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THE ETHIOPIC BOOK OF ENOCH

A NEW EDITION OF IN THE LIGHT THE FRAGMENTS A R A M A I C DEAD SEA

BY

MICHAEL

A.

KNIBB
WITH

IN CONSULTATION

EDWARD

ULLENDORFF

1
T E X T AND APPARATUS

1978

1M
PRESS

OXFORD AT THE CLARENDON

Oxford

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I S B N O 19 8 2 6 1 6 3 2 (g) Oxford University Press jgjS

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PREFACE
T H I S work offers a new edition (volume i) and translation (volume 2) of the Ethiopia text of Enoch. The edition is based on Rylands Ethiopia MS. 23, and full account has been taken of the Aramaic fragments of Enoch that were discovered at Qumr^n. The intention is not to produce a new conflated text of Enoch, but rather to present the sum total of the evidence for the text of Enoch in as clear a way as possible. In its present form this work is a revised version of a thesis that was accepted by the University of London in 1974 for the degree of Ph.D., but its origins go back much further than this. As long ago as 1959 Professor Matthew Black and Professor Edward Ullendorff had it in mind to produce a new edition and translation of Enoch, and an exegetical commentary, and were only prevented from making progress on this work by the delay in the publication of the Aramaic fragments from QumrSn. As a result of this delay, Professor Ullendorff eventually suggested that I should take over his part of the enterprise, i.e. the edition and translation of the Ethiopia text; and at a later stage it was decided that the exegetical commentary, whicTi was to be prepared by Professor Black, should be published separately. I would like to take this opportunity to express the profound debt of gratitude that I owe to Professor Ullendorff, both for his initial suggestion that I should undertake this work on Enoch and for all the patient help and encouragement that he has subsequently given me. The form that this work takes owes much to his advice, and I have adopted many suggestions that he has made without acknowledging them in each individual case. I must, however, stress that the responsibility for everything that appears here is mine. On pp. 7 f. of volume 2 I have described the way in which I was given access to the Aramaic fragments of Enoch. I have also referred there to the fact that, after the Oxford University Press had accepted this work for publication, J . T. Milik generously agreed that proofs of his edition of the fragments be made available to me. The edition has now been published,^ and it will be readily
' J . T . Milik, The Books of Enoch, Aramaic Fragments Oxford, 1976. of Qumrdn Cave 4,

vi

PREFACE

apparent that my view of the significance of these fragments is very different from that of MiHk. Some of MiHk's ideas had of course already appeared in earHer pubHcations, but I did not think it proper in the present work to take issue with MiHk on the arguments and detailed discussions that are contained only in the edition, nor did I think it proper to make other than occasional reference to it. However, a review of Milik's work, prepared jointly by Professor Ullendorff and myself, has appeared in the October 1977 issue of the Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies. The interval that has occurred between the completion of the thesis (December 1973) and its publication has enabled me to make a number of additions and corrections. It has also enabled me to incorporate into the apparatus in volume i the evidence of Lake Tana Ethiopia MS. 9, and my thanks are due to Professor E. Hammerschmidt for kindly sending me a copy of this important manuscript.' However, it should be stressed that, apart from the incorporation of the evidence of Tana 9 and apart from the fact that text and translation have had to be separated for publication (in the original they were on facing pages), no changes of a fundamental kind have been introduced since the completion of the thesis. I have not normally repeated in volume 2 information that is self-evident from the apparatus in volume i, unless, from the point of view of the text, there was a particular reason to do so. However, I have made an exception to this rule in the case of the so-called Parables of Enoch (chapters 3 7 - 7 1 ) because of the widespread interest in the figure of the Son of Man which occurs in this section of the book. My thanks are due to the authorities of the following institutions which kindly supplied me with photographs or microfilms of manuscripts in their possession: the John Rylands University Library of Manchester; the Bodleian Library, Oxford; the British Museum (now the British Library); the Bibliotheque Nationale; the Vatican Library; the Tubingen and Marburg libraries of the Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz. In addition my thanks are due
' In an Appendix in this volume I have given a list of important unique readings attested by Tana 9 which in a number of places cast an interesting light on the text of Enoch. In view of the evidence of this manuscript the discussion of io6. 13 (see volume 2, pp. 39 f., 245 f.) is now in need of correction. See further volume 2, p. 36 n. 34.

