I n s i d e t h e I s l a n d Ey e

S u l l i v a n ’ s I s l a n d • I s l e o f P a l m s • G o a t I s l a n d • D e w e e s I s l a n d
Since May 2005
June 22, 2012 Volume 8 Issue 4 FREE
Drilling continues on page 4
FIREWORK
FUN AND
SAFETY PG 6 & 7
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TURTLE TEAM
TO THE RESCUE
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Sandpiper continues on page 5
A
fter 11 years in the same location
on Sullivan’s Island, Sandpiper
Gallery will relocate two blocks
up Middle Street on Sullivan’s Island to
a beautiful new space located at Station
22 this June. The new location is across
the street from Poe’s Restaurant and
beside Station 22 Restaurant, right in the heart of
the Sullivan's Island shopping and dining district.
As part of the move, Sandpiper has expanded their
framing services as well as their framing staff to
serve a full range of framing needs. Several new
lines of pottery and jewelry have been added to the
variety of work offered in the gallery, as well as new
bodies of work by many of the artists that have
been with the gallery since
the beginning.
The Grand Opening for the
new location will be on June 23 from 6 p.m. until
8 p.m. and will feature “Heart Shaped World,” a
show of up to 15 new works in oil by Leslie Pratt-
Thomas and a book signing with New York Times
Best Selling author Mary Alice Monroe. This show
will run through July 7.
A New Nest for
the Sandpiper
O
n Monday, June 11, U.S.
Senator Lindsey Graham
of South Carolina
introduced a bill to the Senate
known as the South Carolina
Offshore Drilling Act. The bill,
which has received support
from both Governor Nikki Haley
and Congressman Jeff Duncan,
would allow for oil and natural
gas drilling off the coast of South
Carolina in hopes of decreasing
the state’s dependence on
foreign oil.
“South Carolina is leading the
way toward energy independence.
By authorizing offshore leasing
for oil and gas exploration, [we]
will lead a long overdue effort to
open up American-owned energy
reserves,” said Graham.
As outlined in the bill, the area
from the coastline reaching 10
miles out would be designated
a “Buffer Zone” in which no
drilling would be allowed,
leaving waters 10 to 100 miles
out open and available for
drilling. However, waters in the
10 to 50 miles range, known as
the “Opt-In Zone,” would need
to be approved by the governor
in order to be leased to drillers.
Upon South Carolina’s approval
of the drilling lease, a petition
would then be submitted to the
Secretary of Interior to request
that the area be added to a fve-
year plan.
The bill, however, does have
its dissidents.
The Energy and Climate
Director of South Carolina’s
Coastal Conservation League,
Hamilton Davis, said of the
Buffer Zone, “The BP oil spill
occurred 41 miles off the coast,
Senator Pushes
for Offshore
Drilling
BY CAROLINE STEC
"Taking in the Day,"
24x30 oil on canvas
by Susan Hecht.
"Hot and
Humid,"
36x36 Oil on
Canvas by
Leslie Pratt-
Thomas.
OP-ED
T
hroughout the lengthy
public process of the
rebuilding of the Sullivan’s
Island Elementary School (SIES), a
number of inaccurate statements
have repeatedly surfaced. Recent
references to these issues in local
publications have indicated that
the correct facts still require
presentation. Here are answers
to what we think are some of
the most important questions
that still appear inadequately
answered.
Q: Is SIES only for Sullivan’s
Island and Isle of Palm’s students?
A: All public schools in Charleston
County, wherever located, are
Charleston County Schools. They
do not belong exclusively to a
neighborhood. These schools
draw their students from the
constituent district (portion of the
county) in which they are located.
For SIES, last year’s enrollment
was 417 students, of whom
25 percent lived on Sullivan’s
Island, 39 percent lived on Isle of
Palms, and 36 percent were from
elsewhere in the District 2 East
Cooper community.
The elementary schools in East
Cooper are all excellent-rated
schools and are all almost at full
capacity. The assertion that we
can just send all of the students
to another school that has enough
seats off island is inaccurate.
Q: What does it mean that the
SIES is a “partial magnet” school?
Will local students not be eligible?
A: As a partial magnet school
for the East Cooper constituent
district, SIES is a part of the
district’s school choice offerings.
As has been done historically,
it enrolls all students from SI
and IOP. Once they have been
accommodated, any open seats
are allocated via a lottery system
to children from elsewhere in our
constituent district who apply.
This spring there were 138
East Cooper children on the
waiting list for SIES. While we
know that all our residents would
welcome children from any part
of Charleston County, the modest
increase in students for the new
school will come predominately
from the East Cooper constituent
district as the waiting list suggests.

Q: Was the size of the school
kept secret until a year ago?
A: No. The Mayor and the
Town administration attended
meetings in 2009 and 2010 with
the Superintendent and staff of
Charleston County School District
(CCSD). The District has shown
an unwavering and consistent
policy that any new elementary
school must accommodate at least
500 students. This information
was shared widely and openly.
The on-going discussions and
decisions on new CCSD schools
and re-building projects,
including SIES, have been very
public and covered in numerous
media outlets.
Although CCSD had an existing
lease from the Town that ran for
another 40 years, they required a
75-year lease before committing
to a new building. This required
new negotiations between CCSD
and the Town. Of necessity, initial
discussions by Town Council
on parts of these important
negotiations had to take place in
Executive Session to protect the
position of the Town. However,
before Council approved the
lease, it was discussed in several
open meetings of Council before
it was adopted.
The resulting lease reduced the
amount of land leased to CCSD
from almost 13 acres to just below
6 acres, ensured buffers between
the school and its neighbors, and
limited student enrollment and
building size.
Q: Did the SIES Parent Teacher
Association have building
design input before the Town?
A: As with any new building,
the desired functions had to be
detailed before the form could be
considered. CCSD engaged the
faculty and parents in discussions
of the activities and resources
that the new structure should
house and provide. However,
the size and architectural
design of the building were
not topics in these meetings,
nor should they have been.

Q: Why is the new school so big?
A: CCSD has a frm policy that
any new elementary school
must accommodate at least 500
students; the Town’s lease set that
minimum as its maximum. (Many
CCSD elementary schools house
many more than 500.) Given 500
students, the size was driven by
the academic and instructional
Op-Ed continues on page 4
Fact not Fiction about the
New Sullivan’s Island
Elementary School
BY MIKE PERKIS, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE OF SULLIVAN’S ISLAND
A
band of Sullivan’s Island
residents pushing for a vote
on the size of an elementary
school on the island are not
backing down as plans to begin
construction take shape.
As pressure mounts for the
grassroots group Islanders for
a Smaller School to sue the
Town of Sullivan’s Island for
dismissing its request to hold a
referendum on the scale of the
school, elected offcials and other
school proponents already are
anticipating the new Sullivan’s
Island Elementary School.
The long-standing legal
issue likely will end up in court
if activists’ demands for an
island-wide vote are not met by
October, assures Barbara Spell,
spokeswoman for the activist
group.
“People are very concerned
about not having the right to
vote,” says Spell, whose group
is aiming to raise about $20,000
from concerned residents to hire a
lawyer. Spell did not disclose how
much the group has collected so
far, though she says she is “very
gratifed about the response” from
donors seeking a lawsuit against
the Town.
“We are defnitely doing this
unless the Town Council wants
to do the right thing and hold a
referendum,” she says.
A petition certifed in October
by the Charleston County
Board of Elections garnered
261 signatures from island
voters - more than 15 percent
of the municipality’s population
as required by the state for a
referendum. Under state law, the
group has about a year to hold a
referendum after fling a petition.
The Town, Spell alleges, is
neglecting citizens’ rights to vote
on the issue.
“[Town] Council is not following
South Carolina law with what
they’re doing,” she asserts. “And
under South Carolina law it is
our right to a fle a suit.”
But Sullivan’s Island Town
Councilmember Jerry Kaynard
contends that the Council is
not obligated by law to hold a
public vote; the state requires
municipalities merely to consider
a referendum, he says.
“We are a government. We are a
public entity. We follow the law,”
says Kaynard.
The Town sought legal advice
from a private and inside attorney
before voting 6-1 in March of
this year against holding a
referendum, with Mayor Carl
Smith dissenting.
The design of the school,
drawn up by architectural frm
Cummings and McCrady, was
approved by the Charleston
County School District, which
now leases the site of the new
school from the Town. The
Charleston County School Board
of Trustees in April voted 6-3
against a referendum, cementing
the Town’s decision.
The district must follow
state and county mandates
that determine school sizes by
enrollment numbers. According to
district policy, county elementary
schools must house at least 500
students.
“We don’t have a veto over the
size of the school,” says Kaynard,
adding that the $24 million
public school is funded by county
tax dollars.
Critics welcome a new school
on the island, but generally
suggest dimensions closer to
the former 30,000 square-foot
elementary school. The planned
74,000 square-foot building,
Spell insists, will “exacerbate
traffc” and other problems on the
island, including potential storm
water runoff and increased utility
taxes.
“It’s the size - it doesn’t have
to be this big,” Spell says. “There
are other schools that provide an
excellent education that aren’t
this big in proportion.”
But Kaynard views a size
similar to the former school-
which housed students in
trailers before the main building’s
structure was deemed vulnerable
to earthquakes by authorities - as
a step backward in development
plans.
“Every year the school is
getting a little larger,” he says. “If
you build a smaller school, who
do you keep out?”
About 85 to 105 students on
Sullivan’s Island are now enrolled
in the school, which is slated to
open in early 2014.
Kaynard says the Town
has received multiple letters
supporting the school from
stakeholders around the area,
including on the Isle of Palms
and Mount Pleasant. If the Town
approved a referendum, he adds,
it should include votes from
constituents in outlying areas.
“What about the residents of
Isle of Palms? Do they not have
a say in the referendum?” asks
Kaynard. “Sullivan’s Island is
only one piece of the puzzle.”
Spell, however, argues that
the issue is exclusive to island
residents.
“This is a Sullivan’s Island
issue - we are the ones that would
be affected,” she said. “We aren’t
June 22, 2012
3
CIVIC
Lynn Pierotti
publisher
lynn@luckydognews.com
Kristin Hackler
managing editor
kristin@luckydognews.com
Swan Richards
senior graphic designer
swan@luckydognews.com
Jerry Plumb
graphic designer
jerry@luckydognews.com
Christian LeBlanc
Social Media
christian@luckydognews.com
Allison Young
allison@luckydognews.com
Lori McGee
sales manager
614-0901
lori@luckydognews.com
interns
Hannah Dockery
Caroline Stec
reporter
Jacob Flannick
resident photographer
Leo Fetter

