A STUDY ON WELFARE MEASURES ON EMPLOYEE IN CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD PALANI PROJECT REPORT

Submitted by

S.GAYATHIRI DEVI

REGISTER NO: 83209601012
Under The Guidance Of

Ms. K. JAYASURIYAA, B.Sc., M.B.A.,
Faculty, Department Of Management Studies In partial fulfillment for the award of the degree Of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES NPR COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY

NATHAM
June 2011

DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES NPR COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY NATHAM

BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

This to certify that the project work entitled “A STUDY ON WELFARE MEASURES

ON EMPLOYEE IN CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD.,PALANI‖ is a bonafide work
done by S.GAYATHIRI DEVI [REGISTER NO:83209601012] in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of Master of Business Administration by Anna University during the academic year 2009 – 2011.

GUIDE

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

Submitted for Viva-Voce Examination held on

INTERNAL EXAMINER

EXTERNAL EXAMINER

:

ABSTRACT

The welfare measure is ―An effort to make life worth living for workmen‖.

It

motivates employee to a great extent which leads to organizational growth. It is a major factor which affects the employee morale. The study on effect of welfare measure on employee in CLASSIC KNITS INDIA (P) LTD was done to evaluate the level of satisfaction of employees about welfare measure The main objective of the study is to measure the effect of welfare measure, level of satisfaction of employees regarding working condition and general attitude of employee towards the organization. Certain welfare measures provided by the company like medical facility, credit facility, canteen facility, infrastructure facility, and certain factors like motivation. Job

satisfaction interrelationships are considered in this study. This was a descriptive research study. Nearly 105 samples were collected using simple random sampling method. A

questionnaire of 25 questions was prepared and data were collected from the employees of CLASSIC KNITS INDIA (P) LTD appropriate statistical tools were used to analyze the data. From the study it is inferred that most of the employees were satisfied with the welfare measures provided by the company.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

First and foremost we thank god for his blessings showered on us for completing the project successfully. I extend my sincere thanks to Dr. V. Srinivasaraman M.E., PhD. Principal for giving me an opportunity to conduct this study. I have great pleasure in expressing my deep sense of gratitude to Mr. A. Kumar M.B.A., M.Phil. head of the department of management studies for his valuable support. My profound gratitude is also to, Ms. K. Jayasuriyaa B.Sc., M.B.A., faculty guide, for her valuable guidance and constant encouragement in the successful completion of this project. I express my deepest and sincere thanks to, Classic knits India Private Limited, Palani, which gave permission and enabled me to take up this project in this esteemed organization. I am deeply obliged to Mr.M.Selvaraj M.Sc., M.B.A (HR) for their exemplary guidance and support without their help this project would not have been success Last but not the least, I express my deepest gratitude to my beloved Parents for their constant encouragement. I also extend my heartfelt thanks to my friends who supported me in the course.

S.GAYATHIRIDEVI

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TABLE OF CONTENT

ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT LIST OF TABLES LIST OF CHARTS CHAPTER Introduction 1.1 Industry profile 1.2 Company profile I 1.3 Need Of The Study 1.4 Scope for the study 1.5 Objective 1.6 Review of literature 1.7 Research Methodology 1.8 Limitations Data Analysis And Interpretation 2.1 Percentage Analysis II 2.2 Statistical Analysis 2.2.1. Correlation 2.2.2. Chi-Square test 2.2.3. Mann Whitney U -Test Summary of Findings III 3.1 Findings 3.2 Suggestion 3.3 Conclusion Appendix References TITLE

i ii iii v PAGE NO 1 4 6 10 11 12 13 17 21

22 19 50 52 53

54 56 57 58 60

LIST OF TABLES
CHAPTER 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.1.5 2.1.6 2.1.7 2.1.8 2.1.9 2.1.10 2.1.11 2.1.12 2.1.13 2.1.14 TITLE Table Showing the Age Group of respondents Table Showing the Gender of respondents Table Showing the Educational Qualification of respondents Table Showing the Marital Status of respondents Table Showing the Monthly Income of respondents Table Showing the Stages of Worker of respondents Table Showing the Experience of respondents Table Showing the Bonus Amount of respondents Table Showing the Safety Measures of respondents Table Showing the Medical Facility of respondents Table Showing the GPA Benefits of respondents Table Showing the Canteen Facility of respondents Table Showing the Credit Facility of respondents Table Showing the Level of Satisfaction of Allowances of respondents 2.1.15 Table Showing the Level of Satisfaction of Infra-Structural Facility of respondents 2.1.16 Table Showing the Level of Satisfaction of InterRelationship of respondents 2.1.17 Table Showing the Level of Motivation Given To Employee iii 42 41 39 PAGE NO. 23 24 25 26 27 27 29 30 31 32 33 34 36 37

2.1.18

Table Showing the Level of Satisfaction of Information about Management of respondents Table Showing the Status of Grievance Handling of respondents Table Showing the Level of Freedom Given to the Employees Table Showing the Work Satisfaction level of the Employee Table Showing the Satisfaction of Employee About Welfare Measures Table Showing the Satisfaction level of Employee Training Table Showing the Satisfaction level of Employee safety and Welfare Measures

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2.1.19

44

2.1.20

44

2.1.21

46

2.1.22

47

2.1.23 2.1.24

48 49

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LIST OF FIGURES
CHAPTER 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1.4 2.1.5 2.1.6 2.1.7 2.1.8 2.1.9 2.1.10 2.1.11 2.1.12 2.1.13 2.1.14 TITLE Figure showing the Age Group of respondents Figure showing the Gender of respondents Figure showing the Educational Qualification of respondents Figure showing the Marital Status of respondents Figure showing the Monthly Income of respondents Figure showing the Stages of Worker of respondents Figure showing the Experience of respondents Figure showing the Bonus Amount of respondents Figure showing the Safety Measures of respondents Figure showing the Medical Facility of respondents Figure showing the GPA Benefits of respondents Figure showing the Canteen Facility of respondents Figure showing the Credit Facility of respondents Figure showing the Level of Satisfaction of Allowances of respondents 2.1.15 Figure showing the Level of Satisfaction of Infra-Structural Facility of respondents 2.1.16 Figure showing the Level of Satisfaction of InterRelationship of respondents 2.1.17 Figure showing the Level of Motivation Given To Employee v 42 41 39 PAGE NO. 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 36 37

2.1.18

Figure showing the Level of Satisfaction of Information about Management of respondents Figure showing the Status of Grievance Handling of respondents Figure showing the Level of Freedom Given to the Employees Figure showing the Work Satisfaction level of the Employee Figure showing the Satisfaction of Employee About Welfare Measures of respondents Figure showing the Satisfaction level of Employee Training Figure showing the Satisfaction level of Employee safety and Welfare Measures

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2.1.19

44

2.1.20

45

2.1.21

46

2.1.22

47

2.1.23 2.1.24

48 49

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CHAPTER-i

INTRODUCTION:
The study was conducted in CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD to find the effect of welfare measures on employee. The study intends to see the satisfaction level of the employee on the facilities provided by the company and how these welfare measures boost the employee. The study on effect of welfare measure on employee gives the management an indication of the level of satisfaction among the employees regarding the general working condition and the other facilities provided by the organization.

