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Destination 2020

The Dallas ISD Improvement Plan


DRAFT 9 June 2012

Summary of Board Policy BQ (Legal)


The board shall adopt a policy to establish a District and campus-level planning and decision-making process that will involve the professional staff of the District, parents of students enrolled in the District, business representatives, and community members in establishing and reviewing the Districts and campuses educational plans, goals, performance objectives, and major classroom instructional programs. Education Code 11.251(b) The planning and decision-making requirements do not: 1. Prohibit the board from conducting meetings with teachers or groups of teachers other than the District-level committee meetings. 2. Prohibit the board from establishing policies providing avenues for input from others, including students or paraprofessional staff, in District or campus-level planning and decision making. 3. Limit or affect the power of the board to govern the public schools. 4. Create a new cause of action or require collective bargaining. Education Code 11.251(g), .252(e) At least every two years, the District shall evaluate the effectiveness of the Districts decision-making and planning policies, procedures, and staff development activities related to District and campus-level decision making and planning to ensure that they are effectively structured to positively impact student performance. Education Code 11.252(d) The board shall ensure that an administrative procedure is provided to clearly define the respective roles and responsibilities of the Superintendent, central office staff, principals, teachers, District- level committee members, and campus-level committee members in the areas of planning, budgeting, curriculum, staffing patterns, staff development, and school organization. The board shall ensure that the District-level planning and decision making committee will be actively involved in establishing the administrative procedure that defines the respective roles and responsibilities pertaining to planning and decision making at the District and campus levels. Education Code 11.251(d)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
Summary of Board Policy BQ (Legal) Board of Trustees Summary of Board Policy AE (Local) Dallas ISD Core Values and District Goals Performance Targets Destination 2020 and District Goals Correspondence Destination 2020 The Dallas ISD Plan Year 2020 goals What it will take The Direction Course 267, mark 5 Operating Principles Key targets and indicators Key operational expectations Achievement targets Key Actions Attachments A Effective District Planning Diagram B Support-Results Diagram C Superintendents Cabinet D Superintendents Core Team E Dept. of School Leadership Structure F Strategic Feeder Group Structure Appendices 37 Appendix 1 Comprehensive Needs Assessment Appendix 2 Data Trends Appendix 3 Federal and State Compliance Appendix 4 At Risk Criteria Appendix 5 2011-2012 Title I Allocations Appendix 6 District Improvement Plan Committee Appendix 7 Districtwide Advisory Committee 2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 13 15 17 20 22 23 30

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Summary of Board Policy AE (Local)


Dallas ISD Mission and Vision
It is the mission of the Dallas Independent School District to educate all students for success. Its vision is to be a premier urban school district. To achieve both this mission and vision, the Board of Trustees adopted the core values and district goals outlined in the following section in January 2012.

Executive Summary
The Dallas Independent School District (Dallas ISD) District Improvement Plan (DIP) is completed annually in compliance with the Texas Education Code, Chapter 11, Subchapter F, 11.251 and 11.252. Each school district shall have a district improvement plan that is developed, evaluated and revised annually in accordance with district policy. The DIP Strategies serve as a guide for each Campus Improvement Plan (CIP) as well as all department action plans in improving student performance for all student groups in order to attain state standards with respect to academic excellence indicators. The Dallas ISD encompasses an area of 384 square miles in the eastern portion of the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex and includes all or portions of the municipalities of Addison, Balch Springs, Carrollton, Cockrell Hill, Dallas, Farmers Branch, Garland, Highland Park, Hutchins, Mesquite, Seagoville, University Park, and Wilmer. Its students come from homes where almost 70 different languages are spoken. It operates 227 campuses, of which 166 are elementary schools and 77 are secondary schools. Enrollment and ethnicity statistics for 2011-12 are shown in the tables below.
Students Elementary Schools (grades PK-5) Middle Schools (grades 6-8) High Schools Total (as of Jan. 20, 2012) 88,078 31,479 38,018 157,575 Ethnic and Racial Composition Hispanic 108,411 African American 38,627 White 7,295 Asian 1,768 American Indian 644 National Hawaiian/Pacific 169 Islander Two or more 661 Ethnic and Racial Composition Hispanic African American White Asian American Indian National Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Two or more 68.8% 24.5% 4.6% 1.1% 0.4% 0.1% 0.4%

Staff Teachers Professional Support Educational Aides Auxiliary Staff Campus Administrators Central Administrators Total (as of Jan. 20, 2012) 10,277 1,917 1,591 3,804 584 141 18,314 5,725 7,352 4,494 339 63 12 329 31.3% 40.1% 24.5% 1.9% 0.3% 0.1% 1.8%

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Dallas ISD Core Values and District Goals


The six core values are promoted by the current administration and appear worthy to set as expectations for all stakeholders. Based on the belief that people must have a number of core values if they are to be effective in their lives and work, the district expects its employees, students, parents, and other stakeholders to nurture and exemplify the following values at all times: Trustworthiness, Responsibility, Respect, Caring, Citizenship, and Fairness. District goals represent key goals for the administration to focus on as the district continues to improve outcomes for all its students. Policy AE (Local) reads as follows: In everything we do our goal is to improve the quality of education for all our students. We expect every employee to believe that every student can succeed. We will pursue the following operational goals, in order of priority: 1. 2. 3. 4. TEACHERS: Ensure highly effective teachers for all students. PRINCIPALS: Ensure a highly effective leader for every school. SAFE AND SECURE SCHOOLS: Ensure a safe, secure and welcoming environment for all students, parents, staff, and the community. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT: Develop shared responsibility between parents/guardians and schools that foster academic success and selfmanagement of learning. RIGOR: Implement rigorous curriculum and engaging educational practices and experiences. CULTURE: Create and sustain a positive and compassionate common culture throughout the district that leads toward accomplishing our vision and mission. HUMAN RESOURCES: Hire, retain, and develop highly effective employees for every position. DATA AND INNOVATION: Make managerial decisions based on appropriate, reliable, and valid data and best practices, and to develop and continually improve new, innovative ways of schooling to meet the needs of students in the 21st century. CENTRAL OFFICE: Organize central services to encourage and enhance a positive culture throughout the district, support the campuses and positive culture on each campus by removing barriers that prevent achieving our goals. FACILITIES: Systemically upgrade and maintain our facilities to provide every student an efficient learning environment. Page 6

5. 6.

7. 8.

9.

10.

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11.

Performance Targets
The performance targets identify the area-specific performance standards and student populations. These targeted populations address state and federal requirements of the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) and No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). They are included in the second section of this document. A needs assessment was conducted and plans developed to address identified areas of need based upon these performance targets. The resulting strategies outline the macrolevel actions for assessing implementation. The strategies also serve as the underlying framework for all campus improvement plans. The Board of Trustees has not set performance targets for the 2011-2012 school year. Beginning in March 2012 students in third through ninth grades throughout Texas will take the new State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, or STAAR, which encompasses a variety of changes compared to previous tests, including the level of rigor and the way the test is administered. The scores from the results of the 2011-2012 assessments will not be used to rate schools. The ratings will remain the same as the previous year, but will change for the 2013-2014 school year. The ratings of exemplary, recognized, acceptable, and unacceptable for schools will not be used after the 2011-2012 school year. The TEA will not determine passing standards for STAAR for all grades until after the first administration of the test in spring 2012. Students who entered the ninth grade prior to the fall of 2011 or who are in 10th, 11th or 12th grades will continue to take the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) until they graduate. The high school TAKS will be replaced by 12 end-of-course STAAR testsEnglish I-III, Algebra I and II, geometry, biology, chemistry, physics, world geography, world history, and U.S. history. High school students will be able to retake any of the STAAR tests to improve their scores, and students in grades five and eight will be able to retest in reading and math to meet promotion criteria in 2013. Dallas ISD students have been taking end-of-course exams for some time to be better aligned with the goal of students being ready to enter college and the workforce without having to take remedial courses, which is also the goal of the STAAR.

