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Wednesday • June 20, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 264
LIFE SUPPORT
WORLD PAGE 19
WHAT’S THE DEAL
WITH COCONUTS?
FOOD PAGE 18
FORMER EGYPTIAN PRESIDENT WORSENS
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Teachers and the San Mateo
Union High School District reached
a tentative contract agreement last
week which will go up for a vote by
members later this summer.
On Tuesday, June 12, the two
sides reached an agreement that
includes a 2 percent salary increase
and a 2 percent increase to the
employee benefit cap, SMUHSD
Teachers’ Association President
Craig Childress confirmed. In addi-
tion, the agreement would allow up
to two teachers per site to teach six
instead of the normal five periods.
“We are fortunate to be in the
position to offer a 2 percent raise
while other districts across the state
are taking furlough days and reduc-
ing staff and programs,”
Superintendent Scott Laurence said
in a prepared statement.
The agreement includes increas-
ing the maximum number of student
contacts per teacher from 165 to
168 over five teaching periods.
In addition, the district and
teachers agreed to initiate an
Evaluation Task Force to recom-
mend improvements to the current
evaluation process by adding
components such as student
progress and performance and
peer observations.
“We are hoping to add agreed
upon components that will provide
better feedback and assistance to
our excellent teaching staff along
with related professional develop-
ment and peer mentoring,” said
Associate Superintendent Kirk
Black.
The district currently employs
approximately 470 teachers.
District teachers earn more than
$84,000 annually on average,
according to the district.
Teacher contract reached
Tentative agreement for San Mateo Union includes 2 percent raises, vote later this summer
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Ventriloquist Steve Chaney with puppet “Corny Crow”
entertained children at the Hillsdale Branch Library in
San Mateo yesterday afternoon as part of the Penin-
sula Library System’s “Dream Big — Read!” campaign
for children this summer.
SUMMER READING
AT THE LIBRARY
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Automation, online and paperless
were the key words used by county
department heads yesterday as
supervisors heard about plans to
become more efficient and ultimate-
ly save money.
The day of budget presentation
was the second of four scheduled
hearings on the recommended $1.8
billion budget for fiscal year 2012-
2013 that will be tentatively
approved Thursday afternoon and
formally adopted in late September.
Heading into this year’s budget
process, county officials have
described it as a time for depart-
ments to take a break from the dras-
tic cuts of past years and focus on
long-term sustainable practices.
However, the county is still looking
to eliminate a structural deficit on
track to hit $41 million by fiscal
year 2016-2017 without any action.
Yesterday, the hearings — in
which related departments are
County focuses
on automation
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A proposal to build a series of large office
buildings, possibly the home to biotech compa-
nies, at the now-vacant former Burlingame
Drive-in was approved by the City Council
Monday.
Millennium Partners, New York-based devel-
opers of mixed-used properties, applied in
April 2010 to develop the 18.13-acre site — a
project now known as Burlingame Point, locat-
ed at 300 Airport Blvd. (also known as 350
Beach Road). Plans call for 689,810 square feet
of office space in two five-story buildings, one
seven-story building and one eight-story build-
ing. On Monday, the Burlingame City Council
approved three ordinances to amend zoning,
the environmental impact report, and estab-
lished a development agreement.
Vice Mayor Ann Keighran commended the
applicant and said the project was vastly
improved from the original proposal noting
changes were made collaboratively. Her senti-
ments were echoed by the rest of the council.
Councilwoman Terry Nagel enjoyed that the
project was altered so the site would be more
open to the public.
As proposed, the project will provide space
for either office or biotech use. When last
changed, the zoning for the Bayfront was
altered to be open for biotech. There would
also be a two-story, 33,400-square-foot ameni-
ties building that would include a child-care
City approves development at former drive-in
A rendering of the proposed development
at the site of the former Burlingame Drive-in.
Voters in
control of
controller
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County voters will decide this
fall if the currently elected con-
troller position should instead be
converted into a two-term
appointment, a decision reached
after county supervisors slightly
quibbled over the job’s preferred
qualifications.
The Board of Supervisors
unanimously agreed yesterday to
place on the Nov. 6 ballot a char-
ter change amendment that, if
passed by a two-thirds majority,
will change the controller posi-
tion to an appointed position.
The controller is essentially the
See VOTE, Page 20
See COUNTY, Page 20
See DRIVE-IN, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Singer Lionel
Richie is 68.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1782
Congress approved the Great Seal of
the United States, featuring the emblem
of the bald eagle.
“Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty
never grows old.”
— Franz Kafka, Austrian author and poet (1883-1924).
BeachBoys’ Brian
Wilson is 70.
Actress Nicole
Kidman is 45.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A man walks past giant fish made with plastic bottles exhibited at Botafogo beach, in Rio de Janeiro where the United
Nations Rio +20 Conference on Sustainable Development is being held.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the 70s to
mid 80s. Northwest winds around 5 mph
increasing to 10 to 20 mph in the afternoon.
Wednesday night clear in the evening then
becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after
midnight. Lows in the mid 50s. Northwest
winds 10 to 20 mph, becoming southwest 5
to 10 mph after midnight.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the 60s to lower
70s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph. Thursday night mostly
clear in the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. West winds 5 to 15
mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming sunny.
Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s to lower 70s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No.
1,in first plcae;Gorgeous George,No.8,in second
place; and Hot Shot,No.3,in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:41.73.
(Answers tomorrow)
ARENA DERBY MUSKET SMOOCH
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The farmer called the vet to attend to the sick pig
so that the pig could become a — CUREDHAM
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
FRAET
CONTH
TECANC
GURAJA
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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Answer
here:
6 9 1
8 12 18 30 40 4
Mega number
June15 Mega Millions
10 15 26 28 30
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 4 4 5
Daily Four
9 6 9
Daily three evening
In 1791, King Louis XVI of France and his family attempted
to flee the country in the so-called “Flight to Varennes,” but
were caught.
In 1837, Queen Victoria acceded to the British throne follow-
ing the death of her uncle, King William IV.
In 1863, West Virginia became the 35th state.
In 1893, a jury in New Bedford, Mass., found Lizzie Borden
not guilty of the ax murders of her father and stepmother.
In 1921, U.S. Rep. Alice Mary Robertson, R-Okla., became
the first woman to preside over a session of the House of
Representatives.
In 1947, Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel was shot dead at the
Beverly Hills, Calif., mansion of his girlfriend, Virginia Hill,
apparently at the order of mob associates.
In 1948, the variety series “Toast of the Town,” hosted by Ed
Sullivan, debuted on CBS television.
In 1963, the United States and Soviet Union signed an agree-
ment to set up a “hotline” between the two superpowers.
In 1967, boxer Muhammad Ali was convicted in Houston of
violating Selective Service laws by refusing to be drafted.
(Ali’s conviction was ultimately overturned by the Supreme
Court).
In 1972, three days after the arrest of the Watergate burglars,
President Richard Nixon met at the White House with his chief
of staff, H.R. Haldeman; the secretly made tape recording of
this meeting ended up with the notorious 18 1/2-minute gap.
In 1979, ABC News correspondent Bill Stewart was shot to
death in Managua, Nicaragua, by a member of President
Anastasio Somoza’s national guard.
In 1982, President Ronald Reagan proclaimed National Bald
Eagle Day.
Actress Olympia Dukakis is 81. Actor Martin Landau is 81.
Actor James Tolkan is 81. Actor Danny Aiello is 79. Blues musi-
cian Lazy Lester is 79. Actor John Mahoney is 72. Movie direc-
tor Stephen Frears is 71. Actor John McCook is 68. Singer Anne
Murray is 67. TV personality Bob Vila is 66. Musician Andre
Watts is 66. Actress Candy Clark is 65. Producer Tina Sinatra is
64. Rhythm-and-blues singer Actor John Goodman is 60. Rock
musician Michael Anthony is 58. Pop musician John Taylor is 52.
Rock musician Mark DeGliantoni (de-GLI’-an-toh-nee) is 50.
Rock musician Murphy Karges (Sugar Ray) is 45. Country/blue-
grass singer-musician Dan Tyminski is 45.
On average, 54 percent of the amount
of money won in big court cases goes
toward legal costs.
***
Visitors to the boardwalk in Atlantic
City, N.J. can’t miss the landmark Lucy
the Elephant, a six-story building con-
structed to look like an elephant. Built in
1881 as a tourist attraction, the building
has been used as a hotel, restaurant and
private residence over the years. Lucy is
currently a museum.
***
Rocker Jerry Lee Lewis (born 1935)
married his third wife Myra Gale Brown
(born 1944) in 1957. The marriage made
for bad publicity as Myra was only 13
years old, and she was Lewis’ second
cousin.
***
The oil tanker that caused the 1989 oil
spill in Alaska was called the Exxon
Valdez. After the spill, the tanker was
renamed Sea River Mediterranean.
***
The Chatty Cathy doll, introduced in
1960 by Mattel, was the first talking
doll. The doll had a pull-string at the
back off her neck that made her say 11
different things, including “Tell me a
story,” “Will you play with me?” and
“Please brush my hair.”
***
Do you know what Saab, Ikea and
Volvo have in common? See answer at
end.
***
In the movie “Austin Powers” (1997)
the villain Dr. Evil attempts to hold the
world ransom for $1 million. In the
1999 sequel, Dr. Evil again tries to hold
the world ransom but this time he wants
$100 billion.
***
The last album that the band Nirvana
made was “In Utero” in 1993. Lead
singer Kurt Cobain (1967-1994) com-
mitted suicide the following year.
***
The vaccine for chickenpox, the
Varicella vaccine, was licensed by the
Food and Drug Administration in 1995.
It is recommended that children receive
the vaccine when they are between 12
and 18 months old.
***
Sanrio’s most popular character is
Hello Kitty. Other characters created by
the Japanese company are Tuxedo Sam,
Badtz-Maru and Chococat.
***
The Migratory Bird Treaty Act of
1918 makes it unlawful to pursue, hunt,
capture, kill or sell migratory birds.
***
To qualify as tropical, a rain forest
must be located between the Tropic of
Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn.
Tropical rain forests get at least 80 inch-
es of rain per year.
***
In the movie “Rocky” (1976) the
boxer had a pet goldfish named Moby
Dick and a pair of turtles named Cuff
and Link.
***
Burt Reynolds (born 1936) posed for
the first nude centerfold in
Cosmopolitan magazine in 1972. The
photo shows Reynolds lying on a
bearskin rug.
***
The first census of the United States
was taken in 1790.
Answer: They are all Swedish compa-
nies. The founder of Ikea, Ingvar
Kamprad (born 1926), is one of the
richest men in the world, with a fortune
of over $30 billion.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
5 36 37 42 43 24
Mega number
June 16 Super Lotto Plus
3
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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BURLINGAME
Burglary. A vehicle’s window was smashed
and laptops, an iPad and a passport were taken
on the first block of Bay View Plaza before
10:09 p.m. Tuesday, June 12.
Fraud. A woman reported that her credit cards
were charged at several local gas stations on
the 1200 block of Bayshore Highway before
7:29 a.m. Tuesday, June 12.
SAN MATEO
Assault. A person reported that his/her son
was jumped on the 400 block of East Hillsdale
Boulevard before 1:34 a.m. Saturday, June 9.
Vandalism. A person smashed a car’s wind-
shield and was being very aggressive to the
owner on Bovet Road before 12:36 a.m.
Saturday, June 9.
SAN BRUNO
Burglary. A locked bicycle was taken from a
carport area between June 8 and June 9 and on
the 1000 block of National Avenue and was
reported before 2:03 p.m. Friday, June 15.
Petty theft. An unknown amount of money
was taken from a register on the 1100 block of
El Camino Real before 11:25 a.m. Friday, June
15.
Petty theft. A man grabbed an 18 pack of
Coors Light beer and ran off on the 100 block
of Angus Avenue before 1:13 a.m. Friday, June
15.
Police reports
Striking back at ‘The Man’
A public lot parking meter was damaged
on the 1200 block of Donnelly Avenue in
Burlingame before 10:13 a.m. Tuesday,
June 12.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Belmont residents repeatedly told the city’s
Planning Commission last night that a private
school’s desire to build a new campus on
Davis Drive will bring far too much traffic to
the area and that their students will also be too
noisy.
Crystal Springs Uplands School wants to
relocate its middle school from Hillsborough
to Belmont in an area currently zoned for
executive office and warehouse uses.
Many residents said the zoning should stay
intact and that the Ralston Middle School,
adjacent to the proposed CSUS campus, is
already noisy enough.
But Amy Richards, head of CSUS, said the
new campus would actually bring less traffic
to the area than if the existing office buildings
on the site were currently fully utilized.
She also told the commission at a public
hearing last night that the school is a good
neighbor to the 13 residences that share the
property line with it in Hillsborough.
Noise should not be too big of an issue, she
told the commission.
Before the meeting even started, however,
the school requested a continuance of the pub-
lic hearing so it could better address what the
city calls “fiscal neutrality.”
Belmont planners have told school officials
the city needs to get about $116,000 annually
from the school to offset its own costs for the
school’s presence in the city.
Since it is a nonprofit agency, exempt from
paying property taxes, the school has offered
to pay the city $75,000 annually plus the con-
sumer price index, offer $40,000 in financial
aid exclusively for Belmont students, give
preference to Belmont residents in the appli-
cation process and offer its synthetic turfed
athletic field to the community on weekends
and three weeks during summer.
Currently, the city realizes about $65,000 a
year in property tax revenue from the site,
according to school officials.
The commission heard from traffic and
noise experts before it opened up the meeting
to the public, with about 30 asking to speak on
the matter.
Most expressed opposition for the project
based on more traffic clogging Ralston
Avenue. Others expressed concern about too
much noise from the project.
Currently, about 83,000 square feet of com-
mercial/office and warehouse buildings and
165 parking spots are situated at 6-8 and 10
Davis Drive that has stood vacant for years.
Crystal Springs Uplands wants to demolish
the current buildings and construct a 52,000-
square-foot middle school with a 60-space
parking lot, gymnasium/theater/multi-purpose
room and an all-weather synthetic turf playing
field. At capacity, the school would have 216
students, 26 teachers and 10 additional staff.
The school will replace every tree that it
needs to remove during construction and build
a soundwall during construction as well,
according to its development agreement.
Richards called the school’s potential traffic
impact on the city “immaterial.”
She also said ambient noise from Ralston
Avenue would be greater than the noise the
school’s students would make.
Resident John Moody, however, called mul-
tiple traffic studies related to the project inac-
curate.
Another resident, Karen Hall, said the pri-
vate nonprofit school should not be allowed to
buy its way into Belmont.
“The new school belongs in Hillsborough,”
Hall said.
The commission granted the school a con-
tinuance to a later date just before 11 p.m. last
night.
The commission must approve a general
plan amendment, development agreement,
planned development rezoning and a concep-
tual development plan before it forwards the
item to the City Council for final approval.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Noise, traffic dominate school talk
4
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County supervisors yesterday unanimously
approved a plan to let a private company man-
age its nursing facility for three years rather
than shut the doors next summer and shift res-
idents elsewhere as a way to save $9 million
annually.
The plan for Burlingame Long-Term Care is
still contingent on the Trousdale Drive build-
ing’s owners finalizing a sale with Brius, LLC
but yesterday’s board vote puts the pieces in
place for when that occurs. Mario Muzzi, who
owns the building with his brother Vincent,
told the Daily Journal he anticipates the deal to
close quite soon and Health System Director
Jean Fraser told the board Brius will be man-
aging on July 15.
The deal, an unusual arrangement in which
Brius will operate on the county’s license
while transitioning into a stand-alone care
home in October 2015, will cost $1 million to
$3 million less than shuttering the facility in
July 2013.
The arrangement also means the 163 resi-
dents still at the facility can stay, those who’ve
already left have an option of returning, all
will eventually be housed in a renovated build-
ing and at least two-thirds of the employees
will be offered jobs. The county also increases
its number of Medi-Cal beds and avoids cost-
ly renovations at the San Mateo Medical
Center to convert a wing into 32 short-term
beds.
“All of the stakeholders benefit and you
don’t see that very often,” said Supervisor
Dave Pine prior to the board’s vote.
No members of the public spoke yesterday,
in sharp contrast to the crowded and emotion-
al Feb. 14 hearing at which the Board of
Supervisors agreed not to renew the center’s
lease. San Mateo County took over the trou-
bled 281-bed nursing facility in 2003 at the
request of the California Department of Health
Services. The facility never made money,
though, and Fraser recommended letting it go
and finding new spaces for patients either
locally or elsewhere. Since February, the coun-
ty has been trying to find enough spots but 160
residents are still not placed.
With yesterday’s agreement, they needn’t
be. Brius has also committed to employing a
minimum of two-thirds of the approximately
200 employees on its payroll and invest a min-
imum of $3.5 million in building renovations.
Until the building is updated, non-ambulatory
patients will be housed on the ground floor to
allow evacuation in case of earthquake or fire.
In return, Brius will keep whatever profit or
loss it makes on operations. Brius will receive
a higher Medi-Cal reimbursement rate affiliat-
ed with the medical center than on its own —
one reason the San Mateo County Health
System said other operators were not willing
to take over the facility and its patients as a
freestanding operation.
Brius owner Shlomo Rechnitz anticipates
heavy financial losses the first few years
because the patient population will be lower
during renovations but, in a prepared state-
ment, said his “goal is to keep the facility open
with employees and residents in place and to
ensure the safety of every patient we care for.”
The county will provide food services for 30
days after the 2015 transfer date to Brius at an
estimated cost of $75,000 and leave all the
equipment, furnishing and supplies at no
charge.
Fraser said the Health System researched
Brius thoroughly before agreeing to the
arrangement and found the company, which
operates dozens of facilities statewide, to be
strong.
“Frankly, we were quite impressed,” Fraser
said.
If serious problems develop before the
October 2015 transfer, the county has the right
to terminate the contract and all renovation
costs will be on Brius, Fraser said.
Fraser, who signed a nondisclosure form,
was not at liberty to answer Supervisor Carole
Groom’s inquiry into the company’s finances
but said it appears sound.
“I’m not worried,” she said.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Plan to keep nursing home open moves ahead
5
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The second-striker who prosecu-
tors say hit his stepbrother in the
head with a hammer because he sus-
pected the man of an affair with his
girlfriend delayed entering a plea
yesterday to attempted murder.
Lawrence Buffington, 46, is also
charged with felony assault, assault
with force, making criminal threats
and violating his parole in the June
10 incident on the 600 block of
Heller Street in Redwood City.
