
and CDs for sale with prices
starting at $1 for paperbacks and
$3 for hardback books. 9 5:30
p.m. today at the Main Branch
Library, 68 Calhoun Street,
downtown Charleston.
Movies at the Mount Pleasant
Pier: Back to the Future (1985)
Join us on the Great Lawn at the
Town of Mount Pleasant Memorial
Waterfront Park for movies under
the stars! Bring a chair or blanket
and enjoy a family-friendly flm.
Event admission is free and movies
begin around sundown. Free event.
For more info, call 795-4386, or
visit www.ccprc.com.
Madagascar by Moonlight
Fathers Day Weekend Sleepover
Animal encounters, educational
programs, an evening snack, and
a continental breakfast await
your family or group on this
wild overnight safari at the SC
Aquarium. A special Fathers Day
craft project will be included. Make
your reservations today! $40 Ages
4-11 (3 and under are free)/$45
Ages 12 and up. 7 p.m. 8 a.m.
For more info, call 577-FISH
(3474). www.scaquarium.org.
Saturday, June 16
Floppin Flounder 5K
Presented by the Charleston
Running Club, the race starts at
the intersection of Middle Street
and Station 15 on Sullivans
Island at 8 a.m.
Proceeds will
go toward the
Sullivans
Island Fire
Dept. and
the Charleston
Running Club.
$25/runner.
To register, visit www.
charlestonrunningclub.com.
That Summer Book Sale
Friday Sunday. Books, DVDs,
and CDs for sale with prices
starting at $1 for paperbacks and
$3 for hardback books. 9 5:30
p.m. today at the Main Branch
Library, 68 Calhoun Street,
downtown Charleston.
Shaggin on the Cooper:
The Cruiseomatics
Dance the night away under the
stars at the new Mount Pleasant
Pier while enjoying live classic
oldies and beach music performed
by The Cruiseomatics. Beverages
will be available for purchase on-
site. 7 - 11 p.m. Age: 3 & up. Fee:
$10. For more info, call 795-4386,
or visit www.ccprc.com.
Sunday, June 17
Happy Fathers Day!
Fathers Day Fishing on the Cooper
A Lowcountry expert will be
on hand to share techniques
that will make fshing the Mt.
Pleasant Pier a fun and rewarding
experience for you and your dad.
An adult chaperone is required for
participants ages 15 and under.
1-2 p.m. Free. For more info, call
795-4386, or visit www.ccprc.com.
Charleston Sprint
Triathlon Series
Now in its 22
nd
year, the series
will consist of fve triathlons and
will include a .3-mile swim, a 12-
mile bike ride, and a 5K run. Race
starts at 7:15 a.m. at James Island
County Park. To register, contact
Paul King at 881-8872, or go to
www.ccprc.com/csts. Open to ages
16 and up.
High Thyme
Sunday Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 10.
Fathers Day at the Aquarium
Fathers can spend this Fathers
Day holiday at the South Carolina
Aquarium with complimentary
admission. Check out the new
Madagascar Journey, our famous
albino alligator, the renovated
Saltmarsh Aviary, and the playful
river otters. Offer only valid on
June 17. For more info, call 577-
FISH (3474). www.scaquarium.org.
Monday, June 18
Sailing Camp Beginner
Sailing instruction will include
knot tying, seamanship, the
techniques of sailing, and
rigging. At the end of the session,
participants will be able to operate
a two person dingy with safety
and confdence. June 18-22. 8:30
a.m.-4:30 p.m. Meet at Palmetto
Islands County Park. Age: 10-12.
Fee: $215. For more info, call 795-
4386, or visit www.ccprc.com.
tueSday, June 19
Happy Juneteenth!
Also known as Freedom Day or
Emancipation Day, Juneteenth
honors African American
heritage in the United States by
commemorating the announcement
of the abolition of slavery in Texas
in 1865.
Little Explorers:
Crabs that Fiddle
The fddler crab may be small,
but its impact on the salt
marsh ecosystem is as big as its
personality. Spend some time at
Palmetto Island's County Park
salt marsh and solve the riddle as
to why crabs fddle. Ages 3 - 5.
Pre-registration and chaperone
required. 10-11 a.m. Fee: $5. For
more info, call 795-4386, or visit
www.ccprc.com.