DEFINITIONS:
The ILO (International Labour Organization) defined, ―welfare as a term which is understood to include such services and amenities as may be established in or the vicinity of undertaking to perform their work in healthy, congenial surrounding and to provide them with amenities conductive to good health and high morale‖. According to Arthur james Todd, ―welfare as anything done for the comfort or improvement and social of the employees over and above the wages paid, which is not a necessity of the industry‖.

MEANING OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE Employee welfare means, such services, facilities and amenities such as canteens, rest and recreation facilities, arrangement for travel to and for the accommodation of workers employed at a distance from their home, and such other services, amenities and facilities including social security measures as contribute to improve the condition under which workers are employed.

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CONCEPT OF EMPLOYEE WELFARE Employee welfare may be viewed as a total concept, as a social concept and a relative concept. The total concept is a desirable state of existence involving the physical, mental, moral and emotional well-being. The social concept of welfare implies, of man, his family and his community. The relative concept of welfare implies that welfare is relative in time and place. Employee welfare implies the setting up of minimum desirable standards and the provision of facilities like health, food, clothing housing, medical allowance, education, insurance, job security, such as to safeguard his health and protect him against occupational hazards. The worker should also be equipped with necessary training and a certain level of general education. WORKER’S EDUCATION Reading room, circulating library, visual education; literary classes, adult education, social education; daily news review; factory news bulletin; cooperation with workers in education services. Welfare facilities may also be categorized as (a) intra-mural and (b) extra-mural. INTRA-MURAL FACILITIES Intra-mural activities consist of facilities provided within the factories and include medical facilities, compensation for accidents, provision of safety measures, activities relating to improving of employment, and the like.

EXTRA-MURAL FACILITIES Extra-mural activities cover the services and facilities provided outside the factory such as housing accommodation, indoor and outdoor recreational facilities, amusement and sports, educational facilities for adults and children and the like.

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It may be stated that the welfare activities may be provided by the employer, the government, non-government organizations and the trade unions. What employers provided will be stated later, the activities undertaken by other agencies are mentioned here.

WELFARE FACILITIES BY THE GOVERNMENT With a view to making it mandatory for employers, to provide certain welfare for their employees, the government of India has enacted several laws from time. These laws are the factories act, 1948; the mines act, 1952; the plantation labour act 1951; the bid and cigar workers (conditions of employment) act 1966; and the contract labour (regulation and abolition) act, 1970. another significant step taken by the central government has been established in coal ,mica, iron-ore, limestone and dolomite mines. The welfare activities covered by these funds include housing, medical, educational and recreational facilities for employees and their dependents.

WELFARE ACTIVITIES BY THE TRADE UNION Labour union have contributed their share for the betterment of the employees. Mention may be made here of the textile labour association of headband and the railway men’s union and the mazdoor sabha of kanpur, which have rendered invaluable services in the field of labour welfare. The welfare activities Ahmedabad,are worth nothing. of the textile labour association.

WELFARE WORK BY VOLUNTARY AGENCIES Many voluntary social-service agencies have been doing useful labour-welfare work. Mention may be made of the Bombay social service league, the seva sadan society, the maternity and infant welfare association, the YMCA, the depressed classes mission society and the women’s institute of Bengal. The welfare activities of these organization of recreation and sports for the working class 3

1.1 INDUSTRY PROFILE
India is the world’s second largest producer of textiles and garments after China. It is the world’s third largest producer of cotton—after China and the USA—and the second largest cotton consumer after China. The textile and garment industry in India is one of the oldest manufacturing sectors in the country and is currently it’s largest. The textile and garment industry fulfils a pivotal role in the Indian economy. It is a major foreign exchange earner and, after agriculture, it is the largest employer with a total workforce of 35 mn. In 2005 textiles and garments accounted for about 14% of industrial production and 16% of export earnings. The industry covers a wide range of activities. These include the production of natural raw materials such as cotton, jute, silk and wool, as well as synthetic filament and spun yarn. In addition an extensive range of finished products are made. The Indian textile industry accounts for about 23% of the world’s spindle capacity, making it the second highest after China, and around 6% of global rotor capacity. Also, it has the highest loom capacity— including hand looms—with a 61% share. India accounts for about 12% of the world’s production of textile fibres and yarns. This includes jute, of which it is the largest producer. The country is the second largest producer of silk and cellulose fiber and yarn, and the fifth largest producer of synthetic fiber and yarn. The garments industry in India is one of the best in the world. An extremely well organized sector, garment manufacturers, exporters, suppliers, stockiest and wholesalers are the gateway to an extremely enterprising clothing and apparel industry in India. There are numerous garments exporters, garments manufacturers; readymade garments exporters etc. both in the small scale as well as large scale.During April-December 1999-2000, textile exports were recorded as US $ 9735.2 million (Rs.440179.4 million), of which ready made garments comprised nearly 40%. Interestingly, almost ¼ of India’s total exports goes Indian readymade garments and textiles are extremely popular the world over. In fact, exports of readymade garments registered a 6.4% increase in dollar terms and an 11.6% increase in rupee terms during the period April-December 1999-2000, despite a sluggish growth in income both at home and abroad. Indian Garment export growth during April-June 1998 for woolen ready made garments was a phenomenal 150%, for ready made garments made of silk it was 58%, and for other ready made garments. 4

Today, garments exports from India have made inroads into the international market for their durability, quality and beauty. One of the reasons for the economical pricing of India’s ready made garments and apparels is the availability of highly skilled, cheap labor in the country. The superiority of India’s Garment Industry has been acknowledged in the National Textile Policy (NTP) of India 2000. Having realized the tremendous growth potential of this sector there is a proposal in the NTP for taking the Indian Garment Industry out of the SSI reservation list. The textile and garment industry fulfils a pivotal role in the Indian economy. It is a major foreign exchange earner and, after agriculture, it is the largest employer with a total workforce of 35 mn. In 2005 textiles and garments accounted for about 14% of industrial production and 16% of export earnings. The Indian textile industry accounts for about 23% of the world’s spindle capacity, making it the second highest after China, and around 6% of global rotor capacity. Also, it has the highest loom capacity—including hand looms—with a 61% share. India accounts for about 12% of the world’s production of textile fibres and yarns. This includes jute, of which it is the largest producer. The country is the second largest producer of silk and cellulose fibre and yarn, and the fifth largest producer of synthetic fibre and yarn.

