Vitamin A is an essential vitamin required for vision, gene transcription,boosting immune function, and great skin health

. A deficiency in vitamin A can lead to blindness and increased viral infection, however deficiency is only considered a problem in developing countries where it is a leading cause of blindness in children. Over consumption of vitamin A can lead to jaundice, nausea, loss of appetite, irritability, vomiting, and even hair loss. The current recommended daily allowance for Vitamin A is 5000 international units (IU). Below is a list of foods high in Vitamin A.

#1: Liver (Pâté)

The liver of any animal is packed with vitamins and minerals, and is best prepared steamed or fried with onions and herbs. Turkey liver provides the most vitamin A with 75333IU (1507% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 62526IU (1250% RDA) per liver. The liver of most any animal will provide 1000%+ RDA of vitamin A. A single tablespoon of pâté will provide 429 IU (9% RDA) of vitamin A.
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#2: Paprika, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Chili Powder

A tablespoon of paprika contains 3691IU (74% RDA) for vitamin A, or 52735 IU (1055% RDA) for a 100 gram serving. Other red pepper powders have similar amounts with Cayenne powder providing 41610 IU (832% RDA) per 100g or 2081IU (42% RDA) in a single tablespoon.
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#3: Sweet Potatoes

With their bright orange color sweet potatoes are packed with vitamin A. Sweet potatoes provide 19218IU (384% RDA) of vitamin A per 100 gram serving, or 38436IU (769% RDA) in a cup of mashed sweet potato, and 21909IU (438% RDA) in a

medium sized sweet potato.
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#4: Carrots

Carrots are excellent cooked or as a snack. 100 grams of raw carrots provides 16706IU (334% RDA) for vitamin A. That is 10191IU (204% RDA) for a medium sized carrot, and 2069IU (41% RDA) for a single baby carrot.
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#5: Dark Leafy Greens

Crisp, fresh, and delicious, dark leafy greens are great in a salad or steamed as a side. As a bonus they are also high in calcium. Kale provides the most vitamin A with 15376IU (308% RDA) per 100g serving, 10302IU (206% RDA) per cup. It is followed by Turnip Greens (232% RDA), Mustard Greens (210% RDA), Dandelion Greens (203% RDA), Spinach (188% RDA), and Collards (133% RDA).
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#6: Butternut Squash

Dark orange squash has a delicious nutty and sweet flavor. 100 grams baked provides 11155IU (223% RDA) of vitamin A, or 22868IU (457% RDA) per cup.
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#7: Dried Herbs

Dried herbs are so packed with vitamins they appear on practically every HealthAliciousNess Top 10 list. Make it a habit to add a pinch of dried herb to everything you prepare. Dried Parsley provides the most vitamin A with 10184IU (204% RDA) per 100 gram serving, or 204IU (4% RDA) per tablespoon. It is followed by Dried Basil (188% RDA), Dried Marjoram (161% RDA), Dill (154% RDA), and Oregano (138% RDA).
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#8: Lettuce

The kind of lettuce matters when it comes to vitamin A content. Dark colorful lettuces provide the most vitamin A with Red and Green Leaf lettuces providing 7492IU (150% RDA) per 100 gram serving, 2098IU (42% RDA) per cup shredded, and 1274IU (25% RDA) per leaf. Iceberg only provides 502IU (10% RDA) per 100g, 361IU (7% RDA) per cup shredded, and 75IU (2% RDA) per leaf.
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#9: Dried Apricots

Dried apricots are a great portable snack food. 100 grams will provide 3604IU (72% RDA) of vitamin A, which is 4685IU (94% RDA) per cup, and 144IU (6% RDA) per dried apricot.
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#10: Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe and other yellow/orange melons are a great source of vitamin A. Cantaloupe provides 3382IU (68% RDA) of vitamin A per 100 gram serving. That is 5986IU (120% RDA) per cup of mellon balls, or 2334IU (47% RDA) in a medium sized wedge.
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