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Destination 2020
The Dallas ISD Plan
The Dallas Independent School District has steadily improved over the last several years. Student achievement, as measured by the state TAKS exams, has improved in a number of core areas and the graduation rate has climbed from 62.5% in 2007 to 74.6% in 2011. The percentage of Dallas ISD students performing at college-ready levels (TAKS Commended) has increased in each of the last five years. Students, staff, and community members can be proud of the Districts successes and the foundation school leaders have laid which will allow the organization to move from good to great.

Much more to do
We have much more to do. We still have a low graduation rate and many of the students who graduate are not college or career ready. Our achievement gaps are too large, and not all students are getting the best education we can possibly provide. A quick review of schools and an analysis of District data reveal that the quality of instruction can be improved and that leadership capacity is low. Dallas ISD is not working systemically and has the potential to be much more effective. The organization is fairly traditional and is far from adaptive. The last point is important because the educational landscape is changing quickly. It is also clear that the Year 2020 workplace will require different skills and enhanced abilities to think critically and work in teams. Given that a more global environment and flatter world require a higher level of education and rigorous, year-2020 skills, we must expect more of our students and challenge ourselves to prepare them for post-secondary education and the Year 2020 workplace. We need to create a collegegoing mindset.

We need to create a college-going mindset.

We need to expect our students to have the skills and proficiency needed to continue their education after high school. We need to convince our parents and community that college is within the reach of our students. We need to follow through on the notion that a student who can read, communicate well both verbally and in writing, do math, and demonstrate proficiency in Year 2020 skills such as working in teams, information literacy, and economics, will not only be better able to enter college, but, should the Destination 2020, The DISD Plan Page 9

student choose not to go to college, be better able to enter the vocational trades. A vocational education program can no longer mean that a student does not attain proficiency in the core subjects and a Year 2020 curriculum.

Year 2020 Goals


At the end of the day, our job is to prepare students for college or for a Year 2020 workplace. A college- and career-ready student is what our parents want; it is also what our community wants. For the sake of our children, our goal is to have the highest college- and career-ready percentage of graduates of any large urban district in the nation.

By the Year 2020, Dallas ISD will have the highest college- and career-ready percentage of graduates of any large urban district in the nation.

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In particular, by September 2020, we expect: 90% of our students to graduate on time 40% of our students attain a 21 or higher composite score on the ACT exam or SAT of 1110 on Reading/Math 75% of our students to be proficient on the Year 2020 workplace readiness assessments1 80% of our students to enter college, the military, or a career-ready job straight from high school

What it will take


Incremental change isnt going to get us where we need to go. Weve got to be much more ambitious. Weve got to be disruptive. You cant keep doing the same stuff and expect different results. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, November 2010

We will not reach our goal if we continue to conduct business as usual. A transformation is needed, and time is against us. We need to do things differently. We need to challenge ourselves, our students, our parents, and our community. Most of all we have to work together, and we have to work In short, it will take leaders and heroes at all in reinforcing ways. We have levels. Nothing short of that will do. to commit to a common vision, common goals, and common beliefs. We will need Board members, Core Team members, and building level administrators who are willing to lead and make the tough decisions few others are prepared to make. We will need to place student needs above adult issues. And we will need to recruit, develop, and retain the best teachers and support staff in the nation. In short, it will take leaders and heroes at all levels. Nothing short of that will do.

How do we get there?


While we need a clear vision and strong direction, the first thing we need to do is believe believe that our students can achieve at high levels and believe that we can reach our destination. Great organizations work on philosophy first. We will too. Dallas ISDs Core Beliefs will undergird its actions and keep us focused on students. When the chips are down, our Core Beliefs will keep us strong and keep us united.
1

These assessments will be designed by the business and non-profit communities and will include critical thinking, communications, teamwork, information literacy, technology skills, and work ethic

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We will tie our actions and behaviors to our Core Beliefs, for if beliefs are not practiced, they will not become habit. If they are not manifested in observable behavior, they will remain words on a page. The following are our proposed Core Beliefs:2

While an organization should continually work on its Core Beliefs, those beliefs will mean very little without a clear direction to our destination. Dallas ISDs new direction will be Course 267, mark 5.

The Superintendent will get input from the Board, key administrators, and teacher leaders on the Core Beliefs.

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The Direction Course 267, mark 5


The metaphor connotes specificity even in the face of some unknowns challenges and opportunities. We are going on a journey, not an exploration. Educators have known how to improve schools and reach rigorous academic goals for quite some time. The research is clear. Our direction will be founded on that research and on the experiences of high performing school systems. In general, for the next three years, our efforts will be focused on: Effective teachers. We will reach our destination by placing an effective teacher in front of every child. Effective principals. We will reach our destination if we make principals the key to reform. Professional and high-functioning central office. We will reach our destination if the central office staff is one of the most efficient and competent in the nation. Leadership density. We will reach our destination if we expand leadership density. Engaging

parents

and

the

We will reach our destination if our parents and community partners become engaged in graduating college- and career-ready students and if the various groups work in reinforcing ways.

community.

Effective teachers
Our path to our destination includes placing an effective teacher in front of every child. We have to focus on improving the quality of instruction and raising student achievement. Mike Schmokers Results Now on the importance of instruction (and how

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poorly it is monitored) preceded more recent research noting the primacy of effective instruction.3 The ultimate goal is to place an effective teacher in front of every child. While teachers in DISD are working hard and are committed to children, a quick review of instruction and discussions with instructional leaders in Dallas reveal that the quality of instruction is inconsistent and that good instruction is not pervasive in many schools. As curriculum alignment is the number one factor in raising student achievement (Marzano, 2005), we will ensure that teachers know what students are supposed to know and be able to do, that the lesson activities are directly tied to those standards and objectives, and that the student is able to demonstrate that he has learned what he is supposed to have learned. Aligning the curriculum is particularly important because Texas has new (STAAR) standards and objectives.

Effective principals
Our direction is also one in which we develop the strongest principal corps in the nation. I know of no large-scale education transformation that has taken place without the development of principals into effective instructional leaders. Principals are key to reform. Our principals will receive enormous support and professional development. The entire system will be geared to supporting principals and helping them improve the quality of instruction and raise student achievement. Attachment B provides a visual representation of how our system will be focused on support and results. (An excerpt from that representation is to the right.) The pressure of change and transformation will be greatest on the principals, and they need to know that up front. While we will provide the best support and professional development any principal in the State could hope to receive, they will have only one year to demonstrate that they have the capacity and what it takes to lead change and to improve the quality of instruction. The entire central office system will be designed to support schools as teachers and principals try to accomplish three main goals: 1) Improve the quality of instruction
3

Results Now, Mike Schmoker, ASCD (2006).