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1.2 COMPANY PROFILE: The CLASSIC KNITS, a 300 crore company, 100% vertically integrated textile major has been at the forefront of quality and innovation. Since its inception four decades ago. It has its customers across the world with a current supply a million pieces per month. CLASSIC KNITS is one of the few completely backward integrated entities in the garment industry with its own cotton cultivation to ginning, spinning and knitting/weaving to dyeing, finishing and garmenting infrastructure. This infrastructure aids CLASSIC KNITS in maintaining quality control process and self – reliance within the vertical providing them with ample scope for further expansions. As performance bars got raised to new heights and requirements started becoming more demanding in nature, CLASSIC KNITS realized that operational efficiencies was the key to acquire the all important competitive edge. The group then methodically spread its roots to all the areas which it believed was critical for growth, and once this was done they made sure that the roots work as a single unit with the singular objective of helping the organization achieve its goals. CLASSIC KNITS now deals with all kinds of textile such as 100% Cotton, 100% Mercerized, Poly Cotton Blended, Cotton/Rayon Blended, Linen/Cotton Blended, Spandex, Hydrotec, Polyester, Micro Fabric and premium knits such as Micro cross, waffles, Square structures, Interlock knit and soon more then 2000 well trained employees take care of the capacity requirements. INFRASTRUCTURE Innovations in manufacturing of garments occur in our production facilities very often. Our specialization reflects in the quality of the goods delivered, as the workers, executives and machinery are trained and tuned for that purpose.

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Cotton Farming Spinning Knitting Garmenting

Ginning & Pressing Yarn Dyeing & Finishing Captive Power Plan

Cotton Farming More than 50% of the garments around the are made using cotton. CLASSIC KNITS jointly has covered about 5000 acres of wet on Contract Farming. By providing the best and timely manuring, CLASSIC KNITS is getting an average productivity of 10 land seeds world

Quintals/hectare, which is much higher from conventional Cotton Farming. CLASSIC KNITS is assuring the minimum guaranteed price for the farmers and hence apart from the finest quality produce harvested, CLASSIC KNITS enjoys a corporate social responsibility by enlightening about 2000 families involved in Cotton Farming. Constant workshops and seminars are conducted at fields to educate the farmers for a contamination free plucking and safe transportation methods. The present area is planned to go up to 70,000 acres in next 3 years. Hand Picked cotton is used for production Modern Ginning & Pressing From Kappas Cotton, this unit segregates the Cotton seeds and good quality cotton (Lint) and this operation is done with the least number of workers and totally under a pneumatic drive system ensuring least human contacts. Ginning capacity is currently 300 bales/day with an average weight of 170 Kgs/bale and as the cultivation improves can reach up to 400 bales/day. 7

Spinning The ginned cotton is converted into spun yarn in this unit with the following state-ofthe-art latest machineries. Yarn The company deals in 100% cotton yarn, 100% polyester yarn, all types of blended yarn, 100% gassed mercerized yarn, twisted yarn, various melange yarn etc. Our spacious stock yard stores every type of yarn for supply to the regional factories, apart from our own knitwear factories. Advanced yarn testing facility is an added advantage. Yarn can be tested both at the source point of the spinning mill and locally, which ensures best quality of yarn. Knitting Our knitting department has an array of latest, computer controlled knitting machines from reputed international brands. The in-house facility, which includes a Knitting Design Studio, is one of the best in the knitwear industry. There are 20 circular knitting machines that can knit jacquards, interlocks, ribs and jerseys in any pattern or structure as needed. The capacity is 10 tonnes per day. There are 9 flat knitting machines that can knit jacquards, plain, stripes and self-designs with a capacity of 8500 pieces per day. Our circular machinery includes: (All brand new MAYER & CIE Machines) Dyeing & Finishing Our modern soft flow dyeing plant with Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP) has a processing capacity of 10 tonnes per day. The soft flow dyeing plant has 7 vessels imported from Taiwan. Supported by computerized color prediction, measurement and matching systems from Data Color International, USA (Spectra Flash SF600) the plant can deliver evenly colored fabrics, streaks free. Garmenting The completely integrated facilities is topped by our garmenting division with skilled pattern masters, cutting masters, tailors and supporting workmen who are well trained in the specialized activity of making Vests, T-shirts and Undergarments for women & Men. 8

The product specialization gives an excellent finish to the garments we make.The entire production wing is housed under one roof with scientific work systems and quality control systems. Solar Panel The New Solar Heating Plant has been deployed at our Dyeing division as the replacement of exiting Fire Wood with the Capacity of 10000 Ltrs / Day at 90D & 20000 Ltrs/ Day at 80 D… It has replace the usage of 10 tons of Firewood / Day. In-turn we are saving almost 1000 Trees a Day

Deployment of STP (Sewage Treatment plant) With the help of this, CLASSIC KNITS is purifying 1 Lac Liters of Sewage water every day and that is used for Agriculture Purposes. Group Companies Classic Knits Unit – I Classic Knits Unit – III Royal Classic Mills (Ginning) Royal Classic Mills (Knitting) Classic Knits Unit – II Classic Knits Unit – IV Royal Classic Mills (Spinning) SPG Oil Mills

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1.3 NEED FOR THE STUDY

It helps the management to improve the welfare measure facilities and to make workers participate more effectively towards the work.

The study helps to find the satisfaction level of welfare measure provided.

This study gives a good support for improving the performance of employees.

This study provides me a practical exposure to upgrade my knowledge.

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1.4 SCOPE OF THE STUDY

 The study has been conducted with a view to bring out simple measuring tool for understanding the effectiveness of welfare measures facilities and satisfaction level of employees regarding the facilities

 This study will be helpful to the human resource department and organization development for the organization growth.

 The project throws light on the need for welfare measures among the employees in the organization

 This can be referred as a base for future oriented projects.

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1.5 OBJECTIVES:

PRIMARY:

To analysis the welfare measures of employee in CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD, PALANI.

SECONDARY: The secondary objective of the study is as follows

To study whether employees are really measures

Satisfied on an available welfare

To study the role of welfare measures in Improving productivity of the employees

  

To examine the effectives of welfare measures To study expectation of employees about the welfare measures To study about the work environment of employees of the organization

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REVIEW OF LITREATURE:

STATUTORY AND NON-STATUTORY Welfare activities may also be classified into (i) statutory and (ii) non-statutory provision. STATUTORY EMPLOYEE WELFARE FACILITIES Section 42 to 50 of the factories act of 1948, deal with provisions for the welfare of the workers. 1) Washing Facilities (Sec.42) According to sec. 42 every factory shall provide adequate and suitable washing facilities, separately screened for male and female workers, conveniently accessible and clean 2) Storing and Drying Cloth (Sec.43) According to sec. 43, every factory shall provided a place for keeping the clothes which are not worn during working hours and drying of wet clothes. 3) Sitting Facilities (Sec. 44) Every factory shall provide for suitable arrangements for sitting for all workers obliged to work in a standing position. 4) First Aid Facilities (Sec.45) For every 150 workers, there must be readily accessible and well equipped first – aid box. This box must contain the prescribed contents and it must be in charge of a responsible person who holds a certificate in first – aid. Where more than 500 workers are employed an ambulance room shall be provided and maintained. 5) Canteen (sec. 46) Every factory where 250 workers are employed, the occupier has to maintain a canteen for the use of workers. 13

6) Shelter, Rest and Lunch Rooms (Sec.47) In every factory where in 150 workers are employers are employed, the occupier shall provide shelter, rest rooms and lunch rooms. 7) Lighting sec(17) The RBL must be employed in located things is sight. In every part of a manufacturing process where workers are working or passing, there provided and maintained sufficient and suitable light, natural artificial both. 8) Drinking water (sec18) The RBL working place is so hard, employees are need to emphasize the important of providing liberals supply of cool and pure water. The lay down that in every places effective arrangement must be made to provide and main at suitable place conveniently situated for all workers employed there in a sufficient supply of drinking water. The water pumps are situating for five places in factory 9) Welfare Officers The occupier of every factory employing 500 or more workers shall employee the prescribed number of welfare officer.