On Tuesday,
B u f f i n g t o n
appeared in
court but his
court-appointed
attorney asked to
delay entering a
plea until July
10.
Redwood City
police arrested
Buffington after
being told by his hospitalized step-
brother that the man had struck him
in the head with the tool during an
argument. The victim said
Buffington left his Sacramento
home after a fight with his girlfriend
and he had reluctantly agreed to him
staying at his Redwood City resi-
dence. Prior to the confrontation,
Buffington allegedly discovered a
photograph and accused his step-
brother of having an affair with his
girlfriend. The victim said
Buffington screamed he was going
to kill him.
The victim, who suffered a frac-
tured skull, was treated at Sequoia
Hospital, whose staff alerted police.
Buffington remains in custody
without bail and on a parole hold.
Buffington was sentenced to 12
years in prison in 1993 for multiple
robberies using a gun. He also has
convictions for car theft and drug
possession.
Plea delayed in
hammer attack
Lawrence
Buffington
By Chris Cooney
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
Former Portola Valley School
District superintendent Timothy
Hanretty Tuesday morning pleaded not
guilty to charges that he embezzled
more than $100,000 in district funds to
remodel his home.
San Mateo County District Attorney
Steve Wagstaffe said that Hanretty, 55,
allegedly paid for the renovation of his
Woodside home with money from a
special fund established by the district
to pay for solar panel installations at
various schools.
The defendant and his attorney,
Michael Markowitz, declined to speak
with reporters
outside the court-
room in Redwood
City Tuesday
morning.
Pr osecut or s
allege that
Hanretty, who
resigned as super-
intendent in
January, submit-
ted false invoices
totaling $100,926 for payment from the
district's solar panel fund. The invoices
were for construction work at the
schools that was never performed,
Wagstaffe said.
The defendant, who was arrested at
his home on Friday, has been charged
with six counts of felony embezzle-
ment of public funds — one for each of
the phony invoices, Wagstaffe said.
In April, Hanretty was charged with
misappropriating public funds from the
Woodside Elementary School District,
where he worked as the chief business
officer.
Prosecutors allege that in November
2007, Hanretty was placed in charge of
securing a loan not to exceed $632,000
to improve an athletic field for the ele-
mentary district.
Hanretty allegedly presented fraudu-
lent paperwork without the knowledge
of the school board and obtained a loan
of $2.6 million, Wagstaffe said.
The school board gave the defendant
a $5,000 bonus for completing the ath-
letic field project on time and on budg-
et while he was allegedly using the
excess funds to pay for projects at vari-
ous schools without the board's
approval, Wagstaffe said.
The fraud was discovered in
November 2011 when the school dis-
trict conducted an investigation to
determine why its debt was unusually
high, according to the district attorney's
office.
Hanretty has been charged with one
count of embezzlement of public funds,
forgery and filing a false document in
connection with the case, Wagstaffe
said.
Ex-superintendent pleads not guilty to theft
Sheriff’s Office validates
120 gangmembers on coast
The San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Office special gang suppression unit
has made more than 120 validations
of gangmembers within three months
of operation along the coastside,
according to a city of Half Moon Bay
press release.
The Sheriff’s Office Coastside
Neighborhood Response Team has
been actively monitoring and verify-
ing local gang activities in Half Moon
Bay and the greater coastside area to
assist in criminal investigations
involving gangmembers and reduce
the number of gang-related incidents,
according to the press release.
The response team has obtained
more than 120 gang validations and
more than 75 documented gang affili-
ations. The validations reflect the
number of individuals who meet the
state’s rigorous standards for gang
identification, which include such cri-
teria as self-admission to being a
gangmember, possessing identifiable
gang-related symbols, being implicat-
ed by a reliable source and having a
connection with known gangmem-
bers. The documented affiliations rep-
resent individuals who have been
interviewed by the response team but
do not yet meet the minimum criteria,
according to the press release.
Those who have been previously
validated per the state’s requirements
are subject to more severe charges in
criminal cases brought against them.
The additional “gang enhancement”
charge can add significant penalties to
a criminal’s sentence and probation
requirements, which create a strong
deterrent for individuals who have
been previously validated, according
to the press release.
Agreement to fund Caltrain
modernization approved
The approval yesterday by the city
of San Jose is the last endorsement
needed for a regional agreement to
fully fund the modernization of the
Caltrain system, according to the tran-
sit agency.
The agreement leverages local,
regional and federal funding to secure
hundreds of millions of dollars in state
high-speed rail funds for the
Peninsula. The next step will be the
state Legislature’s approval of fund-
ing later this month through the annu-
al budget process. If funding is
approved, riders could see an electri-
fied and modernized Caltrain system
as soon as 2019.
In addition to funding Caltrain
modernization, the agreement also
calls for future improvements to
accommodate integrated Caltrain and
high-speed rail service between San
Francisco and San Jose.
San Bruno police seek
identity of possible witness
The San Bruno Police Department
is seeking the public’s help in identi-
fying an individual that was involved
in an altercation in the area of San
Bruno and Third avenues at about
1:43 a.m., Saturday, May 26.
On that date and time, police
received reports of several individuals
chasing an unknown man along the
south sidewalk of San Bruno Avenue
toward the Valero gas station at
Second and San Bruno avenues. The
suspects chasing the man were later
involved in an incident that occurred a
short distance away. Police believe the
unknown man may be able to provide
assistance in the investigation.
Police are also attempting to deter-
mine the identity of anyone else that
may have witnessed the incident, par-
ticular those who reported it by tele-
phone to police.
Anyone with information pertain-
ing to the identity of the unknown
man or any other information regard-
ing the incident is urged to call the
San Bruno Police Department at
(650) 616-7100.
Hillsborough police
investigate daytime burglary
Police are looking for suspects in a
burglary at a home in Hillsborough that
happened around midday Monday,
police said.
The burglary occurred between 11
a.m. and 1:45 p.m. in the 2600 block of
Butternut Drive, police said.
Anyone who may have witnessed
the crime has been asked to call
Hillsborough police at (650) 375-7470.
RethinkWaste wins
national honor
RethinkWaste was selected as the
2012 Recycling Systems Excellence
Gold Award recipient by the Solid
Waste Association of North
America, the top national award for
a recycling facility.
The award reflects
RethinkWaste’s five-year, $46 mil-
lion master plan project to redesign
and construct an innovative recy-
cling and transfer facility at the
Shoreway Environmental Center in
San Carlos to divert as much mate-
rial as possible from the landfill.
The award will be presented at a
national conference in Washington,
D.C. Aug. 14.
Local briefs
Timothy
Hanretty
6
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Paul Larson


MILLBRAE – I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a “red-fag”. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the “Archdiocese of Los
Angeles” has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
“Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California” the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with “Stewart Enterprises”
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. “Stewart Enterprises” runs a
website called “Catholic Mortuaries.com”
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I don’t see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point I’m trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesn’t mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Four candidates want to be considered for
two vacancies on the Millbrae Elementary
School District Board of Trustees.
An empty seat became available with last
month’s death of Caroline Shea,who was in
the middle of serving her fifth term on the
board. A second opening will be created by
the pending relocation of Trustee Marjory
Luxenberg. She officially leaves her position
June 30. The terms of both women are set to
expire in 2013. The district decided to appoint
people to fill the position. Applications were
due Friday. Four applied – Denis Fama, Lynne
Ferrario, Jeff Steinberg and Craig Yutaka
Yonemura.
Candidate interviews will be scheduled for
a June 25 meeting, at which point the board
could decide to vote or wait until another
meeting to make the decision, said
Superintendent Linda Luna.
Luxenberg will only be able to vote on the
appointment to Shea’s seat.
Fama, an active volunteer in the Millbrae
community, lists his profession as a nonprofit
consultant and college instructor, according to
his application. He holds a bachelor’s degree
in history from San Francisco State University
and a master’s in nonprofit management from
the University of California. He has worked as
a consultant with the Millbrae Education
Foundation and facilitated joint planning ses-
sions between the district and foundation.
Fama is also the chair of the Citizen’s
Oversight Committee for the school bond and
has a granddaughter at Green Hills
Elementary School.
“The ongoing successful education of chil-
dren in our community is an important stan-
dard by which we should be judged. While
test scores, rankings and graduation rates are
a measure of how well we do, it is the quality
of person that our school district produces that
counts post,” Fama wrote as part of his per-
sonal statement.
Ferrario recently retired from a principal in
the district. Through her years at Lomita Park
Elementary School, Ferrario is familiar with
the district and working with curriculum, the
unions and foundation, she noted in her appli-
cation. Ferrario holds a bachelor’s in psychol-
ogy and speech and a master’s in educational
administration from San Francisco State
University.
Ferrario listed a number of reasons to apply
for the position including being dedicated to
quality education for all students. She previ-
ously worked as a teacher before taking an
administrative role.
“We need to give our children the tools to
be productive, responsible and enthusiastic
members of our community now and in the
future. It is also important to make sure that
our staff has the necessary curriculum and
training to prepare our students from the com-
mon core standards,” she wrote.
Steinberg is executive director of Sojourn to
the Past, which offers a civil rights education-
al program for students. The program began
12 years ago. Steinberg holds a bachelor’s
degree in social science.
“Diversity is one of the mainstays of any
educational or societal goal. And the Millbrae
School District can use an advocate for equity
and diversity amongst all the issues involved
in student education,” he wrote on his appli-
cation.
Yonemura is a periodontist who also has
worked since 1995 as an adjunct assistant
clinical professor, lecturer and volunteer fac-
ulty at the University of San Francisco. He
notes a strong support of public education, of
which he is a product, as one of the reasons
for putting in his application. Yonemura holds
a bachelor’s degree in physiology/sociology
from the University of California at Berkeley
and dentistry training from the University of
California at San Francisco.
“While technology will be the driving force
for future advances, sound fundamentals are a
prerequisite for a successful education.
Without a firm foundation, creativity and
potential cannot be fully realized,” he wrote in
his personal statement.
Those appointed will be able to run for
office in November 2013 to serve a full four-
year term, according to Luna.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or byphone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Four candidates vie for two spots
Mirkimi hearing begins
SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco
Ethics Commission is holding a hearing that
will help determine whether the city’s sheriff
should remain in office.
The hearing started Tuesday shortly after 5
p.m. with the five-member commission and
lawyers wrangling over what evidence and
testimony should be considered over the next
several days. Mayor Ed Lee in March began
the process of removing Sheriff Ross
Mirkarimi when he suspended the newly
elected lawman without pay after he pleaded
guilty to a misdemeanor charge of false
imprisonment. Mirkarimi bruised his wife’s
bicep during a New Year’s Eve dispute.
The commission will make its recommenda-
tion to the Board of Supervisors. It will take
the vote of nine of the board’s 11 members to
remove Mirkarimi.
Around the Bay Area
By Jeff Shuttleworth
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
OAKLAND — A 19-year-old Oakland man
was convicted Tuesday of two counts of first-
degree murder for fatally shooting two teenagers
in West Oakland nearly two years ago.
Prosecutor Charles Wilson told jurors in his
closing argument Monday that Nicholas Harris
killed 18-year-old Nario Jackson and 17-year-
old Edward Hampton in front of the Acorn pub-
lic housing project in the 1000 block of Eighth
Street at about 3:30 p.m. on Nov. 6, 2010,
because he wanted to prove himself to his gang.
Jurors deliberated for less than a full day
before announcing their verdict in the packed
courtroom of Alameda County Superior Court
Judge Morris Jacobson, which was guarded by
six sheriff’s deputies and four district attorney
investigators who Jacobson asked to sit in the
front row to provide extra security.
Family members of Harris, Jackson and
Hampton brawled outside the Rene C. Davidson
Courthouse during the lunch break in the trial on
Monday so deputies escorted the families from
the courtroom separately today to try to avoid
more fights.
As the families left the courtroom Tuesday,
Jacobson told them, “Go in peace. Let this trou-
ble end here.”
Harris, who faces a state prison term of 100
years to life when he’s sentenced by Jacobson on
Sept. 21, looked straight ahead and showed no
emotion when the verdict was announced. But
his family members as well as the family mem-
bers of Jackson and Hampton started sobbing
and breathing heavily.
Wilson said Harris belonged to the Gas Town
Gang and wanted to prove himself to his gang
colleagues because they thought he had let them
down by allowing another member to be killed
in a previous incident.
He said Harris killed Jackson and Hampton
because he thought it would put him back in the
good graces of his gang.
Wilson said Jackson was affiliated with the
Gas Town Gang but Harris targeted him because
Jackson also was affiliated with other groups,
including the rival Ghost Town Gang. Jackson
was “a turf hopper” and that wasn’t acceptable to
other gang members, Wilson said.
The prosecutor alleged that Harris targeted
Hampton because Hampton belonged to the
DNI Squeeze Team gang in East Oakland.
Wilson said Harris fired multiple shots at
Jackson and Hampton as they sat in a blue
Jaguar in front of the Acorn housing project,
which he said is in the Gas Town Gang’s territo-
ry. Jackson had borrowed the Jaguar from some-
one else, he said.
Reputed gangmember convicted of
two counts of murder in Oakland
STATE/NATION 7
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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He has a Masters of Science in Traditional
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tice Acupuncture in California, nationally
certified in the practice of Acupuncture,
and is a certified practitioner of Tui Na
Chinese body work. He currently has a
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Traditional Chinese Medicine dates back
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By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Democratic lawmakers
say they balanced California’s budget and
passed it on time for the second year in a row
— an achievement they say will begin to
restore public confidence in the state
Legislature.
But is the budget really done? No.
Lawmakers last week passed the main
budget bill calling for $92 billion in state
spending for the fiscal year starting July 1, but
they didn’t take up about 20 companion meas-
ures known as “trailer bills.”
Such supporting legislation contains the
implementing language of the budget and
directs the state on the most contentious
issues from welfare and health care cuts to
funding for jail construction and the first leg
of a bullet train.
Both houses scheduled floor sessions this
week to potentially take up more trailer bills.
At the same time, Democratic leaders contin-
ue to negotiate with Gov. Jerry Brown on the
level of cuts to welfare and other sticking
points.
Assembly Speaker John
Perez said the action taken
Friday by the Legislature
“balances the budget and
puts California on track.”
The plan to close a $15.7
billion shortfall relies
heavily on the assumption
that voters will approve a
tax increase on the
November ballot. If the
ballot measure fails, automatic cuts will trig-
ger and drastically reduce funding to public
schools.
Tax opponents say Democrats passed an
incomplete budget filled with gimmicks so
they can continue getting paid, referring to a
provision in California law that blocks pay for
legislators if they fail to pass a budget on time.
Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis
Taxpayers Association, an anti-tax group, said
even last year’s budget was filled with overly
optimistic assumptions about tax collections.
“On Friday, legislators sent to you the latest
spending plan that was, once again, billions of
dollars short of a balanced budget,” Coupal
wrote in a newsletter to supporters. “Why?
Because legislators knew that as long as they
sent you a ‘budget’ — no matter how unbal-
anced — they would still get their paychecks.
This is an insult to the intelligence of
California voters.”
No one this year has challenged whether
lawmakers have met their requirement for
passing a prompt budget under Proposition
25, a 2010 voter-approved measure that
allows Democrats to pass the budget on a one-
party vote.
State Treasurer Bill Lockyer said he
believed the plan is “financeable,” meaning it
would allow the state to borrow an estimated
$10 billion for daily cash flow needs.
In a budget dispute last year, the state con-
troller tried to halt lawmakers’ pay for 12 days
after he concluded they had failed to meet
their constitutional June 15 deadline for pass-
ing a balanced budget. However, a judge shot
down the move, saying the controller’s office
lacked such authority.
Although Democrats passed an initial
spending plan to meet the deadline, Brown
vetoed it and said it was unbalanced. A second
budget was passed June 28, 2011.
At the time, an attorney representing the
controller had warned that the judge was over-
looking voters’ demands for timely, balanced
budgets from the Legislature.
“You could take a piece of paper and write,
‘We estimate revenues will meet spending’
and you could wrap it around a ham sandwich
and you could send it over to the governor and
you can call it budget and you can keep your
pay,” said attorney Ross Moody. “But it’s still
a ham sandwich.”
Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg
said Monday that Democrats didn’t send the
governor “a nothing budget.” He suggested
the differences with the governor are small.
“I think the single biggest symbol of peo-
ple’s frustration with the state of California
and certainly the state Legislature, are these
interminably late budgets. It became kind of a
ritual and not a fun ritual by the way,”
Steinberg said. “I know that over time that
will help renew confidence by the people in
state government.”
According to the latest statewide survey by
the Public Policy Institute of California, 17
percent of likely voters approve of the
Legislature. Brown has 42 percent approval.
Democrats not done with state budget
John Perez
By Hannah Dreier
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Two weeks after
California elections, a closely watched effort
to impose a new tax on tobacco in the nation’s
most populous state remains too close to call.
With 400,000 ballots outstanding as of
Tuesday, the measure that would add a $1-a-
pack cigarette tax is trailing by 17,500 votes,
according to data compiled by the secretary of
state.
Through a barrage of campaign ads, tobac-
co companies were able to cut support for the
tax plan spearheaded by champion cyclist
Lance Armstrong. Backing for the measure
dwindled from a two-thirds majority in March
down to a dead heat on Election Day.
Opponents raised $47 million to fight the
proposal, dramatically outspending support-
ers, who raised $12 million.
Since the June 5 voting, Proposition 29 has
seemed headed for defeat by razor-thin mar-
gins, generally trailing by less than a percent-
age point.
In election night returns, the proposal,
which would in part fund cancer research, was
losing by tens of thousands of votes, prompt-
ing many to assume it was dead. But support-
ers have refused to concede defeat.
“Last week, someone was thinking about
having a press conference and conceding, and
everybody else said, ‘Are you out of your
mind?”’ said Stan Glantz of the University of
California, San Francisco’s Center for
Tobacco Control Research and Education.
Glantz has been running statistical analyses
of the returns since the polls closed and said
the chances of a reversal are “unlikely but not
impossible.”
“At this point, everybody’s just biting their
fingernails,” he said.
Tobacco tax trails by thin margin
Chance of contempt vote
against attorney general rises
WASHINGTON — A Republican House
committee chairman said Tuesday he is pre-
pared to follow through on a contempt vote
against Attorney General Eric Holder unless
the Justice Department provides Congress
with documents on a flawed gun-smuggling
probe.
The likelihood of a contempt vote on
Wednesday rose after Rep. Darrell Issa, R-
Calif., and Holder failed to reach agreement in
a 20-minute meeting at the Capitol.
“If we receive no documents, we’ll go for-
ward,” Issa told reporters.