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2) Raise student achievement 3) Create a positive school culture and climate

Engaging parents and the community


While most people would agree that it takes a village to raise a child, very few communities are successful at collaborating strategically to significantly improve academic outcomes for most of the students. We will be much more purposeful in helping community supporters work in reinforcing ways. Dallas is at a unique point in its history with a great number of legislators, foundations, non-profits, and other stakeholders expressing a commitment to help the District move forward and expecting us to do what it takes to improve. We cannot squander this opportunity. At the same time, we cannot have 100 different partners spraying reform initiatives on our schools. That would diffuse the efforts and take us off our direction. Thus, we will help channel the support and ensure the major educational initiatives work in reinforcing ways.

Operating principles
A struggling organization will work more effectively with clear vision and clear direction. But that will not be enough. A struggling organization will not be able to move quickly toward the destination unless it attends to and follows some key operating principles. The best urban school district in the nation will: Reinforce Core Beliefs. An organization not only needs to identify its Core Beliefs, but it must coach staff members on how those beliefs manifest themselves in the workplace. Expand leadership density. Leadership matters; it is the glue that holds the whole system together and ensures mission accomplishment. An effective organization works to expand leadership at all levels. It ensures that it has strong bench strength. Raise the level of accountability. Some level of accountability is necessary to maximize performance. We must build an organization that will seek selfaccountability. Additionally, an effective organization holds people and departments more accountable for results than the accomplishment of processes.

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Work toward defined autonomy. People work best when they have some control over their work environment. Strong organizations establish clear expectations and parameters and then allow individuals or groups of individuals to figure out how to meet those expectations. Of course, until leadership capacity is developed, the organization may have to have less autonomy and more directives. Work systemically. Effective organizations ensure various departments do not work in silos. They attend to system connections, focus on leverage points, and ensure alignment throughout the organization. Build an adaptive organization. The educational landscape and Year 2020 workplace is changing quickly. Organizations need to continually learn and be adaptive. They will have to develop a problem-solving culture and push decisionmaking to the level of implementation. Develop channels for sense-making. An organization undergoing tremendous change needs to have clear lines of communication and have strong processes for disseminating accurate information and for helping people at all levels make sense of decisions and information.

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Key targets and indicators

Superintendent and School Leadership By 1 October 2015

Key Actions By 1 October 2013 At least 75% of the staff correctly 1. Ensure staff members identifies all of the Core Beliefs understand the direction of the At least 65% of the staff somewhat agree, District and the Core Beliefs

District Goal 6- Culture Create and sustain a positive common culture

2. Improve the quality of instruction

District Goal 1- Teachers Ensure highly effective teachers

3. Develop principals into effective instructional leaders


District Goal 2- Principals Ensure highly effective leaders

At least 90% of the staff correctly identify all of the Core Beliefs At least 75% of the staff agree or agree, or strongly agree with the Core strongly agree with the Core Beliefs as Beliefs as measured by the climate survey measured by the climate survey At least 65% of the staff somewhat agree, At least 75% of the staff agree or agree, or strongly agree with the direction strongly agree with the direction of the of the District District As measured by at least 50 independent As measured by at least 50 independent spot observations per school, 75% of the spot observations per school, at least schools will be partially proficient (1.5) or 75% of the schools will be proficient or higher in each of four areas: lesson higher in each of four areas: lesson objectives, demonstrations of learning, objectives, demonstrations of learning, purposeful aligned instruction, and purposeful aligned instruction, and multiple response strategies multiple response strategies At least 65% of teachers are Progressing At least 80% of teachers are II or higher as measured by the teachers Progressing II or higher as measured evaluation by the teachers evaluation At least 55% of teachers are Proficient or At least 65% of teachers are Proficient higher as measured by the teachers or higher as measured by the teachers evaluation evaluation At least 50 school leaders graduate from At least 50 school leaders graduate from the 2012-2013 School Leadership the 2014-2015 School Leadership Academy Academy At least 80% of principals are Progressing At least 90% of principals are II or higher as measured by the principals Progressing II or higher as measured evaluation or the entry performance by the principals evaluation

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interviews

4. Tie teacher and principal evaluations to student achievement data


District Goal 1- Teachers Ensure highly effective teachers

At least 75% of principals are Proficient or higher as measured by the principals evaluation Design a teacher evaluation system that At least 80% of all classroom teachers ties evaluations to student achievement and are placed on a pay-for-performance that creates pathways for career evaluation system advancement At least 60% of teachers on the pay-forperformance evaluation system agree or In a survey of teacher and school leaders, at least 65% agree or strongly agree that strongly agree (does not count somewhat the new evaluation system will be fair, agree) that the pay-for-performance accurate, and rigorous system is fair, accurate, and rigorous In a survey of teacher and school leaders, At least 75% of all principals agree or at least 70% agree or strongly agree that strongly agree that the principal pay-forthe new evaluation system creates effective performance system is fair, accurate, pathways for career advancement and rigorous Implement a principal evaluation system 100% of principals are placed on a paythat ties evaluations to student achievement for-performance evaluation system

Other Superintendent targets and indicators


By 1 October 2013
In a survey of members of the Board and the Board standing committees, 75% of respondents agree or strongly agree that the department is more professional and more effective than a year prior to the survey

Key Actions 5. Create a professional and highfunctioning central office team

By 1 October 2015

District Goal 9- Central Office Organize central services to support campuses

Create a rubric to assess the professional behavior and effectiveness of each major Central Office department (use an independent company to assist) In an assessment by members of the Board and the Board standing committees, each major department receives at least a proficient rating on the rubric

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6. Restructure the Department of School Leadership

District Goal 9- Central Office Organize central services to support campuses

In an assessment by members of the Central Office staff, each major department receives at least a proficient rating on the rubric 100% of principals receive an annual evaluation 95% of principals receive a minimum of 10 school instructional visits, a mid-year review, and a systems review At least 90% of the Executive Directors (who oversee feeders) are rated Proficient or higher as measured by an instructional coaching rubric

7. Create a career-ready certificate

District Goal 8- Data and Innovation

8. Create the Strategic Feeder Group

Reorganize the School Leadership department into five academically congruent divisions 100% of principals receive an annual evaluation At least 95% of principals receive a minimum of 10 school instructional visits, a mid-year review, and a systems review At least 70% of the Executive Directors (who oversee feeders) are rated Proficient or higher as measured by an instructional coaching rubric or performance tasks (if a new hire) Coordinate the creation of a careerready certificate At least 1000 graduates receive employment for which only careerready graduates may apply Outline a plan and timeline to incorporate values and habits of mind in the concept of college and career ready Create two Strategic Feeder Groups

At least 3000 graduates receive employment for which only careerready graduates may apply Incorporate values and habits of mind in the criteria for a career-ready certificate

District Goal 8- Data and Innovation

Create four Strategic Feeder Groups The average achievement score (fourth, eighth, and twelfth grades) for the schools in the strategic feeder groups is at least 30 percentage points higher than their 2011-2012 scores.