NON – STATUTORY EMPLOYEE WELFARE FACILITIES

1) Educational Facilities Educational facilities are important that the children of the workers should be provided with educational facilities. 2) Medical Facilities Employers, whether in private or in public sectors have been providing medical facilities for their workers and their families. Besides general medical treatment and healthcare, separate arrangements for specialist treatment for diseases like T.B. cancer, leprosy, and mental disease. 14

3) Transport Facilities Transport facilities to workers residing at a long distance are essential to relieve them from strain and anxiety. Such facilities also provide greater opportunity for relaxation and recreation and help in reducing the rater of absenteeism. 4) Recreation Facilities Recreation facilities afford the worker an opportunity to develop his sense of physical and mental discipline. It has an important bearing on the individual’s personality as well as his capacity to contribute to social development. 5) Housing Facilities Some of the industrial employers both in public and private sector have provided housing facilities to their employees. The company also renders assistance to the co-operative housing societies formed by its employees. REVIEW OF LITERATURE FROM JOURNALS AND ARTICLES 1) EMPLOYEE WELFARE By Regina bare Employee welfare program is based on the management policy which is aimed shaping perfect employees. Therefore the concept of employee welfare includes to aspects namely physical &mental welfare. 1. Applications of merit system or work performance system as the basis for employee rewarding. 2. Providing the retired employees with the old age allowance. 3. Employee insurance program to provide the employee with better security. 4. Improvement in health security for the employee’s and their families so that they can work confidently and productively.

2) EMPLOYEE’S WELFARE MEASURES By Ann Davis, Lucy Gibson Describes a process through which organizations might seek to implement 15

interventions relating to employee wellbeing. Emphasizes the importance of a comprehensive needs assessment both in obtaining the breadth of information needed to design appropriate interventions and also in providing baseline information against which to evaluate programme effectiveness. Discusses factors which influence the type of intervention appropriate for a particular situation and highlights their design implications. Finally, provides guidance on programme implementation and evaluation, and discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches to tertiary welfare provision. 3) EMERALD GROUP PUBLISHING LIMITED By J. Bruce Prince Purpose – The employee selection process has generally focused on the near-term performance potential of internal candidates in filling vacant positions. This research addresses the potential influence of adding a career development emphasis to the employee transfer decision process. In a career-focused transfer process the applicants' individual career development needs and growth opportunities are a key basis for internal selection decisions. Design/methodology/approach – Using web-based survey methodology, a US financial services firm is used to evaluate the relationship between the use of career-focused employee transfer criteria and key employee attitudes. Findings – The study finds that the use of career-focused processes are positively related to employees' developmental opportunity satisfaction and perceived support for career development. Regression analyses finds that these two attitudes mediate the positive relationship between the use of career-focused transfer criteria and perceived organization support (POS). Other research efforts (e.g. Allen and Shore) have linked POS to a variety of positive outcomes, including lower employee turnover. Past research, however, has not considered how specific human resource practices can be the basis for the development of key attitudes. Research limitations/implications – This research – while limited due to it crosssectional methodology – builds on that stream of research by focuses on the design of the employee transfer process and how it can be a key practice for achieving a developmental focus and associated benefits. 16

Originality/value – The results suggest that focusing on performance potential of applicants and career-focused criteria are not necessarily antagonistic but can be used jointly to make internal selection decisions. Arun Monappa, “Industrial relations”, Tata Mc .Graw Hill Publishing company Ltd., In India, the foundation of modern industry was laid between 1850 and 1970. This was also the period of emergence of the Indian working class. During this period of the growth of India capitalist enterprises, the working and living conditions of the lab our were very poor, and their working hours were long. This was testified by the commission like Indian factory lab our commission (1980) and the Royal commission of lab our (1931). In addition to the long working, their wages were low and the general economic condition was poor in industry. In order to regulate the working hours and other services condition of Indian textile laborers, the Indian factories act was enacted in India

A.M.sharma “Aspects of lab our welfare and social security”, Himalayas publishing house, Bombay The necessity of lab our welfare is felt all the more in our country because of its developing economy aimed at rapid economic and social development. Royal commission on lab our stated the benefits which go under this nomenclature, are of great importance to the workers and which he is unable to secure by himself. The scheme of labour welfare may be regarded as a wise investment, which should and usually does bring a profitable return in the form of greater efficiency.

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1.7. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
RESEARCH – MEANING Research is an art of scientific investigation. According to Redmen and Mary defines research as a ―systematic effort to gain knowledge‖. Research methodology is way to systematically solve the research problem. It is a plan of action for a research project and explains in detail how data are collected and analyzed. This research study is a descriptive research study.

RESEARCH DESIGN A research design is a plan that specifies the objectives of the study, method to be adopted in the data collection, tools in data analysis and hypothesis to be framed. ―A research design is an arrangement of condition for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to combine relevance to research purpose with economy in procedure‖. 1.7.1 TYPE OF RESEARCH: Descriptive Research: Descriptive research involves gathering data that describe events and then organizes, tabulates, depicts, and describes the data collection. It often uses visual aids such as graphs and charts to aid the reader in understanding the data distribution.Three main purposes of research are to describe, explain, and validate findings. 1.7.2. SOURCES OF DATA COLLECTION: Primary data The primary data are collected from the employees of CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD through a direct structured questionnaire. Secondary data Company profiles, websites, magazines, articles were used widely as a support to primary data. 18

1.7.3. Sampling unit: The study is conducted in employees of CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD. 1.7.4. Population size: The population of this study is the total employee in the company. It is finite population. There are four production centers for the organization for this study I have taken only employees in one production centre. 1.7.5. Sample Size: It refers to the number of items to be selected from the universe to constitute as a sample. In this study 105 employees of CLASSIC KNITS INDIA PVT LTD, PALANI was selected as size of sample.

1.7.6. Sample design: The sampling technique used in this study is simple random sampling method. This method is also called as the method of chance selection. Each and every item of population has equal chance to be included in the sample. 1.7.7 Research instrument There are three basic types of questionnaire: • Closed ended • Open-ended • Combination of both 1.Closed –ended Questionnaire: Closed ended questions include all possible answers/prewritten response categories,and respondents are asked to choose among them. 2. Open-ended Questionnaire: -Open-ended questions allow respondents to answer in their own words. 3. Combination of both: Begins with a series of closed –ended questions, with boxes to tick or scales to rank, and then finish with a section of open-ended questions or more detailed response.