Holder told reporters he would not turn over
documents on the gun-smuggling probe called
Operation Fast and Furious unless Issa agreed
to another meeting. The attorney general said
he would explain what is in the materials at
that time. Holder wants an assurance from
Issa that the transfer of the records would sat-
isfy a subpoena from the House Oversight and
Government Reform Committee that Issa
chairs.
“We have offered to make materials avail-
able, documents available ... to brief on those
documents, to answer any questions that
might come up with regard to the documents
that we produced,” the attorney general said.
“The ball’s in their court,” Holder said. “We
made what we thought was an extraordinary
offer.”
Issa took a different view: “After this meet-
ing I cannot say that I am optimistic” for
avoiding a contempt vote, he said.
Ex-Pearl Jam management
exec charged with theft
SEATTLE — A man who worked as the
chief financial officer for Pearl Jam’s manage-
ment company has been charged with 33
counts of theft.
In charges filed earlier this month, 54-year-
old Rickey Charles Goodrich, of Navato,
Calif., is accused of using his position with
Curtis Inc. to bilk the grunge rock band out of
$380,000 from 2006 until he was fired in
September 2010.
The seattlepi.com reports Goodrich
declined to comment Tuesday. He’s expected
to enter a plea at his June 28 arraignment in
King County Superior Court.
Prosecutors say Goodrich transferred
money from company accounts to pay debts
and personal expenses including family vaca-
tions and wine.
Around the nation
NATION 8
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS CABOS, Mexico — With
major European economies on the
brink of collapse, world leaders
concluding an annual Group of 20
meeting were left Tuesday with two
different paths to ease the financial
crisis: Spend more to try to stimu-
late growth or slash budgets in a bid
to restore investor confidence.
For months, that dilemma has
loomed over governments and econ-
omists as they struggled to put out a
debt-fueled economic wildfire that
has threatened banks, wiped out
jobs and toppled governments all
over Europe. But on Tuesday, presi-
dents and prime ministers meeting
in this seaside resort seemed content
to delay any decision for a while
longer, according to a draft state-
ment leaked ahead of the G-20’s
conclusion.
Still, the battle lines in the stimu-
lus-versus-austerity debate were
clearly drawn among the 24 heads
of state gathered in a heavily guard-
ed convention hall lined by a moat.
The conservative leaders of the
United Kingdom, South Korea and
Germany came out decisively for
austerity, warning that budget cuts
were crucial to restoring fiscal order
and worldwide confidence.
“The countries in crisis will have
to find measures that might be
painful and politically unpopular in
the short term, but nonetheless they
must pursue this path,” South
Korean President Lee Myung-bak
said Monday.
On the other side were left-lean-
ing governments such as those in
Argentina, Brazil and France that
have denounced the German-
imposed austerity plan for strug-
gling countries such as Spain and
Greece and pushed for more stimu-
lus spending.
After Argentine President Cristina
Fernandez met with her Brazilian
counterpart, Dilma Rousseff, the
two sides were united in their oppo-
sition to the existing bailout plan.
“At the same time, they agree that
we need to listen to Europe, espe-
cially to Germany, to see what
measures it proposes to exit the euro
crisis,” Argentine Foreign Minister
Hector Timerman said.
Mexican President Felipe
Calderon said the summit ended
with a signed document that includ-
ed a comprehensive plan for the
future but without details. The doc-
ument had yet to be released.
European leaders plan to release a
more complete response to the con-
tinent’s financial crisis during a
summit at the end of June in
Brussels.
Leaders weigh stimulus vs. austerity at G-20
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS CABOS, Mexico — Seeking
to sooth global economic fears, U.S.
officials said they were encouraged
that European leaders appeared
ready to undertake a more forceful
response to the continent’s crippling
debt crisis while still focusing on
much-needed growth.
Treasury Secretary Timothy
Geithner, speaking Tuesday at the
close of the Group of 20 summit,
said Europe was nearing key deci-
sions aimed at stabilizing the euro-
zone. Those steps, he said, include a
stronger framework to strengthen the
continent’s financial system and
helping countries like Spain and Italy
borrow at sustainable interest rates.
“We’re encouraged by what we
heard from the European leaders
today and by the broad focus around
the world we’re seeing to the need to
strengthen economic growth,”
Geithner said.
Geithner spoke following
President Barack Obama’s private
meeting Tuesday with the leaders of
B r i t a i n ,
Germany, Italy,
France, Spain
and the European
Union. The con-
tinent’s leaders
were to outline
the specifics of
their plans dur-
ing a summit in
Brussels next
week, a meeting
Geithner called “critical.”
A senior U.S. official said Europe
would offer a “more forceful
response” than they have contem-
plated to date during the Brussels
summit. The Obama official said the
European strategy will be based
around building more viable finan-
cial institutions over time but also
economic growth measures in the
short term, a step Obama has been
urging for some time.
The official spoke on condition of
anonymity to characterize private
talks without trumping the formal
comments of leaders.
While Obama, as leader of the
giant but struggling U.S. economy, is
central to the Europe talks, it is the
continent’s leaders, led by German
Chancellor, Angela Merkel, who
carry both the power and responsibil-
ity to stabilize a eurozone reeling
from debt, banking and political
problems.
Obama immersed himself in the
economic talks Tuesday before meet-
ing separately with Chinese
President Hu Jintao and holding a
news conference. He was to be back
in Washington by the early hours of
Wednesday, where a fierce re-elec-
tion campaign and a slumping U.S.
jobs market await him.
The leaders gathered on the
Mexican coast seemed intent on
sending the right signals to jittery
markets and unhappy electorates.
Merkel told reporters Tuesday that
the European leaders present made a
unified statement that they were will-
ing to tackle their problems.
Still, European leaders were show-
ing flashes that they have heard
enough about their troubles, particu-
larly from Americans.
U.S. officials ‘encouraged’ by
Europe’s plan to stem crisis
Timothy
Geithner
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — A budget show-
down for the ages could begin after this
year’s election and stretch well into
2013 — despite the threat that an
impending half-trillion-dollar ava-
lanche of tax increases and spending
cuts might rekindle a national reces-
sion.
The reason: an unprecedented colli-
sion of high-stakes fiscal decisions,
coming at a time of intense partisan-
ship, a teetering economy, record fed-
eral deficits and, possibly, a new presi-
dent.
Campaigning for the White House
and Congress will make substantive
action all but impossible before the
elections. And agreement may be near-
ly as tough during a post-election, lame
duck session in November and
December, barring a European finan-
cial meltdown or Middle East oil sup-
ply crisis that demands an immediate
response by lawmakers.
“I don’t know how a Congress that
can’t agree on anything in two years is
all of a sudden going to come together
with the administration in the last 45
days of the year to solve the problem,”
said Rep. Steven LaTourette, R-Ohio.
No one can confidently predict the
outcome of the battle over what many
are calling the “fiscal cliff.” Much
depends on whether President Barack
Obama defeats Republican challenger
Mitt Romney in November and which
party controls Congress.
If Romney wins, Republicans will
want to delay decisions until he takes
office in January. In that case, a lame
duck session would focus on postpon-
ing the spending cuts and extending
current tax rates for six months to a
year. If Obama is re-elected, the fight
could easily stretch into 2013 due to
the complex issues and the parties’
deep differences.
When political and economic stakes
reach these levels, the solution almost
always comes from party leaders and
the White House. Many in Washington
expect that to be true this time as well.
Even so, bipartisan groups of sena-
tors are seeking middle ground, meet-
ing in a Washington town house, a
restaurant and discreet Capitol hide-
aways. A common starting point has
been a debt-reduction plan by a 2010
commission headed by Democrat
Erskine Bowles and Republican Alan
Simpson.
Clash nearing over
tax boosts and cuts
Dad won’t face charges in
alleged attacker’s death
SHINER, Texas — A young Texas
father who beat to death with his fists a
man molesting his 5-year-old daughter
will not be charged, authorities said
Tuesday as they released a dramatic 911
tape of the dad frantically pleading for
help before the hired ranch helper died.
A Lavaca County grand jury Tuesday
declined to indict the 23-year-old father
in the death of Jesus Mora Flores, 47.
Prosecutors said the grand jury reached
same conclusion as police after review-
ing the evidence: The father was author-
ized to use deadly force to protect his
daughter.
The attack happened on the family’s
ranch off a quiet, two-lane county road
between the farming towns of Shiner
and Yoakum. Authorities say a witness
saw Flores “forcibly carrying” the girl
into a secluded area and then scrambled
to find the father. Running toward his
daughter’s screams, investigators said,
the father pulled Flores off his child and
“inflicted several blows to the man’s
head and neck area.”
Southern Baptists elect
first black president
NEW ORLEANS — The Southern
Baptist Convention voted Tuesday to
elect its first African-American presi-
dent in one of its biggest steps yet to
reconcile the 167-year-old denomina-
tion’s troubled racial past and appeal to
a more diverse group of believers.
The Rev. Fred Luter Jr. was unop-
posed in being elected by thousands of
enthusiastic delegates on Tuesday at the
annual meeting of the nation’s largest
Protestant denomination in his home-
town of New Orleans.
Pastor David Crosby of First Baptist
New Orleans nominated Luter, calling
him a “fire-breathing, miracle-working
pastor” who “would likely be a candi-
date for sainthood if he were Catholic.”
Around the nation
OPINION 9
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Leaf blowers are not a
public health hazard?
Editor,
John Mario Chetcuti says there is no
scientific evidence that leaf blowers are
a public health hazard (“Leaf blower
health claims not based on science”
published in the June 13 edition of the
Daily Journal). Thus, there is no proof
that sending dried feces airborne is
unhealthy. But is not sending feces air-
borne unhealthy?
My apartment is quite remote from a
big road —150 feet from a little street
and 1,000 feet from El Camino Real.
But all of the structures and cars in the
yard are covered with dust. Blowers
probably raise it from the soil and
spread it around. In other places, folks
can’t dry their laundry on clotheslines
in their backyards or patios — also
because of blowers.
In my native country, people do not
use leaf blowers. Once a year, they just
take a rake and drag all of the leaves
from under their bushes. Why can’t
Americans do the same? I do not
know.
Yevgeniy Lysyy
Palo Alto
Leaf blowers
Editor,
I want to thank the Burlingame
City Council for their thoughtfully-
crafted initiative to regulate leaf
blower use in our community. I
look forward to several days each
week when our neighborhood will
no longer be blasted by these loud
and dirty machines.
Little did I know when I moved
from the bustling city to the quiet
suburbs that there would be what
sometimes seems like the constant
refrain of leaf blowers. So not only
is this a health issue, with all of
the gas fumes and grime blown up
from the street, but a quality of life
issue for those who work, raise
children and are otherwise at home
during the day.
It was heartening to see the num-
ber of responses to the city survey.
Clearly, with over 850 responses
and 55 percent of those wanting a
ban or regulation of leaf blowers,
this is an important community
issue. Progress does not always
come in the form of a machine to
make our lives easier, but rather
the recognition that people, their
health and well-being are more
important.
Betsy McGinn
Burlingame
Roger Clemens not guilty, why
are we wasting public money?
Editor,
For the second time, Roger Clemens
was found not guilty of lying to Congress
( “Clemens: Not guilty” in the June 19
edition of the Daily Journal). Why are we
wasting precious tax dollars on this non-
sense? We have real criminals that should
be prosecuted. Drug dealers, murderers,
rapists, thieves, sex offenders and a host
of others should be prosecuted, not ath-
letes.
Why lying to Congress is considered a
crime defies any logic. Congressmen and
congresswomen from both parties and
houses lie to us on a daily basis. They tell
us they are reducing the size of govern-
ment when they are really increasing the
size of government. They tell us that
reducing the rate of growth from 10 per-
cent to 5 percent is a cut. Go Roger.
Keith C. De Filippis
San Jose
Letters to the editor
T
hat was quite a letter sent out
Friday evening by County
Superintendent Anne Campbell
after the San Mateo County District
Attorney’s Office announced it was
charging former Portola Valley superin-
tendent Tim Hanretty with embezzle-
ment of public funds.
In the letter, Campbell writes how the
San Mateo County Office of Education
and the Portola Valley School District
became aware of possible criminal
activity when he was chief business
official for the Woodside Elementary
School District. After a forensic audit
conducted by Hemming Morse, it was
revealed that there was a possible mis-
appropriation of solar project funds in
Portola Valley, according to the letter.
The charges include allegations Mr.
Hanretty diverted funds from a Portola
Valley School District solar project to
pay for construction costs on a personal
home renovation project.
The Office of Education is loaning up
to $300,000 to the Portola Valley
School District if needed to meet
expenses for the current fiscal year.
This came after the district’s Board of
Trustees certified its 2011-12 second
interim budget as “negative,” indicating
the district will not be able to meet its
expenses for the current year and the
next two years.
Ms. Campbell offered the following
statement about the Friday arrest:
“I am deeply saddened by the news
of Mr. Hanretty’s arrest, but I appreci-
ate the thorough investigation that has
been conducted by Hemming Morse
and by the District Attorney’s Office.
My focus as county superintendent will
continue to be on working together
with Portola Valley officials to get the
district’s budget back into balance. I
know there is much still to do, but I am
confident the Portola Valley governing
board and Superintendent Carol Piraino
are on the right path.
I look forward to continuing to work
with the Portola Valley School District
in returning the budget to positive sta-
tus.”
This is a responsible, and necessary,
path for the County Office of
Education. However, it is entirely
regrettable and perhaps even avoidable
in the future. Campbell is the former
superintendent of the Portola Valley
School District and likely knows all too
well how small the district office is and
how much trust is placed in the super-
intendent. Countless school officials
have spent their careers doing the best
in trying situations and such allegations
of embezzlement are extremely rare.
Woodside and Portola are the smallest
districts in the county. Portola has two
schools, Woodside has one. Both serve
affluent areas. There has been some
amount of discussion over the years as
to the need for such small school dis-
tricts — and there is the balance
between local control and the savings
created through shared services, merg-
ers and consolidation. This is a prime
opportunity for the county Office of
Education to further explore opportuni-
ties for additional oversight, shared
services and potential mergers of
school districts, particularly the small
ones. Such efforts take time, and there
have been small steps taken. Some
services such as payroll could be pro-
vided by another district or even the
county Office of Education. As initia-
tives are found that work, trust can be
built, and then there could be expan-
sion. In the meantime, the county
Office of Education is exploring ways
to reemphasize the need for financial
oversight by elected boards of trustees.
That’s a key step because elected offi-
cials are voted in to oversee staff.
This case is obviously an isolated
incident, however, there have been
many isolated incidents in recent
months when it comes to smaller dis-
tricts, particularly this one along with
the Mosquito and Vector Control
District and the Mid-Peninsula Water
District — all the alleged victims of
recent embezzlement. And there may
be a tipping point when such incidents
are no longer isolated, and require fur-
ther action by those elected to oversee
these districts. That time might be now.
Another case of alleged small district theft
Food stuff
“W
hat an extraordinary achievement for a civi-
lization: to have developed the one diet that
reliably makes people sick.” — Michael
Pollan, “Food Rules.”
I. Are you looking for an answer to the question of how to
get all of the nutrients you need in your daily diet? Check in
with 83-year-old Bruce Ames. He is associated with CHORI
— Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute. He was
also a professor of biochemistry and molecular geology at
the University of California at Berkeley, researching (among
many other things) the relationship between cancer preven-
tion and aging in relation to micronutrients in our food. He
and his cohorts thought that “a micronutrient deficiency may
explain why the quarter of the population that eats the fewest
fruit and vegetables has double the cancer rate for most type
of cancer when compared with the quarter that consumes the
most fruit and vegetables.
Obviously a very astute
man who has won all kinds of
awards and honors for his
work, Ames and his cohorts
have been working on devel-
oping what they call a Chori
bar for seven years or so. As
reported in the San Francisco
Chronicle on May 20, this is a
bar “designed specifically for
people with poor eating habits
who are lacking essential
nutrients in their diets, and
potentially putting themselves
at increased risk for long-term
health problems.” They say
that the purpose of the Chori bar is to “increase micronutri-
ent consumption toward optimum levels.”
In spite of all that, you wonder just what his purpose is in
developing such bars. Doesn’t this give many people the idea
that they can eat junk food all day but if they eat two nutri-
tion bars daily they will be well-nourished? Won’t this take
the focus away from eating nutritionally dense unprocessed
foods to maintain health? Could he be thinking that the bars
could eventually be used in poverty stricken countries to
help feed the starving? Maybe he’s looking for a legacy to
leave that people will remember him by.
II. I wonder if we in the United States will ever be able to
tell if a product has been genetically modified (or contains
GM ingredients). Fifty countries, including the European
Union require labeling of GM products. How much longer
will the industry (largely Monsanto) control the Food and
Drug Administration? Even though no one knows what
effect such foods may be having on the human body or the
environment, or what long-term problems may arise, the
industry arrogantly carries on — confident that what we
don’t know won’t hurt us (or their bottom line).
As Gary Hirshberg and Eric Schlosser, author of “Fast
Food Nation,” wrote — “The FDA doesn’t let pharmaceuti-
cal companies test new drugs on people without their
informed consent. Consumers should have the same right to
know when it comes to what they eat. But even the narrow
dictates of that FDA rule shouldn’t block the labeling of
genetically engineered foods. Everything about how they
were introduced and spread nationwide without our knowl-
edge or consent, leaves a bad taste in the mouth.”
If Monsanto has its way (and with our government
increasingly becoming corporate controlled), we may never
be able to check labels for GM modification although 93
percent of Americans surveyed think genetically engineered
foods should be labeled.
III. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg has gotten a lot
of flack for his attempt to ban the sale of huge soft drinks —
of course, most of it emanating from the industry. And then
there are those who, like a recent San Mateo County Times
editorial and an “Other Voices” from the McCook (Neb.)
Daily Gazette in this newspaper, belittle his efforts. But,
good grief, we’ve got to start somewhere! Which reminds of
Michelle Obama’s new impressive, highly illustrated tome,
“American Grown.” She writes, “As a mother and a first
lady, I was alarmed by the skyrocketing childhood obesity
rates and the dire consequences for our children’s health.
And I hoped this garden would help begin a conversation
about this issue — a conversation about the food we eat, the
lives we lead and how all of that affects our children.”
Mayor Bloomberg and Mrs. Obama are trying to make a dif-
ference, each in their own way. If more of us would emulate
them, it would make a big difference in the health of our nation.
At the least, we could refuse to purchase most of the manufac-
tured, adulterated and anti-nutritious products put out by our
opportunistic food industry that Kelly Brownell, author of
“Food Fight” refers to as “powerful, pernicious and predatory.”