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Key Operational Expectations


By 1 October 2013 By 1 October 2015

Department Academic

District Goal 5Rigor

Tie learning objectives to STAAR standards Create curriculum maps for science, math, reading, writing, and social studies at all grade levels Create mid-year and end-of-year district common assessments for science, math, reading, writing, and social studies at all grade levels

Human Resources

District Goal 7Human Resources

Talent and Innovation

District Goal 8Data and Innovation

Align the curriculum At least 80% of the schools will receive a proficient score (7-10) on the curriculum alignment rubric In a survey of teachers and school leaders, at least 75% of the respondents agree or strongly agree that the curriculum maps are aligned with the state standards and district common assessments Create curriculum maps for all subjects Create mid-year and end-of-year district common assessments for all subjects Streamline the hiring process Streamline the hiring process The average length of the hiring process for a teacher For 90% of the new hires, the maximum length of the (from the time he hits the submit button to the time he hiring process (from the time he hits the submit receives a job offer) will be less than five weeks button to the time he receives a job offer) will be less [during the prime hiring season March to June] than five weeks [during the prime hiring season March to June] Less than 1% of all teachers who are not proficient are moved to another teaching position in another building Less than 1% of all teachers who are not proficient are moved to another teaching position in another building 95% of all known teacher vacancies are filled by 1 June 2013 98% of all known teacher vacancies are filled by 1 June 2015 75% of leaders at all levels in two Strategic Feeder 85% of leaders at all levels in the four Strategic Feeder Groups have proficient evaluations Groups have proficient evaluations Establish a baseline for the average score on principal The average score on principal candidate performance candidate performance interviews interviews increases by 20 points The community creates or identifies 1000 positions for The community creates or identifies 3000 positions for graduates who have a career ready certificate graduates who have a career ready certificate In a survey of teacher and school leaders, at least 65% At least 80% of all classroom teachers are placed on a somewhat agree, agree, or strongly agree that the new pay-for-performance evaluation system evaluation system will be fair, accurate, and rigorous

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In a survey of teacher and school leaders, at least 65% somewhat agree, agree, or strongly agree that the new evaluation system creates effective pathways for career advancement Communications In an opinion poll conducted by an independent survey company, 70% of community members somewhat agree, agree, or strongly agree with the direction of the District District Goal 4 In an opinion poll conducted by an independent survey Parental company, 70% of community members agree, strongly Involvement agree, or are neutral that teachers and principals are more effective At least 65% of the staff somewhat agree, agree, or strongly agree in the Core Beliefs as measured by the District climate survey At least 65% of the staff somewhat agree, agree, or strongly agree with the direction of the District

At least 60% of teachers on the pay-for-performance evaluation system agree or strongly agree (does not count somewhat agree) that the pay-for-performance system is fair, accurate, and rigorous In an opinion poll conducted by an independent survey company, 70% of community members agree or strongly agree with the direction of the District In an opinion poll conducted by an independent survey company, 70% of community members agree or strongly agree that teachers and principals are more effective At least 75% of the staff agree or strongly agree in the Core Beliefs as measured by the District climate survey At least 75% of the staff agree or strongly agree with the direction of the District

Operations and Finance

District Goal 3Safe and Secure Schools

No school in the Districts loses an instructional day as a result of any system failure that could have reasonably been avoided through a preventive maintenance plan Develop prioritized list of facility improvement/ maintenance projects by 15 August and complete Tier A priorities within budget In a survey of principals, at least 65% of principals agree or strongly agree that the facilities department supports the principal in maintaining a safe and clean learning environment In a survey of staff in the schools, 70% of respondents agree or strongly agree that the school they work in is safe and clean

No school in the Districts loses an instructional day as a result of any system failure that could have reasonably been avoided through a preventive maintenance plan Complete an updated 2012-2013 prioritized list of facility improvement/ maintenance projects within budget In a survey of principals, at least 75% of principals agree or strongly agree that the facilities department supports the principal in maintaining a safe and clean learning environment In a survey of staff in the schools, 85% of respondents agree or strongly agree that the school they work in is safe and clean Page 21

Destination 2020, The DISD Plan

Attain a general fund balance of at least $150 million

Attain a general fund balance of at least $190 million


Receive 100% of the E-rate monies owed to the District

Compliance

Receive $20,000,000 of E-rate monies owed to the District

District Goal 9Central Office college and career ready

Student Services Outline a plan and timeline to incorporate student health Incorporate student health indices in the concept of

indices in the concept of college and career ready

District Goal 5Rigor Improve metrics for parental involvement by 20%

School Leadership (additional)

Outline and include parental involvement in the indices for effective schools; establish baseline data

District Goal 4Parental Involvement

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Achievement Targets and Indicators


Weight
3x 3x 2x 1x 2x 2x 1x 2x

Achievement Metric

Description

June 2012 Baseline

1 August 2013

1 August 2015

Commended performance on STAAR Longitudinal growth measurement for STAAR 8th Grade national reading assessment 10th Grade PSAT

District Common Assessments

Advanced Placement

High School Graduation Rate

11th or 12th Grade SAT/ACT

College readiness 2x

2x

Career readiness

Percentage of all tests (grades 3 11) which resulted in a Commended rating TBD increase in the growth measurement Increase in the average score on the 8th Grade national reading assessment Increase in the average PSAT score Increase in the median composite score (reading, writing, math, and science) Increase in the number of students scoring at least a 3 Increase in the high school graduation rate Increase in the average SAT or ACT score (reading and math) for juniors and seniors Percentage of graduates who are college ready (ACT of 21 or SAT of 1100) Percentage of graduates receiving a career readiness certification

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2012-2013 Key Actions


1. Ensure staff members understand the direction of the District and the Core Beliefs
It is harder to change beliefs than it is to change how one operates. However, if the District is to reach its destination, belief in that destination and adherence to the Core Beliefs will be paramount. Too many districts leave this to chance; we will be purposeful about getting people on the same page and to act upon the Core Beliefs. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Create an easy-to-understand brochure on the vision and direction of the District Destination 2020 Convene several different focus groups teachers, principals, central office staff, parents to receive input on the proposed Core Beliefs Conduct Core Belief exercises at each principal and assistant principal meeting Ensure principals conduct Core Belief exercises with their staffs Strengthen the internal communications system and disseminate information about Destination 2020 and the Core Beliefs Strengthen the external communications system and disseminate information about Destination 2020 and the Core Beliefs Assess understanding of and adherence to the Core Beliefs at the mid-year review and spring systems review Include philosophy as part of the climate survey, principals evaluation, and reviews

2. Improve the quality of instruction


If instruction is the main thing, then we must focus our efforts in improving the quality of instruction and the teachers ability to teach with high levels of engagement and rigor. The system has to be designed to help teachers become experts at their craft. Improving the quality of instruction will become the main metric for all principals and all of the other leaders in the School Leadership chain. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Develop a spot observation form Begin mandatory classroom observations Destination 2020, The DISD Plan Page 24

Open classroom doors when we teach Ten observations for every teacher, who is in his first three years; six for all others Align teacher performance instrument with key practices Lesson objectives, demonstrations of learning, effective lesson planning, curriculum alignment, multiple response strategies Train teachers in good, first instruction Train teachers in key practices of effective teaching