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1.7.8. STATISTICAL TOOLS USED To analyze and interpret collected data the following statistical tools were used. 1. Percentage method 2. Chi-square analysis 3. Correlation 4. Mann – Whitney U test

1) PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS: The percentage method was extensively used for analysis and interpretation. Percentage analysis is the method to represent raw streams of data as a percentage (a part in 100 percent) for better understanding of collected data 2) CHI-SQUARE TEST A chi-square test ( χ2 test) is any statistical hypothesis test in which the sampling distribution of the test statistic is a chi-square distribution when the null hypothesis is true, or any in which this is asymptotically true, meaning that the sampling distribution (if the null hypothesis is true) can be made to approximate a chi-square distribution as closely as desired by making the sample size large enough
Ψ2 = ∑ (O-E)2 E Where "O" is the observed Frequency "E" is the expected Frequency

3) CORRELATION The correlation analysis deals with association between two or more variables. The correlation does not necessary imply causation or functional relationship though the existence of causation always implies correlation. By itself it establishes only co- variance. It is used to find the degree of relationship between motivation and work satisfaction 20

FORMULA:

Where, r = coefficient of correlation x = variable, level of emotional intelligence y = variable, (performance, efficiency and conflict) n = number of samples Mann-Whitney U test: The Mann-Whitney U test, also called the rank sum test, is a nonparametric test that compares two unpaired groups. To perform the Mann-Whitney test, Prism first ranks all the values from low to high, paying no attention to which group each value belongs. If two values are the same, then they both get the average of the two ranks for which they tie. The smallest number gets a rank of 1. The largest number gets a rank of N, where N is the total number of values in the two groups. Prism then sums the ranks in each group, and reports the two sums. If the sums of the ranks are very different, the P value will be small.

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FORMULA:

Where, n1, n2 = number of samples of the two categories R1, R2 = summations of ranks of the two categories mu = mean
u

= standard deviation

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1.8. LIMITATIONS

 Due to time limit the study is restricted to 45 days only.

 The study is focused on a very general level rather than a full scale detailed report.

 The study is not necessarily the solution to the problem that exists.

 Due to personal bias, it is complex to collect the exact information from the employees in the organization.

 The study was conducted only for 105 employees in the organization.

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CHAPTER-ii

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION:

2.1 ANALYSIS:

The data after collection is to be processed and analyzed in accordance with the outline and down for the purpose at the time of developing research plan. The analysis of data in a general way involves a number of closely related operations, which are performed with the purpose of summarizing the collected data and organizing them in such a manner that they answer the research questions.

2.1 PECENTAGE ANALYSIS
The data after collection is to be processed and analyzed in accordance with the outline and down for the purpose at the time of developing research plan. The analysis of data
in a general way involves a number of closely related operations, which are performed with the purpose of summarizing the collected data and organizing them in such a manner that they answer the research questions.

The formula used to compute Percentage Analysis is,

Percentage of the Respondents =

No. of Respondents

x 100

Total No. of Respondents

24

Purpose: To know the age group in which workers belongs to

Table 2.1.1 AGE GROUP S.NO 1 2 3 4 AGE GROUP 18-25 26-35 36-45 Above 45 Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 74 12 13 6 105 PERCENTAGE 70.5 11.4 12.4 5.7 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 70.5% of respondent are 18-25 age group and 11.4% of respondent are 26-35 age group and 12.4% of respondent are 36-45 age group and 5.7% of respondent are Above 45 age group. Figure 2.1.1 AGE GROUP
80 60 40 20 0 18-25 26-35 36-45 Above 45

25

Purpose: To know the gender in which workers belongs to Table 2.1.2 GENDER

S.NO 1 2

GENDER Male Female Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS 33 72 105

PERCENTAGE 31.4 68.6 100

Inference: From the above table it shows that 31.4% of the workers are male and 68.6% of the are female in the organization.

Figure 2.1.2

Male Female

26

Purpose: To know the Education Qualification in which workers belongs to Table 2.1.3 EDUCATION QUALIFICATION

S.NO

EDUCATION QUALIFICATION

NO OF RESPONDENTS

PERCENTAGE

1 2 3 4 5

Below Hr Sec Hr Sec UG PG Diploma Total

27 17 25 13 23 105

25.7 16.2 23.8 12.4 21.9 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 25.7% of respondent are Below Hr Sec and 16.2% of respondent are Hr Sec and 23.8% of respondent are UG and 12.4% of respondent are PG and 21.9% of respondent are Diploma. Figure 2.1.3 EDUCATION QUALIFICATION
30 20 10 0 Below Hr Sec Hr Sec UG PG DIPLOMA

27

Purpose: To know the Marital Status of the workers Table 2.1.4 MARITAL STATUS

S.NO

MARITAL STATUS Married Unmarried Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS

PERCENTAGE

1 2

31 74 105

29.5 70.5 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 70.5% of respondent are Unmarried and 29.5% of respondent are married.

Figure 2.1.4

MARITAL STATUS

80

60
40 20 0 Married Unmarried

28

Purpose: To know the Monthly Income of the workers Table 2.1.5 MONTHLY INCOME S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 MONTHLY INCOME Below 5000 5001 – 10000 10001 – 15000 15001-20000 Above 20000 Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 75 7 3 11 9 105 PERCENTAGE 71.3 6.7 2.9 10.5 8.6 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 71.3% of respondent are below 5000 years and 6.7% of respondent are 5001-10000 years and 2.9% of respondent are 10001-15000 years and 10.5% of respondent are 15001-20000 years and 8.6% of respondent are Above 20000 years. Figure 2.1.5

MONTHLY INCOME
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Below5000 5001-10000 10001-15000 15001-20000 Above20000

29

Purpose: To know the Stages of Worker Table 2.1.6 STAGES OF WORKER

S.NO 1 2

STAGES Temporary Permanent Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS 67 38 105

PERCENTAGE 63.8 36.2 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 63.8% of respondent are Temporary worker and 36.2% of respondent are permanent.