But, in spite of it all, Mr. Brownell is optimistic. “Being
courageous and innovative, standing tall in the face of pres-
sure from the food industry, and taking decisive action is
what the nation needs, what our children deserve, what
appears to be in our future.”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 500
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,837.33 +0.75% 10-Yr Bond 1.62 +2.27%
Nasdaq2,929.76 +1.19% Oil (per barrel) 84.309998
S&P 500 1,357.98 +0.98% Gold 1,618.70
By Pallavi Gogoi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Stocks rose sharply on
Wall Street Tuesday as traders turned their
focus back to corporate news from the U.S.
and hopes that the Federal Reserve will
come up with a plan to jumpstart the econ-
omy. Banks and materials stocks led the
market higher.
The Dow Jones industrial average
soared 95.51 points to 12,837.33, its high-
est close in a month. Microsoft was one of
the biggest gainers in the Dow. The stock
jumped 3 percent after the company
announced a new tablet computer called
Surface to compete with the immensely
popular iPad from Apple. Microsoft was
up 86 cents at $30.70.
Stock traders are also latching on to
recent signals from the Federal Reserve
that the central bank may reveal plans to
stimulate the economy at the end of its
two-day meeting Wednesday.
“A good portion of today’s strong mar-
ket action is from a hope factor that we’re
going to get more easing from the Fed,”
said Peter Cardillo, chief market econo-
mist at Rockwell Global Capital.
Economists say that even if the Fed does
not act after its meeting, it will send a clear
message that it is standing by to do so if
needed.
Financial companies were among the
best performing stocks as investors hoped
for Fed action: Bank of America soared 4.5
percent, Citigroup gained 3.5 percent,
JPMorgan Chase was up 2.2 percent and
Morgan Stanley rose 3 percent.
Bank investors were also pleased to
learn that a federal housing agency will
clarify the process under which home
lenders are forced to buy back soured
home loans. The buybacks have cost banks
billions of dollars. The uncertainty sur-
rounding how much loans they will have to
repurchase from the government has led
them to reduce lending.
The agency’s statement comes just as
the housing market is showing signs of
healing. American builders broke new
ground on more single-family homes in
May and requested more permits to build
homes and apartments than they have in
the past three and a half years.
The Commerce Department also said
April was much better for housing starts
than first thought. The government revised
the figures up to 744,000, the fastest build-
ing pace since October 2008.
Material stocks rose on the prospect of
demand from home construction. US Steel
rose over 9 percent and Freeport-
McMoran Copper rose over 3 percent.
In other trading, the Standard & Poor’s
500 index rose 13.20 points to 1,357.98.
Seven of the 10 industry groups in the S&P
rose. The technology-heavy Nasdaq com-
posite index rose 34.43 points to 2,929.76.
The Dow Jones Utility average touched the
highest level since August 2008 before
closing slightly lower.
Fed news snaps stocks higher
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
J.C. Penney Co. Inc., down $2.08 at $22.25
The department store chain said that Michael
Francis, an executive brought in to help
redefine the brand, is leaving the company.
Walgreen Co., down $1.87 at $30.09
The drugstore chain said it will pay $6.7
billion in cash and stock for a stake in
European pharmacy retailer Alliance Boots.
Barnes & Noble Inc.,down 61 cents at $14.63
The bookseller and Nook e-reader maker
said that its fourth-quarter loss narrowed but
was still wider than analysts expected.
Chesapeake Energy Corp.,up $1.04 at $18.71
An ally to activist investor Carl Icahn will join
the energy company’s board this week as
Icahn pushes for a leadership shake-up.
Nasdaq
Microsoft Corp., up 86 cents at $30.70
In an attempt to take on Apple Inc.’s popular
iPad, Microsoft announced a new tablet
computer it calls “Surface.”
Sonic Corp., up 28 cents at $9.17
A Sterne Agee analyst upgraded the fast food
company’s stock rating to “Buy,”citing its new
ads and improved products.
Network Equipment Technologies Inc., up
14 cents at $1.32
Internet hardware and software maker
InSonus Networks said that it is buying the
communications equipment maker for $41.3
million.
Citi Trends Inc., up $1.90 at $15.64
A Susquehanna analyst upgraded the
clothing chain’s stock rating to “Positive”
citing the company’s strong financial results.
Big movers
By Marcy Gordon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — JPMorgan Chase
CEO Jamie Dimon had a much tougher
reception Tuesday when he returned to
Capitol Hill for a second round of ques-
tions over the bank’s $2 billion trading
loss.
House lawmakers from both parties
pressed Dimon on a number of fronts: Did
JPMorgan manage risk properly? Why
was the bank trading so much out of its
London office? Has the bank become too
large and complex to control?
The hearing before the House Financial
Services Committee was far more combat-
ive in tone than Dimon’s appearance last
week before the Senate Banking
Committee.
For his part, Dimon again apologized for
the trading loss and the damage it caused
to shareholders. The company has lost
about $23 billion in market value since it
came to light on May 10.
But Dimon stressed that taxpayers and
customers of the bank
were not affected by
the loss.
And when pressed,
Dimon was firm and
frank.
At one point, Rep.
Sean Duffy, R-Wis.,
asked Dimon how
high the losses could
mount.
“Is it fair to say that JPMorgan could
have losses of half a trillion, or a trillion
dollars?” Duffy asked.
Dimon replied bluntly: “Not unless the
Earth is hit by the moon.”
He avoided putting a number of the
bank’s trading loss, which has raised con-
cerns about the risks large banks pose to
the U.S. financial system just four years
after the financial crisis.
Dimon also bristled at a suggestion from
Duffy that JPMorgan has become “too big
to fail.” With $2.3 trillion in assets, taxpay-
ers might be asked to step in to rescue the
bank if its trades put the broader financial
system at risk, Duffy said.
“No, we’re not too big to fail,” Dimon
told Duffy in a heated exchange. “I don’t
think there’s any chance we’re going to
fail. But if we did, any losses the govern-
ment would bear should go back, be
charged to the banks.”
Dimon defended the bank’s risk strategy
ahead of the loss.
The bank did its best to update investors
on the level of risk and trusted its methods
for assessing those risks, he said. The mod-
els used provided the best information at
the time and are frequently updated, he
said.
“We disclosed what we knew when we
knew it,” Dimon told the panel.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission is examining whether
JPMorgan’s earnings report on April 13
gave adequate information on the risk
model the bank was using.
Earlier at the hearing, SEC Chairman
Mary Schapiro told the panel “there could
be” violations that would merit legal sanc-
tions against the bank.
JP Morgan CEO grilled over losses
Jamie Dimon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — With the unveiling of
the Surface tablet, Microsoft is heading
into unusual territory: competing with its
partners, the very same companies that
make Windows PCs. But Microsoft has
little to lose, since PC manufacturers
have so far had very little success with
their own tablets.
With the unveiling of its tablet this
week Microsoft Corp. is taking up the
competition with Apple Inc. and its iPad
by borrowing a page from Apple’s play-
book. It is keeping both software and
hardware development under the same
roof.
“If imitation is the sincerest form of
flattery, the compliments from Microsoft
poured down like a torrential storm on
Apple last night,” said analyst Brian
White at Topeka Capital Markets.
Even Steve Ballmer, Microsoft’s
famously tough-talking CEO sounded
downright Zen and Apple-inspired as he
introduced the Surface.
That’s a new philosophy for Microsoft,
a company accustomed to writing the
software, charging loads of money for it,
and letting others design the hardware.
Microsoft has sold hardware before,
most notably the Xbox game console,
which is essentially a PC.
Microsoft tablet risks
alienating PC makers
House panel boosts
rural air service subsidies
WASHINGTON — Tea party lawmak-
ers from rural areas were among those
fighting the hardest to preserve taxpayer
subsidies for airline flights into and out
of small towns last year after senior
Republicans tried to eliminate the oft-
criticized program. Now, the House
Appropriations Committee is awarding
the program an 11 percent budget hike.
Next year, the subsidies would reach a
record $214 million under a bill the
GOP-run committee approved Tuesday.
The subsidies can reach hundreds of
dollars per ticket — and can exceed
$1,000 in a few cases — though a recent
overhaul of the program will soon take
care of such cases.
Last year, the House voted to eliminate
the program in the lower 48 states by
2013. But rural tea party lawmakers like
Reps. Rick Berg, R-N.D., and Kristi
Noem, R-S.D., were among those who
fought to save it.
Business brief
<< Zito roughed up in Anaheim, page 13
• France, England advance at Euro 2012, page 14
Wednesday, June 20, 2012
NO CONTRACT, NO WORRIES: ANDREW LUCK STAYS FOCUSED DESPITE LACK OF CONTRACT >>> PAGE 16
White Sox
swing the
big sticks
Heat one
win away
N
ick Manessis will be the first to
admit he is not the best athlete
around. He knows his
strengths while at the same time
acknowledges his weaknesses.
But when you factor in his mental acu-
men, coupled with his competitive
nature, it adds up to one of the most
impressive high school resumes you’ll
ever see.
“I’m very competitive. It doesn’t have
to be just sports,” Manessis said. “It
could be sports, it could be bingo.”
A three-sport star at Terra Nova,
Manessis had a senior year most athletes
would envy: a first-team, all-Peninsula
Athletic League member in football and
basketball, and the PAL Bay Division
baseball Player of the Year. He was also
awarded the Terra Nova co-senior ath-
lete of the year (along with Chris
Forbes) as well as the school’s “Eye of
the Tiger” award which factors in both
athletic and academic achievements.
“For the first time in school history,
we gave the awards to one person,” said
Bill Gray, Terra Nova football coach and
athletic director.
Manessis now has one more honor to
add to resume: Daily Journal Male
Athlete of the Year.
“I always thought if I played one
sport, I could excel at it, maybe get a
(college) scholarship,” Manessis said.
“But I loved all the sports and I couldn’t
choose. I figured I’d try to be the best in
each one.”
Mission accomplished. As a receiver,
free safety and kicker for the Tigers’
football team, Manessis caught 50 pass-
es for 893 yards and 12 touchdowns
while pulling down seven interceptions
and finishing with 100 tackles, hitting
double digits in six games. In a 44-30 win
over Sacred Heart Prep in the PAL Bay
Division opener last season, Manessis
accounted for 26 points with three
touchdown catches, five extra points, a
32-yard field goal, five catches for 107
yards and an interception.
“He’s just a pleasure to coach. You
only have to tell him once. He’s reliable,
he’s accountable, he understands criti-
cism, he’s humble, he’s not outspoken,
but kids follow him. Hell, the coaches
follow him,” Gray said. “From a coach-
ing standpoint, you look at a kid and
make the simple statement: he gets it.
Sometime we have a hard time explain-
ing what ‘it’ is. He gets school, he gets
the athletic part of it. He’s an above-
average athlete, not a great athlete. His
success comes from his work ethic.”
See MANESSIS, Page 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s still relatively early in the Palomino sea-
son. But if there’s one thing that is crystal
clear, its that White Sox manager Lenny
Souza has a problem most managers dream of.
“We can swing it a little bit,” Souza said.
“When I put the team together, it just seemed
that we ended up with so many corner infield
guys and so many corner outfield guys and I
was worried about how I was going to get
them their at-bats and their reps. It’s worked
out to where we just hit very well because we
have so many corner guys. There are a lot of
bats going through that order.”
Those potent bats were on display Tuesday
at Aragon High School in a 15-5 win over
Hardtke Baseball Academy. San Mateo starter
Aldo Severson surrendered four runs in the
top of the first inning. But all that did was
awaken White Sox bats in a slumber since last
Thursday.
“Aldo didn’t have his best stuff today,”
Souza said. “[Jonathan] Murphy came in and
threw gas and whenever we needed offense,
these guys answered.”
The White Sox answered in an emphatic
way.
The top of the first wasn’t entirely
Severson’s fault. He only surrendered two
hits, but the San Mateo defense had a pair of
errors that prolonged the inning. After the
chaos, the Braves found themselves up 4-0.
By Brian Mahoney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MIAMI — LeBron James better get well
fast. He’s about to play for a championship.
Hardly able to move, James returned from a
left leg injury to make the tiebreaking 3-point-
er with 2:54 remaining
and the Miami Heat held
off Russell Westbrook and
the Oklahoma City
Thunder for a 104-98 vic-
tory on Tuesday night and
a 3-1 lead in the NBA
Finals.
With James watching
the final moments, Mario
Chalmers finished off a
stellar 25-point effort that matched Dwyane
Wade. James had 26 points, 12 assists and nine
rebounds, only missing a triple-double
because he was on the bench at the end after
hurting his leg in a fall near the Thunder bas-
ket.
Game 5 is Thursday night and James will
have a chance to finish a championship chase
that started in Cleveland before he famously -
- or infamously -- left for South Florida before
last season. No team has blown a 3-1 lead in
the finals.
Westbrook scored 43 points for the Thunder,
who wasted an early 17-point lead but were
See NBA, Page 16
LeBron James
See SOX, Page 14
PAMPER ME 12
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Brandon McCarthy showed no
signs of an ailing shoulder in seven impressive
innings, winning his third straight start and sixth
consecutive decision to lead the Oakland Athletics
past the Los Angeles Dodgers 3-0 on Tuesday
night.
Seth Smith and Jonny Gomes each hit RBI sin-
gles, and Coco Crisp reached four times and stole
three bases as the A’s beat the NL West-leading
club that began the day with baseball’s best record.
McCarthy (6-3) outpitched former A’s starter
Aaron Harang (5-4), who couldn’t overcome a
career-high eight walks and his 40-pitch first
inning. Harang, traded by Texas to the A’s in
November 2000, made his major league debut in
the Oakland Coliseum on May 25, 2002.
On Tuesday, he looked far from the same pitch-
er who tossed seven scoreless innings and struck
out 10 that day.
McCarthy — Oakland’s opening day starter —
pitched for the first time since June 7 after he was
scratched from his scheduled start last Wednesday
at Colorado because of a sore shoulder. He was his
usual dominant self, allowing only one runner past
first when Andre Ethier advanced on Bobby
Abreu’s fourth-inning groundout.
McCarthy allowed two hits, struck out five and
walked only one in a strong 81-pitch outing that
featured 56 pitches for strikes.
While these teams met for just the 23rd time in
regular-season history, they faced off in two mem-
orable World Series matchups — Oakland’s 1974
championship in five games and the Dodgers’ title
in ‘88 also in five games. The A’s are 10-2 in the
series at home.
Harang was done after 3 2-3 innings for his
shortest outing since 2010 while with Cincinnati.
He allowed three runs on three hits and struck out
six while throwing a whopping 105 pitches.
This is hardly how the Dodgers hoped to begin
their first Bay Area trip of the season — they
return to play the division rival Giants in San
Francisco next week.
“This is a team anybody in Northern California
doesn’t particularly care for,” A’s manager Bob
Melvin said.
The A’s staked McCarthy to an early lead on
Smith’s first-inning RBI single that took a big
bounce over center fielder Tony Gwynn Jr.’s glove
for a two-base error that allowed a second run to
score. Gomes singled three batters later.
When Harang reached 40 pitches in the first, he
yelled into his glove as he walked off the mound
already trailing 3-0. Those would be all the runs
Oakland needed.
Grant Balfour pitched the eighth, and Ryan
Cook finished the two-hit shutout — Oakland’s
seventh — for his fourth save in five chances. The
Dodgers were blanked for the third time.
Crisp walked in each of his first three plate
appearances and singled in the sixth. He stole his
11th and 12th bases in the fourth and No. 13 in the
sixth, extending his streak to 36 straight successful
attempts. It’s an Athletics franchise record since
caught stealing became an official stat in 1920.
Notes: A’s RHP reliever Andrew Carignan
underwent Tommy John right elbow ligament
reconstructive surgery Tuesday in New York, per-
formed by Mets Dr. David Altchek. ... Oakland
RHP starter Bartolo Colon, who left his Sunday
start against the Padres with a strained right
oblique muscle, will be placed on the disabled list
once the A’s figure out their corresponding roster
move.
McCarthy, Oakland blank Dodgers
A’s 3, Dodgers 0
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM — Albert Pujols hit a three-run
homer, Mark Trumbo added a three-run triple
while driving in five runs, and Mike Trout
matched his career high with four hits in the Los
Angeles Angels’ 12-5 victory over the San
Francisco Giants on Tuesday night.
C.J. Wilson (8-4) allowed season-highs of five
runs and 10 hits, but the Angels backed him with
their highest-scoring performance of the season.
Los Angeles battered Barry Zito (5-5) for
eight runs on nine hits in just 3 1-3 innings, start-
ing with Pujols’ first-inning homer before the
pitcher had recorded an out.
In the California clubs’ first series at Angel
Stadium since the 2002 World Series, the Angels
moved back to a season-high five games over
.500 with their eighth win in 11 games.
Trout went 4 for 4 with a walk and scored four
runs while getting enough plate appearances to
move into the AL batting title race at .337, trail-
ing only Chicago’s Paul Konerko. The rookie
led off the first and second innings with doubles,
and Pujols drove him home both times — the
15th and 16th times that has happened since
May 1.
Pujols drove in four runs and made back-to-
back stellar defensive plays to end a seventh-
inning rally by the Giants, who trailed 9-1 after
four innings. Trumbo cleared the bases in the
fourth, missing a 400-foot homer by inches,
before adding a two-run single in the eighth to
cap his three-hit game.
Wilson wasn’t totally sharp and got spotty
defense during his 6 1-3 innings. His AL-leading
ERA rose to 2.44, yet the Angels have won each
of their new left-hander’s last six starts.
Zito had yet another rough outing in a six-year
stint full of missteps since moving across the
Bay from Oakland to San Francisco. The first
five Angels reached base against him in Los
Angeles’ four-run first inning, and the left-han-
der departed in the fourth inning with the bases
loaded for Trumbo’s triple off George Kontos.
Zito gives up four in first in Giants’ loss
Angels 12, Giants 5
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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KIEV, Ukraine — France was
outplayed, outfought and outscored,
and that was against a team with
nothing to play for.
With world champion Spain now
waiting in the quarterfinals of the
European Championship, things
better improve quickly for the
French to stand a chance of going
any further.
France limped into the knockout
round of Euro 2012 despite a 2-0
loss to Sweden in their final group
game, showing just how much the
team still needs to improve to be
true contenders in the tournament.
The French finished second in
Group D after England beat Ukraine
1-0, and will face Spain on Saturday
in the quarterfinals.