Contributors:
Diane Oltorik
Dr. Brad Bodkin
Bob Hooper
Dimi Matouchev
Mary Pringle
Susan Herlong
Sarah Diaz
Dr. John Nelson
Dr. Bright McConnell
Meredith Nelson
Capt Geoff Bennett
Chris Tindal
Katherine A. Saenger

Published by:
Lucky Dog Publishing
of South Carolina, LLC
P.O. Box 837
Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482
843-886-NEWS
Submit your letters to the editor to:
info@luckydognews.com
Future deadline: June 27 for
our July 6 issue
Lucky Dog PubLi shi ng
of sc, LLc
Publisher of the Island Eye News, The
Island Connection and The Folly Current.
The Island Eye News, a wholly owned subsidiary
of Lucky Dog Publishing of SC LLC, is a free,
independent newspaper published every two
weeks and is for and about the Isle of Palms,
Sullivan’s Island, Goat Island and Dewees Island.
Copies are mailed free of charge to every ac-
tive mailbox in our coverage area and are also
available at area businesses and by subscription
to non-islanders. Subscriptions are $39/year
for non-residents.. Contributions of information,
pictures and articles are welcomed and are
used according to space limitations and news
value and cannot be returned except by special
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not necessarily refect the opinion of Lucky Dog
News, or its writers.
All advertising rates are listed at:
www.islandeyenews.com under “advertising”.
Isle of Palms
886-6428
www.iop.net

Tuesday, June 26
City Council Meeting
7p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Tuesday, July 7
Board of Zoning Appeals
5:30p.m.
1207 Palm Boulevard
Sullivan's Island
883-3198
www.sullivansisland-sc.
com
Wednesday, June 27
Tree Commission
7p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Mondat, July 2
Council Workshop
6p.m.
2050-B Middle Street
Tuesday, July 3
Municipal Court*
5:30p.m.
2050-B Middle
Street
* Bench Trials will be at a temporary Town Hall facility located behind the Fire Station, next to the Stith Park
(2050 Middle Street). Contact SI Clerk of Court directly at 883-5734 (Maria LoRusso) for payments or questions.
Civic Calendar
Recycle - Wednesday, June 27 - Recycle
 
Civic continues on page 4
Divide Widens Over School on Sullivan’s
BY JACOB FLANNICK
Isle of Palms, are we?”
Sullivan’s Island parent
Jennifer Smith suggests critics
of the school should consider
educational benefts.
Smith, who was drawn to the
“tight-knit social fabric” of the
island 10 years ago with her
husband and four children,
worries her ties to her children’s
education may thin without a
neighborhood school.
“It’s about our future
generations,” says Smith, who
has children in grades ffth,
fourth, second, and kindergarten.
“What does it come down to? The
kids.”
The divisive issue has already
exposed rifts between democratic
views among some citizens and
elected offcials.
Island resident Vince Graham,
a neighborhood developer,
says the Town’s reluctance to
hold another vote is “effectively
disenfranchising the citizens of
Sullivan’s Island.”
“Unfortunately, those who
manipulate the law hold a lot of
power in society,” he says. “Not
just for the short run, but for
the long run people are going
to be upset with their leaders.”
Councilmember Kaynard agrees
that the outcome of next election
may hinge partly on whether the
Town answers activists’ call for
the right to vote.
“Everybody has a right to a
ballot box,” he says. “If this is the
most important vote to [islanders]
during the next election, they can
cast their vote that way.”
Mayor Smith, in a letter to the
editor of the Island Eye News,
alleged that some petitioners were
“vilifed” by council members for
their opposition.
“A citizen can vote his or her
true convictions in the voting
booth, and maybe that is what
this Council does not want to
happen,” writes Mayor Smith,
who described the school as “out
of character for Sullivan’s Island.”
so the idea that drilling 40 to 50
miles off will protect us in the
event of a spill or anything like
that is inaccurate.”
Sen. Graham insists, however,
that the Act will not only reduce
our national debt, but create jobs
for South Carolinians. According
to the proposed bill, the revenue
from the drilling would be shared
among the federal government
(50%), the state of South Carolina
(37.5%), and the Land and Water
Conservation Fund (12.5%).
According to a recent report
created for the S.C. Energy
Forum, the S.C. Citizens for
Sound Conservation, and the
Palmetto Agribusiness Council
by Miley and Associates, offshore
drilling could bring in as much as
$87.5 million in sales, taxes, and
income, and create thousands
of jobs. Comparatively, however,
spending on travel or on behalf
of tourism in South Carolina
totaled $15 billion in 2010, and
more than $1.1 billion in state
and local tax revenues according
to a report by the South Carolina
Department of Parks, Recreation,
and Tourism. Additionally, the
tourism industry employs more
than 19,000 people in Charleston
county alone, with 11 other
counties boasting more than
1000 individuals each directly
employed in tourism.
“It makes sense for revenue
sharing, but I don’t believe the
resources exist so that South
Carolina will see any revenue
from these activities,” said Davis.
The next step for the bill is
review by the Senate Committee
on Energy and Natural Resources,
to which it has been referred.
For more info, visit http://
lgraham.senate.gov or contact
Kevin Bishop at (864) 250-1417.
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
4 June 22, 2012
Civic continues from page 3
Drilling continues from cover
T
he success of the Loan Closet continues to amaze me!
I am at the fre station many times a week, putting
items back in or getting others out. Folks call me all
the time. This past week I had an offer of a bathtub chair
with a back, something I have not had or felt a need to have,
but there it is for anyone that may need such an item. I also
continue to get calls for canes, but my thinking has always
been that canes are very inexpensive to buy, costing less
than $25, so I do not stock them. As long as I can stack
items “up,” I can manage, without using a step stool, to take
in a couple more items. I am still looking for a walker with
a seat!
I had an unusual request this past week for a pair of
crutches for a 10 year old. Sadly, I could not accommodate
the individual. Also recently, a woman having a knee
replacement needed a standing potty chair and a walker with
wheels. She told me she did not want to charge insurance
for these items in order to keep the cost of insurance down.
I hand delivered fyers to all the realtors telling them about
this service. I see it only getting busier as the summer goes
on! The City of IOP should be very proud of this service
that helps our citizens and our visitors, and I am happy to
coordinate this valuable service.
For more information, contact Diane at 324-1401.
IOP Loan Closet Thriving
BY DIANE OLTORIK
needs and the educational
specifcations that CCSD and the
State use for all schools. While
there are exceptions this building
was designed specifcally for our
location it is not like any other
school building.
Even with an enrollment
below 500, the new building
would not be much smaller.
Historic enrollment numbers
at SIES average in the 375-417
range and there are 445 slated
for enrollment next school year.
Based on current standards for
elementary schools, even if the
enrollment were capped at this
445 level, the building would
only be a few thousand square
feet smaller. Space requirements
are much greater than they were
when the old school was built.
The biggest driver of the size
of the new building is not the
small increase in enrollment, but
the change in school building
standards over the last 50 years.
We do not believe that anyone,
SI resident, parent, or Charleston
County taxpayer, wants to spend
2012 dollars on a 1960s school.
We all want an educational
facility that meets today’s and
tomorrow’s standards at least
as well as the old school met the
standards of its day. While we all
have varying perspectives, our
Town acted democratically, and
we have moved forward together
towards the future.
This article is also supported by
Sullivan’s Island Councilmembers
Jerry Kaynard, Hartley Cooper,
Mary Jane Watson, Madeleine
McGee, and Pat O’Neil.
Op-Ed continues from page 2
SIES Gone but not Forgotten
Demolition on the old Sullivan's Island Elementary School began in early June and is
nearing completion.
June 22, 2012
5
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
Pratt-Thomas arrived at the theme of this
show after noticing a recurring visual revealing
itself in many of her paintings. Pratt-Thomas
explains, “Representational painting is
generally composed of four geometric shapes;
the sphere, the cylinder, the cone, and the
cube. For example, in the fgure the head is
a sphere, the body is a cube, and arms, legs,
fngers, and toes are cylinders. A pear is a
sphere with a cone on top...you get the idea.
As a painter, I look for these shapes and the
way light defnes them.” Within the last year,
Pratt-Thomas has been noting a heart shape
(not a legitimate form of course) in many of
her pieces…say, within the branches of trees,
the edges of petals, the angle of a bird’s wing.
The concept of a show with the heart shape as
a theme evolved and came to fruition.
Of course, the heart shape has traditionally
symbolized love. The connection of Leslie
Pratt-Thomas’ work with a book signing for
Mary Alice Monroe’s latest novel seemed
ftting as the two women have collaborated
on a book cover in the past, as well as their
shared LOVE of the natural world.
Monroe’s latest novel, Beach House Memories,
continues the saga of her bestselling novel,
The Beach House. Beautifully wrought and
rich with keen insight, this is an unforgettable
tale of marriage, resilience, and one woman’s
private strength and commitment.
Celebrating its 11
th
anniversary this year,
Sandpiper Gallery has become a center of
the island art community. There is a casual
funky fair to Sullivan’s which is echoed in
Sandpiper Gallery. Fine pieces of art are
regularly carried away by happy barefooted
clients on their bicycle or golf carts. The
range of art represented at this gallery is very
eclectic, from fne paintings by some of the
same artists represented at sister gallery,
Edward Dare Gallery on Gallery Row, to a wide
variety of fne American craft. The gallery also
features pottery, exquisite jewelry, plus unique
works in wood, glass and metal. Paintings,
sculpture, pottery, and jewelry that celebrate
the colorful tapestry of the southern coastal
culture abound in this gallery.
Whether you are a local or visiting the
lowcountry, make sure you make the time
for a jaunt out to charming Sullivan’s Island,
just 10 minutes from Charleston, have a
memorable dining experience
at one of the many
restaurants and then
satisfy your soul at
Sandpiper Gallery.
Sandpiper Gallery
is located at 2201
Middle St, Sullivan’s
Island. For more
information, call
883-0200 or visit
sandpipergallery.net.
Sandpiper continues from cover
"Hanging in There," 30x15 oil on canvas by Sara
Jane Doberstein.
Beach House
Memories, the
latest novel by
Mary Alice Monroe.
6 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.SC
ISLE OF PALMS
Isle of Palms Fireworks
The City of Isle of Palms will be
hosting their annual freworks
display on front beach. Fireworks
will begin at dusk. Make sure
to get out to the beach early, as
traffc and parking can become
diffcult. This event is free and
open to the public.
Wild Dunes Independence Day
Family Fun Run
Runners are welcome to meet at
8 a.m. at the Grand Pavilion in
Wild Dunes for an early morning
run on the beach. Prizes will be
awarded for the top male and
female fnisher. Entry fee is $25
and includes a t-shirt. Please
pre-register at the Fitness Center
on The Village Plaza at least 24
hours in advance. Call 888-845-
8915 extension 7008 for more
information.
Wild Dunes Fourth of July
Cook Out
Wild Dunes will host an All-
American cookout at the Village
Plaza from 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Dinner includes grill favorites
such as hamburgers and
hotdogs with all the trimmings,
as well as BBQ chicken, pulled
pork, potato salad, baked beans,
and a special July 4 dessert.
Cost is $35 for adults and $12
for children ages 5 – 12 inclusive
of tax and gratuity. Children
ages 4 and under are free.
Reservations required. Call 888-
845-8915 extension 2307.
SULLIVAN’S ISLAND
Annual All-Day Celebrations
on Sullivan’s
The Town of Sullivan's Island
will host their annual island
celebration activities starting at
9 a.m. with a golf cart parade.
Golf carts line up at the Fire
Station on Middle Street and end
at the Island Club for family fun
festivities. Afterward, everyone
is welcome to bring their picnic
to the park and enjoy live music
at the gazebo. The night will
end with traditional freworks
surrounding the park from
behind the mound. For more info,
visit the Town of Sullivan’s Island
website at www.sullivansisland-
sc.com.
MOUNT PLEASANT
Patriots Point Fourth of July
Blast
The Patriots Point Blast is one
of the biggest events in the
lowcountry, with over 25,000
people in attendance. This year,
freworks will be launched from
a donated barge in the Harbor
instead of the USS Yorktown,
providing for an even bigger
display. The fight deck on
the Yorktown will be open to
spectators. The event is free and
open to the public, beginning
at 2 p.m. Patriots Point boasts
the biggest frework show in
Charleston and the lowcountry,
and with food vendors and live
music, the event is sure to be a
blast for the whole family. For
more information visit www.
patriotspoint.org or call 866-831-
1720.