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 12.
WedneSday, June 20
Happy First Day of Summer!
Also known as the summer solstice,
this is the longest day of sunlight
all year.
thurSday, June 21
Home School Days - Gettin
Twiggy With It
Through hands-on activities and
a plant walk, well discover plant
anatomy, diversity, and cool
uses of local plants at Palmetto
Islands County Park. There will
be parallel sessions for kids ages
4-6 and 7-10. Pre-registration and
chaperone required. 10-11:30 a.m.
Fee: $5. For more info, call 795-
4386, or visit www.ccprc.com.
Sunday, June 24
High Thyme
Sunday Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 10.
Monday, June 25
Adventure Camp at Palmetto
Islands: Tour SUP and Rock Climb
Campers will experience this
historic Hawaiian craft on the lake
at James Island County Park. This
week also includes rock climbing
where campers will learn the
basics of knot tying, belaying, and
climbing techniques. June 25-29.
8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Age: 10-12. Fee:
$198. For more info, call 795-
4386, or visit www.ccprc.com.
tueSday, June 26
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 12.
WedneSday, June 27
Early Morning Bird Walks
at Caw Caw
View and discuss a variety of birds,
butterfies, and other organisms
at Caw Caw Interpretive Center,
5200 Savannah Highway, Ravenel.
Pre-registration is encouraged, but
walk-in registrations are welcome.
8 12 p.m. $5. For more info, call
795-4386 or visit ccprc.com.
14 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
O
n Friday, May 25, the
students of Sullivans
Island Elementary School
(SIES) held their annual May
Day festival. This years theme,
Its Science!, allowed students
to share the exciting things they
learned in science class this
year as SIES pushes towards a
curriculum that focuses more on
science and mathematics.
The program began with a
warm welcome from Principal
Susan King, who then introduced
the ffth grade Boy Scouts as
they presented the colors. Cailyn
Hager wowed the crowd with her
solo performance of the Star
Spangled Banner before all the
students of SIES joined together
in singing this years theme song,
Its Science.
Skylar Taylor then introduced
the ffth grade students who
performed Scientifc Method.
The students sang and danced
a choreographed routine,
outlining the processes they have
learned to conduct a science
experiment. This was followed
by an impressive performance by
the kindergartners titled Garden
Hoedown, and after that, several
frst grade students shared their
knowledge of the phases of the
moon in Moon Song.
Izzy Angiola introduced the
second graders who performed A
Bunch of Animals, sharing their
knowledge of animal kingdoms
and classifcations. The third
grade classes performed Sound,
Sound, Sound followed by the
fourth graders explaining the
water cycle in The Water Cycle.
Fifth grader William Rocco then
approached the microphone to
introduce the main event the
dancing around the Maypole.
This traditional dance, dating
back to the Roman Empire,
celebrates the passing of spring
and the beginning of summer.
The decorating and dancing
around the Maypole is one of the
highlights of being a ffth grader
at SIES.
The event was a great success
for the students at SIES, as well
as the staff, faculty, and parents.
Special thanks go to all who made
the event possible, as well as the
SIES Art Club for their artistic
contributions to May Day and
throughout the year.
The ffth grade students of SIES perform a traditional dance around the Maypole.
PHOTOS BY HANNAH DOCKERY
May Day Kicks Off Summer 2012
S T U D E N T S AT S I E S PA R T I C I PAT E I N A N N U A L MAY D AY C E L E B R AT I O N S
BY HANNAH DOCKERY
15 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
Acme Cantina:
Enjoy a great beach
atmosphere, casual Americana
dining, and fresh-catch
seafood for breakfast, lunch,
and dinner.
$$
886-0024
www.acmecantina.com
31 J.C. Long Blvd.
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Atlanticville:
With a casual and relaxing
atmosphere, enjoy an
extensive wine list and award-
winning menu, along with a
Sunday brunch menu.
$$$
883-9452
www.atlanticville.net
2063 Middle Street, Sullivans
Island, SC 29482
Ben & Jerrys:
Enjoy an array of ice cream
favors, from Chocolate
Therapy to Peach Cobbler
on Isle of Palms Ocean
Boulevard.