“You have to be optimistic to
think that we can beat Spain, but it’s
hard right now to imagine that we
can. We have to do better on
Saturday,” France coach Laurent
Blanc said. “We wanted to finish top
of the group but couldn’t manage it,
so we have to deal with that.”
France’s 23-game unbeaten streak
came to a crashing end as the
already-eliminated Swedes exposed
frailties in the back four and neu-
tralized the dual attacking threat of
Karim Benzema and Franck Ribery.
The Swedes dominated proceed-
ings for much of the game and
Zlatan Ibrahimovic broke the dead-
lock with a piece of artistry in the
54th minute, sending a spectacular
volley past helpless goalkeeper
Hugo Lloris. Sweden had plenty of
chances to add a second before
Sebastian Larsson finally did in
injury time to secure the team’s first
points of the tournament.
“We really wanted to win this
game for the fans, their support has
been fantastic,” Ibrahimovic said.
“We wanted to finish this strongly
for them.”
Perhaps France can still do the
same, but the team has big problems
to solve in both defense and attack.
“We were too average in too many
areas to hope to win this match,”
Blanc said. “The Swedish team
played with all their hearts, they
were better prepared than us. They
had a player in their ranks
(Ibrahimovic) who made the differ-
ence. If you analyze the game, we
were in trouble for most of it.
“We’re very disappointed with
how we played. The main thing is
that we’ve qualified.”
England finished with seven
points, while France had four and
Ukraine and Sweden bowed out
with three each.
France looked lackluster through-
out much of the game and lacked
clinical finishing when it did threat-
en the Swedish goal.
Substitute Jeremy Menez had
France’s best chance to equalize
when he broke into the area in the
81st minute but his low shot was
stopped by goalkeeper Andreas
Isaksson’s leg. From the resulting
corner, Olivier Giroud headed just
wide.
Benzema was largely ineffective
again and remained scoreless at the
tournament. Ribery had France’s
best chance in the first half when the
ball fell to him on the left edge of
the area but his shot was parried by
Isaksson.
Instead, it was Ibrahimovic who
stole the show with another spectac-
ular goal to add to his resume. The
tall AC Milan striker met Larsson’s
cross from the left and put himself
nearly sideways in the air before
striking the ball perfectly past
Lloris.
“It was a perfect cross from Seb,”
Ibrahimovic said. “The whole team
played a fantastic game today.”
Lloris then single-handedly kept
France in the game over the next
few minutes as Sweden kept press-
ing, making point-blank saves to
deny Christian Wilhelmsson and
Olof Mellberg.
Larsson finally added the second
by emphatically volleying a
rebound into an empty net, giving
the large contingent of Swedish fans
a reason to celebrate.
“It’s mixed emotions right now,”
Sweden coach Erik Hamren said.
“We should be happy with the victo-
ry and the performance. ... But at the
same time, there’s a sense of sad-
ness in us all because we would
have wanted to stick around a bit
longer.”
England 1, Ukraine 0
DONETSK, Ukraine — Only one
goal counted, and it belonged to
Wayne Rooney.
The England striker returned from
a two-match suspension to head in
the lone goal Tuesday and give his
team a 1-0 win over Ukraine and a
spot in the European Championship
quarterfinals. The co-host
Ukrainians, however, will leave the
tournament knowing that things
could have been different.
Needing a win to advance, the
Ukrainians thought they had tied it
the 62nd minute when Marko
Devic’s deflected shot appeared to
loop over the line before it was
hooked clear by England defender
John Terry. But the goal was not
awarded by the referee or his extra
assistant, who was half-standing on
the field only a few meters from the
post.
“The goal that wasn’t given really
changed our plan because if it was
given, I think the whole game could
have looked another way,” Ukraine
captain Andriy Shevchenko said
through an interpreter.
France reaches Euro quarters despite 2-0 loss
Coming off two-game suspension,Wayne Rooney’s goal give England top spot inGroup E
But the Sox responded almost
immediately. Armando Fajardo
walked to lead off and he scored on
a double off the left-field fence by
Marcus Pollard. John Coloma
scorched another double to right
field that scored Pollard easily and
Coloma scored two batters later on
a sacrifice fly off the bat of Mike
Chavez.
“I was a concerned, not worried,”
Souza said after the first inning.
“Just because we haven’t played
since Thursday of last week. We
usually play a lot of games and you
don’t have to practice because
you’re going so much. But when I
saw the first, I was like, ‘Oh man,
we’ve had too much of a layoff.’ But
we bounced back.”
It took the Sox four hitters into
the second inning to tie the game
and another two after that to take
their first lead.
Trevor McNeil began the festivi-
ties with a double. Fajardo drew a
one-out walk and Pollard picked up
the RBI with a single to center for
the equalizing run. A Nick Manessis
hustle play forced an error at short
that plated Fajardo with the go-
ahead run and another boot by the
Braves defense plated Pollard.
From that point on, the Sox set-
tled down and began really distanc-
ing themselves from Hardtke.
“We had some shoddy defense
early on,” Souza said, “and I really
believe our strengths are pitching
and hitting. We’re going to make
some mistakes along the way. But
we handled it. We didn’t let it both-
er us. It’s good to see that.”
San Mateo put up another
crooked number in the third, aided
by another Braves error. Fajardo
and Pollard picked up RBIs in that
frame.
“Honestly, it’s been pretty easy
[filing out a lineup] because it’s
more so looking at the stats and bal-
ancing the at-bats because everyone
on the team can play. Everyone
gelled early,” Souza said. “They
understand what their role on the
team is. They understand that I’m
going to get them what they were
told. The biggest challenge has been
keeping the playing time even.”
Hardtke drew to within one run in
the fourth, only to see San Mateo
come right back in their half of the
inning and plate another three runs
— fueled by another error and a pair
of walks. McNeil picked up an RBI
and Fajardo stayed hot, plating
another two with a pretty, two-out,
3-2 single to the opposite field.
Murphy came in to relieve
Severson to begin the fifth and the
right hander was perfect, striking
out three of the six batters he faced.
“Murphy throws very hard,”
Souza said. “I think he’s going to do
well at the next level because he
hasn’t been pitching that long. We
started pitching him last year and
he’s been very good for us. We’re
just trying to get him as many
innings as possible right now.”
San Mateo put the game to bed in
the sixth, sending nine batters to the
plate. They scored all five of their
sixth-inning runs with two outs.
Pollard picked up another RBI,
Coloma walked with the bases
loaded, Manessis drew another error
to score a pair and Chavez ended the
game with an infield single.
Continued from page 11
SOX
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 38 27 .585 —
New York 37 32 .536 3
Atlanta 36 32 .529 3 1/2
Miami 33 34 .493 6
Philadelphia 32 37 .464 8
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 38 29 .567 —
Pittsburgh 35 31 .530 2 1/2
St. Louis 34 34 .500 4 1/2
Milwaukee 31 37 .456 7 1/2
Houston 28 40 .412 10 1/2
Chicago 24 44 .353 14 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 42 26 .618 —
San Francisco 38 31 .551 4 1/2
Arizona 33 34 .493 8 1/2
Colorado 25 41 .379 16
San Diego 24 45 .348 18 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Atlanta 4, N.Y.Yankees 3
Cleveland 3, Cincinnati 2, 10 innings
Philadelphia 7, Colorado 2
Pittsburgh 7, Minnesota 2
Detroit 6, St. Louis 3
Tampa Bay 5,Washington 4
N.Y. Mets 5, Baltimore 0
Boston 7, Miami 5
Kansas City 2, Houston 0
Chicago Cubs 2, Chicago White Sox 1
Toronto 10, Milwaukee 9
Oakland 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Texas 7, San Diego 3
L.A. Angels 12, SanFrancisco 5
Seattle at Arizona, late
Wednesday’sGames
Atlanta (Hanson 7-4) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 7-
5), 10:05 a.m.
Kansas City (B.Chen 5-6) at Houston (Lyles 1-3),
11:05 a.m.
Toronto (Undecided) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 5-5),
11:10 a.m.
Seattle (Vargas 7-6) at Arizona (Cahill 5-5), 12:40
p.m.
Texas (Darvish 8-4) at San Diego (Bass 2-7), 3:35
p.m.
Cincinnati (Arroyo 3-4) at Cleveland (Masterson 3-
6), 4:05 p.m.
Colorado (White 2-5) at Philadelphia (Blanton 6-
6), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (Liriano 1-7) at Pittsburgh (Bedard 4-
7), 4:05 p.m.
NL STANDINGS
GroupA
W D L GF GA PTS
x-Czech R. 2 0 1 4 5 6
x-Greece 1 1 1 3 4 4
Russia 1 1 1 5 3 4
Poland 0 2 1 2 3 2
GroupB
W D L GF GA PTS
x-Germany 3 0 0 5 2 9
x-Portugal 2 0 1 5 4 6
Denmark 1 0 2 4 5 3
Netherlands0 0 3 2 5 0
GroupC
W D L GF GA PTS
x-Spain 2 1 0 6 1 7
x-Italy 1 2 0 4 2 5
Croatia 1 1 1 4 3 4
Ireland 0 0 3 1 9 0
GroupD
W D L GF GA PTS
x-England 2 1 0 5 3 7
x-France 1 1 1 3 3 4
Ukraine 1 0 2 2 4 3
Sweden 1 0 2 5 5 3
x-advanced to quarterfinals
TuesdayGames
Sweden 2, France 0
England 1, Ukraine 0
QUARTERFINALS
Thursday, June21
Czech Republic vs. Portugal, 11:45 a.m.
Friday, June22
Germany vs. Greece, 11:45 a.m.
EURO 2012
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 41 25 .621 —
Baltimore 39 28 .582 2 1/2
Tampa Bay 37 29 .561 4
Toronto 34 33 .507 7 1/2
Boston 33 33 .500 8
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 35 32 .522 —
Cleveland 34 32 .515 1/2
Detroit 32 34 .485 2 1/2
Kansas City 29 36 .446 5
Minnesota 26 39 .400 8
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 41 27 .603 —
Los Angeles 37 32 .536 4 1/2
Oakland 31 36 .463 9 1/2
Seattle 29 40 .420 12 1/2
Tuesday’sGames
Atlanta 4, N.Y.Yankees 3
Cleveland 3, Cincinnati 2, 10 innings
Pittsburgh 7, Minnesota 2
Detroit 6, St. Louis 3
Tampa Bay 5,Washington 4
N.Y. Mets 5, Baltimore 0
Boston 7, Miami 5
Kansas City 2, Houston 0
Chicago Cubs 2, Chicago White Sox 1
Toronto 10, Milwaukee 9
Oakland 3, L.A. Dodgers 0
Texas 7, San Diego 3
L.A. Angels 12, SanFrancisco 5
Seattle at Arizona, late
Wednesday’sGames
St. Louis (Westbrook 5-6) at Detroit (Porcello 4-4),
4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Archer 0-0) at Washington (Strasburg
8-1), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Matusz 5-7) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 4-5), 4:10
p.m.
Miami (Nolasco 6-5) at Boston (Doubront 7-3),4:10
p.m.
Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 1-1) at Chicago White Sox
(Floyd 4-7), 5:10 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Eovaldi 0-2) at Oakland (Milone 6-
5), 7:05 p.m.
San Francisco (Vogelsong 6-2) at L.A. Angels
(Weaver 6-1), 7:05 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
St. Louis at Detroit, 10:05 a.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Oakland, 12:35 p.m.
AL STANDINGS
@A’s
7:05p.m.
NBC
6/22
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
@Rapids
6:30p.m.
CSN+
6/20
@RSL
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/23
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@FCDallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/7
@Angels
7:05p.m.
NBC
6/20
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
vs. Dodgers
12:35p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/21
vs. Dodgers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/20
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. 9 4 3 30 29 19
Kansas City 9 3 1 28 19 10
New York 8 4 2 26 27 21
Chicago 6 5 3 21 18 18
Columbus 5 4 4 19 13 13
Houston 5 4 4 19 15 16
New England 5 7 2 17 18 18
Montreal 4 7 3 15 19 22
Philadelphia 2 8 2 8 8 15
Toronto FC 1 10 0 3 8 23
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Real Salt Lake 10 3 2 32 25 14
San Jose 8 3 3 27 27 17
Vancouver 7 3 4 25 17 15
Seattle 7 4 3 24 17 13
Colorado 6 7 1 19 20 19
Chivas USA 4 7 3 15 9 17
Los Angeles 4 8 2 14 16 21
Portland 3 6 4 13 12 16
FC Dallas 3 9 4 13 16 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday’s Games
D.C. United 1, Philadelphia 0
Vancouver 1, Colorado 0
Montreal 4, Seattle FC 1
New England 0, Columbus 0, tie
Houston 2, FC Dallas 1
Sporting Kansas City 2, Toronto FC 0
Real Salt Lake 3, Chivas USA 0
Sunday’s Games
Chicago 3, New York 1
Los Angeles 1, Portland 0
Wednesday, June 20
Toronto FC at Houston, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.
San Jose at Colorado, 6:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Seattle FC, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.
New York at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Saturday, June 23
New England at Toronto FC, 2:30 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
MLS STANDINGS
vs. Giants
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/22
@A’s
4:15p.m.
FOX
6/23
vs.Giants
4:15p.m.
FOX
6/23
vs.Giants
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/24
@A’s
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/24
vs. Dodgers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/25
vs.Dodgers
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/26
@Mariners
7:10p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/25
vs.Dodgers
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/27
@Mariners
12:40p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/27
BASEBALL
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL—Suspended
PhiladelphiaINFFreddyGalvis 50games for testing
positive for a banned substance.
AmericanLeague
BOSTONREDSOX—Activated OF Cody Ross from
the15-dayDL.PlacedOFScott Podsednikonthe15-
day DL, retroactive to June 18.
CHICAGOWHITESOX—OptionedRHPZachStew-
art to Charlotte (IL). Recalled RHP Dylan Axelrod
from Charlotte.
DETROIT TIGERS—Activated RHP Octavio Dotel
from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Thad Weber to
Toledo (IL). Released DH Brad Eldred from Toledo.
KANSASCITYROYALS—Renewedtheir player de-
velopment contract with Omaha (PCL) through
2016.
TAMPABAYRAYS—Placed RHP Jeremy Hellick-
son on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Chris Archer
and OF Rich Thompson from Durham (IL).
National League
PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Agreed to terms with
RHP Adrian Sampson, INF D.J. Crumlish and INF
Chris Diaz on minor league contracts.
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Activated OF/INF Skip
Schumaker from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP
Maikel Cleto to Memphis (PCL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
CINCINNATI BENGALS—Placed RB Rodney Stew-
art on the waived-injured list.
DALLASCOWBOYS—Released TE George Bryan.
INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Signed RB Mewelde
Moore. Released QB David Legree.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS—ReleasedTEBoScaife
and OL Mike Ingersoll.
TRANSACTIONS
Former US men’s
coach Panagoulias dies
VIENNA, Va. — Former U.S. men’s team
head coach Alketas “Alkis” Panagoulias has
died. He was 78.
USA Soccer and the Greek Football
Association confirmed Tuesday that he died
on Monday.
A native of Greece, Panagoulias led the U.S.
men from 1983-85, and also guided the 1984
Olympic team. He later managed Greece from
1992-94 and led his country to its first World
Cup appearance in 1994.
The Americans went 6-5-7 with Panagoulias
as coach. At the time, Panagoulias’ six wins
were the second-highest total for a U.S. head
coach.
Greek players will wear black armbands
during the Euro 2012 quarterfinal against
Germany on Friday.
A funeral for Panagoulias will be held on
Friday in Falls Church, Va.
Ichiro Suzuki gets his 2,500th hit
PHOENIX — Ichiro Suzuki of the Seattle
Mariners singled to lead off Tuesday night’s
game against the Arizona Diamondbacks for
the 2,500th hit of his major league career
The 38-year-old Suzuki had 1,278 hits in
nine seasons with the Orix Blue Wave of the
Japanese Pacific League before joining the
Mariners in 2001.
His 3,778 hits are the third-most among pro-
fessional players in either country, seven more
than Henry Aaron and trailing only Pete Rose
(4,256) and Ty Cobb (4,191).
Sports briefs
16
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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While Manessis’ goal of winning back-to-
back CCS title came to an end with a loss to
Bellarmine in the Central Coast Section Open
Division playoffs, Manessis reached his goals
of winning a PAL title — going undefeated in
the process — while earning all-league, first-
team honors.
“We were just a tight-knit team. Even after
the Bellarmine game, even though we got
killed (56-12), it felt good to play against one
of the top teams in the state,” Manessis said.
“I’m definitely proud [of my football career].
I like proving people wrong.”
The Tigers didn’t lose to the Bells because
of Manessis. On the contrary, he had a
tremendous game against the eventual CCS
champs, finishing with seven catches for 123
yards and a score.
Because of his extended football season,
Manessis was late arriving to the basketball
court, but quickly made up for lost time. In 21
games, Manessis led the Tigers in scoring at
14.9 points per game. He was second on the
team in rebounds, averaging six a game while
playing every position on the court.
“Basketball is the one (sport) that I love the
most,” Manessis. “This year, I was the No. 1
ball handler as I pretty much played every
position. I’m a really good passer and really
good at making my teammates better.”
More importantly, it was a tremendous
bounce-back season for Manessis and the
Tigers. When he was a junior, the Tigers did
not win a single PAL game and his individual
numbers were down across the board.
“My junior year, I didn’t get any (post-sea-
son) nominations. I was definitely disappoint-
ed with my play my junior year. I knew I had
the talent. I wanted to be dominant (this sea-
son).”
Terra Nova basketball coach Kenny Milch
knew Manessis’ junior year was an aberration.
He also knew Manessis was a rare high school
athlete.
“Nick was our best all-around player. … He
just got better this year,” Milch said. “There
was no doubt what us coaches thought he was
going to do. We knew what we were getting
— the whole package.”
If Manessis was merely good on the foot-
ball field and basketball court, he was spec-
tacular once he transitioned to the baseball
diamond. He set some pretty lofty goals for
himself in the spring and other than winning
the PAL Bay Division and CCS titles, he
accomplished what he set out to do.
“I wanted to hit over .500,” Manessis said.
How about .553? Manessis had 47 hits in 85
official at-bats in 25 games this season, lead-
ing the team in RBIs with 19 and tying for the
team lead in doubles (5) and home runs (1),
striking out just four times all season.
He also excelled on the mound, posting a
2.08 ERA in 57 1/3 innings pitched.
As well as Manessis performed in the ath-
letic arena, he was an all-star in the classroom
as well. He had a 4.2 GPA for his high school
career and was named the 2012 class salutato-
rian.