PREFACE

vii

to many individuals who have given me help and advice on particular matters, but here it is possible to mention by name only Dr. Stefan Strelcyn and Professor P. R. Ackroyd. I would also like to thank the staff of the Oxford University Press for their help and for the care they have devoted to the publication of this work. The greatest debt of all, however, is owed to my wife for all she has done to see that this work was brought to a conclusion.
M . A. KNIBB

University of London King's College December igyy

CONTENTS
VOLUME N O T E ON T H E A P P A R A T U S ABBREVIATIONS L I S T OF S I G L A TEXT ADDITIONS APPENDIX AND CORRECTIONS I xi xiv XV I 424 425

List of Unique Readings in Lake Tana Ethiopia MS. 9


VOLUME ABBREVIATIONS INTRODUCTION 2 vi

1. Previous Editions of the Ethiopia Text of Enoch 2. The Aramaic Fragments of the Book of Enoch 3. The Greek Version of the Book of Enoch 4. The Ethiopia Version of the Book of Enoch 5. The Versions Underlying the Ethiopia Text of Enoch 6. A Note on the Translation
BIBLIOGRAPHY LIST OF S I G L A

i 6 15 21 37 47
48 53 55 253 259

TRANSLATION REFERENCE AUTHOR INDEX

INDEX

NOTE ON THE APPARATUS


T H I S introductory note is merely intended to describe the organization of the material in the apparatus. The Introduction proper to this work will be found in volume 2 where full details are given of the manuscripts that have been used and the procedures that have been followed. The edition is based on Rylands Ethiopia MS. 23, and the text consists of photographs of the manuscript; The apparatus below the text is divided, where necessary, into an Ethiopia and a Greek section. (i) In the Ethiopia apparatus I give the variants of the Ethiopia manuscripts used in this edition, both those that I have myself collated (BM 485, BM 491, Berl, Abb 35, Abb 55, Tana 9, BodI 5, and Ull), and those whose evidence I have taken from Charles's text-edition (Bodl 4, Frankfurt MS., Curzon 55, Curzon 56, BM Add. 24185, BM 484, BM 486, BM 490, BM Add. 24990, BM 492, BM 499, Vat 7 1 , Munich 30, Garrett MS., and Westenholz MS.).' Subject to the exceptions noted below, I give all the variants (including mistakes) attested by the manuscripts that I have myself collated. I have been more selective in the case of the evidence taken from Charles's text-edition and normally ignored readings attested only by one or two manuscripts, unless the reading in question happened to agree with a reading in one or more of the manuscripts collated by me. The apparatus works on the principle that where a manuscript is not mentioned, it is to be assumed that its evidence agrees with that of Ryl. However, I have occasionally thought it necessary to make quite clear which manuscripts (if any) agree with Ryl; in such cases I give the manuscript support for the reading before quoting the reading itself (cf. e.g. fol. 2rb, line 20 S11"ai>'rt ; ) .
' Cf. volume 2 , pp. 36 f., and for the sigla see the list at the end of this Note. In the case of the evidence taken from Charles, I normally do not name the manuscripts to which the variants are to be attributed (unless only one manuscript is involved), but merely use the formula '5 M S S ' , '7 M S S ' , etc. Where Charles's evidence was incomplete, or there was some uncertainty about it, I carried out such checks as I was able and made the necessary corrections. There are some obvious misprints and some errors and omissions in Charles's edition, and although in general his apparatus seems to be reliable, his collation of the E t h II manuscripts was not always completely precise; the figures ' 5 ' , ' 7 ' , etc., should only therefore be regarded as approximately correct.