$
886-6314
www.benandjerrys.com
1009 Ocean Boulevard, Isle of
Palms, SC 29451
Caf Medley:
Start your day or end it with
a well rounded caf, serving
breakfast, lunch, and a glass
of wine in the evening.
$$
793-4055
www.cafemedley.com
2213 Middle St Sullivans
Island, SC 29482
High Thyme Cuisine:
A small island bistro with
a wide range of dishes from
seafood, tapas on Tuesdays,
and a brunch on Sunday
mornings.
$$$
883-3536
www.highthymecuisine.com
2213 Middle St, Sullivans
Island, SC 29482
Home Team BBQ:
Not limited to barbeque, this
casual eatery also serves
salads, wraps, tacos, and
quesadillas, as well as Sunday
brunch.
$$
883-3131
www.hometeambbq.com
2209 Middle Street Sullivans
Island, SC 29482
Morgan Creek Grill:
Relax with a front row seat
on the Intracoastal waterway
while enjoying fresh seafood
and southern hospitality.
$$$
886-8980
www.morgancreekgrill.com
80 41st Avenue
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Poes Tavern:
Famous for their gourmet
burgers and chicken
sandwiches, this Poe-inspired
eatery also features great deals
on fresh fsh tacos.
$$
883-0083
www.poestavern.com
2210 Middle St
Sullivans Island, SC
Station 22:
Enjoy a fun atmosphere with
fresh seafood and southern
favorites, a Sunday brunch
menu, and new sushi menu.
$$$
883-3355
www.station22restaurant.com
2205 Middle Street Sullivans
Island, SC 29482
Sullivans:
Grab a casual dinner of fried
founder or crab cakes in a
cozy atmosphere, as well as
lunch on the weekends.
$$
883-3222
2019 Middle Street Sullivans
Island, SC 29482
Taco Mamacita:
Enjoy made-from-scratch Tex
Mex soups, salads, tacos,
and enchiladas, and quench
your thirst with one of several
specialty margaritas.
$$
789-4107
www.tacomamacita.com
2213-B Middle Street
Sullivans Island, SC 29482
The Windjammer:
Isle of Palms home to live
music, this fun beach club
features unbeatable prices
on sandwiches, burgers, and
seafood.
$$
886-8596
www.the-windjammer.com
1008 Ocean Boulevard
Isle of Palms, SC 29451
Island Eats
16 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
T
he Mount Pleasant Artists Guild awards a visual art scholarship
each year to a high school senior living in the East Cooper area.
This year, Bethany Summers of Mount Pleasant is the winner
of the 2012 Mount Pleasant Artists Guild Scholarship, amounting
to one thousand dollars. Summers, a graduating senior at Wando
High School, plans to attend the College of Charleston in the fall. She
was selected for the award based on a written application, a resume
of scholastic and artistic accomplishments, as well as a portfolio
interview by a panel of guild members. Congratulations to Bethany
for her achievements!
Amy Johnson is the Mount Pleasant Artists Guild Scholarship Chair.
For more information, contact Amy at ajohnson@behs.com.
Scholarship winner Bethany Summers presented her artwork at the May 7 meeting of
the Mount Pleasant Artists Guild.
An Artist on the Rise
MO U N T P L E A S A N T A R T I S T S G U I L D A WA R D S
S T U D E N T WI T H 2 0 1 2 S C H O L A R S H I P
BY AMY JOHNSON
determine pick-up routes.
A county subcontractor
sometime next week will distribute
containers to single-family
and rental properties between
Breach Inlet and 30th Avenue,
he says. And a collection truck
ftted with an automated arm --
known by Pitts and others as the
one-armed bandit -- will pick
up bins every other
Wednesday.
The
project drew
unanimous
approval last
year from IOP
City Council,
according to
the Citys Loftus,
who began
advocating for the
project in November
when running for re-
election.
He calls the project
a city-wide effort
and says offcials are
working earnestly to
generate enthusiasm for
the new system.
Im looking at the big
picture, he says. Its
a win-win for the
environment and its a
win-win for the tax payers.
The county, after fnalizing
next years budget, plans in the
next 18 months to issue more
containers and another truck to
the northern half of the island
between 30th Avenue and the
Wild Dunes Resort, according to
Loftus.
When one part of the island
sees that its going well, he says,
theyre going to say, What about
us?