“He is the model student-athlete. He’s had
straight A’s since he entered high school. He
has numerous academic awards,” Gray said.
[His parents] have stressed both academics
and athletics, both.”
Gray said Manessis took on leadership roles
that extend far beyond athletics and one
would have to be intimate with the Terra Nova
community to know how far his reach goes.
Gray said Manessis has worked tutoring
younger athletes, especially in math and
English — two subjects with which many
people struggle.
Manessis is attending University of San
Diego next year and has talked with the man-
ager about trying to walk on to the baseball
team. He doesn’t know in what he will major,
but business, sociology and politics all pique
his interest.
“I like debating,” Manessis said.
There is one thing that can’t be debated:
Manessis’ place in the history of Terra Nova
athletics. Gray puts Manessis in the top-5 all-
time athletes at the school.
Milch put it more succinctly: “He’s one of
those rare kids who don’t come around too
often.”
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
MANESSIS
never out of the game because of their sensa-
tional point guard. Kevin Durant had 28
points but James Harden threw in another
clunker, finishing with eight points on 2-of-10
shooting. Westbrook and Durant were the
only Thunder players to score in the last
16:46.
James stumbled to the court on a drive mid-
way through the fourth quarter, staying on the
offensive end of the floor as the Heat regained
possession on a blocked shot, and he made a
short jumper that made it 92-90. After
Westbrook missed a jumper, the Heat called
timeout as James gingerly went to the court.
Unable to walk off, he was carried to the side-
line by a pair of teammates.
He returned to a huge roar with a little over
4 minutes left and the Heat down two, and
after Chris Bosh tied it, James slowly walked
into a pull-up 3-point attempt — perhaps
doing so knowing he couldn’t drive by any-
one.
That made it 97-94, and when Wade fol-
lowed with a layup with 2:19 left, the Heat
finally enough room to withstand Westbrook,
who kept coming all night.
“Whatever it takes. No excuses,” said Wade,
who had to shake off his own aches and pains
after landing hard on his back in the first half
following a spectacular block by Serge Ibaka.
“You don’t want to leave this arena saying you
missed opportunities.”
Chalmers sure didn’t. The player who was
struggling so badly that the Thunder put
Durant on him in hopes of avoiding further
foul trouble made 9 of 15 shots, scoring more
points than he had in the previous three
games.
“Mario Chalmers is a winner,” Wade added.
“He’s due for a big game and he came through
for us.”
The Heat couldn’t have done it without
James, who refused to let any pain prevent
him from taking the biggest step of his career.
The Heat never got past their second finals
victory last year, with James’ struggles their
biggest problem as they lost the last three to
Dallas. But he was at his brilliant best in this
one, keeping up his scoring surge but also
willingly kicking it out to open teammates
whenever he was double-teamed.
He tried to play through the pain, but the
Heat had to call another timeout and remove
him for good shortly after his go-ahead bas-
ket. There was no immediate word on the
extent of his injury.
Bosh finished with 13 points and nine
rebounds for the Heat, who quickly climbed
out of the 17-point hole by scoring 16 straight
points, with Chalmers and backup Norris Cole
helping steady them until James and Wade got
going.
James and Durant sat alone on their bench-
es moments before the game, Durant staring
quietly toward the floor and James saying
something to pump himself up. Then they
went out to start, and this time Durant stayed
away from him.
In foul trouble the last two games, he began
the game covering Chalmers, an adjustment
that freed him from the burden of defending
James. It kept Durant safe from fouls — but
the Thunder probably didn’t count on the
scoring explosion from Chalmers after he had
totaled just five over the previous two games.
Continued from page 11
NBA
Luck not worried about unsettled contract
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS — Andrew Luck is
focused on his new job and will let others
contend with the business of football.
Two days after picking up his architectural
design degree from Stanford, the No. 1 over-
all draft pick returned to Indianapolis to work
on football and make his first big steps into
the community at a Play 60 camp downtown.
The only impediment standing between
Luck and reporting to training camp is sign-
ing a contract. He’s not concerned about it.
“To me, I worry about
getting better at football,”
Luck said after the event.
“My agent, I’ll let him
take care of that.”
Luck is scrambling to
catch up.
He’s trying to get famil-
iar with the city, get his
timing down with team-
mates and still cramming
to learn the full playbook, something he
admits is an ongoing process.
“Hardly. I’m trying every day,” Luck said
when asked whether he knew the playbook
yet.
The Stanford graduate is hardly alone.
Indy’s top three draft picks — Luck, sec-
ond-rounder Coby Fleener and third-rounder
Dwayne Allen — are all unsigned. The Colts’
other seven draft picks are under contract.
Team owner Jim Irsay did not expect the
negotiations to take this long, thanks in part
due to the new rookie wage scale which was
supposed to make it easier to complete deals.
Irsay told reporters in late April he expect-
ed negotiations to proceed quickly and that
Luck’s deal would be almost identical to the
four-year, $22 million contract last year’s top
pick, Cam Newton, signed. Newton became
the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year.
A little more than two weeks ago, Irsay
also wrote on Twitter that the two sides were
getting closer to a contract. Just not there
yet.
Luck’s agent, Will Wilson, has remained
relatively quiet about negotiations and told
The Associated Press in an e-mail Tuesday
he had “nothing to add.”
Andrew Luck
FOOD 17
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EVERY
THURSDAY
THURS SDDAAA GHT GGGHT T H GGGHT T YY WINE NIGHT AAA THURSDAY WINE NIGHT
E V EV EV E E E E V VE VVV EV EVERR RRRRRRRR RRYYYYY Y YY RRRRR RRR
S S RS RS RS RS R R U UR U HU H H T TH TT T S SS SS S S U U URR RR R T T THH H HUU U SSS S RR R HH H DD DDD DD DDD DA AA A A DDDDAA AAAAA AAA AY YY AYYY AAY AAYYY Y A AA AAAA AAAA AA
EVERY
THURSDAY
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Admittedly, steamed fish doesn’t exactly
scream mouthwatering. But what it lacks in
excitement it more than makes up for in health
cred.
Steaming generally involves no added fat
and is a great way of retaining all of the nutri-
ents in your food. It’s also relatively speedy.
One of the best ways to steam fish is what
the French call en papillote (pronounced on
pap-ee-oat), or literally “in parchment.” In
this simple method, fish is wrapped in a pack-
et of parchment paper. As it cooks, the food
releases juices. Those flavorful juices turn to
steam and are trapped in the packet, cooking
and flavoring the food, while keeping it moist.
You also can add other ingredients to flavor
and cook alongside the fish, such as herbs,
slices of lemon and vegetables. Because fish
cooks quickly, it’s a good idea to pick vegeta-
bles that are either thinly cut or tender; this
helps them cook at the same speed as the fish.
Try to avoid vegetables that give off too much
liquid, such as spinach.
Chicken thighs and lamb also can be
cooked in this manner, though they take
longer.
Don’t have any parchment handy? It’s
widely available alongside the plastic wrap at
the grocer and is excellent for lining baking
sheets when roasting foods or baking cookies
(it’s nonstick). But you also can use foil to
make the packets. Whatever you choose, be
sure not to wrap it too tightly.
For our dish, we went with hake, a firm
white fish. We arranged it over a bed of sea-
soned green beans and topped it with a simple
blend of fresh herbs and lemon. Other ideas
could be par-cooked, thinly sliced potatoes,
scallops and rosemary.
You also might julienne carrots, celery and
pea pods and top with raw shrimp seasoned
with garlic powder, cayenne and orange
slices. For an all-vegetable option, you could
do asparagus, sliced the long way, topped with
sliced shiitake mushrooms, apple slices and
chives.
Hake en papillote
Start to finish: 30 minutes
Servings: 4
1/2 pound small green beans, trimmed
Pinch smoked paprika
Salt and ground black pepper
Four 4-ounce hake fillets
4 sprigs fresh thyme
4 fresh mint leaves
4 small sprigs fresh marjoram
4 lemon slices
Heat the oven to 375 F.
Cut 4 large pieces parchment paper, about 12-
by-20-inches each. Fold each in half the short
way.
In a small bowl, toss the green beans with the
paprika. Season with salt and black pepper.
Open each sheet of parchment similar to a book.
Arrange a quarter of the beans on one half of
each sheet of parchment, placing them close to
the fold line. Top each pile with a hake fillet.
Season again with salt and black pepper.
Top each fillet with a sprig of thyme, a mint
leaf, a sprig of marjoram and a slice of lemon.
Fold the parchment packets closed like a book
again. Starting at one end of the fold, fold the
edges of the paper together every couple of inch-
es, creating a seam all the way around. Tuck the
last end under and place on a baking sheet.
Bake for 10 minutes. To serve, place each
packet on a serving plate and tear open at the
center.
Nutrition information per serving (values are
rounded to the nearest whole number): 120 calo-
ries; 10 calories from fat (8 percent of total calo-
ries); 1 g fat (0 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 65 mg
cholesterol; 5 g carbohydrate; 22 g protein; 3 g
fiber; 200 mg sodium.
Pack in the flavor with healthy, steamed hake
By Michael Hill
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WESTVILLE, N.Y. — “Got milk?” is get-
ting to be a difficult question when it comes to
organic.
Because even as more consumers are will-
ing to pay premium prices for organic milk,
supermarkets are having trouble keeping it on
the shelves as high feed and fuel prices have
left some organic dairy farmers unable to keep
up with demand.
“The market has surged faster than supply,”
said George Siemon, CEO of Wisconsin-
based Organic Valley, the nation’s largest
cooperative of organic farmers, “and at the
same time we had high feed costs reduce sup-
ply, so we had a double hit here.”
Organic milk shortages are nothing new. As
the milk — which federal regulations require
be from cows fed organic feed and free from
production-boosting synthetic hormones —
rose in popularity during the past decade,
there haven’t always been enough farmers to
meet demand (it can take three years to transi-
tion a conventional dairy farm to organic).
The shortages have been serious enough
that major chains like Hannaford
Supermarkets in the Northeast and Publix
Super Markets in the South recently posted
signs in the milk aisle advising shoppers of
reduced supply. Some relief is expected with
the seasonal spring boost in production. But
industry watchers say this shortage is more
worrisome because of the alarming jumps in
the price of organic corn and other feed cou-
pled with higher fuel costs.
“It’s kind of like a treadmill thing,” said
Siobhan Griffin, an upstate New York organic
farmer whose cows chomp hay in a hilly pas-
ture. “If you make less milk you make less
money, and then you can’t afford to make
more milk.”
After a recent dip during the recession,
sales of organic milk — which can sell for
twice as much or more as conventional milk
— are strong again. Sales for organic whole
milk were up 16 percent from January
through November of last year compared with
a year earlier, even as sales of conventional
milk declined, according to federal agricultur-
al statistics.
Molly Keveney, a spokeswoman for
Horizon Organic, the No. 1 selling organic
milk-brand, estimated a 7 percent growth in
organic milk demand in a time of flat supply.
Some farmers have switched to less expen-
sive feed, but that reduced production. Griffin,
who runs Raindance Organic Farm 55 miles
west of Albany, is losing money as costs out-
run prices. She sold 15 cows in the fall so she
could afford to buy feed for her remaining
cows.
In Elko, Minn., Tim Zweber of Zweber
Farms said his family sold about 20 milking
cows since the fall because of the feed costs,
leaving them with about 100. Zweber — who
like Griffin is a member of the Organic Valley
cooperative— said the price his family
receives for its milk versus the high costs of
Organic milk low, demand up and farmers struggle
Steaming fish in parchment paper locks in all the flavor, turning a boring technique into a
mouthwatering, healthy dish.
See ORGANIC, Page 19
18
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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W
ho knew coconut milk could be so
confusing? It shouldn’t be. At
heart, it’s a delicious liquid made
from coconuts (duh!) that can effortlessly add
an exotically creamy richness to so many
foods.
Except that grocers sell about half a dozen
different products that go by the same or very
similar names. And they aren’t interchange-
able.
So let’s start with what coconut milk isn’t.
Coconut water is a hip new drink that is
made from the liquid
inside coconuts. Drink
it, but don’t cook with it.
Coconut milk bever-
age is a sweetened drink
made from coconut milk
and sugar. It’s usually
sold in boxes alongside
soy milk.
Coconut cream is a
very thick, fatty liquid
made from steeping
shredded coconut in hot
water at a 4:1 ratio. It is
sold in cans, usually in the international aisle.
Sweetened cream of coconut is coconut cream
that has been (are you ready?) sweetened. It’s
intended for cocktails. Pina colada anyone?
Coconut milk is the real deal and the one you
want for cooking. Coconut milk is made like
coconut cream, but with a 1:1 ratio of coconut to
water. The result is a thick, pourable product
sold in cans in the international aisle.
In Southeast Asia, Africa and even South
America, coconut milk is used in curries, soups
(like Thai chicken and coconut), sauces, even
sweets, such as rice puddings and some baked
goods. In the U.S., we see it most often in cur-
ries, cream pies and puddings.
While it isn’t hard to make your own (sim-
mer shredded coconut in water, then drain),
let’s face it, none of us is going to do that.
Canned coconut milk is widely available
and inexpensive. But you will need to stir or
shake it. The fatty “cream” will rise to the top
of the can over time, creating a dense layer
that needs to be mixed back into the watery
liquid below.
Coconut-Lime Pulled Chicken Tacos
Start to finish: 25 minutes
Servings: 4
2-pound rotisserie chicken
1 cup coconut milk
1/2 teaspoon cumin
Zest and juice of 1 lime
Splash hot sauce
Salt and ground black pepper
1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped
Eight 6-inch flour tortillas, warmed
1 small red onion, diced
1 avocado, peeled, pitted and sliced
Remove the meat from the chicken, then
use your fingers to pull any larger chunks into
bite-size pieces.
In a medium saucepan over medium heat,
combine the chicken, coconut milk, cumin,
lime zest and juice, and hot sauce. Simmer
until heated through and thick. Season the
chicken with salt and pepper, then remove
from the heat. Stir in the cilantro, then divide
the mixture between the tortillas.
Top each serving with diced onion and avo-
cado. Serve immediately.
Nutrition information per serving (values
are rounded to the nearest whole number):
610 calories; 290 calories from fat (48 percent
of total calories); 33 g fat (15 g saturated; 0 g
trans fats); 100 mg cholesterol; 39 g carbohy-
drate; 40 g protein; 6 g fiber; 970 mg sodium.
Coconut milk: What it is and how to use it
J.M. HIRSCH
Burger King bets on
bacon sundae for summertime
NEW YORK — Burger King wants to lure
customers this summer with a barbecue party —
and a bacon sundae.
The world’s second biggest hamburger chain
on Thursday is launching several pork, beef and
chicken sandwiches as limited time offers. And
for a sweet ending, the company is also offering
a bacon sundae — vanilla soft serve with fudge,
caramel, bacon crumbles and a piece of bacon
— that started in Nashville, Tenn. earlier this
year.
The salty-sweet dessert clocks in at 510 calo-
ries, 18 grams of fat and 61 grams of sugar.
The limited-time items are Burger King’s lat-
est push to win back customers with a revived
menu and reverse sliding market share, an effort
that started soon after the company was taken
private by the private equity firm 3G Capital in
late 2010.
Earlier this year, Burger King launched its
biggest-ever menu expansion including fruit
smoothies, snack wraps and new salads. The
items were intended to go after a broader audi-
ence of moms and families, a shift from the
chain’s previous strategy of courting young men
with calorie bombs.
Core menu items, such as French fries and the
Whopper, have also been tweaked as part of the
company’s efforts to improve food quality.
Burger King is trying to underscore its own
focus on ingredients with a new tag line, “Taste
Is King,” which replaces “Have It Your Way.” A
new ad has been celebrating summer barbecues
to highlight the chain’s emphasis on fire-grilling
burgers.
Food brief
FOOD/WORLD 19
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL


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producing it results in margins that are very tight.
“If you can’t make any money doing it, take the word ‘sus-
tainable’ out of organic,” Zweber said with a laugh.
In fact, some struggling farms are switching back to conven-
tional milk or leaving the dairy business entirely. Milk Thistle
Farm, a Hudson Valley farm that was a popular vendor at New
York City farmers markets, recently announced that it no
longer could afford to continue production.
Horizon and Organic Valley say they have more dairy farm-
ers making the transition to organic. But Ed Maltby of the
Northeast Organic Producers Alliance said not as many farm-
ers are making the switch because of the economics.
The farmers’ plight illuminates an unusual feature of the
U.S. dairy economy: Most farmers do not set their own milk
prices. Organic farmers typically enter into contracts with
processors. This provides stability compared with the month-
to-month pricing of conventional milk, but it has caused prob-
lems once food and fuel costs took off.
Both Organic Valley and Horizon Organic, owned by Dean
Foods Co., have raised the prices they pay to farmers to
account for higher production costs.
But many struggling farmers say they need more. The
Northeast Organic Producers Alliance, for instance, is petition-
ing for a 60 cent a gallon hike. The Western Organic Dairy
Producers Alliance recently sent a letter to processors seeking
an increase that would add 22 cents to a half gallon for con-
sumers
That might be a tough sell.
There are questions over just how much consumers — even
those who will pay a premium to support sustainable family
farms — will pay for a half gallon of milk. Western alliance
president Tony T. Azevedo said he’d like to induce retailers to
kick more of their percentage back to the farmers, though he
acknowledges that’s “a pretty daunting task.”
Some farm advocates say additional price pressure comes
from industrial-style organic farming operations with 1,000 or
more milking cows that are producing more milk for “private
label” store brands sold in supermarkets and box stores. The
large-scale operations, some with their own processing plants,
can produce the milk less expensively than traditional farms
and put pressure on all producers to keep prices low.
The growth of these industrial-style operations has angered
small-farm advocates who say they violate the spirit of organ-
ic, sustainably produced food.
“Forget about the letter of the law for a second, these do not
comport with the values that the consumers think they’re sup-
porting when they’re buying organic milk,” said Mark Kastel
of the Wisconsin-based farm-policy group The Cornucopia
Institute.
Though no one knows when supply will catch up with
demand, many expect it to at least ease in a couple of months
with the production boost that comes each spring when the
fields are in bloom and cows can graze. Hannaford is telling
customers to expect more consistent inventory levels in April.
Maltby is more pessimistic.
“Perhaps when the cows go out to pasture in the spring, there
might be an increase in production, but we don’t anticipate that
happening dramatically,” Maltby said. “Nothing will really
change until the price that the farmer gets paid starts to meet
their cost of production.”