3. Develop principals into effective instructional leaders


Principals are the key to reform (see Attachment B). Without strong instructional leaders we will not be able to develop teachers, improve instruction, or evaluate teachers effectively. As the capacity of instructional leadership throughout the District is low, we have to take steps to build capacity quickly. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Conduct a School Leaders Academy Train 60 school leaders for an entire year Develop a principal evaluation system Determine achievement metrics and progress monitoring metrics Evaluate principals and assistant principals Implement principal coaching model Conduct mid-year reviews and system reviews Train principals and assistant principals Conducting instructional feedback Curriculum alignment Lesson planning, lesson objectives, demonstrations of learning, multiple response strategies Evaluating teachers Conducting performance interviews and hiring teachers Systems thinking and action planning Leadership Change theory

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4. Tie teacher and principal evaluations to student achievement data


In the end of the day, our job is to raise student academic proficiency. One cannot be a great teacher or a great principal unless he can also raise student achievement. We will begin to tie teacher and principal evaluations to student achievement data. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Coordinate and align current efforts with the Destination 2020 plan Identify principles and parameters of effective evaluation systems Formulate a draft teacher evaluation system Identify draft achievement metrics Identify performance metrics Conduct initial (dry run) of teacher evaluations, using the new system no harm, no foul Partial evaluation with regard to achievement Develop a data platform that can tie achievement data to individual teachers given several key parameters See Key Action number 3 for actions to develop principal evaluations tied to student achievement data

5. Create a professional and high-functioning central office team


Only a strong central office team will be able to guide a system as large as Dallas ISD. This team must revamp the current structure into one focused on instruction and support of schools. It must design the processes necessary to ensure we are working in reinforcing ways and working effectively. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Hire a first-rate cabinet Create a rubric to assess the professional behavior and effectiveness of each major Central Office department Train central office instructional leaders Organizational effectiveness, systems thinking, leadership, instruction

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6. Restructure the Department of School Leadership


The Department of School Leadership will be responsible for three major objectives: improving the quality of instruction, raising student achievement, and helping the schools maintain a positive school climate. In order to support and monitor effectively, the Department must be reorganized to enable leaders to coach principals effectively and to provide professional development and resources in a more focused way. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Restructure the School Leadership Department into five academically congruent divisions and vertical feeders Consolidate professional development activities and align professional development with this plan See Attachment E

7. Create a career-ready certificate


Some students drop out of high school because the diploma does not carry much value for them. We have to convince students that we will get them either college ready or career ready. That means that they will be able to enter a regular four-year college without remediation or enter the Year 2020 workplace with the skills and knowledge necessary to acquire and hold a career-ready job. We will take advantage of the enormous community support that DISD has at the moment. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Work with key community groups to develop career-ready metrics Apply those metrics for the students in the Class of 2013 Identify and acquire, in collaboration with the business community, 1000 careerready positions for the graduates of the Class of 2013 Assign career-ready positions to academic divisions; give priority to Strategic Feeder Groups (see below)

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8. Create the Strategic Feeder Group


There is tremendous interest from various community partners and individuals to help move DISD forward. However, the various efforts are diffuse and not aligned. If we were to focus and channel the various efforts, we would have plenty of resources to apply to the transformation of a couple of feeder groups. In this way, we would work with those interested in both economic and educational renewal. We would, in effect, establish a beachhead from which to expand. Some actions associated with this Key Action are: Work with the community to identify two Strategic Feeder Groups by 1 Sep 2012 Identify additional resource needs and specific community support by 1 Nov 2012 Work with the community to assign projects and tasks by 1 Feb 2013 Create action plans for various partners and projects by 1 April 2013 Restructure Strategic Feeder Groups by 1 June 2013 to create career pathways (link this structure to pay-for-performance) Recruit and restaff (if necessary) to fill positions by 1 June 2013

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Meeting District Goals


District Goal
1. TEACHERS: Ensure highly effective teachers for all students.

Key Actions or Operational Expectations

2. Improve the quality of instruction (p. 17) 4. Tie teacher and principal evaluations to student achievement data (p. 18) 2. PRINCIPALS: Ensure a highly 3. Develop principals into effective instructional effective leader for every school. leaders (p. 17) 4. Tie teacher and principal evaluations to student achievement data (p. 18) 3. SAFE AND SECURE SCHOOLS: Operational expectations for operations and finance Ensure a safe, secure and (p. 20)
welcoming environment for all students, parents, staff, and the community. 4. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT: Develop shared responsibility between parents/guardians and schools that foster academic success and self-management of learning.

Operational expectations for Communications and School Leadership (p. 20 and p. 21)

5. RIGOR: Implement rigorous curriculum and engaging educational practices and experiences.
6. CULTURE: Create and sustain a positive and compassionate common culture throughout the district that leads toward accomplishing our vision and mission. 7. HUMAN RESOURCES: Hire, retain, and develop highly effective employees for every position. 8. DATA AND INNOVATION: Make managerial decisions based on appropriate, reliable, and valid data and best practices, and to develop and continually improve new, innovative ways of schooling

Operational expectations for Academics (p. 19)

1. Ensure staff members understand the direction of the District and the Core Beliefs (p. 17)

Operational expectations for Human Resources (p. 19) 7. Create a career-ready certificate (p. 18) 8. Create the Strategic Feeder Group (p. 18)

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to meet the needs of students in the 21st century. 9. CENTRAL OFFICE: Organize central services to encourage and enhance a positive culture throughout the district, support the campuses and positive culture on each campus by removing barriers that prevent achieving our goals. 10. FACILITIES: Systemically upgrade and maintain our facilities to provide every student an efficient learning environment.

5. Create a professional and high-functioning central office team (p. 17) 6. Restructure the Department of School Leadership (p. 18)

Operational expectations for Operations and Finance. (p. 20)

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Attachments

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Attachment A -- Effective Districts Planning Diagram


Core Beliefs Philosophy first
What are you prepared to act upon?

Vision
Actionable picture of success

Guiding frameworks

Theory of Action

Operational Framework

Systems Thinking

-- System connections -- Leverage points -- Archetypes

Needs Assessment
Achievement Data

Needs Assessment
System Evaluation Quality of Instruction

District Action Plan Key Actions

District Action Plan


Indicators of Success Specific Actions

Empowerment and Accountability

Goals and metrics for Central Office Targets and Parameters for School Leaders
-- Student achievement -- Quality of instruction -- Human capital management

Dept. Action Plan

School Action Plan

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Attachment B -- Support Results Diagram


Superintendent
Support Support

Central Office PRINCIPALS

Support

Teachers

Results

Result s

Other departments

Student Achievement
Metrics Quality of Instruction

Metrics

Philosophy/ Culture

Support Metrics Metrics


Page 33

Destination 2020, The DISD Plan

Results

School Supervision

Attachment C Superintendents Cabinet

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Attachment D Superintendents Core Team

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Attachment E Department of School Leadership Structure

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Attachment F Strategic Feeder Group Structure

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Appendices

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Appendix 1

COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT


According to student achievement on TAKS and ITBS, there is a need to develop and continually revise a clear, specific, and rigorous curriculum, including intervention strategies, by grade and subject in all content areas. This curriculum will be aligned to the districts strategic plan and theory of action based on best practices that are focused on content and pedagogy. In addition, there is a need to provide professional development to central and campus-based staff to ensure proper implementation of curriculum and pedagogy. Campus disaggregation of data by teacher has shown that some teachers are more successful than others. Quality professional development of content and pedagogy is needed to address fluctuations in teaching abilities related to student achievement, number of years of experience, and specific content area. In order to accomplish this in a timely manner, Virtual Professional Learning Communities (VPLC) are provided in the core content areas. Following the VPLC, aligned training will be held at the campus. It is necessary to build instructional leadership capacity of campus and district staff that is focused on academic goals and tied to student achievement. Also, there is a need for schools to use district-selected materials when student achievement does not reach determined goal levels while also providing flexibility to high-performing schools to continue successful practices that may differ from others in the district. Districtwide data indicates a need for supplemental materials and instructional time and staff training in the areas of mathematics, reading and science. There is a need to monitor student learning beginning with a comprehensive, coherent district assessment system that supplements state and standardized assessments. Therefore, the district needs an assessment system that will benchmark student achievement at key grades, allowing teachers to provide modifications when needed. In light of this, the district needs to translate the wealth of data into actionable information that impacts instruction for teachers. This can be accomplished through MyData Portal. To best facilitate this, there is a need for professional development to support this initiative. According to various district reports, there is a need to ensure all campuses and district offices have a safe, secure, and orderly environment. District and campus staffs need to be trained in the districts discipline prevention and intervention model, including how to set an environment for positive, consistent and pro-active student behavior interventions. These data also indicate a need for training to ensure safe and drug-free schools to lessen these areas of concern. To support students with issues that impact their success in school, there is a need to provide supplemental professional development in

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Appendix 1 the areas of physical and mental health. The rate of student health in Texas has led the government to legislate the need for a coordinated health program at each school. There is a need for parents and community members to actively participate in the educational process of the district. This includes a need to provide parent education in English and in other languages to support and better equip parents and guardians to become involved with their childrens education. The district will conduct programs, workshops, and outreach efforts to increase parent and family involvement, fostering partnerships between parents and schools. Due to the insufficient number of students entering college there is a need to increase student access and parent awareness of higher education opportunities. This low number of students entering college also indicates the necessity to provide PSAT/SAT/ACT student preparation sessions. There is also a need to increase communication with parents about college readiness. According to the districts graduation rate, there is a need to provide students with the opportunity to recover credit for courses failed during the school year. The district loses teachers and campus administrators each year to the surrounding suburbs. This situation creates a need to implement a compensation management plan that will attract, motivate and retain qualified personnel. At the campuses with the lowest academic performance, there is difficulty in recruiting and retaining quality staff. To address this, the district needs to utilize recruitment activities and alternative certification as well as provide incentives at designated campuses. Due to the AYP rating of schools, there is a need to ensure that all teachers and campus administrators are skilled in the use of scientifically-based strategies to improve student achievement. Estimating the sizeable number of students who may not pass one or more EOC assessments Spring of 2012, there is a need to provide supplemental instructional summer sessions aimed at assisting students with acceleration and course credit. Supplemental summer math, reading, and science instruction are necessary to support data-determined areas of need in meeting student standards.

An analysis of AEIS, TAKS, and TELPAS assessment results from the district pointed out the need to address special population groups. Disaggregated student achievement data shows that the following groups need to be addressed in order to close the learning gaps: Hispanic, Limited English Proficient, African-American, special education, and atrisk students. According to these data, there is a need to provide supplemental staff and programs to support the social, emotional, and academic needs of low achieving students, English language learners and other students considered at risk of academic failure. There is also a need to target training and support to ensure that all teachers are skilled in the use of evidence-based instructional practices and cultural proficiency. This training Destination 2020, The DISD Plan Page 40

Appendix 1 will be provided by the district, approved consultants, and the Educational Service Center. To serve as first-level responses to learning difficulties, the campuses will need to identify and develop proven, practical intervention practices and strategies (e.g., reteaching, flexible grouping, paraprofessional support, etc.). The campuses will also need to address learning difficulties common across a particular concept or objective by identifying additional human and material resources and discussing the difficulty within teacher collaborative planning groups. There is a need to support this endeavor through the use of instructional coaches and instructional specialists providing the greatest amount of services to Title I campuses with the greatest needs. For those students at risk of being retained, there is a need for extended year programs to provide intervention and acceleration. The percent of students scoring below the 40th percentile at grades Kindergarten-Five indicates a need to provide real world experience through exposure to activities in and around the community. To serve our youngest students, the district needs to provide high quality programs and services for young children (ages 0-5 years), particularly low-achieving children in the highest poverty schools. Annually, there is a need to fund additional instructional positions for campuses that have the largest class sizes to assist them in meeting the instructional needs of the students. The number of low performing schools and schools that do not meet Adequate Yearly Progress indicates a need for supplemental initiatives to raise the level of academic achievement. Each academically unacceptable campus needs additional support through the use of instructional coaching. Supplemental Educational Services and School Choice are provided to students at schools that do not meet AYP. In order to better serve the districts homeless, neglected, and delinquent population, there is a need to allocate resources to ensure these students have the necessary support to meet academic achievement standards. There is a need to provide supplemental services to the regular education program for the purpose of increasing the academic achievement and reducing the dropout rate of those students who meet the state defined eligibility criteria for being at-risk utilizing State Compensatory Education funds. There is also a need to provide a system of support through a student support team. Students experiencing mental or physical issues that interrupt the learning process need to receive services to remedy these issues.

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Appendix 2

DATA TRENDS
Commended TAKS gains surpassed passing rate gains by close to three percentage points in 2011. The number of 2010-2011 exemplary and recognized schools now totals 43%. The number of Academically Unacceptable schools decreased from 21 in 2008-09 to 14 in 2009-10, but increased to 34 in 2010-11. The rise in Academically Unacceptable schools can be attributed in part to the discontinuation of the use of the Texas Projection Measure (TPM) in 2010-11. Continued efforts must be made to accelerate the achievement levels in mathematics and science. Continued efforts must be made to decrease the gap among student groups in mathematics and science. Continued efforts must be made to accelerate the achievement levels to reach college readiness targets. Continued efforts must be made to implement strategies for multiple-year AYP high schools.

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Appendix 3

Federal and State Compliance


Target 15.0 Meet federal and state requirements.
Timeline: August 1, 2013 Item Number Action Step
Provide ongoing training and support to campuses on implementation of the districtwide Coordinated School Health program. Increase staff, student, and parent awareness of issues regarding abuse of children as required by Texas Education Code, Section 38.004. Implement a dating violence policy as required by Texas House Bill 121. Provide an alternative setting for students when required to promote their well-being and academic achievement. Implement a districtwide Developmental Assets framework by building on current strengths and adding intentionality to support the following initiatives: Anti-Bullying Policy, Creating Caring Classrooms Initiative, Character Counts, Coordinated School Health, Drug and Violence Prevention, College Readiness, and African-American Success Initiative. Provide suicide prevention and assessment training. Present guidance lessons, including Breaking the Code of Silence, anti-bullying and harassment and anti-victimization. Provide resources, referral service, yearround programs, and staff training to ensure comprehensive support to homeless students. Provide enhanced services to the regular education program for enrolled pregnant and parenting students. Provide refugee and migrant students and parents with orientation services, transition services, translation services, tutoring services. Provide staff development to school personnel around refugee services and the social and emotional impact of the refugee resettlement process. Implement the Bilingual/ESL education program. Continue to develop and implement quality enrichment opportunities for all students during both in school and out of school time. Provide support to campus teams on implementation of the districtwide Response to Intervention framework.

Staff Responsible
Student Services Executive Director

Resource
General Operating Funds

15.1.1

15.1.2

Student Services Executive Director

General Operating Funds

15.1.3 15.1.4 15.1.5

Student Services Executive Director Student Services Executive Director Student Services Executive Director

General Operating Funds SCE Funds

General Operating Funds, Title II Funds, CDC funds

15.1.6

Student Services Executive Director

General Operating Funds

15.1.7 15.1.8

Student Services Executive Director Student Services Executive Director

Title I Funds, McKinney Vento Resources TEXSHEP and Title I Part A. General Operating Funds, Medicaid Billing, State Comp Education Funds Refugee Impact Grant

15.1.9

Student Services Executive Director

15.1.10 15.1.11 15.1.12

Chief Academic Officer Chief Academic Officer Chief of School Leadership Chief Academic Officer

Title III Funds General Operating Funds, Title I Funds, Grant Funds General Operating Funds, Title I, II, and III Funds

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Appendix 3
15.1.13
Provide consultation and direct services districtwide to support Behavioral RtI. Provide individual or groups services utilizing Tier 2 and Tier 3 Positive Behavior and Intervention Supports. Provide individual and campus-based crisis response. Provide supplemental instructional summer sessions for students desiring to retake one or more EOC assessments. Provide an accelerated instructional plan for first-time 9th grade students in the 2011-2012 school year not meeting the passing standard on one or more EOC assessments. Review, revise and provide training on the Student Code of Conduct for each school year as needed and submit for Board approval. Plan, design, and deliver ongoing classroom management programs such as Champs and Foundations. Provide training for high school course planning and college-going orientation to all middle school students and parents prior to the high school course selection process in the spring of 8th grade. Chief Academic Officer General Operating Funds, McKinney-Vento Funds, Title I Funds

15.1.14 15.1.15

Chief of School Leadership

IDEA-B Funds. Title I, II and III Funds General Operating Funds

Chief of School Leadership

15.1.17

Chief of School Leadership

General Operating Funds, Title II General Operating Funds Title II Funds General Operating Funds Title I

15.1.18

Chief of School Leadership

15.1.19

Chief of School Leadership

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Appendix 4
2011- 2012 At-Risk Criteria
An at-risk student, for the 2011-12 school year, is defined as any student who is under 21 years of age and meets one or more of the criteria in column 4.
1 Row 1 2 Grades PK-3 3 State Criteria Did not perform satisfactorily on a readiness test or assessment instrument administered during the current school year. 4 District Interpretation Pre-K Current school year Opening the World for Learning (OWL)/ I-SIP K-2nd Previous school year Spring ITBS Reading Total LE 40th %ile or Math Total LE 40th %ile K-3rd Current I-SIP Note. If one test is missing, use available test; if both tests are missing, rely on remaining at-risk criteria. If the sum of grades in any one of the following pairs is less than 140 during a semester in the preceding or current school year: a. English and Mathematics, b. English and Science, c. English and Social Studies, d. Mathematics and Science, e. Mathematics and Social Studies, or f. Science and Social Studies. Maintained same grade level status in any two consecutive school years.

7-12

Did not maintain an average equivalent to 70 on a scale of 100 in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum during a semester in the preceding or current school year, or is not maintaining such an average in two or more subjects in the foundation curriculum in the current semester.

All

Was retained. (For one or more school years.)

3-12

Did not perform satisfactorily on an assessment instrument administered to the student under Subchapter B, Chapter 39. Has not performed at a level equal to at least 110% of its satisfactory level in the previous or current school year.

5 6

All All

Is pregnant, or is a parent. Has been placed in an alternative education program during the preceding or current school year. Has been expelled during the preceding or current school year. Is currently on parole, probation, deferred prosecution, or other conditional release.

This criterion identifies 4 population groups: (1) Students who fail to meet the raw scale cut off on any subset of TAKS/STAAR, and; (2) On subsequent TAKS/STAAR, students who perform at a level equal to 110% of the level of satisfactory on any subset of TAKS/STAAR will be exited from this at-risk category; (3) Students who do not perform at a level of satisfactory progress established by the ARD committee and; (4) On subsequent TAKS/STAAR-Modified or TAKS/STAAR-Alt, students who meet the assessment goal determined by the ARD will be exited from the at-risk category. Has been identified as pregnant during the current school year and/or is a parent. Has been placed in a disciplinary alternative education program during the preceding or current school year. Has been expelled during the preceding or current school year. Each campus is required to identify and provide appropriate services to this population. Due to confidentiality, safety, and security requirements, each campus is required to maintain documentation verifying the provision of supplemental services to identified students. Is a dropout or has been previously reported through the PEIMS to have dropped out of school. Is LEP on latest database snapshot. Each campus is required to identify and provide appropriate services to this population. Due to confidentiality, safety, and security requirements, each campus is required to maintain documentation verifying the provision of supplemental services to identified students.

7 8

All All

9 10 11

All All All

Is a dropout. (Was previously reported through the PEIMS to have dropped out of school.) Is LEP. Is in the custody or care of the Department of Protective and Regulatory Services or has, during the current school year been referred to the department by a school official, officer of the juvenile court, or law enforcement official.

12

All

Is homeless.

Has been identified as homeless based on McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act of 2001. Resided during the preceding school year or currently resides in a residential placement facility in the district. Includes a detention facility, substance abuse treatment facility, emergency shelter, psychiatric hospital, halfway house, or foster group home.

13

All

Resided in the preceding school year or resides in the current school year in a residential placement facility in the district. Includes a detention facility, substance abuse treatment facility, emergency shelter, psychiatric hospital, halfway house, or foster group home.