Recycling continues from page 5
M
ay is my favorite
month. I had to
think about this
for a while, and it was a
close contest with April,
but May seems to me a
bit milder, and without
as many storms (I could
be wrong on this last
part). Classes are over,
its time for graduation,
and people start thinking
about summer. The
yellow jessamine and
azaleas are long fnished,
but the magnolias are
blooming. Theres a sort
of sweet fragrance in
the air on these quiet
mornings, with plenty
of birds singing, and
theres a nest in every
bush, with skinks in the garden.
There is a good mix of spring and
early summer fowers to study.
Once we roll into June, it starts
warming up and a large part of
the landscape is entering its high
green phase; that is, there are
not many fowers to see, mostly
foliage.
May boasts some of the prettiest
wildfowers there are, and some
of the most fragrant. This weeks
Mystery Plant is a show-stopper
in both departments.
It is an herb, rising from a
buried rhizome. Its aerial stem
produces one or two (usually
two) slender, pointed, dark green
leaves, sheathing at the base. The
leaf blade is prominently veiny.
Flowers appear regularly at the
beginning of May. A raceme of
fowers is characteristic, each
fower hanging from a slender
stalk on one side of the raceme.
The fully developed corolla of the
fower is bowl-shaped, with six
fused, snow-white petals. Six tiny
stamens and a single pistil may be
found within. The fruits produced
are small, reddish berries. The
fowers are remarkably fragrant,
and just one or two stalks of
blossoms in a vase can fll a room
with a delicate, spicy sweetness.
Although it might be hard to
describe the fragrance, it is not
likely to be forgotten once sniffed,
and so fgures into plenty of
childhood memories.
This plant is a member of the
lily family, and it is related, as
distant cousins go, to Solomons-
seal, and to garden monkey-
grass. Most botanists agree
that this species is made up
of three different, but closely
similar, varieties. The varieties
differ enough that they can be
separated according to technical
features, and the varieties have
their own separate geographic
distributions. Our plant is the
European variety, which tends
to form dense clumps, and has
been widely grown in gardens. It
has now spread over large parts
of the eastern United States,
mostly toward New England. The
North American variety is hardly
distinguishable, and is also quite
fragrant, but tends not to form
dense colonies. It most likely
appears in rich woods in the
mountains from West Virginia
to Georgia. The third variety is
restricted to Japan and China.
This photo was shared with
me by a friend of mine who lives
near Paris. In France, the plant
is called muguet and is now
traditionally sold on street corners
as a fragrant good-luck token
for friends to exchange in May. I
hope Claudia has a sprig for me.
(Photo by Claudia Wanner).
John Nelson is the curator of
the Herbarium at the University of
South Carolina, in the Department
of Biological Sciences, Columbia
SC 29208. As a public service,
the Herbarium offers free
plant identifcations. For more
information, visit www.herbarium.
org or call 803-777-8196.
[ A n s w e r : L i l y o f t h e v a l l e y , C o n v a l l a r i a m a j a l i ]
Follow Your Nose to
This Week's Flower
CAN YOU GUESS THI S WEEK S MYSTERY PLANT?
MYSTERY PLANT
PHOTO BY CLAUDIA WANNER
19 June 8, 2012
T
hese are things that people say to me that make me yell
Nonsense! Lines such as Im not creative at all, I cant draw
a straight line, or I wish I had listened to my mother telling me
to practice. Now Ill never learn to play the piano. I believe instead
that everyone is creative and its never too late to learn something
new.
Heres some advice from the Piccolo Spoleto artists and beyond of
how their parents helped them become creative adults:
TVoff,musicon.Glass mosaic artist Honey McCrarys mother
painted. The parents of John Donahue, a metal sculptor, were
journalists. Actress Laura Rikard was soothed as a baby by the
soundtrack from Grease. Crank up the volume and have a
family dance party. Show your kids art matters to you.
Throwawaythecoloringbooks,says artist Sabra Richards
who creates in kiln formed
glass and steel. Just give
them art materials. Dont
show them how to draw. Let
them show you. Make a place
in your house where messy
is allowed and fll it with art
supplies. Something else that
makes me shout Nonsense
is yet another variation
on the story of how some
teacher forever squashed a
childs creativity by saying something like, How could you have
painted that tree blue? Dont you know it should be green! Make
yours like everyone elses! If every childs art project looks the
same, get your child into another class.
Encouragementismagical.Nancy Roth is a jewelry maker.
Anything I wanted to do I was encouraged to do and given the
stuff to do it. Now, as long as I have a creative project to do, Im
happy. Heather Mithoeffer, whose block printed fabric creations
just earned her a spot in the New York Gift Mart, made block
printed Christmas cards every year with her mom. Consider
that your words and examples as
parents repeat inside your childs
head forever.
Skillisimportant.Choreographer
Twyla Tharp says, Skill gives you
the wherewithal to execute whatever
occurs to you. Without it, you are
just a font of unfulflled ideas.
Discipline, teachers, lessons, and
concentration are essential but need
not be stultifying. Its called playing
the piano, not working the piano.
Eunjoo Yun, who founded and
directs the Charleston Academy of
Music, stresses the need for learning
the fundamentals. Thats rather
apparent in her art form of classical
music, but what happens when a kid
How to Raise a Creative Child
O R B E O N E Y O U R S E L F
BY CAROL ANTMAN
ROADTRIPS CHARLESTON
Eunjoo Yun, Roadtrip continues on page 22
Sabra Richards.
20 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
Do you know what this is?
Kids, send your guess for this weeks
Eye Spy to: eyespy@luckydognews.com
Please include your mailing address with
your submission.
Paulina Robinson correctly guessed last issue's Eye Spy, it was the
two chairs outside of Dr. On Call offce.The frst person to send in
the correct answer for this iss ue will receive a coupon for a FREE
ice cream at Caf Medley on Sullivan's Island.
Eye Spy
C
handler Davis, a senior at Wando High School, won the ACE
(Accepting the Challenge of Excellence) Award from the Isle of
Palms Exchange Club on May 24. The ACE Award recognizes
students who have overcome physical, emotional or social obstacles,
and encourages students to overcome their hardships to achieve their
goals. Davis was involved in a serious motor vehicle accident in 2009.
With the support of her family, home schooling, specialized classes at
Wando High School, and much hard work, she is graduating on time
with her class.
As an ACE Award winner, Davis received a $2000 scholarship
toward her college tuition. She plans to attend Winthrop University to
become a special education teacher.
She resides in Mount Pleasant with her parents, Doug and Cheryl
Davis, and her three brothers.
PHOTO BY PAMELA MARSH, IOP EXCHANGE CLUB SECRETARY
(l to r) Doug Davis, Chandler Davis, ACE Award Recipient, Cheryl Davis, and Angelo
Hassig, IOP Exchange President.
Isle of Palms Recreation Center
www.iop.net
886-8294
Summer Comedy Show
Friday, June 15, 7:30 p.m.
The City of Isle of Palms presents
GREAT SCOTT. Bring the whole family
out to enjoy clean comedy, magic close
up shows and strolling magic. Warning: if you love to laugh out
loud, dont miss this show! Tickets are $10. Children 6 & under
are FREE! Tickets on sale now at the Rec. Call 886-8294 for
more details.
Kids Night Out (5-12 years)
Friday, June 8, 6 p.m. 9 p.m.
Parents, drop your children off at the Recreation Department
while you enjoy a night out. Activities include movie, games, and
crafts. Pizza and snack will be provided. Register by Monday,
June 4. $10 resident/$15 non-resident. REGISTER NOW!
2012 Disaster Expo
Wednesday, June 13, 5 p.m - 7:00 p.m.
The City of Isle of Palms and Town of Sullivans Island invite
you to gain helpful information on putting together a disaster
preparedness plan and kit. Find ways to protect your family,
children, and pets. FREE EVENT! Childrens games, face
painter, entertainment, food and so much more! Call 886-8294
for more details.
Student Overcomes Obstacles
and Wins ACE Award
21 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
FINANCIAL
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
Jun 8
Jun 9
Jun 10
Jun 11
Jun 12
Jun 13
Jun 14
Jun 15
Jun 16
Jun 17
Jun 18
Jun 19
Jun 20
Jun 21
5:41am/5:51pm
6:31am/6:47pm
7:22am/7:45pm
8:12am/8:44pm
9:01am/9:42pm
9:49am/10:38pm
10:36am/11:29pm
11:22am
12:17am/12:07pm
1:01am/12:50pm
1:43am/1:32pm
2:23am/2:13pm
3:02am/2:53pm
3:40am/3:34pm
11:55am
12:26am/12:51pm
1:17am/1:46pm
2:07am/2:39pm
2:57am/3:31pm
3:47am/4:22pm
4:37am/5:10pm
5:26am/5:56pm
6:14am/6:41pm
7:00am/7:24pm
7:45am/8:05pm
8:28am/8:45pm
9:09am/9:22pm
9:49am/9:58pm
I
f youre part of Generation X the age group born between the
mid-1960s and the early 1980s youre probably in one of the
busiest phases of your life, as youre well into your working years
and, at the same time, busy raising a family. But just as youre multi-
tasking in your life, youll also need to address multiple fnancial
goals.
In seeking to accomplish your key objectives, you may be asking
yourself a variety of questions, including the following:
Should I contribute as much as possible to my IRA and 401(k)?
In a word, yes. Your earnings on a traditional Individual Retirement
Account (IRA) and a 401(k) grow on a tax-deferred basis, so your
money can accumulate faster than it would if placed in an investment
on which you paid taxes every year. Plus, since you typically make
401(k) contributions with pretax dollars, the more you contribute,
the lower your taxable income. Additionally, your traditional IRA
contributions may be tax-deductible, depending on your income. If
you meet income guidelines, you can contribute to a Roth IRA, which
provides tax-free earnings, provided you meet certain conditions.
ShouldIputawaymoneyformykidscollegeeducation?
Its not easy to fund your retirement accounts plus save money
for your childrens college education. Still, college is expensive,
so if you feel strongly about helping to pay for the high costs
of higher education, you may want to explore college funding
vehicles, such as a 529 plan, which offers tax advantages.
ShouldIpaydownmymortgageorinvestthosefunds?
Most of us dream of freeing ourselves from a mortgage
someday. So, as your career advances and your income
rises, you may wonder if you should make bigger mortgage
payments. On one hand, theres no denying the psychological
benefts you would receive from paying off your mortgage.
However, you may want to consider putting any extra money
into your investment portfolio to help as you work towards your
retirement goals. Work with your fnancial advisor to determine
what may be most appropriate for your portfolio.
DoIhaveenoughinsuranceinplacetoprotectmyfamily?
You may hear that you need seven or eight times your annual
income in life insurance, but theres really no right fgure for
everyone. You may want to consult with a fnancial advisor
to determine how much life insurance is appropriate for your
needs.
AmIfamiliarwithmyparentsfnancialsituationand
estateconsiderations?Now is the time to communicate
with your parents about a variety of issues related to their
fnancial situation and estate plans. The more you know, the
better positioned youll be to provide assistance and support if
and when its needed. Just to name one example, you should
inquire of your parents if theyve designated a durable power
of attorney to make fnancial decisions for them in case theyre
ever incapacitated.
By answering these questions, you can get a handle on all
the fnancial issues you face at your stage of life. It may seem
challenging, but taking the time now can help you better position
yourself to reach your fnancial goals.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local
Edward Jones Financial Advisor.
Working Income
G E N E R AT I O N X E R S MU S T J U G G L E A VA R I E T Y O F F I N A N C I A L I S S U E S
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
D
uring my 22 years in
Charleston, I have
seen this tale unfold
many times. A major hurricane
threatens our coast and as it
closes in on South Carolina,
the stress level increases and
borderline chaos begins. As the
founder and owner of Windward
Shutters, LLC, I have talked with
many people about their opinions
of hurricanes and evacuations.
I have found there are typically
two groups of residents: The
frst, well call them the Smiths,
actually prepare in advance for
whats an almost certain major
hurricane landfall. The second,
well call them the Joneses, take
a few steps but dont really have
a grasp of what to expect or how
optimistic theyve been about how
much they can get accomplished
in a matter of days.
The Smiths:
Once a landfall is even a
possibility, the Smiths make
reservations at a hotel in an
area that is well inland and will
not see major structural damage
even if the storm follows them
to their destination. They know
several routes that lead to this
destination. They know the hotel
theyve researched will allow
the family pet. They know the
cancellation policy and will cancel
the reservation if evacuation
becomes unnecessary.
The Smiths had hurricane
protection installed on their
home a few years ago and now
decide its time to secure the
house. They did a dry run after
the install and know exactly how
long it will take to secure the
house. They have everything they
need so this takes very little time.
Once the house is secure they
focus on whats most important,
leaving the danger zone.
The Smiths have, each year,
taken a video inventory of their
home and contents. They have
copies of their insurance policies
and contact information in a fle
with their evacuation kit. The kit
includes everything they will need
for the next 12 hours. They know
they may be stuck in traffc in a
rural area for an extended period
of time. The kit includes food,
water, toilet paper and a frst aid
kit. The kit contains a short list
of everything they need to take
with them: cash, photo albums,
irreplaceable family heirlooms,
and a list of evacuation routes.
They pack the car with peace of
mind and hit the road.
The Joneses:
The Joneses have lived on the
coast for a number of years and
have bought batteries, duct tape,
and a tarp. They thought about
getting shutters and even had a
company quote them when they
frst moved. It was more than they
wanted to spend and decided they
would get them eventually. Their
friends told them about the chaos
experienced in the Hurricane
Floyd debacle but they fgure,
now that I-26 will be reversed,
the traffc wont be a big deal.
They fgure theyll deal with it if it
happens. They fgure theyll fnd
someone to put up plywood or
theyll just go to a building supply
center and buy some plywood
and even a ladder. They fgure
theyll get the store employee to
cut the plywood for them. Surely
there will be enough time to get
all this done and even if they
cant fnd help, how hard could
it be? They eventually realize
there isnt enough time, available
supplies, or resources to get the
plywood on most, if any, of their
windows. They see that several
of their neighbors have closed
up their shutters and are pulling
out of the driveway and then
it happensthey panic. They
realize they are in the majority,
unprepared for the inevitable
and now sentenced to a very long
trip out of town while constantly
worried that their home will be
damaged or destroyed. Will the
insurance company pay for the
damages since the plywood wasnt
installed on all the windows and
doors? Will the house be there
when they get back? Where will
they go? Where will they live?
You will want to be a Smith
when the next hurricane makes
landfall on our coast. The time
to prepare is today. The time to
prepare is now.
Tim Smith is the president
of Windward Shutters, LLC.
For more information, visit
windwardshutters.com or call,
881-6262 or 768-6898.
22 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
doesnt learn to read music and wants to switch from playing
three chord rock n roll to jazz when hes older? Cant be
done. Laura Rikard says, I cant tell you how often my best
student is not my most talented student - it is my student
that has the most self-discipline.
Its a long and winding road. At Creative Spark, lots of
children wander through dance or clay classes, start piano
and end up with guitar. For artist Honey McCrary, piano was
her frst creative endeavor. Nancy Roth worked as a sculptor
before she switched to jewelry. Even Beethoven changed
musical forms from sonatas to trios to symphonies to
freshen up his perspective. Give your children some latitude
to fnd their creative voice.
Make a fool of yourself. Kids are good at this. Adults are
not as brave. Greg Tavares is the founder of Theater 99,
where making a fool of ones self is transformed into improv
comedy. He advises, Its okay not to be good at it when you
start. Explore and see if theres something there for you.
Trust that little voice. Gary Erwin, Charlestons blues
impresario, says, Take
yourself seriously as an
artist. Consider that you
have something to say. Listen
to that little voice inside
you that is your unique
voice. As parents our job
is simple: listen and pay
attention. Even if were busy
or bored or we dont get it.
Theyre on a path. Miles
Davis (as depicted by On
Q at Piccolo Spoleto) told of
his music being ridiculed as
uppity. Instead he had the
confdence in his vision to
call himself an exceptionally
cool cat.
Listen to your elders. Most every artist I spoke to had a
mentor who impacted their careers. Eunjoo Yuns life was
changed when she met Enrique Graf, who has brought so
many exceptional musicians to our community. Gary Erwin
advises, Dont reject the help that is offered by those who
have gone before. Dont think you can do it all yourself. As
parents, we are responsible for fnding our children the best
teachers and examples.
Fun is important! This seems obvious but in our goal
oriented culture, fun sometimes is relegated to the end
of the list. What is the objective, anyway? Carnegie Hall?
That would be nice but more realistically our intention is to
enjoy the arts as a means of self-expression and recreation.
Lighten up!
Make-believe and imagination come naturally to
children. When we help them gain skill and confdence,
and encourage them, they become creative adults. Ernest
Hemingway said, The thing is to become a master and, in
your old age, to acquire the courage to do what children did
when they knew nothing.
Carol Antman is covering the festival for Lucky Dog Publishing.
Her artistic pursuits have included the life-long study of classical
piano and recently as a travel journalist. She is an avid patron of
the arts, producer and arts entrepreneur as the founder of Creative
Spark Center for the Arts. For suggestions or comments, email her
at cantman@aol.com
Gary Erwin.
Roadtrip continues from page 19
The Hurricane Cometh
A TA L E O F T WO F A MI L I E S
BY TIM SMITH
23 June 8, 2012
WWW.SLANDEYENEWS.COM
N
ow is the time to get ready
for hurricane season, and
its easy with the help of
the new 2012 Charleston County
Hurricane Guide. The public can
go to www.charlestoncounty.org
and click on the Are You Ready?
banner on the front page of the
Countys website to download,
print and share the 2012
Charleston County Hurricane
Preparedness Guide, and the 2012
Disabilities and Special Needs
Emergency Preparedness Guide.
"Charleston County
Government is always preparing
for a storm and working with other
local and state agencies to do so,
but everyone has an individual
responsibility to get prepared
and make sure their family has
a plan," said Cathy Haynes,
Charleston County Emergency
Management Department's Chief
of Operations. "Churches and
civic groups can also help by
printing the guide for those who
do not have access to the internet.
Our entire community needs to
help spread the word.
In anticipation of an evacuation
order, which can only be given
by the governor, Haynes also
reminds the public that they
should plan to leave town if at all
possible, and everyone along the
coast is strongly encouraged to
make travel arrangements well in
advance.
Because of the low lying areas
in our county, we will never
have enough safe shelter space
for all of Charleston Countys
residents, said Jason Patno,
Charleston County Emergency
Management Director. Therefore,
we encourage everyone who has
the means to leave town to do
so and to consider shelters only
as a last resort when they have
nowhere else to go.
Also, those who have the ability
to leave should do so as early as
possible.
You dont have to wait until
an evacuation order is issued,
Patno said. If you can, leave as
early as possible to make your
trip easier and to help relieve the
traffc congestion on our roads.
Citizens who do not have
transportation should learn where
their nearest evacuation pick-up
point is located. The evacuation
pick-up points are noted by blue
signs with a hurricane and bus
symbol, and are located across
the county at many CARTA
bus stops and popular areas
like schools, churches, and
shopping centers. In the event of
a mandatory evacuation, buses
will transport citizens from the
79 pick-up points to the nearest
available Red Cross shelter.
It is vital for residents in
our community who dont have
transportation to know where their
nearest pick-up point is before the
next hurricane approaches our
coast, Haynes said. It takes all
of us working together to make
sure our citizens and neighbors
are prepared and safe.
The procedures for opening
shelters have changed for the
2012 hurricane season. Rather
than having a list of shelters in
advance, emergency shelters will
be determined with the approach
of a hurricane to South Carolina.
In the event of a hurricane or
other major disaster, residents
are asked to monitor local media
outlets for a current list of open
shelters. During an evacuation,
listen for emergency alerts on the
radio and look for road signs for
shelter information.
The 2012 Charleston County
Hurricane Preparedness Guide
will also run throughout hurricane
season on Comcasts education
and government channel 60.
For more info, visit www.
charlestoncounty.org.
County Releases 2012 Hurricane Guide
BY CHARLESTON COUNTY
Information in the 2012
Charleston County Hurricane
Preparedness Guide includes:
What to have in your
emergency supplies kit
Evacuation information
and routes out of
Charleston County
Shelter procedures
What to do if you dont
have transportation look
for pick-up point signs
posted around the county!
Defnitions and what
you need to do during
hurricane watches,
warnings, and tropical
storms
Rules to know and items
to bring if you and your
pet need to stay at the pet
shelter
Preparations for your
home and your family
before the storm
What to do after a storm,
including safety measures
and handling debris
A family communications
plan form to fll out
Important phone
numbers, including ones
that will be activated in
the event of an emergency