Continued from page 17
ORGANIC
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak was
being kept alive by life support after he was
rushed from prison to a military hospital in
a rapidly worsening condition, officials
said. The 84-year-old ousted leader’s health
crisis added a new element of uncertainty
just as a potentially explosive fight opened
over who will succeed him.
The state news agency MENA said
Mubarak was “clinically dead” when he
arrived at the hospital and that doctors used
a defibrillator on him several times. It ini-
tially said the efforts were not successful.
But the official said Mubarak was put on
life support. He had no further details on
his condition. The official spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because he was not
authorized to talk to the press.
The developments add further layers to
what is threatening to become a new chap-
ter of unrest and political power struggles
in Egypt, 16 months after Mubarak was
ousted by a popular uprising demanding
democracy. Egyptians were uncertain
about Mubarak’s fate, about who will suc-
ceed him and about whether his successor
will have any power.
The campaign of
Mubarak’s former
prime minister,
Ahmed Shafiq, said
Tuesday he has won
Egypt’s presidential
election, countering
the Muslim
Brotherhood’s claim
of victory for its can-
didate, Mohammed Morsi.
The election commission is to announce
the official final results on Thursday and no
matter who it names as victor, his rival is
likely to reject the result as a fraud. If
Shafiq is declared winner in particular, it
could spark an explosive backlash from the
Brotherhood.
The Brotherhood, Egypt’s most powerful
political group, is already escalating its
challenge against the ruling military over
the generals’ move this week to give them-
selves overwhelming authority over the
next president. Some 50,000 protesters,
mostly Islamists, massed in Cairo’s Tahrir
Square on Tuesday evening chanting slo-
gans in support of Morsi and denouncing
the generals’ power grab.
The health crisis of Mubarak, who is
serving a life prison sentence, is yet one
more thing to stoke the heat.
Moving Mubarak out of prison is likely
to further infuriate many in the public.
Many Egyptians have been skeptical of
earlier reports that his health was worsen-
ing since he was put in prison on June 2,
believing the reports were just a pretext to
move him to another facility. There is a
widespread suspicion that security and mil-
itary officials sympathetic to their old boss
are giving him preferential treatment.
Details of the crisis were still sketchy.
Earlier the news agency and officials said
that while at the Torah Prison hospital he
suffered a “fast deterioration of his health.”
His heart stopped beating until he was
revived by defibrillation, then he suffered a
stroke.
At that point, he was moved from the
prison hospital to Maadi military hospital
— notably the same one where his prede-
cessor Anwar Sadat was declared dead
more than 30 years ago after being gunned
down by Islamic militants. That was when
MENA reported him “clinically dead.”
Egypt’s Mubarak on life support
Greek coalition government
possible Wednesday
ATHENS, Greece — A coalition gov-
ernment could be formed by mid-
Wednesday in Greece, the head of the
country’s socialist party said Tuesday,
easing the nation from political limbo as
it struggles to deal with a financial crisis
that has affected Europe’s economy and
markets around the world.
Evangelos Venizelos, whose PASOK
party came third in Sunday’s elections,
said the socialists “will support this gov-
ernment sincerely and will participate in
it in the most beneficial way in order to
make it effective and credible.”
At the core of any administration
would be Antonis Samaras’ conservative
New Democracy party, which came first
in Sunday’s vote and won 129 of
Parliament’s 300 seats — short of the
151 needed to govern alone.
The radical left Syriza party, which
finished in second place, with 71 seats,
has refused to join any government that
will implement the terms of Greece’s
international bailout, under which the
country has received billions of euros in
rescue loans in return for deeply unpop-
ular spending cuts and tax hikes.
Around the world
Hosni Mubarak
LOCAL 20
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Alzheimer Cafe. 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Coastside Adult Day Health Center, 645
Correas St., Half Moon Bay. This is a
supportive, safe social space for those
with dementia and their loved ones. A
chance to socialize in a comfortable,
non-judgmental atmosphere. Experts
will be on hand to provide safe,
appropriate activities, games, and
advice. Free. For more information or
to reserve a spot call 726-5067.
OwntheNightFilmSeries: Gremlins.
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
ages 12 and up. For more information
contact conrad@smcl.org.
Magical Fun-due atTheMelting Pot.
6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The Melting Pot, 2 N. B
St., San Mateo. SeeLiveMagic.com’s
own David Miller will be performing
sleight-of-hand and close-up magic.
This event is free to restaurant patrons.
For more information go to
www.seelivemagic.com.
Blues Kitchen at Club FoxBlues Jam
6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. Nancy
Wenstrom will host and Blues Kitchen
will perform. Blues Kitchen will play two
sets at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. In between
sets, musicians are invited to join the
blues jam if they come early and sign
up. $5. For more information or to
reserve tickets call 369-7770 or go to
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Wednesdays Group Series Dance
Classes. 7:30 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City
Boulevard, Suite G, Foster City.
Beginning Argentine Tango Class from
7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Advanced Club
and Social Group Series Classes
learning Salsa from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Intermediate Argentine Tango Class
from 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Argentine
Tango Practica from 9:30 p.m.to 10:30
p.m. $16 to drop in. For more
information call 627-4854.
THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Job Seekers. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Mateo Main Library, second floor, 55 W.
Third Ave., San Mateo.Volunteers with
experience in human resources,
coaching and teaching will help with
the job search. Event runs Monday
through Friday at the same time. Free.
For more information call 522-7802.
AARP Chapter 139 Meeting. 11 a.m.
Beresford Recreation Center, 2720
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. 11
a.m. is the social hour. The business
meeting will start at noon, after which
the Rahiti Polynesian Dancers will
perform. For more information call 345-
5001.
Dinosaurs Rock. 2 p.m. Hillsdale
Shopping Center, 60 31st Ave., San
Mateo. Bring the pre-historic world to
life for its monthly Kid’s Club event,
‘Dinosaurs Rock.’ Children are invited
to take a trip back in time to learn
about dinosaurs, check out fossil and
mineral specimens and even come
face to face with a T-Rex skull. Experts
will talk to kids about these ancient
creatures and invite children to
particpate in educational activities,
including a simulated fossil dig. Free.
For more information
shelbi@spinpr.com.
My Liberty San Mateo Meeting. 6
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. American Legion Post
No. 82, 130 South Blvd., San Mateo.
Meetings are held the first and third
Thursday of every month. Free. For
more information call 345-7388 or go
to MyLibertySanMateo.com.
Central ParkMusic Series. 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. Central Park, downtown San
Mateo, corner of Fifth Avenue and El
Camino Real, San Mateo. Enjoy music
by ‘Dance Party.’ Free. For more
information call 522-7522 x2767.
Thursdays group Series Dance
Classes.7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Boulevard,
Suite G, Foster City. All Level Bachata
Class from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. All Level
Salsa Class from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. $16 to
drop in. For more information call 627-
4854.
2012Summer Gaieties. 7:30 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City.$20.
For more information or to reserve
tickets call 369-7770 or go to
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Salacious Underground: a neo-
burlesque experience. 8 p.m. to 10
p.m. Angelica’s Bistro, 863 Main St.,
Redwood City. Featuring some of the
hottest and most creative talent of the
Bay Area with performers like Laika Fox,
Ophella Coeur De Noir, Pearl E. Gates
and special guest Lynn Ruth Miller ‘The
Stripping Granny.’ Tickets $15 at door.
For more information go to
http://www.angelicabistro.com.
MoviesontheSquare: TheMuppets.
8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square, 2200
Broadway, Redwood City.This movie is
rated PG. Free. For more information
call 780-7340 or go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/m
ovies.html.
FRIDAY, JUNE 22
MonthlyRhythmDanceParty.8 p.m.
to midnight. Boogie Woogie Ballroom,
551 Foster City Blvd., Suite G, Foster City.
Raul Ante teaches Hustle and hosts our
monthly Rhythm Dance Party. Hustle
lesson is from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m., followed
by a three-hour Rhythm Dance Party.
$12 at 8 p.m., $10 at 9 p.m. For more
information call 627-4854.
Danilo Perez Trio perform. 8 p.m.
Dinkelspiel Auditorium, 471 Lagunita
Drive, Stanford. Latin-influenced
rhythms and a command of classical
technique combine with world-class
jazz to make the Danilo Perez Trio a
must-see group. Students $15. General
Admission $36. For more information
go to http://stanfordjazz.org/jazz-
festival/events
The Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit
and RinTinTiger and Hang Jones. 9
p.m. Club Fox, 2209 Broadway,
Redwood City. $10. For more
information or to reserve tickets call
369-7770 or go to
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, JUNE 23
Early Bird Jazz for Kids: Jim Nadel.
10 a.m. Dinkelspiel Auditorium, 471
Lagunita Drive, Stanford. Live music,
fascinating instruments and talented
performers at affordable and family-
friendly morning of jazz. Kids under 18
are free. In advance $5. At the door $10.
For more information go to
http://stanfordjazz.org/jazz-
festival/events.
The Birth and Baby Fair, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. San Mateo Event Center, 2495 S.
Delaware St., San Mateo.The Birth and
Baby Fair is the ultimate event for new
and expecting parents in the Bay Area.
Workshops, demonstrations, shopping,
raffle prizes, and more. $10 admission.
Ages 18 and under are free. For more
information go to
www.babyandbirthfair.com.
Master Gardeners Present: 2012
Educational GardenTour. 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Check in at Redwood High School,
1968 Old County Road, Redwood City,
to receive maps to the gardens. $20.
For more information call 726-9059 x
107.
American Radio RelayLeague Field
Day. 11 a.m. to 11 a.m June 24.
Beresford Park, 2720 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. All are invited to try
to make contact around the United
States. Free. For more information
contact scwatkin@yahoo.com.
SherryAustin with Henhouse. 3 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more
information go to
www.smcl.org/content/belmont.
Annual Temple Bazaar. 3 p.m. to 9
p.m. The San Mateo Buddhist Temple,
2 S. Claremont St., San Mateo.There will
be Japanese and American foods,
game booths, bingo and
entertainment. Admission is free. Prices
vary for games and foods. For more
information call 342-2541 or go to
sanmateobuddhisttemple.org.
International Latin — Samba Dance
Class. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boogie Woogie
Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd., Foster
City. Drop-in cost in $16. For more
information call 627-4854.
Bobby Hutcherson and the Joey
DeFrancesco Trio. 8 p.m. Dinkelspiel
Auditorium, 471 Lagunita Drive,
Stanford. Leaders of their respective
jazz generations, vibist Bobby
Hutcherson and jazz organist Joey
DeFrancesco combine their virtuosity
to energize and delight. Students $15.
General Admission $36. For more
information go to
http://stanfordjazz.org/jazz-
festival/events.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
lumped together under specific headings
like “collaborative community” —
included those that handle the county’s
money like the assessor-county clerk-
recorder, controller and treasurer-tax
collector. Despite their differing needs,
common themes arose in each area —
mainly, the use of technology to work
better and with fewer costs.
The Information Services Department
is facing its own structural deficit and,
as part of a two-year elimination plan, is
recommending 12 positions be cut, said
Deputy County Manager Reyna
Farrales.
Taken with 20 positions already gone,
the department has seen a 20 percent
drop in its workforce from three years
ago.
Information Services handles every-
thing from lights to computer needs but
the number of projects overall are down
which has contributed to its deficit. This
year’s budget, however, is up by $6 mil-
lion because of large-scale projects for
the San Mateo Medical Center like
implementing electronic records.
ISD is readying itself to support a
growing number of mobile devices used
by various departments in the field, such
as planning and public works, and mov-
ing to cloud-based solutions.
“Regardless of what device they get,
we need to be able to support it,” she
said.
Similar to ISD’s goal of using new
technologies to lower costs, Sandie
Arnott, the county treasurer-tax-collec-
tor, outlined her move toward electronic
billing and Controller Bob Adler said
his department is using automation tools
to find anomalies in transactions. Adler,
who is proposing no reductions in serv-
ice next year, is focused on improving
internal controls, improving bill pro-
cessing at the San Mateo Medical
Center and teaming with smaller depart-
ments for accounting and audits.
But while the departments presented
yesterday offered glimpses at an
improving, if slow, recovery —
increased property tax revenue of which
the county will receive about $10.1 mil-
lion, increased assessment roles and
higher assumed earnings on retirement,
for example — there was also warnings
of challenges to come.
Mark Church, assessor-county clerk-
recorder, told the Board of Supervisors
he will be coming back in the future for
help to find more data storage. He also
said 33 percent of his staff is eligible to
retire, which could prove a staffing chal-
lenge.
On Wednesday morning, the supervi-
sors will be hearing from the offices of
the sheriff, district attorney, coroner and
probation. Closing remarks and
approval happens Thursday afternoon.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9
a.m. Wednesday, June 20 in Board
Chambers, 400 County Government
Center, Redwood City.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
COUNTY
county’s top fiscal officer and, according
to Supervisor Don Horsley, more an
administrative than policy-making posi-
tion.
If passed, the measure will add San
Mateo County to nine of 58 other coun-
ties with appointed controllers. Of
those, six have consolidated depart-
ments of finance including the con-
troller, treasurer and tax collector and
nearly all have switched fairly recently,
said County Counsel John Beiers.
Supervisor Dave Pine suggested look-
ing at a similar consolidation in the
future but kept most of his focus yester-
day on a proposed requirement that the
controller have a degree in accounting
or equivalent. Pine maintained a perfect-
ly acceptable applicant could have an
actual degree in something like engi-
neering but have developed solid finan-
cial skills as a CFO or similar job during
his or her career.
Supervisor Carole Groom, who sub-
mitted the charter change proposal
along with Horsley, said the idea is
opening the door to younger possibili-
ties with “a combination of experience
and new ideas rather than somebody 30
years into their career.”
Currently, the law holds that the con-
troller must meet at least one of several
criteria: be a certified public accountant;
hold a baccalaureate degree in account-
ing or its equivalent and not less than
three years experience within the last
five years in a senior management posi-
tion in a public agency, private firm or
nonprofit organization.
The proposed change to appointment
would exceed the minimum qualifica-
tions by adding that being designated a
professional internal auditor and/or
experience as a county auditor would
not be sufficient. The committee also
recommends candidates have knowl-
edge of public administration principles
and practices, budgeting, fiscal adminis-
tration and effective personal adminis-
tration, employee relations and manage-
ment in a public setting.
Ultimately, Pine did not push the
degree issue and the board unanimously
directed Beiers to draw up the ordinance
as proposed by Horsley and Groom.
Namely, the charter change would allow
the county manager to select a candidate
for consideration with final approval by
the Board of Supervisors. The controller
would be an at-will employee who can
be removed without cause or a public
hearing as long as it comes with a coun-
ty manager’s recommendation and a
four-fifths vote of the board.
The Board of Supervisors began look-
ing at the possibility of changing the
office after naming assistant controller
Bob Adler to the vacant position left by
former controller Tom Huening’s mid-
term resignation. In 2010, a 17-person
Charter Review Committee recom-
mended making both the controller and
treasurer-tax collector appointed jobs
but county supervisors unanimously
rejected the idea.
Beiers will bring the ordinance back
for a vote at the July 10 meeting.
Placing the measure on the ballot will
cost approximately $40,000.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
VOTE
facility, exercise facility and a cafe/break
room. Parking would be offered in a five-
story parking structure and a podium-
level parking area below the four office
buildings and in smaller lots scattered
around the site.
Councilman Michael Brownrigg noted
that the development would call for a
denser floor area ratio than currently in
the regulations. He felt like it was a fair
tradeoff given the developer’s commit-
ment to improvements like upgrading
the streets and trails in the area.
Keighran agreed with his statement.
The project, for example, calls for
developers to contribute $1 million to
Burlingame’s $8 million share of
improving the Broadway overpass. In
addition, it will require a contribution be
made to the Poplar Avenue off ramp
once San Mateo chooses a solution.
Contributions by the companies who
move into the space will also allow an
increased number of shuttles from the
Millbrae BART Station.
Ground is expected to be broken in
early 2013.
In other business, the council
approved an ordinance to allow up to
three more restaurants in certain areas of
the Burlingame Avenue Commercial
District.
Noting a demand for restaurant space,
a property owner requested the
Burlingame City Council allow addition-
al food establishments in the 1400 block
of Burlingame Avenue, which was con-
sidered earlier this month. As written,
the ordinance will allow for three addi-
tional restaurants — two on the 1400
block of Burlingame Avenue and one
within the Burlingame Avenue
Commercial District, according to a staff
report.
Brownrigg suggested the city study
getting rid of the limits on certain types
of restaurants altogether.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
DRIVE-IN
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Until I started watch-
ing videos on Samsung’s new Galaxy S
III phone, I never thought of the
iPhone’s display as small.
The Galaxy’s screen measures 4.8
inches diagonally, compared with 3.5
inches for the iPhone. That translates to
a display area that’s nearly twice the
size. Yet the Galaxy is thinner and
lighter.
Apart from that, the Galaxy shares the
iPhone’s curvy and shiny design, along
with a center button that wakes up the
device from power-saving mode or takes
you from whatever you’re doing to a
home screen.
Unlike the iPhone, the Galaxy runs on
faster 4G cellular networks (AT&T mar-
kets its iPhones as 4G, but the network is
based on older technology). The Galaxy
also comes with a new wireless technol-
ogy called near-field communications,
which can be used to share files and
make purchases.
Pictures taken with the Galaxy were
sharper and had better light balance than
those with the iPhone, based on a hand-
ful of test shots I took. The Galaxy’s tool
for measuring data usage — for those of
us no longer on unlimited plans — sur-
passes what comes with the iPhone.
All that makes the Galaxy a strong
contender to Apple’s popular device.
I understand the comparison isn’t
entirely fair. The iPhone 4S is about
eight months old, and there’s a new
model expected this fall. Last week,
Apple previewed changes to the phone’s
operating system, promising improve-
ments to its Siri virtual assistant, a map-
ping service with voice navigation and
more.
But the reality is the new Galaxy is
available this week — not in September
or October.
All four national wireless companies
and regional carrier U.S. Cellular will
sell the Galaxy, which runs the latest
operating software from Google, a flavor
of Android known as Ice Cream
Sandwich.
The Galaxy phones will be available
in white or blue. AT&T will also have a
red version this summer, but it won’t
carry the 32 GB model.