xii

NOTE

ON T H E

APPARATUS

Although I have not attempted, much less achieved, absolute consistency, I have normally left out of the apparatus all variants of a purely orthographic character, and particularly variants involving the following common phenomena : (1) the formation of the imperfect (I i and II i) of verbs whose first radical is a laryngal or pharyngal (cf. e.g. fol. 3rb, line 27 h.'f'iCh i for which the following variants occur: h.^'iC'h;, A-tOCT-;, a-rOCh:; note that for the 1 1 imperfect the pattern J&0C7 : is very frequently found in the Eth I manuscripts (particularly BM 485 and Berl) in the case of such verbs); (ii) the occurrence of the vowels u and i with the corresponding semivowels w and y (thus variants of the type F^COjp; / y^ayip ;, ^P-rh ;/ ^f'tb : have generally been ignored); (iii) the spelling of names (here, particularly, I am conscious that I have often had to make arbitrary decisions); (iv) alternative spellings and forms of words that occur frequently (e.g. the common variants I'i'M^:, ffi>?fl^! Iao'ii.fl^jErfvC: /fi-fi^C: and related forms of this verb); (v) the writing of the numerals (for which the Eth I manuscripts normally use words, the Eth II manuscripts signs). I have also normally left out of the apparatus such variants as the following: hiiih: /hhtif:, " : /"HTF:, ?iftTF : / hii-'ifhiiO : H /Aa-F;. I have felt it necessary to treat Abb 5 5 differently from the other manuscripts. From c. 83 onwards Abb 55 has a much abbreviated text, and were its evidence for cc. 83-108 to be incorporated into the apparatus, there is a serious risk that the apparatus would become confused and overloaded. Since its evidence for cc. 83-108 is inevitably of very limited value, it seemed to me best to ignore it altogether for these chapters except in one or two cases of special importance. (2) In the Greek apparatus I record the divergences between the Greek and the Ethiopic texts. I have given rather more evidence from the Greek version than was perhaps strictly necessary in order to try to make as clear as possible the relationship between the Greek and the Ethiopic. However, I have ignored trivial variants of number (the singular in the Ethiopic, the plural in the

NOTE

ON T H E

APPARATUS

xiii

Greek, and vice versa), particularly in cases where the Ethiopic evidence was undivided. I have taken the Greek evidence from the editions of Swete and Bonner' and have normally not recorded corruptions in the Greek, unless they were of some significance from the point of view of the Ethiopic or Aramaic texts. Where account is taken of corruptions in the Greek, I give first the manuscript reading and then, in brackets, the restoration proposed by Swete or Bonner. Only in exceptional cases have I noted any other proposals for the restoration of the text. As has already been indicated, full information about the manuscripts used will be found in volume 2, but a list of sigla is appended here to make the use of this volume easier. Where the name of an author occurs in the apparatus, unless otherwise indicated the reference is to the relevant Ethiopic or Greek textedition; in these and all other instances consultation of the Bibliography in volume 2 will make clear, in case of doubt, which work is intended.
' Cf. volume 2, pp. 17 f., notes 15 and 24, and p. 20.

ABBREVIATIONS
HTR JA J AOS JBL JES JSS JTS NTS PL RB RRAL RSE SAB ThBl ZA W ZDMG ZNW Harvard Journal Journal Journal Journal Journal Journal New Revue Theological asiatique of the American of Biblical of Ethiopian of Semitic of Theological Studies Latina delta Reale Accademia di Studi zu Etiopici der Blatter Wissenschaft Gesellschaft Wissenschaft der Deutschen Morgenlcindischen Deutschen (Preussischen) Akademie der Berlin dei Lincei (Classe di Scienze Oriental Studies Studies Studies Society Literature Review