Figure 2.1.6

STAGES OF WORKER

100 50 0 Temporary Permanent

30

Purpose: To know working experience of the workers Table 2.1.7 EXPERIENCE S.NO 1 2 3 4 EXPERIENCE 0-1years 1-5years 5-10years Above 10 years Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 38 45 12 10 105 PERCENTAGE 36.2 42.9 11.4 9.5 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 36.2% of respondent are 0-1 years and 42.9% of respondent are 1-5 years and 11.4% of respondent are 5-10 years and 9.5% of respondent are Above 10 year. Figure 2.1.7

EXPERIENCE
50 40 30 20

10
0

0-1yr

1-5yr

5-10yr

Above 10yr

31

Purpose: To know bonus amount of the workers Table 2.1.8 BONUS AMOUNT S.NO 1 2 3 4 BONUS AMOUNT Below 5000 5001-10000 10001-15000 Above15001 Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 75 19 11 105 PERCENTAGE 71.4 18.1 10.5 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 71.4% of respondent are Below 5000 years and 18.1% of respondent are 5001-10000 years and 10.5% of respondent are 1000115000 years. Figure 2.1.8

BONUS AMOUNT
80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Below5000 5001-10000 10001-15000 Above15000

32

Purpose: To know Safety Measures of the workers Table 2.1.9 SAFETY MEASURES S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 EXPERIENCE Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 39 32 19 9 6 105 PERCENTAGE 37.1 30.5 18.1 8.6 5.7 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 5.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 37.1% of respondent are satisfied with the safety measures. HS→Highly Satisfied D→Dissatisfied S→Satisfied N→Neutral HD→Highly Dissatisfied

Figure 2.1.9

SAFETY MEASURES

40 30 20 10 0 HS S N HD D

33

Purpose: To know Medical Facility of the workers Table 2.1.10 MEDICAL FACILITY

S.NO 1 2 3 4 5

EXPERIENCE Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total

NO OF RESPONDENTS 24 43 18 15 5 105

PERCENTAGE 22.9 41 17 14.3 4.8 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 4.8% of respondent are dissatisfied and 41% of respondent are satisfied with the Medical Facility. Figure 2.1.10

MEDICAL FACILITY
D HD

N
S HS 0 10 20 34 30 40 50

Purpose: To know GPA Benefits of the workers Table 2.1.11 GPA BENEFITS S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 GPA BENEFITS Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 23 40 16 15 11 105 PERCENTAGE 21.9 38.1 15.2 14.3 10.5 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 10.5% of respondent are dissatisfied and 38.1% of respondent are satisfied with the GPA Benefits.

Figure 2.1.11

GPA BENEFITS
40
30 20 10 0 HS S N HD D

35

Purpose: To know Canteen Facility of the workers Table 2.1.12 CANTEEN FACILITY

OPINION (i)CLEANLINESS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (ii)HYGIENIC NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (iii)SERVING NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (iii)PRICE NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

Highly Satisfied 32 30.5 21 20 27 25.7 26 24.8

Satisfied

Neutral

Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 19 1.9 19 18.1 12 14.4 14 13.3 6 5.7 6 5.7 7 6.2 3 2.9

Total

46 43.8 52 49.5 45 42.9 46 43.8

2 18.1 7 6.7 14 13.3 16 15.2

105 100 105 100 105 100 105 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 46% of respondent are satisfied with the cleanliness of canteen facility. From the table it infers that 5.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 49.5% of respondent are satisfied with the Hygienic of canteen facility. From the table it infers that 5.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 42.9% of respondent are satisfied with the Serving of canteen facility. From the table it infers that 2.9% of respondent are dissatisfied and 43.8% of respondent are satisfied with the Price of canteen facility 36

Figure 2.1.12

CANTEEN FACILITY
60 50 40 30 20
Cleanliness Hygienic Serving Price

10
0 HS S N HD D

Figure 2.1.12(i)

satisfaction of canteen facility
52 50 48 46 44 42 40 Cleanliness Hygienic Serving Price

Note: . From the Figure shows that 46% of respondent are satisfied with the cleanliness and price of canteen facility. 37

Purpose: To know Credit Facility of the workers Table 2.1.13 CREDIT FACILITY S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 CREDIT FACILITY Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 24 23 17 6 35 105 PERCENTAGE 22.9 21.9 16.2 5.7 33.3 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 5.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 22.9% of respondent are satisfied with the Credit Facility. Figure 2.1.13

CREDIT FACILITY
40 30 20 10 0

HS

S

N

HD

D

38

Purpose: To know level of satisfaction of allowances of the workers Table 2.1.14 LEVEL OF SATISFACTION OF ALLOWANCES OPINION (i)TRANSPORT NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (ii)ATTENDANCE NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (iii)PUNCTUALITY NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (iv)EDUCATION NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE Highly Satisfied 33 31.4 26 24.8 19 18.1 40 38.1 Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 13 12.3 8 7.6 9 8.6 10 9.5 12 11.4 19 18.1 17 16.2 14 13.3 Total

38 36.2 38 36.2 32 30.5 28 26.7

9 8.5 14 13.3 28 26.6 13 12.4

105 100 105 100 105 100 105 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 12% of respondent are dissatisfied and 36.2% of respondent are satisfied with the Transport of Allowances. From the table it infers that 7.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 36.2% of respondent are satisfied with the Attendance of Allowances. From the table it infers that 8.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 30.5% of respondent are satisfied with the Punctuality of Allowances. From the table it infers that 9.5% of respondent are dissatisfied and 38.1% of respondent are satisfied with the Education of Allowances.

39

Figure 2.1.14

ALLOWANCES
45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 HS S N HD D

Transport

Attendance
Punctuality Education

Figure 3.1.14(i)

satisfaction of Allowances
40 30 20 10 0 Transport Attendance punctuality Education

Note: From the Figure shows that 38.1% of respondent are satisfied with the Education of Allowances. 40

Purpose: To know level of satisfaction of infra-structural facility of the workers Table 2.1.15 LEVEL OF SATISFACTION OF INFRA-STRUCTURAL FACILITY OPINION (i)RESTROOM NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (ii)DRINKINGWATER NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (iii)VENTILATION NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (iv)LIGHTING NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (v)TOILETS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (vi)WORKING ENVIRONMENT NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (vii)TRANSPORTATIN NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE Inference: 1. From the table it infers that 12.4% of respondent are dissatisfied and 37.1% of respondent are satisfied with the Restroom of Infra-Structural Facility. 2. From the table it infers that 12.4% of respondent are dissatisfied and 42.9% of respondent are satisfied with the Drinking Water of Infra-Structural Facility. 3. From the table it infers that 8.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 44.8% of respondent are satisfied with the Ventilation of Infra-Structural Facility. Highly Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Total Satisfied Dissatisfied 29 27.6 28 26.7 18 17.1 28 26.7 22 20.9 24 22.8 36 34.3 39 37.1 45 42.9 47 44.8 38 36.2 43 40.9 42 40 42 40 5 4.8 5 4.8 20 19 17 16.2 17 16.2 13 12.4 6 5.7 13 12.4 14 13.2 9 8.6 12 11.4 13 12.4 9 8.6 11 10.5 19 18.1 13 12.4 11 10.5 10 9.5 10 9.6 17 16.2 10 9.5 105 100 105 100 105 100 105 100 105 100 105 100 105 100

41

4. From the table it infers that 9.5% of respondent are dissatisfied and 36.2% of respondent are satisfied with the Lighting of Infra-Structural Facility. 5. From the table it infers that 9.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 40.9% of respondent are satisfied with the Toilets of Infra-Structural Facility. 6. From the table it infers that 8.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 40% of respondent are satisfied with the Working Environment of Infra-Structural Facility. 7. From the table it infers that 9.5% of respondent are dissatisfied and 40% of respondent are satisfied with the Transportation of Infra-Structural Facility. Figure 2.1.15

INFRA-STRUCTURAL
50
Restroom

40 30 20 10

Drinking water Ventilation Lighting Toilets Working Environment Transportation

0
HS S N HD D

Figure 3.1.15(i)
satisfaction level of Infra-structural Facility
60 40 20 0 R D V L T W T

Note: From the Figure shows that 44.8% of respondent are satisfied with the Ventilation of InfraStructural Facility.

42

Purpose: To know level of satisfaction of inter-relationship of the workers Table 2.1.16 LEVEL OF SATISFACTION OF INTER-RELATIONSHIP

OPINION (i)CO-WORKERS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE (ii)SUPERVISORAND WORKERS NO OF RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

Highly Satisfied 36 34.5 24 22.8

Satisfied 32 30.5 40 38.1

Neutral 19 18 15 14.3

Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 7 6.7 9 8.6 11 10.5 17 16.2

Total 105 100 105 100

Inference: 1. From the table it infers that 6.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 34.5% of respondent are satisfied with the Relationship between Co-Workers of Inter-Relationship. 2.From the table it infers that 8.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 38.1% of respondent are satisfied with the Relationship between supervisor and Workers of Inter-Relationship. Figure 3.1.16
INTER-RELATIONSHIP

45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 HS S N HD D

43

Purpose: To know level of motivation given to employee. Table 2.1.17 LEVEL OF MOTIVATION GIVEN TO EMPLOYEE S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 34 36 9 14 12 105 PERCENTAGE 32.4 34.3 8.6 13.3 11.4 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 11.4% of respondent are dissatisfied and 34.3% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 3.1.17

LEVEL OF MOTIVATION GIVEN TO EMPLOYEE
35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 HS S N 44 HD D

Purpose: To know level of satisfaction of information about management of the workers Table 2.1.18 LEVEL OF SATISFACTION OF INFORMATION ABOUT MANAGEMENT S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 19 47 23 9 7 105 PERCENTAGE 18.1 44.8 21.8 8.6 6.7 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 6.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 44.8% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 3.1.18

LEVEL OF SATISFACTION OF INFORMATION ABOUT MANAGEMENT
50 40 30

20
10 0 HS S N 45 HD D

Purpose: To know status of grievance handling of the workers Table 2.1.19 STATUS OF GRIEVANCE HANDLING S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 17 41 18 13 16 105 PERCENTAGE 16.2 39.1 17.1 12.4 15.2 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 12.4% of respondent are dissatisfied and 39.1% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 2.1.19

STATUS OF GRIEVANCE HANDLING
40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 HS S N HD D

46

Purpose: To know level of freedom given to the employees. Table 2.1.20 LEVEL OF FREEDOM GIVEN TO THE EMPLOYEES S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 20 39 15 19 12 105 PERCENTAGE 19.1 37.1 14.3 18.1 11.4 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 12.4% of respondent are dissatisfied and 39.1% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 3.1.20

LEVEL OF FREEDOM GIVEN TO THE EMPLOYEES
40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 HS S N 47 HD D

Purpose: To know work satisfaction level of the employee of the workers Table 2.1.21 WORK SATISFACTION LEVEL OF THE EMPLOYEE S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 24 52 12 7 10 105 PERCENTAGE 22.9 49.5 11.4 6.7 9.5 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 6.7% of respondent are dissatisfied and 49.5% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 3.1.21

WORK SATISFACTION LEVELOF THE EMPLOYEE
50 40 30 20 10 0 HS S N 48 HD D

Purpose: To know satisfaction of employees about welfare measures of the workers Table 2.1.22 SATISFACTION OF EMPLOYEES ABOUT WELFARE MEASURES S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 28 33 20 11 13 105 PERCENTAGE 26.7 31.4 19 10.5 12.4 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 10.5% of respondent are dissatisfied and 31.4% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 2.1.22

SATISFACTION OF EMPLOYEES ABOUT WELFARE MEASURES
35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 HS S N 49 HD D

Purpose: To know satisfaction level of employees training of the workers Table 2.1.23 SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EMPLOYEES TRAINING S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 16 43 26 9 11 105 PERCENTAGE 15.2 41 24.7 8.6 10.5 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 8.6% of respondent are dissatisfied and 41% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 2.1.23

SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EMPLOYEES TRAINING
50 40 30 20 10 0 HS S N 50 HD D

Purpose: To know satisfaction level of employees safety and welfare measures of the workers Table 2.1.24 SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EMPLOYEES SAFETY AND WELFARE MEASURES S.NO 1 2 3 4 5 OPINION Highly Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Total NO OF RESPONDENTS 22 49 21 4 9 105 PERCENTAGE 20.9 46.7 20 3.8 8.6 100

Inference: From the table it infers that 3.8% of respondent are dissatisfied and 46.7% of respondent are satisfied. Figure 2.1.24

SATISFACTION LEVEL OF EMPLOYEES SAFETY AND WELFARE MEASURES
50 40 30 20 10 0 HS S N HD D

51

2.2 STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: 2.2.1. CORRELATION FORMULA:

Where, r = coefficient of correlation x = variable, level of emotional intelligence y = variable, (performance, efficiency and conflict) n = number of samples

CORRELATION BETWEEN WORK SATISFACTON LEVEL OF EMPLOYEE AND RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUPERVISOR AND WORKER: HYPOTHESIS: H0: There is no significant difference between work satisfaction level of employee and relationship between supervisor and worker H1: There is significant difference between work satisfaction level of employee and relationship between supervisor and worker .

52

Table showing the correlation work satisfaction level of employee and relationship between supervisor and worker:

Correlations

Interrelationship-Supervisor Are you satisfied with the and Workers Interrelationship-Supervisor and Pearson Correlation Workers Sig. (2-tailed) N Are you satisfied with the work you do Sig. (2-tailed) N .029 105 105 Pearson Correlation 105 .213
*

work you do 1 .213
*

.029 105 1

Interpretation: The Spearman correlation value for the correlation between work satisfaction level of employee and relationship between supervisor and worker is .029. Therefore H0 is accepted. Thus there is a positive correlation between level of satisfaction on the training program and the job efficiency. As satisfaction level of relationship between supervisor and worker increases, job efficiency also increases

53

2.2.2 CHI-SQUARE:

Chi- Square test between safety measure and work satisfaction level of the employee.

HYPOTHESIS: H0: There is no significant difference between safety measure and work satisfaction level of the employee. H1: There is significant difference between safety measure and work satisfaction level of the employee.

Table showing Chi- Square test between safety measure and work satisfaction level of the employee.

Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2Value Pearson Chi-Square Likelihood Ratio Linear-by-Linear Association N of Valid Cases 58.535
a

df 16 16 1

sided) .000 .000 .011

47.715 6.540 105

Interpretation: P value is 58.535. P value is greater than 0.05. Therefore H0 is accepted. Thus there is no significant difference between safety measure and work satisfaction level of the employee.