Uncle Sam Jam
Charleston County Park and
Recreation Committee will be
hosting their annual Uncle Sam
Jam at the Mount Pleasant Pier.
Live music will be provided by
local favorite Permanent Vacation
and the pier, located at the foot
of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge,
provides the perfect location
to watch the frework show.
Beverages will be available for
purchase on-site, as well as
handspun milkshakes, made to
order sandwiches, and snacks
at the pier's Riverwatch Café.
Gates open at 7 p.m. and music
begins at 8 p.m. Only 800 tickets
will be sold, so get yours today!
Tickets are $10, or $8 in advance
for Charleston County residents.
The Mount Pleasant Pier is
located at the foot of the Ravenel
Bridge next to the Mount
Pleasant Waterfront Memorial
Park at 71 Harry Hallman Blvd.
For further information, call 796-
4386 or visit www.ccprc.com/
unclesamjam.
Fireworks, Festivals, and Fun!
A L I S T T O H E L P P L A N Y O U R 4 T H O F J U L Y F E S T I V I T I E S
<<ONLY EAST
ISLAND AD
June 22, 2012 7
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
T
he sights and sounds of a freworks display are a traditional
part of a 4
th
of July celebration. Unfortunately, freworks can
also lead to another annual tradition - a trip to the emergency
room. According to Dr. Brad Bodkin, Therapeutic Optometrist,
approximately 6400 Americans are treated annually for freworks-
related injuries during the 4
th
of July holiday period. And of those,
almost 1600 are treated for injuries to the eye.
“Every year, as many as 400 Americans lose sight in one or both
eyes due to freworks,” Dr. Bodkin stated. “We strongly encourage
people to attend only authorized public freworks displays conducted
by licensed operators. However, since freworks are legal in South
Carolina, we know there will be plenty of backyard freworks for those
wishing to celebrate at home.”
Dr. Bodkin provided these tips for those choosing to enjoy
their own freworks show:
• Always have adult supervision when lighting all freworks
• Always aim freworks away from people as well as away from
other objects that my cause a ricochet or explosion
• Use eye protection when lighting freworks
Dr. Bodkin also provided these eye-opening facts about
freworks-related eye injuries:
• Children under 14 account for 45% of freworks-related eye
injuries
• Almost half of freworks injuries happen to bystanders
• The freworks that cause the most injuries are bottle rockets,
frecrackers, and sparklers
Dr. Bodkin owns and practices at The Vision Center at Seaside
Farms located at 1956 Long Grove Drive, Suite 1 in Mount Pleasant.
Dr. Bodkin is a Fellow in the American Academy of Optometry and a
member of the American Optometric Association
Although freworks provide loads of excitement, don’t let careless behavior lead to a
hospital visit.
Keep Safety in Sight
this 4
th
of July
D R . B O D K I N P R O V I D E S H E L P F U L T I P S O N
H O W T O AV O I D I N J U R Y F R O M F I R E WO R K S
PROVIDED BY THE VISION CENTER
8 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.SC
COMPUTER CORNER
I
n the past couple of weeks
I have been dealing with
problems that I think are
common with most computer
users. If you receive an email
asking for information about
your personal email address,
passwords, bank accounts, or
any other personal information,
it is what is called “phishing” and
it’s not from who you think it is.
Why would someone need your
email address if they sent you an
email? These are all spammers,
or worse, someone wanting to
steal your secure information
and use it against you.
I had a client last week who
received an email stating that
he was eligible for an upgrade to
his Yahoo email service online.
He clicked on the “click here”
button and was taken to what he
thought was a Yahoo website. It
asked for his username or email
address and his password for his
Yahoo email account. He dutifully
put the info in and clicked
“send.” Guess what? In about
10 minutes he could not get into
his email service. He was locked
out. The attacker took over his
account and sent out a message
to all on his contacts that he
and his wife were attacked in
London, had lost all money, and
needed help. People
started calling their
cell phones wanting
to know how to
help. Unaware of the
spammer’s attack, he
and his wife had no
idea what was going
on. The attacker had
all emails from his
service forwarded
to another email
address so that none
stayed in his account
and he could not be
tracked.
It took numerous
calls to AT&T, and
fnally Yahoo, to be
able to even change
the password. Yahoo
started at $100 with
an end amount of
$1000 to fx the problem. My
client declined the “offer” and we
got everything back except about
24 hours of emails. The client has
since moved all emails to a new
service and has them downloaded
to the in-house computer using
Outlook. Yahoo is no longer used
and that email address has been
abandoned. Thank goodness a
potentially devastating attack
was avoided.
So remember, no email service,
bank, or credit card company is
going to send you an email needing
your personal password, under
any circumstances! If you have
any doubts regarding suspicious
emails, search out the phone
number using Google or a similar
search engine, and contact the
company immediately. Chances
are that you have received a
spam email. Never give out your
password in reply to an email;
it will only bite you in the “end”
(pun intended). As always I will
be happy to answer questions, so
if in doubt, call me.
Feel free to contact Bob with
questions or concerns. If you need
immediate assistance, call Rent
A Bob at 822-7794 or email at
rentabob@live.com.
Bob checks his email for spammers trying to hack into his
system.
Watch Out for Spammers
BY BOB HOOPER, AKA RENT A BOB
June 22, 2012 9
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.SC
SARAH'S BIRDS
O
n Tuesday, June 5, Greg Gress and Darrell Noisette at the
Sullivan’s Island Sewer Department stumbled upon a truly
remarkable, and out of the ordinary, spectacle. When walking
by one of the drying beds at the treatment facility, which are used to
store liquid bio-solids until properly dried, Noisette and Gress noticed
what they thought to be a Red-tailed Hawk that had stumbled into
the bed. Although hawks entering the beds accidentally are not too
unusual, the bird turned out to be a recently fedged frst year Bald
Eagle. Weighted down with sludge from the bed, the eagle could hardly
fy, so a quick-acting Gress contacted the Center for Birds of Prey. In
order to save the bird, employees at the Sewer Department attempted
to catch the eagle in a recycling bin to keep it from escaping without
being properly cleaned up. The bird was taken to the Center for Birds
of Prey, and specialists determined that not only was the bird covered
in sludge, but it had ingested some as well. To make matters worse,
the poor bird was covered in mites.
Mary Pringle, who helped admit the eagle to the hospital, contacted
Gress to follow up on the eagle’s health. Pringle informed Gress that,
while the bird regurgitated some of the sludge onto the examining table,
there was still considerable swelling from the remaining contents.
Fortunately, specialists were able to clean the bird’s eyes and mouth
which were extremely contaminated. Further, Pringle commented on
the status of the bird’s mite infestation. “The mites have been treated
and the crop is now empty and that problem seems to have resolved.
Now he will be able to get cleaned up and can start on a normal diet.”
Pringle was unsure how long the eagle would be at the clinic, but
she estimated that it would take at least a week or two of a good diet
of rats and fsh, as well as some observation, before the bird could
be released. “Because the Center is located in a perfect eagle habitat
along the Intercoastal Waterway just north of the Bulls Bay Golf
Course in Awendaw,” Pringle stated, “the best option may be to release
the bird in this area.”
Fortunately, the bird was young enough that a speedy recovery
should be on the way.
Mary Pringle of the Center for Birds of Prey holds the
contaminated eagle.
Injured Eagle Will Soar Again
E MP L O Y E E S AT S U L L I VA N ’ S S E WE R D E P T
R E S C U E T R A P P E D B I R D
BY HANNAH DOCKERY
T
he Red-winged Blackbird is
one of the most abundant
birds in North America.
This species can be found year-
round from the United States
to Costa Rica, and is found in
Canada only during the breeding
season. Males are a shiny black
with distinctive red and yellow
shoulder patches, which they
faunt during territorial displays.
Females are slightly smaller and
are a drab, streaky brown. Red-
winged Blackbirds are found
in salt marshes, rice felds, and
other open, grassy habitats. In the
winter, they congregate in huge
focks of up to a million birds.
These focks, which are notorious
for ravaging rice and corn crops,
often contain European starlings,
brown-headed cowbirds, and
other Blackbirds. The Red-winged
Blackbird is highly polygynous,
meaning that one male has many
female mates. Successful males
have multiple females nesting
in their territories—sometimes
as many as 15. It was originally
believed that females bred almost
exclusively with the male whose
territory they nested in; however,
with the advent of DNA analysis,
it was determined that females
often sneak off and mate with
males in neighboring territories.
Males, too, will sneak into other
males’ territories and mate with
multiple females. Females are
responsible for nest building
and caring for young, while
males spend most of their time
protecting their nesting females
from predators and defending
territories.
The Song of the Blackbird
O F A ME R I C A’ S MO S T P O P U L A R B I R D S
BY SARAH HARPER DIAZ
PHOTO BY SARAH DIAZ
A Red-winged
Blackbird.
10 June 22, 2012
I
had the pleasure of chatting
with Dorothea Benton Frank
at her home on Sullivan’s
Island to talk about her life, the
lowcountry, her crazy sense
of humor, and what inspires
her. Dorothea just released
her thirteenth bestseller, Porch
Lights, which hit stores on June
12. Dorothea is a brilliant writer
who is surprisingly humble about
her work and success. She loves
her fans and that is what keeps
her inspired and happy everyday
of her hectic life.
LM: Your stories make me
want to lean more about
history in the lowcountry. Is
that something you intend to
do when you sit down to write?
DBF: We take everything for
granted. It wasn’t necessary for
us to know and learn growing
up. I love the concept of being
a life long learner. That is what
I am doing with my writing from
here on in; I want to give my
readers more than just a story.
Like the history of Edgar Alan
Poe, who is weaved throughout
Porch Lights. Nobody cared
about him when he was alive,
but now 150 years after his
death everyone wants to claim
him. His story is fascinating.
LM: You were born and raised
on Sullivan’s Island. What
has changed the most since
your childhood?
DBF: There are too many laws
and rules, but there are a
lot more people here now so
maybe they need the additional
laws. It’s a less forgiving town
government than it used to be.
LM: What’s your favorite thing
to do when you are here?
DBF: Walk on the beach, of
course.
LM: You live here and also in
New York. Your tour schedule
brings you to Charleston
several times and all over
the country through the
summer. What do you do to
unwind; fnd your “peace” and
“calmness”?
DBF: I come here to Sullivan’s
Island. I live here four months
out of the year and the
remaining eight months I live
in New Jersey. My husband’s
business is based there. I just
come here, that’s all I need. I
don’t need some big old fancy
home in the south of France. I
just like to “be.” When I’m here
you will fnd me sitting on my
porch. I love to sit on my porch
at night by myself. Be quiet. I
am not a party animal; I don’t
like talking on the phone. I like
to dine around the island. I
had a piece of salmon the other
night at Atlanticville that was as
good as I have had anywhere in
the world. I had some sushi at
Station 22 that was fabulous.
They have these guys bring all
their equipment and prepare the
fsh right there. It was amazing.
I love High Thyme, and Kenny
the owner is a hoot and a half.
He is awfully nice to me. Café
Medley is a favorite of mine and
the owner Michelle is adorable.
LM: When I arrived here at
your home and walked up
the steps, I really felt I was
coming home to see my long-
lost best friend. So many of
your readers feel that way
about you. You make us
laugh and forget about our
everyday troubles.
DBF: That’s the only way to be. If
you don’t have a sense of humor
you will die. You will just cry
yourself through every day of the
rest of your life.
LM: What is your process for
writing one of your amazing
southern tales?
DBF: I do research for about
three months and I have about
six months to write it, then it
goes to my editor. Then the book
goes to the copy editor, or as
we call them, the “punctuation
police.” For instance, if there is a
character that says “holy moley,”
you can’t have another character
say holy moley. If you have Uncle
John with a fu in chapter two,
you need to ask him how he’s
feeling in chapter three. Mainly
they focus on punctuation and
grammar. From there it goes into
production so if I turn it in on
April 4 it will be in production by
April 20.
There are so many books I would
have liked to been able to add
more to. In Porch Lights, I would
have written a scene where the
daughter weeps with her mother.
The daughter Jackie never wants
her mother, Annie, to see her
sweat. I would have liked to just
slap the daughter and tell her to
take a deep breath. And tell her
mother Annie to quit worrying so
much, but that’s how Annie loves.
Like in the book Five Languages of
Love, Annie loves by cleaning your
house, fussing around, buying
you treats, and pampering you,
and it drives her daughter insane.
That’s the whole thing with Annie.
Jackie doesn’t like her mother
any more. She’s too much, she
can’t take it here. Then she sees
her mother is lonely and that kills
her. She never thought of her
mother as a loving human being
that might be lonely.
There is another aspect in
the book about Annie and her
best friend Deb that applies to
people in the lowcountry and
it’s about “knowing.” When you
are here you know in your gut
when something is happening. I
think it’s that your mind relaxes
enough so that you become a
little more intuitive, you become
sympathetic with your fellow
man, and you feel more for other
people.
LM: What inspires you to be so
funny?
DBF: I’m the youngest of fve
children. If you want to get
heard, you better be clever.
LM: What is on your bedside
table?
DBF: The Possibly of You by
Pam Redmond, and I’m reading
Adriana Trigiani’s book The
Shoemaker’s Wife, and Meg
Wolitzer’s book The Ten Year
Nap.
LM: So have you started on
your next book and will it be a
lowcountry tale?
DBF: Yes, and of course! It’s
about a woman from Atlanta. I’m
not sure what made me think of
this but one day I stood up and
said why in the world would a
woman with a brain in her head
have a full time career, give birth
to children, take care of the
children, run the house, and do
everything? Why do it? When
the husband comes in from
work and asks what’s for dinner
and says, “I’m so tired, don’t
torture me, blah blah blah,” and
your kids are asking for $20
and for you to drive them to the
mall…who in their right mind
really wants this job? So that
is what my new book is about.
It’s contrasting the life of this
woman from Atlanta who ends
up living in Josephine Pinckney’s
house in downtown Charleston
with Josephine Pinckney, who
by the way never married. So
maybe she knows something we
don’t. Although she did die alone
and she died lonely. So who has
it better? Where is the balance?
What have we done to ourselves
with this women’s lib? It’s too
much. So this next book is about
is it worth it.
LM: When can we expect your
new book?
DBF: By the second week in next
June. They just keep cranking
them out of me.
When I started reading Porch
Lights I had diffculty putting
it down. It’s set right here on
Sullivan’s Island, and contains
all the magic and beauty that
goes along with that. It’s a tale of
a southern family spanning three
generations that will make you
laugh, cry, and leave you wanting
more…and we always do!
To learn more about Dorothea
Benton Frank, her tour schedule,
and her books, visit www.
dotfrank.com.
A Southern Sit-down with Dorothea Benton Frank
BY LORI MCGEE
June 22, 2012 11
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
NATURE & WILDLIFE
O
ne of the neatest things
about being a botanist
is that there is always a
surprise right around the corner.
We sometimes fall into the trap
of thinking that everything
around us is hum-drum and
uninteresting, and then boom!
Something really wonderful, or
otherwise remarkable, appears.
Why, just the other day I was
browsing around in a ditch near
Walterboro, and I found a plant
new to South Carolina, a humble
little thing in the carrot family
called Bowlesia incana (I don’t
even think it has a common
name. Sorry.) Although Bowlesia
won’t win any beauty contests,
and probably will never provide
a cure for cancer (but you never
know until you investigate it), it
is important to know that this
species now has at least a toe-
hold in the state, and that we
might expect it to become more
common.
This week’s Mystery Plant is
also remarkable. Although it is a
native species, it is not commonly
seen…and it is surely one of
the prettiest wildfowers of the
southeast. This plant is a wild
orchid, and it is “wild” in more
than one way. This species has a
slender, upright stem bearing a
number of smooth, strap-shaped
leaves. A number of fowers are
loosely arranged along the upper
end of the fowering stalk. The
fowers tend to be somewhat
greenish, or even a bit yellowish or
snowy white. As with all orchids,
there are three sepals and three
petals. The two uppermost petals
are small and squatty, but the
lowermost petal is modifed into
what botanists call a “lip.” In this
case, the lip is quite distinctive,
and it rather easily differentiates
this species from its relatives.
This marvelous lip is divided into
three portions, or segments, and
each segment is fnely divided into
numerous threadlike divisions. A
dramatic sort of raggedy-fringed
effect is produced. At the base of
the fower is a very slender tube
called a “spur” an inch or so
long and projecting backward. If
pollination occurs successfully,
a small capsule will develop from
the ovary, eventually producing
a very large number of very
small seeds (This is a hallmark
characteristic of all orchids).
Our little forest friend
is fairly widespread here
in South Carolina, and
indeed, is known nearly all
of eastern North America.
It is fond of wet woods,
often growing with other
species, and is frequently
seen in places featuring
a lot of Sphagnum
moss. Despite its wide
distribution, however,
this species is not very
common anywhere, and
its populations usually
consist of fairly small numbers
of individual plants. This plant
may indeed deserve attention as
a species of concern, which is
its bureaucratic ranking here in
my state. Unfortunately, many
orchid species are declining in
population numbers due in large
part to habitat loss, but also, I am
chagrined to say, by overzealous
collection by botanists and orchid-
growers. The appreciation and
study of orchids is a fascinating
aspect of botany, and no matter
where you live, there are bound
to be local species to learn about.
John Nelson is the curator of
the Herbarium at the University of
South Carolina, in the Department
of Biological Sciences, located in
Columbia. As a public service,
the Herbarium offers free
plant identifcations. For more
information, visit www.herbarium.
org or call 803-777-8196. For
plenty of information on a number
of Southeastern orchids, consider
Wild Orchids of South Carolina by
J. A. Fowler, published in 2005 by
the USC Press.
Can You Guess This Week’s Wildfower?
BOTANI ST DR. NELSON DESCRI BES THI S WEEK’ S MYSTERY PLANT
BY DR. JOHN NELSON
A N S W E R : “ R a g g e d f r i n g e d - o r c h i d , ” P l a t a n t h e r a l a c e r a
July 31 June 23 Is l and Eye Cal endar
Saturday, June 23
Explore Ashem
This remarkable 67-acre property
neighbors one of the most
signifcant sites in the state;
Charles Towne Landing. Until last
year it remained in private hands.
Now it belongs to you. Join us and
be one of the frst to uncover this
site’s amazing stories. Advance
registration is required. 9 a.m.-12
p.m. Fee: $6. For more info, call
795-4386, or visit www.ccprc.com.
VFW Fish Fry
Join the Isle of Palms VFW for their
highly anticipated Fish Fry dinner.
6 p.m. – 8 p.m. $8/plate. For more
info, call 886-6840. 1004 Ocean
Blvd, next to the Windjammer.
Sunday, June 24
High Thyme Sunday
Afternoon Music
From 5:30 to 8:30 every Sunday,
enjoy live music at High Thyme
restaurant on Sullivan’s Island.
This Sunday will feature Jordan
Igoe and Aaron Firetag. 2213 C
Middle Street. For more info, visit
www.highthymecuisine.com or call
883-3536.
Monday, June 25
Adventure Camp at Palmetto
Islands: Tour SUP and Rock Climb
Campers will experience this
historic Hawaiian craft on the lake
at James Island County Park. This
week also includes rock climbing
where campers will learn the
basics of knot tying, belaying, and
climbing technique at the climbing
wall. June 25-29. 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Meet at Palmetto Islands County
Park. Age: 10-12. Fee: $198. For
more info, call 795-4386, or visit
www.ccprc.com.
tueSday, June 26
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
Every Tuesday from 7 p.m. - 10
p.m. enjoy the sweet acoustic
sounds of Jim and Whitt Algar as
they cover a wide variety of popular
songs from Elvis to Eric Clapton.
2063 Middle Street Sullivan’s
Island. For more info, call 883-
9452 or visit www.atlanticville.net.
WedneSday, June 27
Sundown Festival featuring
Rickey Godfrey & the Beach-
Boogie-Blues Kings
Enjoy live music by Rick Godfrey
and his all-star band along with
southern lawn games, children’s
infatables, and evening train
rides. Night Heron Grill will be
open extended hours. Admission
is complimentary and open to the
public. Music begins at 6:30 p.m.
at Kiawah Island’s Night Heron
Park. For more info, call Kiawah
Town Hall at 786-9166 or visit
www.kiawahisland.org.
Saturday, June 30
SI Fire & Rescue Fish Fry
Enjoy fried fsh, hush puppies, and
all the fxins for $5, along with live
music, jump castles, and more.
Hot dogs also available. 5 p.m. – 8
p.m. under the Big Tin (Fish Fry
Shack near Fort Moultrie). Tickets
available at Fire Station, Town
Hall, Piggly Wiggly at Sea Island
Shopping Center (Mt. Pleasant)
and Simmons Seafood.
Sunday, July 1
High Thyme Sunday
Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 24.
tueSday, July 3
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 26.
WedneSday, July 4
HAPPY FOURTH OF JULY!
See a list of 4
th
of July events on
page 6.
4
th
of July on Sullivan’s
The annual Middle Street Parade
begins at 9 a.m., with golf carts
lining up at the fre station and
ending at the Island Club at
Station 14 ½ for family fun and
festivities. Picniking welcome at
the park with live music in the
gazebo. Fireworks will be launched
from behind the Mound soon after
dark. For more info, visit www.
sullivansisland-sc.com.
Saturday, July 8
Local Sea Kayak Trips - Morgan
Creek to Dewees Inlet
Departing from the IOP Marina
we’ll explore Morgan Creek and
head out to Dewees Inlet where
we can do some beach combing.
For our return trip, we can paddle
back the way we came or take the
Intracoastal Waterway. 10:30 a.m.-
3 p.m. Age: 16 & up. Fee: $48. For
more info, call 795-4386 or visit
www.ccprc.com.
Sunday, July 8
High Thyme Sunday
Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 24.
Monday, July 9
Petite Picasso Camp
July 9 – 13 for ages 5 – 7. Centered
on the theme “Lowcountry
Scenes,” kids will enjoy activities
from acrylic painting on canvas
to watercolor weaving and surfer
dude bracelets. 9 a.m. – noon.
$195. Fear No Easel, 1960 Riviera
Dr Suite E. For more info, visit
www.fearnoeasel.com.
tueSday, July 10
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 26.
WedneSday, July 11
Charleston Summer
Classic I Horse Show
July 11-15 at Mullet Hall
Equestrian Center on Johns
Island. Events ongoing throughout
the day. This AA-rated hunter/
jumper horse show hosted by the
Classic Company is celebrating
its 20th Anniversary! Open to
spectators. For more information,
call 768-5503 or visit www.
classiccompany.com.
Saturday, July 14
Shaggin’ on the Cooper
Spend an evening dancing on the
scenic Mount Pleasant Pier to live
classic oldies and beach music by
the Port Authority Band! Beverages
will be available for purchase
on-site. To purchase tickets, call
795-4386 or visit www.ccprc.
com. Age: 3 & up. Fee: $10/$8
CCR Discount/$10 on-site if still
available. 7 – 11 p.m.
Sunday, July 15
High Thyme Sunday
Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 24.
Monday, July 16
Bishop Gadsden
Community Market
Local food, produce from area
farmers, and art will be available
for sale at Bishop Gadsden from
3:30 – 6 p.m. Vendors include
Joseph Fields Farm, King of Pops,
CoCo’s Mini Donuts, and Tazzo
Beverages. Live music. Bishop
Gadsden is located on Camp
Road between Folly and Riverland
roads on James Island. For more
info, call 406-6546 or visit www.
bishopadsden.org.
Petite Picasso Camp
July 16 - 19 for ages 8 –
12. Centered on the theme
“Lowcountry Animals,” kids
will enjoy activities from acrylic
painting on canvas to watercolor
weaving and surfer dude bracelets.
9 a.m. – noon. $195. Fear No
Easel, 1960 Riviera Dr Suite E. For
more info, visit.fearnoeasel.com
tueSday, July 17
Charleston Summer
Classic II Horse Show
July 17-21 at Mullet Hall
Equestrian Center on Johns
Island. Events ongoing throughout
the day. This AA-rated hunter/
jumper horse show hosted by the
Classic Company is celebrating
its 20th Anniversary! Open to
spectators. For more information,
call 768-5503 or visit www.
classiccompany.com.
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 26.
Friday, July 20
Movies at the Mount Pleasant
Pier: The Muppets (2011)
Join us on the Great Lawn at the
Town of Mount Pleasant Memorial
Waterfront Park for movies under
the stars! Bring a chair or blanket
and enjoy a family-friendly flm.
Event admission is free and movies
begin around sundown. For more
info, call 795-4386, or visit www.
ccprc.com.
Saturday, July 21
Redux Summer Art
Institute Exhibition
The high school Summer Art
Institute (SAI) will be working
on an exhibition at Redux
gallery from July 21 -28, with
an opening reception to be held
on Saturday July 21, from 6 - 9
p.m. Admission is free. 136 St.
Philips St, downtown Charleston.
For more info, visit www.
reduxstudios.org
Sunday, July 22
High Thyme Sunday
Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 24.
Monday, July 23
Petite Picasso Camp ages 6 - 8
July 23- 26 for ages 6 - 8. Centered
on the theme “C’est La Vie,” kids
will enjoy activities from acrylic
painting on canvas to watercolor
weaving and surfer dude bracelets.
Add in ballet classes for a well-
rounded creative camp! 9:30 a.m.
– 2:30 p.m. $285. Fear No Easel,
1960 Riviera Dr Suite E. For more
info, visit www.fearnoeasel.com.
Petite Picasso Camp ages 5 - 7
July 23 - 26 for ages 5 - 7.
Centered on the theme “Pirates
and Mermaids,” kids will enjoy
activities from acrylic painting on
canvas to watercolor weaving and
surfer dude bracelets. 9:30 a.m. –
11 a.m. $78. Fear No Easel, 1960
Riviera Dr Suite E. For more info,
visit www.fearnoeasel.com
Petite Picasso Camp
July 23 - 26 for ages 6 - 8.
Centered on the theme “France,”
kids will enjoy activities from
acrylic painting on canvas to
watercolor weaving and surfer
dude bracelets. 12:30 – 2:30 p.m.
$96. Fear No Easel, 1960 Riviera
Dr Suite E. For more info, visit
www.fearnoeasel.com
tueSday, July 24
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 26.
thurSday, July 26
Parks for Tomorrow –
Public Input Session
Open to the public, this session
will gather input on topics
including parks, recreation and
trails to incorporate into the
master plan for the Charleston
County Park and Recreation
Commission. St. James Santee
Elementary School cafeteria in
McClellanville from 7 – 8:30 p.m.
For more information, visit www.
ccprc.com/ParksforTomorrow.
Sunday, July 29
High Thyme Sunday
Afternoon Music
See Sunday, June 24.
Monday, July 30
Petite Picasso Camp
July 30 – August 2 for ages 8
a.m. – 12p.m. Centered on the
theme “Lowcountry Scenes,” kids
will enjoy activities from acrylic
painting on canvas to watercolor
weaving and surfer dude bracelets.
9 a.m. – noon. $195. Fear No
Easel, 1960 Riviera Dr Suite E. For
more info, visit fearnoeasel.com.
tueSday, July 31
Algar Rhythms at Atlanticville
See Tuesday, June 26.
14 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
W
ith more than 10 facilities in the
Charleston County area, not
counting a multitude of managed
boat landings, Charleston County Parks
and Recreation (CCPRC) is a vital part of the
livability aspect of Charleston County. Each
year, the parks continue to grow both their
programs and facilities through new project
builds, new program development, and the
occasional acquiring of new park land.
This summer, however, CCPRC is reaching
out to Charleston County residents and
asking, “What do you want to see in your
community park system?”
Called the Parks for Tomorrow plan, the
campaign will gather input from residents
regarding what they would like to see over
the next 10 years in their parks, recreation,
and trails. The ideas will then be incorporated
into the agency’s master plan, taking into
consideration the existing CCPRC facilities,
programs, and services. This program will
not only determine the current and future
level of CCPRC service in Charleston County,
it will also prioritize the needs and wishes
for upgrading existing and potentially new
facilities and services.
Thanks to the help of the nationally
renowned parks and recreation consulting
frm GreenPlay, LLC, CCPRC
will be able to determine the
timing, phasing, funding, and
other details for these projects
and services.
In order to gather the
necessary information, CCPRC
will be hosting a series of
workshops throughout the
Charleston County area during
the months of June and July.
Additionally, they will be
conducting a survey throughout
a statistically signifcant
portion of Charleston County
households during the same
time. The results will then be
explored by several internal
and external focus groups of select key
community leaders as well as CCPRC staff
and commissioners, who will look into areas
such as special events, outdoor recreation,
trails, community enrichment, and outreach
in further detail.
Public Workshops will be held on Tuesday,
July 24, at the Burke High School media
center, located at 244 President Street in
downtown Charleston; Wednesday, July 25,
at the Baptist Hill High School cafeteria,
located at 5117 Baptist Hill Road on Younge’s
Island; and on Thursday, July 26 at St. James
Santee Elementary School cafeteria, located
at 8900 Highway 17 North in McClellanville.
The mission of the Charleston County Park
and Recreation Commission is to improve
the quality of life in Charleston County by
offering a diverse system of park facilities,
programs, and services. For more information
on Parks for Tomorrow, visit www.ccprc.com/
ParksforTomorrow or call 795-4386.
What do You See in Your Parks?
PROGRAM ASKS RESI DENT S WHAT T HEY NEED I N F UT URE PARKS, RECREAT I ON, AND T RAI L S
BY KRISTIN HACKLER
15 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
I
t was a real “show up” party this year
with the frst ever fundraiser in the
park on the mound, overlooking the
waterways and town of Sullivan’s Island
on Earth Day weekend, April 21. The park
mound was the setting for tasty cuisine
and drinks from island restaurants and
our local community businesses. Our host
musicians Nashville Songwriters in the Round
provided entertainment and an intimate,
casual evening as guests surrounded the
stage. The four musicians played together in
harmony and took turns playing separately,
often stopping to chat with the crowd and comment
about a song or tell a humorous story.
With the community of 300 attendees “showing
up” once again, the park foundation raised
$30,000! A special appreciation to the 300
supporters who attended and our community
sponsors who contributed to this event. Stay
tuned for next years event!
For more information, visit siparkfoundation.com
On the Mound in the Round
FI RST SUL L I VAN’ S I SL AND PARK FOUNDATI ON
FUNDRAI SER A HUGE SUCCESS
BY SUSAN HERLONG
Hughes Rentals
KEVCO
Sullivan’s Restaurant
Poe’s Tavern
Dunes Properties - Tim Reese
Home Team BBQ
Cafe Medley
Exit Realty
TBonz Restaurant Group
Island Eye News
Buzz Off Mosquito
Carolina One Real Estate -
Everett Presson
High Thyme Restaurant
The Co-Op
Beachside Vacations Inc.
Phillip W. Smith General
Contractors, Inc.
Triangle Char & Bar
Sam Schirmer Insurance
Agency
Yard Works Landscaping
Atlanticville
Station 22 Restaurant & Bar
East Islands Real Estate -
Ashley Haynes
Prolegal Copies (PLC)
Daly & Sawyer Construction
Herlong & Associates
Architecture
Pearlstine Distributors
Brown Meihaus Construction Co.
Kirsten Moran Studio/gd
Bottles Beverage Superstore
Taco Mamacita
Ilderton Contractors
BiLo
Sandpiper Gallery
Dunleavys Pub
Brought to you by the Sullivan’s
Island Park Foundation
Thank you to all the sponsors of the
2012 Round on the Mound
PHOTOS BY SUSAN HERLONG
16 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
ASK THE DOCTOR
T
urn on the television and
chances are you will see an
advertisement for hormone
replacement therapy. But what
exactly is hormone replacement
therapy, and are all hormone
therapy programs the same? Dr.
Bright McConnell III of FitMed
Partners breaks down the facts.
What is Hormone Replacement
Therapy?
Hormone replacement therapy is
the process of restoring hormones
to a clinically appropriate level.
As people age, their hormone
levels decrease while their risk
factors for conditions like heart
disease and diabetes increases.
Hormone replacement therapy
provides signifcant health
improvement for patients forty
years of age and older. Benefts
include increased energy,
improved muscle mass, weight
loss, disease management and
prevention, heightened libido,
improved cognitive function and
mental health.
What type of Hormone
Replacement Therapy should I
use?
There are different types of
hormone replacement therapies
available. Dr. McConnell advises
only considering the Bioidentical
Hormone Replacement Therapy,
“Medical science evidence and
outcomes support the safe use of
hormones produced by the body
naturally.” McConnell explains.
Conversely, synthetic hormones
should be avoided.
What symptoms does Hormone
Replacement Therapy relieve?
People turn to hormone
replacement therapy to relieve
symptoms like energy loss,
weight gain, loss of libido, hot
fashes, and erectile dysfunction.
Furthermore, hormones can
have an added beneft correctly
managed and tailored to each
individual. A comprehensive
evaluation including an
extensive blood panel enables
FitMed to customize each dose
for the patient. Further, the
routine management of the
patient and their response
to the hormone replacement
therapy is critical to achieving
positive results. “If given at the
appropriate levels, Bioidentical
Hormone Replacement Therapy
(BHRT) can lower the risk of
heart disease, help patients
maintain bone density, optimize
metabolism, and maintain
cognitive function” McConnell
explains.
What factors should I look at
when choosing a Hormone
Replacement Therapy program?
Baseline and Follow-up
laBoratory testing
Each patient’s BHRT should
begin with a baseline. A baseline
provides the patient with a snap
shot of their current hormonal
health. It also gives the patient
a clear picture of their nutrient
defciencies, cognitive health,
current ftness, and disease risk.
Therapy should be monitored
with serial blood tests.
Cost
FitMed is signifcantly less
expensive than competitors.
Some hormone therapies are
costly without providing all of
the benefts of BHRT. FitMed
provides a document to self-
fle with health insurance for
reimbursement as appropriate.
We do not fle health insurance.
Health savings accounts are
a good way to invest in your
ongoing health.
physiCian
Check for board certifcation,
age management training, and
years of experience in preventive
medicine such as Biodentical
Hormone Replacement Therapy
(BHRT), age management,
nutrition, ftness and related
areas of expertise. Start with a
consultation to fnd out more.
Ensure that individual time
with the physician is a part
of the evaluation and ongoing
BHRT program. Inquire about
routine blood panels to monitor
and adjust hormone levels and
access to the physician.
Consider how the hormone
is administered
Hormone therapy can come
in the form of a pill, cream,
injection, or pellet. Dr.
McConnell advises to avoid pellet
hormone therapy, as it may be
diffcult to modify dosing when
necessary. Hormones also have
different effects, depending upon
whether they are given orally or
as a cream. Dosage form should
be tailored to a patient’s needs
and risk factors.
don’t Forget Fitness and nutrition
Hormone therapy can be
substantially more effective when
coupled with an individualized
ftness and nutrition plan.
FitMed uses the science of
genomics to tailor each patient’s
nutrition plan genetically for
optimum results.
Dr. McConnell’s expert
advice is based on scientifc
evidence and three decades of
experience. Patient treatment
plans are individualized using
diagnostic, laboratory, and one-
on-one physician evaluations
to determine each patient’s
best course of action. FitMed
Partners/Charleston Sports
Medicine is located at 900 Island
Park Drive on Daniel Island. For
more information, visit www.
ftmedpartners.com or call 284-
5720. Do you have a question for
Dr. McConnell? Send it to Health@
luckydognews.com.
Hormone Replacement Therapy: Get The Facts!
H O W H O R MO N E R E P L A C E ME N T T H E R A P Y WO R K S
BY DR. BRIGHT MCCONNELL
A
hhh, summertime! Time
to go on vacation. Pack
your bags...you are about
to embark on a few days with no
housekeeping, grocery shopping,
laundry, household repairs, trips
to the gym...wait, WHAT? You
forgot to pack your exercise?
Don’t skip exercising just
because you haven’t made a plan
to maintain your ftness while
on vacation. You work too hard
to let it all go, even if only for a
week or so. We all know how
it works – a week or two out of
your usual routine can result
in an even longer return to your
good habits when you get home.
Instead, take advantage of a week
away from your gym or your
trainer to get out of your workout
rut and experience some new
activities! With a little planning
and creativity, you can return
home with more motivation and
excitement to get back to your routine.
Here are some tips to help you keep up with exercise in some form
while you are on vacation:
• Make sure your hotel has a ftness center. Going to the gym
isn’t always the same experience. Using different types of
equipment than what you are accustomed to can present
challenges for your muscles, making even the same exercises
seem different.
• Check the internet or ask at the front desk for information on
nearby gyms that offer drop-in classes. Taking a class with a
different instructor can be refreshing! Don’t forget that vacation
is a great time to treat yourself. I often attempt to book a
session with a personal trainer when I am away from home. If
you don’t usually splurge on personal training, treat yourself!
You just might learn something to use back home.
• No gym in the area, and no ftness center on the premises?
Walk, run, bike, or swim everyday. And of course you can be
creative with what you’ve got. Staying in a high-rise? Walk the
stairs. Over and over and over. Is there a park close by? Many
offer ftness “trails” with exercise stations.
• Got a foor? Of course you do! Get on it, complete about 10
minutes of stretching, and do push-ups and sit-ups. And then
do a few more.
Whatever type of exercise you choose to do, try to get it done frst
thing in the morning. Otherwise, family plans, indulgent meals, the
afternoon adult beverage (you ARE on vacation!), and of course, just
being “vacay-lazy,” may stand in your way.
Remember, just because you are on vacation doesn’t mean your
ftness has to be forgotten. Pack your exercise, and you just might
return home with no extra baggage!
Meredith Nelson, M.Ed, is the owner of PrimeTime Fitness, Inc, on
Sullivan’s Island. Certifed through AFAA, ACE, and TPI as a group
ftness instructor, personal trainer, and golf ftness professional,
Meredith has been bringing ftness to the East Cooper area for twenty
years. PrimeTime Fitness offers group ftness classes, indoor cycling,
private yoga, personal training, massage therapy, golf ftness training,
and monthly gym memberships. Meredith divides her time between
the gym on Sullivan’s Island and limited in-home training on Daniel
Island, where she resides along with her husband Mark. You can
reach Meredith with your ftness questions at 883-0101, or meredith@
primetimeft.net.
Going on Vacation?
Pack Your Exercise!
T I P S T O S TAY F I T WH I L E Y O U T R AV E L
BY MEREDITH NELSON, M.ED., OWNER, PRIMETIME FITNESS
June 22, 2012 18
PETS
P
et owners agree that your pet is
considered a member of the family.
Therefore, losing your pet could be
devastating to you and possibly even fatal for
your pet.
Animal shelters end up with millions of
animals every year with only 15-20 percent
of dogs and less than 2 percent of cats
fnding their way back to their owners. Those
numbers get even worse after big storms,
freworks, or disasters like a hurricane. Even
the most diligent pet owner is at risk for their
pet to slip out of its collar or harness, escape
through the front door during a Fourth of
July party, slip through a non-screened
window, or jump out of a car window during
a hurricane evacuation.
Although collars and tags are important
and certainly benefcial when worn by the pet,
they’re at risk for breaking, fading, becoming
scratched, or even falling off the animal.
Should this occur, there is no way to determine
to whom the animal belongs…unless the pet is
microchipped. Microchipping is a permanent
means of identifcation for your pet. Unlike
collars and tags which may be broken or
unreadable, microchips are placed under the
skin of the pet, providing a permanent means
of identifcation. Microchipping allows the
best possible chance of a bringing a lost or
stolen pet back to their family.
To paraphrase a popular
advertising campaign:
Losing a pet = Heartbreaking
Microchipping your pet = $50
Peace of mind = Priceless
Implanting a microchip is safe and easy and
can be performed during a routine visit to the
veterinarian. It is commonly performed during
routine surgeries like spaying or neutering. A
microchip is a small, electronic chip enclosed
in a glass case that is about the size of a grain
of rice. It is injected under the skin using a
needle. If your pet is lost, a scanner activates
the chip and the identifcation number of the
chip is read by the scanner. If a lost animal
is brought to a veterinary hospital or shelter,
one of the frst things they do is a scan for a
microchip. In fact, Charleston was one of the
frst municipalities to
pass a law requiring
all shelters to scan
for microchips.
Studies have shown
that approximately
75 percent of lost
dogs that had been
microchipped were
returned to their
owners because
of the microchip,
whereas only about
22 percent of dogs
are returned to their
owners when they do
not have a microchip.
The story is really
sad for cats, in that
less than 2 percent
of non-microchipped
cats are returned to
their families. Cats
with microchips fnd
their owners nearly
40 percent of the
time. There have also
been reports of dogs
being reunited with
their family years after being lost because
the microchip was detected by a shelter or
veterinary hospital. Microchips have also
been responsible for reuniting pets lost as far
as 1000 miles away from their homes.
All you need to do is tell your veterinarian
that you want your pet microchipped. Then be
sure that the chip is registered in a national
database. Often your veterinarian does this
for you, but you need to be sure to update
information as it changes by logging onto the
microchip website.
Finally, make sure
your pet maintains
a healthy weight
because it is harder to
pick up microchips in
obese animals.
When dogs get
anxious from the
sound of freworks, they become irrational
and try to run away. The same thing happens
during a frantic hurricane evacuation.
Don’t let your pet be on the wrong side of
the statistics mentioned in this article. Get
your pet microchipped before the freworks.
That way you’ll be prepared for all sorts of
unpredictable events, as well as a hurricane
evacuation, if it should happen this fall.
For more information on microchipping,
contact your local veterinarian.
Ensure Your Pet is Homeward Bound
MI C R O C H I P S H E L P L O S T P E T S R E T U R N T O T H E I R O WN E R S
BY DR. KATHERINE SAENGER
A lost dog turned into an animal shelter is scanned for a microchip in hopes of returning
him to his family.
19 June 22, 2012
H
ere’s to another great competition
and another fantastic year with
unbelievable sculptures! This
year, an astounding 48 teams registered
to compete in the annual sand sculpting
competition on the IOP Front Beach.

Some facts and fgures:
Children category = 7 sites
Young Adult category = 3 sites
Family category = 24 sites
Adult category = 14 sites
Total = 48 sites
Listed are the winners from this year’s
competition. Congratulations to all of
you who participated, as well as the
winners.
A special thanks goes out
to Will McElheny and the
IOP Recreation Department
for all of his hard work.
Thanks to the judges as
well, for their patience and
continued dedication to
making this event a success.
Finally, a huge thanks to all
of the sponsors!
Sandcastle Art is a Spectacle
T H I S Y E A R ’ S I O P S A N D S C U L P T I N G C O MP E T I T I O N P R O D U C E S A MA Z I N G R E S U L T S
B Y C H R I S T I N D A L
Best of Children’s
1
st
- Site U - Soldier’s Appreciation
2
nd
- Site Y - Chillin’ by the Sea
3
rd
- Site BB - Angels
Best of Young Adults
1
st
- Site K - Pick-Below Spoleto

Best of Family
1
st
- Site GG - Two Dolphins
2
nd
- Site II - Mount Slashmore
3
rd
- Site I - Sun-Kissed

Most Creative
1
st
- Site 23 - The Muppets Take
Mount Pleasant
2
nd
- Site 29 - Angel Oak
3
rd
- Site 36 - Eskimo Pie

Best Architectural
1
st
- Site 9 - John’s Magic Castle
2
nd
- Site 17 - Parthenon
3
rd
- Site 28 - Repunzel's Castle

Best of Adults
1
st
- Site 21 - Ice Dream
2
nd
- Site CC - All is ‘Well’ at Spoleto
3
rd
- Site 14 - Granddad’s Old
Castle

Best of Show - Overall
Site 15 - Mockingjay
PHOTOS BY THE CITY OF ISLE OF PALMS
20 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
Do you know what this is?
Kids, send your guess for this week’s
Eye Spy to: eyespy@luckydognews.com
Please include your mailing address with
your submission.
Cooper and Sawyer Garner correctly guessed last issue's Eye Spy,
it was the breakfast sign in front of Acme Cantina.The frst person
to send in the correct answer for this iss ue will receive a coupon for
a FREE ice cream at Café Medley on Sullivan's Island.
Eye Spy
C
ongratulations to William Ross. He easily won the 10 and
under division at Belton’s 2012 tennis championship last
week. William won both sets 4-0, 4-0. The Intercollegiate
Tennis Association and Family Circle Tennis Center congratulate
him on this major victory. He represented the ITA and FCTC well
with his dominating style of play and great attitude. William has a
big serve and strong, consistent ground strokes. He creates a lot of
open court opportunities by going behind the player or hitting a good
angle with spin, making him one of the toughest competitors on the
court. Congratulations William!
Tennis Prodigy
Takes the Gold
WI LLI AM ROSS WI NS BELTON TENNI S TOURNAMENT
AFTER 4- 0, 4- 0 VI CTORY
A n s w e r :
T A P E D , P A T E N T , A I R P O R T , P A T I E N T , I M P A R T I A L , A P A R T M E N T , T R A N S P L A N T
Using only the letters in the word
PAT, complete the words in the
"escalator". Every word contains
each letter of PAT at least once.
Words read across only.
21 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
FINANCIAL
I
f you’re like most people, you
go through many complex
thoughts and emotions
when choosing investments.
In fact, a feld of study called
“behavioral fnance” is devoted to
understanding why people make
their investment decisions. As part
of their work, behavioral fnance
researchers examine “biases”
that affect people’s investment
selections. As an individual
investor, you too, can beneft from
understanding these biases so
that you can avoid them.
Here are some of the key biases
identifed by behavioral fnance
experts:
Overconfdence
Overconfdence leads investors
to believe they know the
“right times” to buy and sell
investments. But if you’re
constantly buying and selling in
the belief that you are correctly
“timing” the market, you may
be wrong many times, and you
may incur more investment
fees, expenses, and taxes than
if you simply bought quality
investments and held them for
the long term.
Representativeness
If you make decisions based
on preconceived ideas or
stereotypes, you may be
suffering from a bias called
“representativeness.” For
example, if you see that
investments from a particular
sector, such as energy, have
performed particularly well in
one year, you might think these
types of vehicles will do just as
well the next year, so you load
up on them. Yet every sector will
go through ups and downs, so
one year’s performance cannot
necessarily predict the next
year’s performance. Instead of
chasing “hot” investments, try to
build a balanced portfolio that
refects your individual goals,
risk tolerance and time horizon.
Anchoring
Similar to representativeness,
an anchoring bias occurs
when investors place too much
emphasis on past performance.
If you own shares of XYZ stock,
for instance, and the stock
price hit $60 per share, you
might assume XYZ will always
sell for at least $60 a share.
But if XYZ drops to $30 per
share — perhaps as a result of
a broad-based market decline
— you might think it’s now
“undervalued,” leading you to
“snap up” even more shares.
However, XYX shares could
also fall due to a change in
its fundamentals, such as a
shake-up in the company’s
management or a decline in the
competitiveness of its products.
As an informed investor, you
need to work with your fnancial
advisor to determine the causes
of an investment’s decline and
any actions you may need to
take in response.
Confrmation
If you are subject to confrmation
bias, you may look for
information that supports your
reasons for choosing a particular
investment. This type of bias can
lead to faulty decision making,
because you'll end up with
one-sided information. In other
words, you may latch onto all
the positive reasons for investing
in something. such as a "hot
stock." but you may overlook the
"red fags" that would cause you
to think twice if you were being
totally objective. To fght back
against confrmation bias, take
your time before making any
investment decision. A quality
investment will almost always be
just as good a choice tomorrow
as it is today.
Being aware of these invest-
ment biases can help you make
better decisions, and over a
period of many years, these
decisions can make a difference
as you work toward achieving
your fnancial objectives.
This article was written by
Edward Jones for use by your
local Edward Jones Financial
Advisor.
Don't Fall Victim to Investment "Biases"
BY DIMI MATOUCHEV
Breach I nl et Ti de Char t
Date High Tide Low Tide
Hurricanes, storms etc., are NOT included in the
predictions. Tidal current direction changes and tide time
predictions can be very different. Tide predictions are
PREDICTIONS; they can be wrong so use common sense.
Source: www.saltwatertides.com
Jun 22
Jun 23
Jun 24
Jun 25
Jun 26
Jun 27
Jun 28
Jun 29
Jun 30
Jul 1
Jul 2
Jul 3
Jul 4
Jul 5
10:28am/10:35pm
11:08am/11:15pm
11:53am/11:58pm
12:43pm
12:48am/1:39pm
1:42am/2:39pm
2:42am/3:41pm
3:45am/4:44pm
4:49am/5:46pm
5:52am/6:46pm
6:54am/7:44pm
7:53am/8:39pm
8:50am/9:31pm
9:45am/10:21pm
4:18am/4:16pm
4:57am/5:02pm
5:38am/5:51pm
6:22am/6:46pm
7:11am/7:46pm
8:05am/:50pm
9:02am/9:56pm
10:03am/11:01pm
11:04am
12:02am/12:04pm
1:00am/1:02pm
1:55am/1:57pm
2:47am/2:51pm
3:37am/3:44pm
22 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
O
n June 5 a loggerhead turtle did
not choose a good place to lay her
eggs. From the size of her tracks it
appeared that she was a very small, possibly
inexperienced female, perhaps in her frst
season of nesting. Her nest was below the
high tide line near Grand Pavilion in Wild
Dunes. Team member Marilyn Colen had
also reported two other nests that morning
in the same section of beach, and this was
the third one that the Turtle Team had been
to that morning. A nest below the high tide
line is very unusual. Normally any tracks
that low on the beach are a false or non-
nesting crawl. Obviously this young turtle
had failed to read our "Directions for Laying
a Nest" in the last issue.
We arrived there just before high tide and
found the “body pit” she made in the damp
sand. Since sea turtle eggs need oxygen to
develop, a nest below the high tide line would
not survive repeated overwash and fooding
from ground water. If the nest was going to
hatch, it was necessary to move it to higher
ground as quickly as possible. But just as we
had located the eggs and had begun to place
them in a bucket of damp sand, the frst
waves of the rising tide began to food the egg
chamber! We managed to get 22 of them out
before the rushing water and wet sand caving
in made any more excavation impossible.
Brian Duffy and Catherine Malloy, Turtle
Team members, were also out on the beach
that morning and had seen all three nests.
They offered to help in any way they could.
We stuck a probe stick into the sand in the
shallow water where we had found the eggs
and they waited there as the tide continued
to cover the nest. At this early stage of
development, we wonder if eggs might survive
a couple of hours submerged in water. We
continued to work in relocating and marking
the other two nearby nests as Brian and
Catherine stood in the water making sure the
spot was marked.
Two hours later the tide was at last
beginning to recede. Brian began to build
a mud wall to protect the spot so we could
retrieve the remaining eggs. We dug into the
very wet sand and extracted 58 more eggs
bringing the clutch number to 80. These
were taken to a primary dune further down
the beach and placed in an ideal spot and
marked with a sign. The frst 22 unsubmerged
eggs were placed on top of the others before
covering the nest.
We pulled loggerhead eggs out of the
water at the Links golf course dunes in 2007
and 86% of them hatched successfully, but
these were only under water about 10 or 20
minutes. This nest will be a very interesting
one to watch, and we will learn if being under
water for two hours spoiled their chances of
surviving.
NESTING UPDATE:
As of June 13 the Island Turtle Team has
found 29 loggerhead nests - 4 on Sullivan’s
Island and 25 on the Isle of Palms. There have
been 15 non-nesting false crawls. Our number
of dead stranded turtles this season is 3, well
below our average by mid June. The Turtle
Hospital at the South Carolina Aquarium also
has a low number of patients for this time of
year, but the state has had about the usual
number of strandings at 54.
PHOTOS BY BARBARA BERGWERF
Mary Pringle trying to scoop out the water from the
incoming tide with Tee and Barb.
Brian Duffy working on a “sea wall” to protect the team
while they are digging up the eggs.
Holding Back the Tide
T U R T L E T E A M WO R K S T O P R O T E C T
L O G G E R H E A D E G G S F R O M R I S I N G T I D E
BY MARY PRINGLE
Tee Johannes and Barb Gobien probe for a turtle nest.
PHOTO BY BARBARA BERGWERF
23 June 22, 2012
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
W
hat an exciting time
to be fshing! With our
waters now loaded with
bait, the fsh have strapped
the feedbags on and are eating
aggressively. All the summer
seasonal species have arrived and
when combined with our regular
gamefsh, provide a whole host
of options for an angler. If your
fshing season hasn’t yet begun,
there’s no better time to start.
Redfsh are attacking artifcial
lures. Jerk shad lures rigged on
futter hooks are my go-to option.
These artifcial lures, usually
4”-5” in length, imitate small
baitfsh. Flutter hooks have a
weight on their shank that let you
cast a far distance and also put
motion on the lure. I use futter
hooks in size 3/0 with a 1/8oz.
weight. Make sure to cast to the
edges of the schools If you cast
right into the middle you stand a
good chance of spooking them.
With water temperatures so
warm, our trout bite continues
to improve. The preferred rig of
live bait under a popping cork is
hard to beat. Live shrimp is now
available and will give you another
option than mud minnows. It’s a
good idea to start carrying your
cast net and see if you can fnd
some fnger mullet. Finger mullet
under a cork is just deadly.
Anglers targeting founder have
been reporting good numbers
being caught. Try fshing fnger
mullet along the bottom around
structures. Move the bait slowly,
and when you think you have a
bite, wait a few seconds (if you
can) before setting the hook.
We’ve been picking up quite a
few founder with mud minnows
under a popping cork as well.
My favorite summer time fsh
is the ladyfsh. With such warm
weather, there are more ladyfsh
present than in any season I can
recall. These dynamic fsh will
smack shrimp under a popping
cork and make your drag zing.
Their acrobatic jumps and
hard runs make these fsh so
entertaining. Look for them in
some of the same spots that you
fnd trout.
See you on the water!
Capt. Geoff Bennett operates
Charleston Charter Fishing
providing fy fshing and light
tackle charters. Clients choose
from a full menu of fy rods,
artifcial and live bait fshing
options with charters tailored
to their desires. USCG licensed
and insured, Capt. Bennett is
committed to providing a safe and
enjoyable charter to anglers of all
skill levels and ages. For more
information, call Capt. Bennett
at 324-3332, visit his website at
www.charlestoncharterfshing.
com or email him at captain@
charlestoncharterfshing.com.
A Perfect Fishing Oppor-tuna-ty
C A P TA I N G E O F F B E N N E T T G U I D E S F I S H E R MA N WI T H T H I S MO N T H ’ S R E P O R T
BY CAPTAIN GEOFF BENNETT
WWW.ÌSLANDEYENEWS.COM
24 June 22, 2012

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