Testament biblique

Patrologia Rendiconti Rassegna

M o r a l i , Storiche e Filologiche) Sitzungsberichte Wissenschaften Theologische Zeitschrift Zeitschrift Zeitschrift

fiir die Alttestamentliche fiir die Neutestamentliche

LIST OF SIGLA
Aram T h e A r a m a i c D e a d Sea F r a g m e n t s o f E n o c h . Aram Aram ^'^'rastr. d d i f f e r e n t m a n u s c r i p t s t o w h i c h the various f r a g m e n t s belong T h e G r e e k Version of E n o c h T h e F r a g m e n t s in Syncellus (Gr^y""^ ^ = 6. 1-9. GrSync b = g 4_io_ GrSy-": c = 15. 8-16. i ) T h e A k h m i m M a n u s c r i p t ( C o d e x Panopolitanus) GrPan a Grvat GrCB Eth E t h I and E t h I I Eth I B M 48s B M 485a B M 491 Beri Abb 35 Abb 55 Tana 9 T a n a 9a Eth IIBodl 5 Ryl Ull Bodl 4 Frankfurt M S . Curzon 55 Curzon 56 B M Add. 24185 B M 484 B M 486 B M 490 B M Add. 24990 B M 492 B M 499 A duplicate version o f 19. 3 - 2 1 . 9 within the A k h m i m Manuscript Codex Vaticanus G r . 1809 T h e Chester Beatty-Michigan Papyrus T h e E t h i o p i c Version o f E n o c h T h e two families of E t h i o p i c m a n u s c r i p t s British M u s e u m Orient. 485 A duplicate version of 97. 6 b - i o 8 . 10 within British M u s e u m Orient. 4 8 5 British M u s e u m Orient. 4 9 1 Berlin M S . O r . P e t e r m a n n I I N a c h t r a g 2 9 Abbadianus 35 Abbadianus 55 T a n a Ethiopic M S . 9 A duplicate version o f 7 8 . 8 b - 8 2 . 2 0 within Bodley M S . 5 Rylands E t h i o p i c M S . 2 3 Ullendorff M S . Bodley M S . 4 F r a n k f u r t M S . Orient. Ruppell 11 i = British M u s e u m Orient. 8 8 2 2 = British M u s e u m Orient. 8 8 2 3 ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, ,, Orient. 4 8 4 Orient. 486 Orient. 490 Add. 24990 Orient. 4 9 2 Orient. 4 9 9 British M u s e u m A d d . 2 4 1 8 5 4;

Gr GrSync

xvi Vat 7 1 Munich 30 Garrett M S . Westenholz M S . hmt.

LIST

OF

SIGLA

Vatican Ethiopic M S . 7 1 M u n i c h Ethiopic M S . 30 P r i n c e t o n E t h i o p i c 2 [ ( G a r r e t t Collection) D e p 1 4 6 8 ] H a m b u r g Orient. 2 7 1 a = homoioteleuton 130

A raised ' is used t o refer to an original reading in a m a n u s c r i p t , a raised ^ to a c o r r e c t e d reading.

ADDITIONS A D COHEEOTIONS M

52.5 54.2

Pol. 6va 2 8 Pol. 6 l 2 2 v3

f\'Tl

Berl omits.

For 'Eyl Ull 2 MSS "hfh % ^ 'Eyl Ull other Eth II MSS

7^T>:'^/1.'

> read

'

and delete ' 7 MSS' from after 'Tana 9 ' .


60.7

Pol. 7 r c 2 Pol. 7ro 2 2

Tana 9

0'^n<:l-'5:

60.12

P e r 'BM 4 8 5

dDfT/^: ' read 'Hyl^ CDAiT/YHM 485 CD'Vf-f^ ;Eyl^ and all other MSS

60.21
61.1

Pol. 7 v a 2 1 Pol. 7vl) 2 Pol. 8va 2 2 Pol. 9 r a ^ Pol. 9 r c ^


Pol. 1 0 r e 11

BM 491, Ctozon 56 Tana 9 ^"^^z^.' For 'Bodl 5 Bodl 5

^T?^/!^"/"-'

^/t)

'

67.10
69.27 72.1 75.4

Tana 9 omits.
2 MSS ^ / ^

7-^ ' / ^ ^ C : 'read


-^^C-

5 MSS ; . ^ 7 A

Entry for Tana 9 should read


S P i l ? ^

iX)!!!!