Samsung Galaxy strong contender to iPhone
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20, 2012
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Generally speaking,
in most situations you must prime the pump frst
to generate a fow. Thus, if you want to be on the
receiving end today, be a giver.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- It’s important to note
that if you make good choices, certain actions you
take concerning a pertinent matter are likely to have
a number of far-reaching, favorable effects.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Although you might not have
as much control over an important matter as you’d
like, take comfort in knowing that someone else act-
ing on your behalf will come through for you.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Even if companions are
much faster than you at thinking on their feet, you’ll
still be the one who’ll recognize the value of their
ideas and maximize the benefts.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t fret if you feel
threatened, because any challenging developments
will only awaken your ingenuity. Competition will
strengthen your resolve instead of weakening it.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Endeavors that you
attempt solely on your own may yield only marginal
successes. Conversely, you are apt to be extremely
fortunate in all partnership arrangements.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Overall conditions
look to be extremely promising for you, and that
even includes certain negative developments. Any
disruptive effects will be short-lived and ultimately
benefcial.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- It’s OK to be careful,
but don’t play things so close to the vest that you end
up overly cautious. Sometimes you need to take a
calculated risk to get to the next level.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- With such a
considerable number of material opportunities
hovering about you, now is the time to improve or
enlarge upon a situation that has already proved
its worth.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- It would help you
tremendously to be hopeful about the outcome of
events that have an effect upon your fnancial well-
being. Positive thinking will lead you to luck.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Regardless of how the
day starts out, it’s likely to fnish on a good note.
You’ll make sure that many of the good things being
denied others won’t be held back from you.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- If you want good things
to happen, you can’t be indifferent about matters that
can directly affect your interests. To succeed, you
need to be assertive.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
6-20-12
TUESDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED
PREVIOUS
SUDOkU
ANSWERS
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
cages, must combine using the given operation (in any
order) to produce the target numbers in the top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in the
top-left corner.
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ACROSS
1 Chipper
6 Yelled insults
12 Tarzan’s moniker
14 More nervous
15 Bwana’s trek
16 Squirming
17 ER staffers
18 Dijon summer
19 Bolt holder
21 Mr. Mineo
23 New socialite
26 Panel truck
27 Duped
28 Musical sounds
30 Holy terror
31 Lennon’s wife
32 Map within a map
33 Animals that bark
35 Desk item
37 Mysterious sighting
38 Wanted-poster word
39 Mao — -tung
40 Salesperson, briefy
41 Fabric meas.
42 Poisonous reptile
43 Kept up the fre
44 Mi. above sea level
46 Laid up
48 Type of tiger
51 Good-looker
55 Meeting plan
56 Causing gloom
57 Rookie surfers
58 Helena rival
DOWN
1 Faux —
2 Clean-air org.
3 Sports “zebra”
4 Target rival
5 Kitten’s toy
6 Topaz or opal
7 Work in the newsroom
8 Incited (2 wds.)
9 Outft
10 Electric swimmer
11 Tumble the wash
13 Sentra maker
19 To wit
20 Like some debts
22 Votes to accept
24 Guarantee
25 Lodged a complaint
26 Travel document
27 The biggest Cartwright
28 Rake tooth
29 Layover
34 Pasta dish
36 Caught sight of
42 Globe substitute
43 Skips town
45 Cheryl or Alan
47 Ancient harp
48 Scrooge’s retort
49 Freud topic
50 Hammett detective
— Beaumont
52 Frying medium
53 Suffx for forfeit
54 Drain cleaner
DILBERT® CROSSWORD PUZZLE
fUTURE SHOCk®
PEARLS BEfORE SWINE®
GET fUZZY®
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVERS
VARIOUS ROUTES
SAN MATEO COUNTY
PENINSULA
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required. Must have
valid license and appropriate insurance coverage
to provide this service in order to be eligible.
Papers are available for pickup in San Mateo at
3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Credential Teacher
Resume Available
Pre-K to College
Multiple Subjects
Contact Elizabeth
opendoortutoring@yahoo.com
110 Employment
BUSINESS OPERATIONS Specialist
Req. MBA. Job Location: Foster City,
CA. Send resume to: Cooking Papa Inc.
2830 Homestead Rd., Santa Clara, CA
95051
CAREGIVERS
We’re a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906 650) 556-9906
or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
DAYCARE ASSISTANT - Experienced
CPR/Cert., PT/FT, (650)245-6950
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
LINE COOK - Night Shift,
1201 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos.
SERVERS, BARTENDERS &
DISHWASHERS NEEDED - @
Red Lobster in San Bruno. Apply
in person at: 1210 El Camino.
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
NOVELLES DEVELOPMENTAL Serv-
ices Ogden Day Program is hiring direct
care staff to work with adults with physi-
cal and developmental disabilities. Mon-
Fri, day shift only. Previous experience
required. Interested applicants should fax
resume to 650.692.2412 or complete an
application, Mon-Fri, 9am-3pm at 1814
Ogden Drive, Burlingame.
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250620
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Dragon Vending, 659 Hunting-
ton Ave., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: David Seward, 1166 Maple Ave.,
San Bruno, CA 94066 and Xi Luo, 34855
Starling, #4, Union City, CA 94587. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ David Seward /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/25/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250231
The following person is doing business
as: Palm Liquors, 116 South Blvd., SAN
MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Carolyn Furtado,
149 13th Ave., San Mateo, CA 94402.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
06/28/2006.
/s/ Carolyn Furtado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250635
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Arco Building Maintenance,
1359 San Mateo Ave., SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Norma
Angulo & Nadia Ventura, 124 Southwood
Ct., #4, So. San Fran., CA 94080. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Norma Angulo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250514
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Kerouac Construction, 1575 Ox-
ford St., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Karina Alexanyan & Stephan Fitch,
988 Godetia Dr., Woodside, CA 94062.
The business is conducted by Husband
& Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
01/01/12.
/s/ Stephan Fitch /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250564
The following person is doing business
as: The Tiny Jungle, 169 First Avenue,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Christine
Mende, 1255 Sanchez St., San Francis-
co, CA 94114. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/26/2012.
/s/ Christine Mende /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250279
The following person is doing business
as: Bad Wolf Press, 501 Seaport Court,
#205, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Bad Wolf Press, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
02/14/2012.
/s/ Lisa Adams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250408
The following person is doing business
as: Diamond Motors, 1710 S. Amphlett
Blvd., Ste. 117, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: D Motors, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/13/2002.
/s/ Armen Sadakian/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250611
The following person is doing business
as: Yume, 889 Ralston Ave., BELMONT,
CA 94002 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Mike Meng, Inc., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Yan Meng /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/24/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
05/30/12, 06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
23 Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250742
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hair Service, 1662 Palm Ave-
nue, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Ping
Lee & Jui Lan Liang, same address. The
business is conducted by Husband &
Wife. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Ping Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250304
The following person is doing business
as: Final Touch, 2827 Hosmer St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Marcos Ramos,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Marcos Ramos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/09/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250743
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe Baklava, 680 Laurel St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Serende
Corp., CA. The business is conducted by
a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Ilker Yuksel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250746
The following person is doing business
as: Brad Zucker Consulting, 814 Sover-
eign Way, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Sportsnet, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Bradley Evan Zucker /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/04/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250637
The following person is doing business
as: Smiling BBQ, 189 El Camino Real,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jingjing
Gong, 234 S. Figueroa St., #1631, Los
Angeles, CA 90012. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jingjing Gong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/1312, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250701
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Health Center, 1600 El Ca-
mino Real, #C, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Qun Wang, 707 Capital St., San Francis-
co, CA 94112. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Qun Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12, 06/27/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250679
The following person is doing business
as: MP Trading Services, 207 Satuma
Dr., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Joselito Nuguid, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Joselito Nuguid /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/12, 06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250699
The following person is doing business
as: Green Civil Engineering, 222 8th
Ave., #206, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Chin Hang Wong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Chin Hang Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/31/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/12, 06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250808
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Square Apartments, 2200
Lake Rd., 2200 Lake Rd., BELMONT,
CA 94002 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Richard Tod Spiekr, and
Catherine R. Spieker, 60 Mulberry Ln.,
Atherton, CA 94027. The business is
conducted by Husband & Wife. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 06/01/2012.
/s/ Richard Tod Spiekr /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/13/12, 06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250886
The following person is doing business
as: Fresh Apparel, 413 Hillsdale Mall,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Fr3sh, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Salem B. Zarour /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250929
The following person is doing business
as: CFO Today of Northern California,
116B E. 25th Ave, SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Gilmer Business Associates
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
March 2003.
/s/ T.P. Gilmer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/15/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250548
The following person is doing business
as: M & D Carpet & Upholstery, 1300 El
Camino Real #17, MILLBRAE, CA 94030
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Marco V. Tello Figueroa and
Dawnette Tello-Loezius, Millbrae, CA
94030. The business is conducted by a
Husband and Wife. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 4/30/12
/s/ /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250823
The following person is doing business
as: Anvil Capital, 520 S. El Camino Real
#524, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Anvil
Capital Advisors, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Michael Liou /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250834
The following person is doing business
as: Jeffrey Realtors, 2155 Ward Way,
Woodside, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jeffrey
Thomas Kockos, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Jeffrey Thomas Kockos /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/11/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250860
The following person is doing business
as: Fresh Apparel, 413 Hillsdale Mall,
SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Fresh Ap-
parel, Inc., CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Salem B. Zarour /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250677
The following person is doing business
as: Dolce Hair Lounge, 4060 S. El Cami-
no Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Adriana Rodriguez, 821 Winchester Dr.,
#2, Burlingame, CA 94010. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Adriana Rodriguez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/30/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250950
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Q & E Vending, 1509 Main
Street, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Gurpaul Gill, 101 Recino St., Fre-
mont, CA 94539 and Jagdeep Johal,
3104 Del Monte St., San Mateo, CA
94403. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Gurpaul Gill /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/19/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/20/12, 06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: April 24, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
RM EL TORITO LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
388 VINTAGE PARK DR
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 20, 2012
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: April 24, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
RM EL TORITO LLC
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
1590 BAYSHORE HWY
BURLINGAME, CA 94010
Type of license applied for:
47-On-Sale General Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 20, 2012
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Date of Filing Application: May 11, 2012
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
PIZZA MY HEART INC.
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
235 PRIMROSE ROAD
BURLINGAME, CA 94010-4207
Type of license applied for:
41-On-Sale Beer & Wine - Eating Place
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 6, 13, 20, 2012
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 248289
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: Ta-
queria San Agustin, 3 N. Kingston St.,
San Mateo, CA 94401. The fictitious
business name referred to above was
filed in County on 01/05/12. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Elaine G Barra-
za, 813 Jefferson Ct., Apt. 3, San Mateo,
CA 94401.
/s/ Elaine Barraza/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/15/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/30/12,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT of
USE of FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT # 245332
The following person has abandoned the
use of the fictitious business name: 24
Hr. Emergency Locksmith Inc., 922 Ter-
minal Way, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070.
The fictitious business name referred to
above was filed in County on 06/17/11.
The business was conducted by: Shay
Ben Simon, same address.
/s/ Shay Ben Simon /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 05/29/2012. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 05/30/12,
06/06/12, 06/13/12, 06/20/12).
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST - White iPhone in Redwood City
near Woodside Road & Kentfield. Re-
ward! (650)368-1733
LOST JUNE 12TH - Chain & pendant,
inscribed with “Grant Me the Serenity”,
(415)260-2930
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
296 Appliances
LARGE REFRIGERATOR- Amana
Looks and runs great. SOLD!
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
STAINLESS ELECTROLUX dishwasher
4 years old $99 (650)366-1812
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress
$25, (650)873-8167
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
298 Collectibles
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all.(650)589-8348
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard SOLD!
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MUCH SOUGHT after Chinese silver Fat
Man coin $75 (650)348-6428
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. (650)871-7200
SIGNED AUTOGRAPH Art and Gloria
Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
‘50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo (650)589-8348
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLAT SCEEN Monitor and Scanner, mint
condition; HP monitor 17in; Canon Scan-
ner 14 x 10 flatbed, SOLD!
303 Electronics
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$50 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ALL WOOD Kitchen Table 36” plus leaf,
William-Sonoma, SOLD!
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, (650)589-8348
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all.SOLD!
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
SOLD!
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6’ x 2.5’, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FRENCH PROVINCIAL COUCH - gold,
7’ long, good condition, $40., San Bruno,
SOLD!
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SIDECHAIR, WOOD arms & legs, Euro
sleek styling, uphol. seat cushion NICE
SOLD!
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
(650)343-4461
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $30 each or both for $50. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $90,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$75., (650)290-1960
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
24
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Jaunty tune
5 Desert bloomers
10 They may be on
KP
14 Land east of the
Urals
15 Detective
Pinkerton
16 Vex
17 White Castle
offering
20 Wide cigar
21 Drive on a course
22 Look like a wolf
23 Yields to gravity
24 Gadget for
sharing a TV
signal
29 The U.K.’s
Labour, for one
31 “Leaves of
Grass” poet
Whitman
32 __ de la Cité
33 “That makes
sense”
34 Becomes frayed,
say
36 Feds fighting
counterfeiting
37 Broke a fast
38 Talk with one’s
hands
39 It doesn’t hold
water
40 Angler’s weight
44 Mid-month time
45 Not e’en once
46 Blue shades
49 Affirm under oath
53 Types of them
can be found at
the ends of 17-,
24- and 40-
Across
56 Opposite of ecto-
57 Monterrey jack?
58 Salad dressing
“Born in a great
steak house.”
59 Professor’s boss
60 Confederacy
61 Starch from a
palm
DOWN
1 Cowardly Lion
portrayer
2 Golfer Aoki
3 Life partner?
4 Arrange in
columns
5 OPEC is one
6 Climate Reality
Project chairman
7 Cavs, on
scoreboards
8 Roofer’s supply
9 Sets up, as
software
10 One hearing a
confession
11 Everypooch
12 Curvy music
figure
13 Lord’s laborer
18 Words on a
yogurt container
19 On the up and up
23 Train between
ropes
24 First Nations
members
25 Cygnets’ parents
26 Kitchen
counter?
27 Alt.
28 Former Quebec
premier
Lévesque
29 “La Vie en Rose”
chanteuse
30 Sparkling libation
of Italy
34 Tart, juicy apples
35 Fabergé
collectibles
36 Hanging
organizers
38 “P.S. I Love You,”
to “Love Me Do”
39 Trapshooting
41 Add to the payroll
42 Place to be
43 Rather recent
46 Propped up by
pillows, perhaps
47 Writer Grey
48 Fed. inspection
org.
50 Mother of Zeus
51 100 C-notes
52 Bologna bone
54 Sign of summer
55 Shaq’s alma
mater
By Gary J. Whitehead
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/20/12
06/20/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $5. SOLD
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS vintage
drinking glasses, 1970’s, colored etching,
perfect condition, original box, $25.
(650)873-8167
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used,SOLD!
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
310 Misc. For Sale
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AC/DC REFRIGERATOR - for RV or
Boat, 20” tall, 23” deep, 19” wide, $499.,
(650)580-3316
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SOLD
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others SOLD!
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
ASTRONOMY BOOKS (7) mint condi-
tion, hard cover, eclipse, solar systems,
sun, fundamentals, photos $12.00 all,
SOLD!
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BOOK - “Fighting Aircraft of WWII”,
Jane’s, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
310 Misc. For Sale
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5” long X 17”
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm,
(650)344-8549
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree (650)834-
4926
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45”L, 20”W, 3”H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
ONE BOYS Superman Christmas Wrap-
ping paper $2., (650)873-8167
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $85. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PATRIOTIC BLANKETS (2) unopened,
red, white, blue, warm fleece lap throw.
$10.00 both. (650)578-9208
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Christ-
mas Wrapping Paper Retail $6 selling $2
each 6-7 yards, (650)873-8167
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLE CLOTH oval 120" by 160" with
12 napkins medium blue never used $25
(650)755-8238
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
310 Misc. For Sale
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea SOLD
UNOPENED, HARDCOVEED 556 page
BBQ book from many countries recipes
for spice rubs, sauces, grilling, photos
$12.00, (650)578-9208
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MEN’S navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MEN’S jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 SOLD!
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MEN’S PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SEARSUCKER suit size 42 reg.
$30 SOLD!
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMEN’S SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
2 ANTIQUE Glass Towel bars $60 pair
(650)271-0731
3 FRAMLESS shower door 3/8th” thick,
25”x66”, 24”x70”, 26”x74”, $30 ea.
(650)271-0731
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8”x4”x2” $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
25 Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19.
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF CLUBS - women RH complete set
W/ Cart & Bag used for only 5 lessons
like new $95 (650)365-1797
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45
(650)365-1797
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$65 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
LAT PULL machine, with accessories,
$50 OBO, SOLD!
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
PROFESSIONAL DART BOARD with
cabinet, brand new, $50obo SOLD!
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
THE THRIFT SHOP
ALL CLOTHING ON
SALE 50% OFF
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
470 Rooms
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in Daly City,
$750., (650)808-6210
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC ‘93 Sedan $ 1,800 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH ‘72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - ‘88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, $2,700.,
(650)593-3610
635 Vans
1999 CHRYSLER Town & Country Van,
Runs Well $700 SOLD!
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT ‘97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
“WE FIX CARS”
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair •Restore •Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13”,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning Cleaning
Concrete
Construction Construction
JOHN KULACZ CONSTRUCTION
Europena Quality! Worked in
San Mateo County for over 10 years,
20 years of experience
•INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR
REMODELING •KITCHEN •BATH
•DECKS, ECT.
(415)378-8810
email:
JKulaczConstruction@gmail.com
excellent references in SM County
license# 879568•insured, bonded
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed •Insured •Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
26
Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S
FLOORING
14086 Washington Ave
San Leandro
510-895-5400
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
•Carpentry •Plumbing
•Kitchens •Bathrooms
•Dry Rot •Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
PAYLESS
HANDYMAN
Kitchen & Bathroom Remodels
Electrical, All types of Roofs.
Fences, Tile, Concrete, Painting,
Plumbing, Decks
All Work Guaranteed
(650)771-2432
Handy Help
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
•General Home Repairs
•Improvements
•Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting •Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
JON’S HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
AM/PM
HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
•Sprinkler systems •New fences
•Flagstone •Interlocking pavers
•New driveways •Clean-ups
•Hauling •Gardening
•Retaining walls •Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando
(650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
•Interior & Exterior
•Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
•Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
Painting
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$69 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 898-4444
Lic#933572
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed –Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates •Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zeriloe
(650)245-8212
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Español
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specific directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
Food
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast •Lunch •Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
Food
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast •Lunch •Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way •San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
27 Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Table Showers now available
One hour $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
•Gold •Jewelry
•Art •Watches
•Musical Instrument
•Paintings •Diamonds
•Silverware •Electronics
•Antique Furniture
•Computers •TV’s •Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes •Multi-family •
Mixed-Use •Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
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Wednesday • June 20, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL