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Flow of Presentation

Status of Barangay (Village) Energization Policies & Strategies
Best Practices Support to Ensure Sustainability

STATUS OF ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAM
As of June 1969
ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTION UTILITIES
LUZON - 8 EDUs VISAYAS - 4 EDUs MINDANAO - 4 EDUs TOTAL 16 EDUs

STATUS OF BARANGAY (VILLAGE) ENERGIZATION
LEGEND: 119 ECs

Towns/Cities
Potential 1,422 Energized 739 Energized 51.97%

90 – 100% 24 PIOUs/LGUs

Connections
Potential 6.210 M Served 1.217 M Energized 19.60%
Source: EA Annual Report 1968-1969

Policies & Strategies
I. Appropriate Laws:
STATE POLICY OBJECTIVE “Total Electrification of the Countryside on an Area Coverage Basis”
Provision of electric service by combining the more thinly settled areas with the most densely settled areas

What is a typical rural barangay?
The smallest political unit in the country with an average of 230 residential consumers With 7.5 kms distribution network

What is a typical rural sitio?
A territorial enclave within a barangay which may be distant from the barangay center Composed of 60 to 80 households

Policies & Strategies
II. Policy Framework:

Rural Electrification is considered as an infrastructure like roads & bridges
Every kilometer of line extended supports economic uplift & opportunities in the countryside Congress appropriates funds annually for missionary electrification

SITIO ELECTRIFICATION PROGRAM
YEAR NO. OF SITIOS EST. PROJECT COST (P) IN DOLLARS

2011
2012 2013 2014 2015 TOTAL

1,520
5,643 6,500 10,729 10,851 35,243

0.814 B
5.643 B 6.500 B 10.729 B 10.851 B 34.537 B

18.94 M
131.23 M 151.16 M 249.44 M 252.35 M 803.12 M

Conversion: $1 = P 43.00

Continuing Support of Leaders & Populace to Ensure Sustainability

III. Government Partnership with International Funding Agencies
Experience & funds with concessional terms facilitate program management. For present & future undertakings, funds and expertise can be tapped for renewable energy projects and advance technology.

Policies & Strategies
IV. Private – Public Partnership
Other than public support, funds from generating companies, among others, have been tapped to support village electrification for marginalized communities where they are hosted.

Policies & Strategies
V. Strategic Program Implementation
Beneficiaries are tapped for participation & support to program execution, such as securing right-of-way, line clearing, labor & manpower provision, as well as information/education programs, among others.

Policies & Strategies
VI.People Participation

Involvement & participation of beneficiaries and would-be beneficiaries in sustainability programs. Shared undertaking and responsibility can be a strong indicator of success in a project.

Best Practices
I. Task Force “Kapatid” (Brotherhood)
Composed of NEA & electric cooperatives (ECs) engineers & linemen, organized for construction, restoration and rehabilitation of the electric distribution system including calamity-stricken ECs

Best Practices
II. Organization of Barangay (Village) Power Association (BAPA) and Electric Consumers Association (ECA)

• Install main meter to clustered houses • Reduce operational expenses • Participate in pilferage control • Extend livelihood loan

Best Practices
III. ORGANIZATION OF AN MSEAC (Multi-Sectoral Electrification Advisory Council) • • • • Effective complement in institutional strengthening Positive support from the community Responsive monitoring & evaluation of projects Representatives come from Agro-Fishery, Barangay Council, Business, Civic, Education, Local Government, Media, Religious, Youth & Women

Continuing Support of Leaders & Populace to Ensure Sustainability

National & Local Government Support
Consistent support in terms of policies & funds ensures participation and sustainability of program, thus achieving better quality of life/ education & business opportunities for the countryside population.