'.

Tana 9 ^ ^ A t A

LP^ ^

76.11
80.6 83.7 88.1

Pol. lOva 2 1 Pol. l i r a 28


Fol. I l v b l^fj. Pol. 1 2 r b l l

Entry for Tana 9 shovda read ffl Berl Abb 3 5 ' ' ( ? )
Tana 9 a

d)^!

^^

^ T . ^ ^ '

Por 'BM 491 adds CDA Abb 55

^ '

' r e a d 'BM 491

89.29
89.47 90.9

Pol. 1 2 v b 1 ^
Pol. 1 2 v o ^

BM 491 also reads (Lh d) Berl f d > ^

BM 491 7 ^ d l ; 7 ^ .'

Pol. 15va 22f^ Pol. 13vb 2 1 Pol. 13vo2 Pol. 13vo 2 Pol. 14pb 2^
Pol. 14Va 18 Pol. 1 5 v a 2

90.19
90.24

BM 491 also reads Tana 9 ^ ' T T ^ ^ L J - ; Till c D ^ ^


Tana 9 '?\^'' dy"T :

90.26 91.11
93.10 100.3

Berl also reads < j D ^ ^ jbT^A" =


Tana 9 dO ?rt)

100.9

Pol. 1 5 v a ^

Entry for Tana 9 should read ^ ^ V O d

'

424

APEEaiDIX

I give below a list of readings which seem to me to be in some way significant and are attested only by Tana 9 amongst the manuscripts which I have used.
1.6 1.9 2.1

Fol. 2 r a 21 Fol. 2 r a ^ Fol. 2 r a ^ Fol. 2rb


^

CD^^h^B^: ')6A=LP^Tana 9 (71^'^ Tana 9 hP^^H d)^ ^-b '

Tana 9 prefixes Tana 9 : Tana 9 omits. d)H^

d)^d)^<^:

^d/l'Tl'/V'^-'

5.8 7.5
8.2
10.2
10.13

d)'A^,H:
dX

Fol. 2va Fol. 2va 2 Fol. 2vb 1 Pol, 2vo 10 Fol. 2vo ^6 Pol. 2vc 18f. Pol. 2vo jil Fol. 3 r a 6

Tana 9 ^ fX ^ h -D tf^ Tana 9 Tana 9

Tana 9 adds TT/Y

10.16
10.20

d)'h'h/)-:

dOD^dC
' Tana 9 omits.

11.2

12.1
12.3

Pol. 3 r a 2
Pol. 3 r a 1 2 Fol. 3 r a 3 6 f . Pol. 3rb 12 Pol. 3ro 2 Pol. 3 r c Pol. 3 r c I6f^ Pol. 3va ^6
Pol. 3 v a 2 0

n^dTana 9 adds d^S^iT/Y CThh '?'f)d>h': Tana 9 adds '^O'^


'TTA: Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 ^ + ' Tana 9

13.5
14.2 14.9
14.10

^H^-^^^ ^ ^ Hd)[}f) 0(19^ : ^ ' T O ' . - ^ ^ H ^ ^ ' ^ f: V]^^ .'


Tana 9 omits.

^^"^-^rt'^^^^fir^.'/l^^/h:

f\h^^^a^:

^/V

14.15
15.4 15.5

Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9

Tl^iT'Tl^--

Pol. 3 v a 20 15.8 Pol. 3 v a 2 6 f . Pol. 3va 28


15.9
15.11 15.12

^'^'^^h^ 'td)J^P: a)d>ht: Tana 9 / I ^ : 0 4 / 7 '


^ ^ ^ ^ A 7 t - '

Pol. 3va 28f.


Pol. 3 v a 4 0

Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9

Pol. 3-vb 2 Pol. 5vo 12 Pol. 3vo 2 6 f .


Pol. 4 r a l 5 ,

18.9 18.12f.
20.5

Tana 9 ^ /V !