54

2.2.3. Mann-Whitney Test
Mann-Whitney Test for satisfaction level of the employee welfare & safety measures And Gender HYPOTHESIS: H0: There is no significant relationship between satisfaction level about the welfare & safety measures and gender. H1: There is significant relationship between satisfaction level about the welfare & safety measures and gender. Table showing Mann-Whitney U test for satisfaction level about the welfare & safety measures and gender.
Ranks Sort of worker In general are you satisfied with the welfare and safety measures given by Management Total 105 Temporary Permanent N 58 47 Mean Rank 51.70 54.61 Sum of Ranks 2998.50 2566.50

Test Statistics

a

In general are you satisfied with the welfare and safety measures given by Management Mann-Whitney U Wilcoxon W Z Asymp. Sig. (2-tailed) a. Grouping Variable: Sort of worker 1287.500 2998.500 -.518 .605

Interpretation: From the above table it is clear that since the P value is greater than 0.05. H0 is accepted and thus there is no significant relationship between satisfaction level of the employee welfare & safety measures And Gender. 55

CHAPTER-iii

SUMMARY AND FINDINGS 3.1. FINDINGS  Majority (70.5%) of the respondents are between 18-25 age groups.  Majority (68.6%) of the respondents are female.
  Majority (25.7%) of the respondents are studied Below Hr Sec. Majority (70.5%) of the respondents are unmarried.

 Majority (71.3%) of the respondents are having salary below 5000.  Majority (63.8%) of the respondents are Permanent worker.  Majority (42.9%) of the respondents are having 1-5yrs experience.  Majority (71.4%) of the respondents are having bonus amount below 5000.  Majority (37.1%) of respondents are satisfied the safety measures.  Majority (41%) of respondents are satisfied the medical facility.  Majority (38.1%) of respondents are satisfied the GPA benefits.
          Majority (46%) of respondents are satisfied the Cleanliness of Canteen facility. Majority (49.5%) of respondents are satisfied the Hygienic of Canteen facility. Majority (42.9%) of respondents are satisfied the Serving of Canteen facility. Majority (43.8%) of respondents are satisfied the Price of Canteen facility. Majority (4%) of the respondents say that, they are not satisfied restroom. Majority (42.9%) of the respondents say that, they are satisfied Drinking water. Majority (44.8%) of the respondents say that, they are satisfied Ventilation. Majority (36.2%) of the respondents say that, they are satisfied Lighting. Majority (40.9%) of the respondents say that, they are satisfied Toilet. Majority (40%) of the respondents say that, they are satisfied Working environment, Transportation.

 Majority (22.9%) of respondents are satisfied the credit facility.
56

Majority (36.2%) of respondents are satisfied the both transportation, attendance of allowances.

   

Majority (30.5%) of respondents are satisfied the punctuality of allowances. Majority (38.1%) of respondents are satisfied the education of allowances. Majority (34.5%) of respondents are satisfied the relationship between co-worker. Majority (38.1%) of respondents are satisfied the relationship between supervisor and co-worker.

 

Majority (34.3%) of respondents are satisfied the motivation given by employee. Majority (44.8%) of respondents are satisfied the information given the employee by the management.

     

Majority (39.1%) of respondents are satisfied the grievances handling. Majority (37.1%) of respondents are satisfied the freedom given to the employee. Majority (49.5%) of respondents are satisfied their work. Majority (31.4%) of respondents are satisfied the welfare officer. Majority (41%) of respondents are satisfied the employee training. Majority (46.7%) of respondents are satisfied the welfare and safety measures.

57

3.2. SUGGESTIONS

The researcher listed out the following suggestion after analyzing the main findings of this research study. 

Classic Knits India (p) Ltd facilitate for the up gradation of the studies to employee. This can be more improved.

   

Rest room facilities can be further more improved. Since the employees are married the company can concentrate on crèche facility.

The company can provide safety equipments to the employees.

The salary increment for employees will increase the employee satisfaction and which in turn increase the employee morale.

Management must make necessary arrangements for periodic medical check-up, so that occupational diseases can be diagnosed earlier and necessary treatments can be given to the concerned workers.

58

3.3. CONCLUSION
Employers are more than willing to understand the employee’s requirement and design their welfare packages and employee benefits programmers accordingly. The time for them to understand the changes in employee needs and bridge the gap. Employers should understand what employees want and compensate them accordingly.

Employees are need of promotion, increment, sport and game, Technical tour programme, Restroom.

Thus the focus of welfare policy should be on these factors. If the organizations want to achieve the aim of attracting and retaining suitable talent from the labour market.

59

APPENDIX

A STUDY ON WELFARE MEASURES ON EMPLOYEE QUESTIONNAIRE 1. Age: (a) 18-25 (b) 26-35 (c) 36-45 (d) Above 45 2. Gender: (a) Male (b) Female 3. Educational Qualification: (a) Below Hr Sec (b) Hr Sec (c) UG (d) PG 4. Marital Status: (a) Married (b) Unmarried 5. Monthly Income: (a) Below 5000 (b) 5001 to 10000 (c) 10001 to 15000 (d) 15001 to 20000 (e) 20001 and above 6. What sort of worker you are? (a) Temporary (b) Permanent 7. Experience (a) 0-1 Yrs (b) 1-5 Yrs (c) 5-10 Yrs (d) Above 10 Yrs 8. what is your bonus amount on last year? (a) Below 5000 (b) 5001 to 10000 (c) 10001 to 15000 (d) 15001 and above (A) Highly satisfied (B) Satisfied (C) Neutral (D) Dissatisfied Highly (E) Dissatisfied 9. Safety Measures: A a)Are you satisfied with the safety appliances in work place? 10. Medical Facility: A a. Specify the level of satisfaction 11. GPA Benefits: A a. Specify the level of satisfaction about GPA Benefits 12. Canteen facility: A Cleanliness Hygienic Serving Price 60 B C D E B C D E B C D E B C D E

13. Credit facility: A Is any advances and loan given to you are satisfied 14. Specify the level of satisfaction of other allowances: A Transport allowance Attendance allowance Punctuality allowance Education allowance 15. Infra-structural facility: A Rest room Drinking water Ventilation Lighting Toilets Working environment Transportation 16. Inter-relationship: A Relationship between co-workers Relationship between supervisor and workers. B C D E B C D E B C D E B C D E

A 17. Level of motivation given to employee: 18.Are you informed about all the management activities 19.Does the management solve all your grievances 20.Level of freedom to express your ideas 21.Are you satisfied with the work you do 22.Are you satisfied with welfare officer 23.What is the satisfaction level of Training 24. In general are you satisfied with the welfare and safety measures given by Management?

B

C

D

E

Any Suggestion: 61

REFERENCES

BIBLIOGRAPHY

TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS

1. C.R.Kothari

-

Research Methodology- New age international (p) Ltd., publishers.1985

2. S.P. Gupta

-

Statistical Method -Sultan chand &Sons Publishers, New Delhi, thirty fourth editions, 2005

3. Aswathapa

-

Human Resource and personnel Management. Tata McGraw-Hill publishing-New Delhi second reprint 2002

4. R.C.Saxena WEBSITES 1. www.google.com

-

Labor problems and social welfare K.Nath&Co.meeract-2

2. www.classicknits.co.in 3.www.citehr.com

62

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