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Appendix 4

2011-2012 Title I Allocations


Description Instruction Function 11 Object Class 6100 6200 6300 6400 6600 Curriculum Development and Instructional Staff Development 6200 6300 6400 Community Services 61 6100 6200 6300 6400 Instructional Resources, Media, School Leadership, and Other 6200 6300 6400 6100 Total 6200 Total 6300 Total 6400 Total 6600 Total Grand Total Other 6100 13 6100 2011-12 Amount $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 39,397,241 9,500,511 4,686,614 309,357 472,500 14,908,236 191,724 610,142 1,009,815 4,332,476 126,810 489,253 156,895 6,548,798 5,805,920 258,933 517,036 65,186,751 15,624,965 6,044,942 1,993,103 472,500 89,322,261

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Appendix 4

20112012 SCE Allocations


Row Labels 699 - Extended School Year 6118 Extra Duty Prof - SC - Ext Lrng Opportunities - Extended Year School Extra Duty Prof - SC - Generic - Extended Year School 6128 Extra Duty Support - SC - Ext Lrng Opportunities - Extended Year School Extra Duty Support - SC - Generic - Extended Year School 6295 Internal Svc Fund Billing - SC - Extended Year School 6296 Transportation - Dallas County Schools - SC - Extended Year School 6329 Reading Mtrls - SC - Extended Year School 6399 Gen Sup - SC - Extended Year School 6411 Emp Travel - SC - Local Mileage - Extended Year School 6499 Misc Op Exp - SC - Extended Year School 860 - Alternative Education Learning Community 6118 Extra Duty Prof - SC - Drop Out Prevention - Alternative Education Learning Community 6295 Internal Svc Fund Billing - SC - Alternative Education Learning Community 6396 Tech Equip <$5K/unit - SC - Alternative Education Learning Community 6399 30,000 7,500 20,000 12,000 157,500 2,500 30,500 12,000 45,000 30,000 24,000 11,037 115,000 11,037 Budget Total 293,074

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Appendix 5
Gen Sup - SC - Alternative Education Learning Community 6412 Student meals, lodging and registration - SC - Alternative Education Learning Community 6638 Tech Equip & Software >$5K/unit - SC - Drop Out Prevention - Alternative Education Learning Community 919 - Dept of Magnets and Special Programs 6265 Copier Exp - SC - Generic - Campus Administrative Services 6294 Misc Contract Svc-Printing - SC - Generic - Campus Administrative Services 6396 Tech Equip <$5K/unit - SC - Generic - Campus Administrative Services 6399 Gen Sup - SC - Generic - Campus Administrative Services 6411 Emp Travel - SC - Generic - Campus Administrative Services Emp Travel - SC - Local Mileage - Campus Administrative Services 6499 Misc Op Exp - SC - Generic - Campus Administrative Services 925 - Attendance Improvement and Truancy Dept. 6119 Prof Sal - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6129 Support Sal/Wage - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6141 FICA - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6142 =Health/Life Ins - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 17,280 8,169 38,830 524,682 25,000 710,817 1,500 3,000 8,000 3,000 3,500 16,000 80,000 10,000 10,000

60,000

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Appendix 5
6143 Wkrs Comp - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy Wkrs Comp - SC - Incentive Awards - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6145 Unemp Comp - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy Unemp Comp - SC - Incentive Awards - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6146 TRS - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy TRS - SC - Incentive Awards - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6149 Other Emp Benefits - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy Other Emp Benefits - SC - Incentive Awards - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6265 Copier Exp - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6294 Misc Contract Svc-Printing - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6399 Gen Sup - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6411 Emp Travel - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy Emp Travel - SC - Local Mileage - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 6499 Misc Op Exp - SC - Attendance Improvement and Truancy 929 - Student Discipline 6223 Student Tuition-Other than Public Schools - SC - Student Discipline 6249 Contract Repair & Maint-Other - SC - Student Discipline 40,000 400,000 40,000 440,000 2,398 3,325 48,312 4,800 0 0 216 0 13,524 0 2,254 0 7,027 0

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Appendix 5
934 - Health Services 6118 Extra Duty Prof - SC - Generic - Health Services 6299 Misc Svc - SC - Generic - Health Services 943 -Dyslexia Services 6112 Subs for Professionals - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services 6118 Extra Duty Prof - SC - Dyslexia Services 6119 Prof Sal - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services 6129 Support Sal/Wage - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services 6141 FICA - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services FICA - SC - Dyslexia Services 6142 Health/Life Ins - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services Health/Life Ins - SC - Dyslexia Services 6143 Wkrs Comp - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services Wkrs Comp - SC - Dyslexia Services 6145 Unemp Comp - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services Unemp Comp - SC - Dyslexia Services 6146 TRS - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services 19,142 3,190 0 9,944 0 26,880 0 11,566 0 35,998 761,586 120,000 12,000 10,000 1,320,642 265,371 275,371

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Appendix 5
TRS - SC - Dyslexia Services 6149 Other Emp Benefits - SC - Dyslexia - Dyslexia Services 6269 Rentals-Op Leases - SC - Dyslexia Services 6294 Misc Contract Svc-Printing - SC - Dyslexia Services 6299 Misc Svc - SC - Dyslexia Services 6329 Reading Mtrls - SC - Dyslexia Services 6339 Testing Mtrls - SC - Dyslexia Services 6396 Tech Equip <$5K/unit - SC - Dyslexia Services 6397 Other F & E between $500 & $4999/unit - SC - Dyslexia Services 6399 Gen Sup - SC - Dyslexia Services 6411 Emp Travel - SC - Dyslexia Services Emp Travel - SC - Local Mileage - Dyslexia Services Grand Total 1,500 20,000 3,257,404 212,500 3,000 15,000 9,000 41,000 5,000 9,000 4,000 336 0

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Appendix 6

District Improvement Plan Committee

Vincent Reyes Shirley Ison-Newsom Sherry Christian Steven Korby Wendy Hawthorne Elizabeth Casas Loretta Simon Jacqueline Landry Cecilia Oakeley Jordan Roberts Gray Salada Charles Tuckey Liliana Valadez Rachel Moon

Interim Division Chief of Teaching and Learning Interim Division Chief of Teaching and Learning Interim Division Chief of School Leadership and Administrative Services Interim Division Chief of Staff Executive Director Executive Director Executive Director Executive Director Executive Director Executive Director Executive Director Student Discipline Executive Director Parent Services Coordinator

Teaching and Learning Schools Leadership Division Schools Leadership Division Business Services Instructional Support Services Multi-Language Enrichment Communication Services Professional Development Evaluation and Accountability Grants Management Executive Director Technology Services of Information

Schools Administrative Support College and Career Readiness Parent Services and School Choice

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Appendix 7

Disrict-wide Advisory Council


Karen Marx Viola Camble Alexis Snider Tenisha Brown Brian Young Priscilla Vega Tondolyn Mosley Jeffrey Baker Shelly Vaughan Anthony Holmes Joan Chalkley Teacher of the Year. North Dallas HS Teacher, Spruce HS Teacher, Tasby MS Teacher, Hotchkiss ES Teacher, Terry ES Teacher, Botello ES Principal, U. Lee ES Principal, Seagoville HS Principal, Burnet ES Parent, Middle School Parent, High School Valerie Kelley Zubair Saiyed Adam Brian Smith Sandra Horton Meewan Branch Carroll Hopkins Jose Cardenas Lora Morris Jeanne Juneau Blanca Espinosa Janis Daniels Cris Manning Alan King Victor Washington Rena Honea Teacher, Boude Storey MS Teacher, Rusk MS Teacher, Hillcrest HS Teacher, Bryan ES Teacher, Ireland ES Teacher, Early College HS Mountain View Principal, Tasby MS Principal, Larry Smith ES Counselor, R. E. Lee ES Parent, Elementary School Parent, High School Community member Interim Superintendent of Schools SELC Coordinator Alliance Teacher Affiliation

Fernando Salazar Community member Les Titus Vicente Reyes Lisa DeVeaux Chairperson, Community member Interim Division Executive, Teaching and Learning School Leadership

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