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CREATIVITY AND INSTRUCTIONAL

STRATEGIES

DR. BRIAN HOUSAND


DEER PARK, TX - JUNE 18, 2012

http://bit.ly/HISD2012

brianhousand.com

OVER HERE!

GEEK

GIFTED

EDUCATOR

RESEARCHER

Raising geeks goes beyond teaching them the difference between Darths Vader and Maul. It means teaching them an empowering worldview.
WIRED - JUNE 2012

Hawaii Minnesota North Carolina California Georgia New York Montana Pennsylvania Nova Scotia Texas Connecticut Virginia Colorado Indiana

2012

I Informing & M Motivating P People A About C Creativity & T Technology

2012

DID

Rather than running the risk of having our students become

WALKING ENCYCLOPEDIAS
we need to TEACH them how to

THINK CREATIVELY.
(Sternberg, 2006)

1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Communication and Collaboration 3. Research and Information Fluency 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making 5. Digital Citizenship 6. Technology Operations and Concepts

bit.ly/nets-proles

p21.org

The Nation that dramatically and boldly led the world into the age of technology is failing to provide its own children with the intellectual tools needed for the 21st century.

Our children could be

STRAGGLERS
in a world of technology.

NOT LET THIS


HAPPEN

WE MUST

AMERICA MUST NOT BECOME AN INDUSTRIAL DINOSAUR

WE MUST NOT

provide our children

a 1960s education
21st Century WORLD.

for a

1983

SepTEMBER 12

www.p21.org
Learning and Innovation Skills

Creativity and Innovation Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Communication and Collaboration

New Skills For A New Age

What students must master to succeed.

LEARN
Access, evaluate, and use different forms of information. Exercise critical thinking. Exhibit fluency with tech tools.

CREATE
Use various forms of media when presenting ideas. Display originality. Employ problem solving skills.

COLLABORATE
Work successfully as a team. Demonstrate cross-cultural awareness. Communicate complex ideas effectively.

GOALS FOR TODAY EXPOSURE IDEAS ENRICHMENT INSPIRATION OH!

TodaysMeet
todaysmeet.com/hisd2012

ONE: CURRICULUM COMPACTING

The National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented

www.gi%ed.uconn.edu

What is Curriculum Compacting?


Modifying or streamlining the regular
curriculum Eliminating the repetition of previously mastered material Upgrading the challenge level of the regular curriculum Providing time for enrichment and/or acceleration activities while ensuring mastery of basic skills

Three Objectives
To create a challenging learning environment within the context of the regular curriculum To guarantee proficiency in the basic curriculum To buy time for enrichment and acceleration

For students, Compacting


Recognizes large reservoir of knowledge Satisfies hunger to learn more about self-selected topics Encourages independence Eliminates boredom resulting from unnecessary drill and practice

Types of Compacting
Basic Skills Compacting:
Eliminates specific skills that students have already acquired. Spelling, mathematics, or grammar. Pre-testing is easier to accomplish. Mastery can be documented more easily and objectively.

Types of Compacting
Content Compacting:
Social studies, science, and literature Students may already know the objectives or may be able to read the material and master the objectives in a fraction of the time. More flexible students can absorb the material at their own speed. Evaluation may be less formal essays, interviews, or open ended tasks.

How to Compact

Step One:

Identify the objectives in a given subject area.

Step One
Which objectives cannot be learned without formal or sustained instruction? Which objectives reflect the priorities of the school district/state department of education?

How to Compact

Step Two:

Find or create appropriate pre-tests.

Step Two
Which objectives have already been mastered by the student? Which objectives have not already been mastered by the student? Which problems might be causing students to fall short of reaching any of the objectives?

How to Compact

Step Three:

Identify students who should be pre-tested.

Step Three
Look at the individual strengths of the students in your class. Academic records, class performance, and evaluations from former teachers are all effective methods of pinpointing candidates for pre-testing.

How to Compact

Step Four:

Pre-test students to determine their mastery level of the chosen subjects.

Step Four
Point out that some students will already be familiar with the material. Ask students individually, if they would like to test out of the unit by demonstrating that they already know the objectives being taught.

How to Compact

Step Five: Eliminate


instructional time for students who show mastery of the objectives.

Step Five
Students who have a thorough grasp of the learning objectives should be allowed to take part in enrichment or acceleration activities. Some students may be excused from specific class sessions, while others may skip certain chapters or pages in the text or specific learning activities.

How to Compact

Step Six: Streamline instruction of


those objectives students have not yet mastered but are capable of mastering more quickly than their classmates.

Step Six
Bright students frequently need less practice to master new objectives than their peers. Students may demonstrate mastery of some, but not ALL the target learning objectives.

4 conditions to create individualized instruction


1. 2. 3. 4. Work must be high quality. Work must be appropriate to the students levels. Students must be motivated to work on the tasks. Students must have adequate time to learn.

How to Compact

Step Seven: Offer challenging


alternatives for time provided by compacting.

Step Seven
Assign individual or small group projects using contracts or management plans Create interest or learning centers Create opportunities for self-directed learning or decision making Teach mini-courses on research topics or other high interest areas

How to Compact

Step Eight: Keep records of this


process and the instructional options available to compacted students.

Step Eight
Record student strength areas, as verified by test scores or performance Save the pre-tests used to determine mastery and the learning objectives that were eliminated Compile enrichment and acceleration activities

Base decisions about replacement


activities on
The

needs of the students Time Space Resources School policy Support personnel

TWO: DEPTH & COMPLEXITY

Nomenclature, lexicon, or vocabulary of the study


LANGUAGE OF THE DISCIPLINES

What terms or words are specic to the work of the disciplinarian? What tools does the disciplinarian use?

Traits, attributes, characteristics to describe something

DETAILS
What are its attributes? What features characterize this? What specic elements dene this? What distinguishes this from other things?

Reoccurring events

PATTERNS
What are the reoccurring events? What elements, events, and ideas are repeated? What was the order of events? How can we predict what will come next?

Inuences or forces that shape ideas

TRENDS
What ongoing factors have inuenced this study? What factors have contributed to this study?

Unknown areas of a discipline UNANSWERED QUESTIONS What is still not understood about this area, topic, study, or discipline? What is yet unknown about this area, topic, study, or discipline? In what ways is the information incomplete or lacking in explanation?

Dilemmas, controversies, issues

ETHICS
What dilemmas or controversies are involved in this areas, topic, study, or discipline? What elements can be identied that reect bias, prejudice, and discrimination?

Generalizations, principles, theories

BIG IDEAS
What overarching statement best describes what is being studied? What general statement includes what is being studied?

Stated or unstated reasons or explanations

RULES
How is this structured? What are the stated and unstated causes related to the description or explanation of what we are studying

Past, present, future happenings

OVER TIME
How are ideas related between the past, present and future? How are these ideas related within or during a particular time period? How has time affected the information? How and why do things change or remain the same?

Connections between and across disciplines

ACROSS DISCIPLINES

How are these ideas related or connected?

Perspective, opinion

OF VIEW
What are the opposing viewpoints? How do different people and characters see this event or situation?

POINTS

Iconic Prompts of Depth and Complexity Retrieval Chart


Topic: Top Ten Things You Need to Know About Global Warming Language of the Disciplines (Think like a Climatologist).
-climate change -ozone depletion -ecosystem -carbon dioxide -greenhouse gas -glacier -temperature -CFC - Kyoto Protocol

Details
Global warming is caused primarily by carbon dioxide from burning coal, oil, and gas.

Patterns
-Misconceptions about global warming -poles warm faster than equator (US temps rising faster than over globe)

Trends
Global Warming Natural patterns of climate change (1 degree F in the past 100 years) shifting due to human activity (3-10 degrees F in next 100 years)

Unanswered Questions
-Can global warming be reversed or stopped (or is it too late)? -What new technologies, programs, or innovations will help slow global warming?

Global Warming Natural patterns of climate change (1 degree F in the past 100 years) shifting due to human activity (3-10 degrees F in next 100 years)

-Can global warming be reversed or stopped (or is it too late)? -What new technologies, programs, or innovations will help slow global warming?

Ethics -Is global warming real? -Human impact; reducing carbon


footprint: driving less, fuel efficient appliances, solar energy, etc. -US impact on poorer nations.

Big Ideas (Change/Power)


-Change can be either positive or negative -Change is inevitable -Power may be used or abused

Rules
Carbon dioxide, methane, and CFCs, and nitrous oxide all contribute to global warming.

Over Time
-temperature shifts lead to changes in ecosystems -temperature shifts lead to rising sea levels -a temperature rise will cause more extreme weather

Across Disciplines -Science: Environment/ Ecology


-Political Science: Kyoto Protocol -Sociology: Mans behavior

Multiple Perspectives (Points of View)


State your opinion on global warming from the perspective of: participant of Kyoto Protocol, alternative energy scientist, and person living 100 years from now.

BREAK

THREE: DEVELOPING INTERESTS

The biggest mistake of past centuries in teaching has been to treat all children as if they were variants of the same individual and thus to feel justified in teaching them all the same subjects in the same way.

- Howard Gardner

! My!Way!.!.!.
!!An! Expression!Style!Inventory
K.!E.!K e ttle,!J.!S .!Renzulli,!M .!G.!Rizza University!of!C onn cecticut

Products)provide )stude nts)and)professionals) with)a)way)to) express )what)they)have learned)to)an) audience.)This)survey )will)help)determi ne)the)kinds)of)products) YOU are) interested )in)creating. My!Name! is:!! _______ _______ _______ _____ _____ ______ _____ _____ ______ _____ _

Inst ructions:
Read)each)statement)and)circ le)the)number)that)shows)to)what) extent) YOU)are interested !in)creating)that)type) of)product.))(Do)not)worry)if)y ou)are)unsure)of)how to)make)the )product.) Not! At!All !Of!Littl e!!!! !!! !!!Moderatel y!!!!! !!! !!!!! !!!!!! !!!!! !!! !!!!!!! !!!!!! !! V ry e
Inte re sted!! !!!!!! !!!!Interest!!! !!! !!!!!Inte re sted !!!!!! !!!!!! In tereste d!!!!! !!! !!!Interested

Exampl : e writ i g!song!lyrics n

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

)writin g)stories discussing)w hat)I )have l earned paint ing)a)picture des igning)a)c omputer softw are)project filming)&)editing)a)v ideo creating)a)company hel ping)in)the )community ac ting)in)a)play

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5

FLIPPING
THE CLASSROOM

KHAN CAN AND KHAN

YOU

TOO

KNOW UNDERSTAND

DO

The whole process of education should thus be conceived as the process of learning to think through the solution of real problems.
-- John Dewey, 1938

Real World Problems Academic Rigor Technology Integration


www.ecugifted.com

Why did the pirate go to the Apple store?

Scan for the answer

FOUR: QUESTIONING & NEW LITERACIES

Benjamin Bloom 1913 - 1999

Knowledge)alone)is)NOT)enough.)

WHO WHAT WHEN


WHERE WHY

IS DID WILL MIGHT


SHOULD COULD WOULD

CAN

HOW

in Search of

Critical Thinking

If your students can the answer, then you may be asking the wrong question.

Every man should have a built-in automatic crap detector operating inside of him.
-- Ernest Hemingway

NEW LITERACIES
newliteracies.uconn.edu
IDENTIFY Important Questions LOCATE Information CRITICALLY EVALUATE SYNTHESIZE Information COMMUNICATE Answers

The illiterate of the 21st Century will not be those who cannot read or write,

but those who cannot LEARN, UNLEARN AND RELEARN.


(Tofer, 1970)

5 TYPES OF EVALUATION

UNDERSTANDING RELEVANCY ACCURACY RELIABILITY BIAS


(Coiro, 2006)

A Google a Day

G LF

DID

www.google.com/ mobile/goggles/

LUNCH

CREATIVITY
THEORIES AND

STRATEGIES

Sir Ken Robinson

We are educa)ng people Crea)vity is as important in out of their crea)vity. educa)on as literacy.

PREPARATION

INCUBATION

VERIFICATION

ILLUMINATION

E. Paul Torrance 1915 - 2003

FLUENCY FLEXIBILITY ORIGINALITY ELABORATION

FACTyou know about the problem or challenge FINDING Listing all PROBLEM FINDING Listing alternative problem denitions IDEA freely listed FINDING Ideas are SOLUTION FINDING Criteria for idea evaluation are listed ACCEPTANCE FINDING
Implementation / Action Plan

SUBSTITUTE COMBINE ADAPT MODIFY PUT TO OTHER USES ELIMINATE REVERSE

20%

1. Creativity and Innovation 2. Communication and Collaboration 3. Research and Information Fluency 4. Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making 5. Digital Citizenship 6. Technology Operations and Concepts

bit.ly/nets-proles

PK - 2
Identify, research, and collect data on an environmental issue using digital resources and propose a solution.

3-5
Produce a media-rich digital story about a signicant local event based on rst-person interviews.

6-8
Create original animations or videos documenting school, community, or local events.

9 - 12
Design, develop, and test a digital learning game to demonstrate knowledge and skills related to curriculum content.

COMPUTER
AS PAINTBRUSH

Pianos
NOT Stereos
(Resnick, 1996)

FREEDOM TO EXPERIMENT

FREEDOM TO FAIL

FREEDOM TO TRY ON IDENTITIES

FREEDOM OF EFFORT

BREAK

OUTLETS

CREATIVE

PLUGGING INTO

Plugging Into Creative Outlets


Brian C. Housand Angela M. Housand Gifted Education Communicator Spring 2011 Vol. 42, No. 1

DANGER
TOOLISHNESS
If#you#dont#read#much,# you#really#dont#know#much.# YOU #ARE

AHEAD DANGEROUS! !

--Jim Trelease

Googleable

ve frames
http://www.ickr.com/groups/visualstory/

ickr ve frames
1st photo:

establish
characters and location

ickr ve frames
2nd photo: create a situation with possibilities of what might happen

ickr ve frames
3rd photo: involve the characters in the situation

ickr ve frames
4th photo: build to probable outcomes

ickr ve frames
5th photo: have a logical but surprising end

instagram

dermandar

BORN: February 15, 2005

72 hours of video are uploaded every minute! Over 3 billion videos are viewed a day

Pianos
NOT Stereos
(Resnick, 1996)

www.youtube.com/searchstories

THE COMPUTER IS MY INSTRUMENT.

will.i.am

MAKING A PLAN

STEP TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PLAN

5. EVALUATE 4. WATCH IT GROW

3. GIVE IT TIME 2. PROVIDE A PURPOSE 1. IDENTIFY A TECH TOOL


(Besnoy, Housand, & Clark, 2008)

tyvm
brianhousand.com