A^f^/)
^4/9'

d)'A^^04>^i

d)^^Pd)C'A.i>
425

APPBHDIX

21.2
21.3 21.5

Fol. 4ra22
Fol.4ra2^ Fol.4ra22

Tana 9
Tana 9

H/\V
^ ^

^7 :
' /) ^ .'

^Ad)

Tana 9 cDH

21.6

Fol. 4 r a i 2

Tana, 9 f ? f l ^ l O - f T ^ ' ^ ^ '

Fol. 4ra ^
Fol. 4ra

Tana 9

<^ 'i'^ ^ .'


Tana 9 o m i t s .

21.7

F o l . 4rb J _
Fol. 4 r b X t Fol.4rb2 F o l . 4xb

^^C-'

Tana 9 o m i t s .

21.9 21.10 22.10


24.5 25.5 25.6

Tana 9

i2

P o l . 4va_2 F o l . 4va 6 P o l . 4va 2 ^

Tana 9
'94':

r ) Y 7 ^ U -Tana (iD^'Z-O;
Tana 9 o m i t s .

Tana9r)7-/P;

4 1 ^ 1 / T V ;
9

d^TlO^Lt^

^^d?U-n !
Tana 9

Tana 9 o m i t s .

P o l . 4va 2 2
P o l . 4va 2 2

Tana 9 / I / f ) ^ ^ T ^

d)d>- C?^"^-

26.2

F o l . 4va ?ef.
P o l . 4vb

Tana 9 < ^ ^ / t ) - ^ '

27.2 28.1
28.2

12

F o l . 4vbJ0f5_ Fol. 4vb22 P o l . 4vb ^ P o l . 4vb i O P o l . 4vo JO Pol. 4 v c l 2 t Pol.Sral^

Tana 9
Tana 9

fff^S^: Tana 9 adds d^C'^YY'd) % 0 d)

29.1
29.2

Tana 9
Tana 9 Tana 9

d)^'^lf\'
6 B'P Lh

31.2 32.2 34.1


41.2

/^^OT-' /l^OrTl .' Tana 9 adds / l ^ ^ C ' Tana 9 ^ ^/7 ^ tD/^/> '
Tana 9

P o l . Sva^O
P o l . 5vb ^

41.9 44
45.1 46.2

Tana 9 Tana 9
Tana 9

(1?;!^/^^'^'^.'
^ :

F o l . 5vo 2^
Pol. 5vo25fj. Pol. 6 r a 2

/l^'^H.?^:
; Tana 9

7^TV d?/) ^ /? "/l ^


Tana 9 4/1: Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 ^ Tana 9 omits.

H-f^^^ .'

49.1 52.6 53.5 54.7 54.10 56.6 56.7 57.2

_ P o l . 6ro 2 2 Pol. 6 v a 1^ F o l . 6vb J 2 Pol. 6 v c 6 Pol. 6vo l^f^ Pol. 7ra J J . Pol. 7ra J 2 Pol. 7 r a J 8 Pol. 7ra 29f.

d)fCi~:
KT)?:

S'j^'A k '
-f ; H ?1

Tana 9 D ^

Tana 9 H, T) ? = Tana 9 1 ^ ^ ^ 426 ;

^^d>AS^^-

APEEHDIX 58.1 60.8 60.9 60.13 60.19 60.24 Pol. 7 r a 2 2 f j . Pol. T r o l l Pol. 7ro 1 2 Pol.7rol0 Pol. T v a r i Pol. 7 v a 2 2 Pol. Pol. 7va 2 1 Tana 9 Tarn 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 VA^-

+^^/T)-'^^/)'-^^/^/^ =

Tana 9 H^^-t

A^^-nC''

70^^^:
OH^:

Tana 9 / )

Tana 9 DD^- H h ^ : /L^'VF^^-NFH^C.-Tana 9 a d d s - ^ A L P ^ : y-'^C^.-R7^: a ^ d J ? ^ ^ ; ^ # > ^ ^ ^ . 9 omits.

7va22fi

6o.25 61.4 61.5 61.6 62.1 62.5 65.8 65.10 65.11 68.1 68.3 68.4 69.2 69.11 69.15 69.16 69.22 69.27 72.3 72.27 72.29 74.12 74.l4r.

Pol. 7va 37-39 Pol. 7va22 Pol. 7vb 10 Pol. 7vb

/1A'7/i?').<^^^/^^. 4/1 / I T ) : Tana


Tana 9 ^T/V: Tana 9

16

Pol. 7vb 20 Pol. 7vo l^f^ Pol. 7vo 1 8 Pol. 7vc 221^ Pol. 8ro ^Ii. Pol. 8 r c l 6 f j , Pol. 8ro 20 Pol. 8vb ^ Pol. 8vb 1 6 Pol. 8vb 1 8 Pol. 8 v b 2 2 Pol. 8 v c 2 2 Pol. 9 r a l Pol. 9 r a 2 Pol. 9ra 1 8 F o l . 9ra 26 Pol. 9 v a 2 Pol. 9 v o 2 Fol. 9vo4 Pol. 9V0 1 0 Pol. l O r b l i Pol. lOrb 2 2 - 2 4

(:i)f/f)d^<r : Tl<^'- Tana 9 adds YT/V Tana 9 (DTf/)^^ 'h^ATana 9 d^-^^IW .'
Tana 9

'=^6-

Irilt^'^'

Tana 9 ( L ^ / V ^ h H ^ : ' Tana 9 ^ ^(IZ?/^ ^ ' Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 d)h^Tana 9 Tana 9

^VT^

Tana 9 A^/)

4 LP-^ / i ^ ^ ' ^ / l ' l ^


^ '

"

^f^kiC'f''
Od':

H(D6/^^:
Tana S adds ^

'^'OAOh' ^Y}'?':
^" '^'t P^/<1

Tana 9 ill? ^ Tana 9 A Tana 9 ^ / l T^r^ 9 9 -la^ 9

LP(J^ ^ cD/^ ^

in^Ort)! P^CP^ft U"


P^C/^ft U"-

h^^'dPlnf^d^fl:

Tana 9 / ^ f / ^ f [>

d)d)C'^:f<^^p^JZ)-: d)<^^:^

Tana

9 ?O)/):?

V^^i^na

427

APHSMDIX 75.2 75.5 75.6 77.1 81.3 81.9 82.2 82.5 82.10 83.7 88.1 89.1 89.3 89.25 90.9 92.5 99.14 100.13 103.2 103.12 Pol. 10rb 40 Pol. lOro 1 4 f . Pol. lOro Jl Pol. lOva 37f. Pol. Ilrb 2 Pol. llrb 2^ Pol. llrb 36f. Pol. 1 1 r o 10 Pol. 1 1 r o 22 Pol. Ilvb 14f. Pol. 12rb 21 Pol. 12rb 2 5 f . Pol. 12rb 20 Pol. 12va 38f. Pol. 13va 27f. Pol. 14ro 22 Pol. 15rc 20 Pol. 15vb 2fi. Pol. 15vo 20 Pol. I6ra 2

Tana9T^*4';^^f
Tana 9 omits. Tana 9

CDdL ^4Tana Tana 9 d^fUl^'rh'


Tana 9 / \ ^ <^<iZ> r

.'^t7/)^, .-^94^ : C^Tf Z


9 adds

^h<^:

S A r?'(1 OyTY ^ dDf DC O: Tana 9 d)-hfA ^^?: fhA^Tl ' Tana 9 dDd^d}"<^h<PCTana 9 adds d)7i' ^J^<P<^ : Tana 9 'h^'O:^^:
Tana 9 Tana 9 ^ C^ Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9 Tana 9

Tana 9

'^n-n.- Tana 9 a d d s ^ ^ r ^ T O r / V . - r ^ / V ^ (Dan'h: dD'^hTi -n . ^ nn .


^ '

f^^^^^: ciJ^/O'^^.'
^UJ^-f-!

'd)^

O'l6

H^l'^t/^^^-' ^^l--%h: Tan. 9 adds ^ f ? ^

^4-^.

428