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Contents
1. INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................................... 2
1.1. STUDY PURPOSE ............................................................................................................................ 2
1.2. THE STUDY APPROACH AND PROCESS .......................................................................................... 3
1.3. STRUCTURE OF REPORT ................................................................................................................ 3
2. THE CONTEXTUAL HISTORY: ................................................................................................................... 4
3. EVOLUTION: ............................................................................................................................................ 5
4. CONNECTIVITY ........................................................................................................................................ 7
5. LAND USE ANALYSIS: .............................................................................................................................. 8
5.1. RESIDENTIAL LAND USE............................................................................................................... 10
5.1.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 10
5.2. COMMERCIAL LAND USE:............................................................................................................ 11
5.2.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 11
5.3. RECREATIONAL LAND USE ........................................................................................................... 12
5.3.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 12
5.4. GOVERNMENT LAND USE ........................................................................................................... 13
5.4.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 13
5.5. UTILITY LAND USE ....................................................................................................................... 14
5.5.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 14
5.6. PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC LAND USE ........................................................................................... 15
5.6.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 15
5.7. TRANSPORT LAND USE ................................................................................................................ 16
5.7.1. INFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 16
6. DESIGN PROPOSALS: ............................................................................................................................ 17
6.1. THE CONCEPT: ............................................................................................................................. 17
6.2. THE PHOOL WALI GALI ................................................................................................................ 19
6.3. THE COMMERCIAL STREET .......................................................................................................... 19
6.4. THE NALLA ................................................................................................................................... 19
7. THE PHOOL WALI GALI ......................................................................................................................... 20
8. COMMERCIAL STREET .......................................................................................................................... 23
9. NALLA FRONT DEVELOPMENT .............................................................................................................. 28

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1. INTRODUCTION
asti Hazrat Nizamuddin, a 14 the century village grew
around the shrine of the Sufi saint Hzt. Nizamuddin
Auliya (1236 – 1325). Today this pilgrims’ destination
has become a predominantly Muslim “urban village”
filled with congested, narrow lanes, scattered tombstones,
bustling markets, and mosques. Beside these congested lanes
Most Delhites are unaware of the richness hidden in the gallis of
Nizamuddin basti: Dargah, tombstones, Mosques, culinary
delights, qawallis, the ruins of Barakhamba and Chausath
Khamba.
The Hazrat Nizamuddin Basti is a custodian of 700 years of a
living cultural heritage. That this legacy encompasses secular and
inter-faith cultural traditions makes it even more valuable in
today’s context.
It is a prime location situated at the junction of NH-2 and the Lodi road. The area is encompassed by well-
known locations such as Humayun's tomb, Nizamuddin west, and Lodi road complex. Its historical
background is very rich takes us right back to the slave dynasty which ruled over the Delhi region.
1.1. STUDY PURPOSE
This comprehensive study has designed to provide with a deeper understanding of the urban character of
the area, its heritage, its existing built form, and its role and function. And to give different proposals for
the redevelopment of Nizamuddin basti and to evaluate based- sets of planning provisions to achieve
high quality built form and urban design outcomes for both the public and private domain.
The project aims to integrate the community with its cultural heritage by making its revival and
preservation inclusive to the community’s economic and social interests. And to respect the heritage
characteristics of the neighborhoods within the study area and develop approaches to ensure that the
conservation values are maintained.
The process is to undertake a comparative review of all relevant documents, analyze information
gathered on site and inputs from the native people of basti .This work is then synthesized into preliminary
guidelines. Once finalized, the guidelines will be incorporated into a consistent and comprehensive
planning framework.
B
Figure 1-1 Kevin Lynch
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1.2. THE STUDY APPROACH AND PROCESS
The methodology and design solutions for this study are derived from an appreciation and understanding
of immediate context of the study area, including such considerations as:
 The history and heritage significance of the area.
 Community imperatives.
 Social / cultural profiles
 Existing connectivity and desire lines for pedestrians
 Viability of uses within the area.
 Development context and evolution
The project has four main phases:
1. Fieldwork – view, photograph, map and study every property in the study area
2. Analysis – extensive data collection, in depth analysis of the area,
3. Consultation – including meeting with Hope foundation.
4. Reporting – analysis will inform detailed recommendations and outcomes.
1.3. STRUCTURE OF REPORT
The report is structured into the sections detailed below:
Section 1: Introduction briefly explains the project, outlines its purpose and objectives, the project
approach and outcomes, and the structure of this report.
Section 2: The study of contextual history of area.
Section 3: Evolution pattern of area that describe the development pattern of the area and urban
character of area.
Section 4: Land use analysis to describe the existing character, key physical elements that make up the
area and provide the overall organizing principles that underpin the development strategies and built
form recommendations.
Section 5: Inferences concluded from analysis.
Section 6: Design proposals based on analysis, the concept, and design strategies in identified areas of
interventions.
Section 7: Drawings of design interventions

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2. THE CONTEXTUAL HISTORY:
The city of Ghiaspur (Nizamuddin) was settled on the banks of river Yamuna, the best location for
sustenance of any settlement, though with time Yamuna changed its course but the city still stand as the
city of Nizamuddin Auliya ‘ the dervish of Ghiaspur’ .
The Dervish spread the message love and soon the place became the center of Sufism, and devotees flew
from far and near places with the belief of connection to God. The settlement started at mass level
around the hospice of the dervish. This was the time when the migration was at its boom; Nizamuddin
Auliya was receiving a lot of visitors thus the market places also developed at a faster rate.
On 13th April 1324 AD Khwaja winged its way to paradise, but the visitors never stopped, in 1562 the
Dargah was built which encashed more followers and the need of Kotwali roused, thus the Kot came into
existence and a walled area was built with The Kotwali and jails etc. All the streets leading to the Mazaars
evolved as a Mazaars street and commodities for the customary procession were sold. Job opportunity
grew due to this. The city extended is bounds to all sides of the Dargah, Nizam Nagar, and Dildar Nagar
etc. came up as major parts.
The city had its boundary almost confined but the population had never its control, as a result of it every
inch of the area was taken for inhibitions nobody cared for the heritage but shelter , and many were
brought down and even the walled Kot is now a residential Kot mohallah. The city of Nizamuddin is full of
tombs (Mazaars) and monuments of historical importance, in Nizamuddin west INTACH has listed 45
number of such monuments which include Kali Masjid, Chausath Khamba, khan-e-durran khans mosque,
tomb of Hazrat Nizamuddin, tomb of Khan-i-Jahan Tilangani, Atgah Khan’s tomb etc. A community that is
considered the living heritage of the Capital — one can see a visible transition. Small eateries, attar shops,
and heritage structures still dot the streets, but what comes as a surprise is the feverish activity going on
in the area. The revamped MCD School is abuzz with children, the community center has women cutting
out designs on paper, a queue snakes out of the polyclinic and workers reconstruct collapsed portions of
an ancient baoli. In a successful public-private partnership, three years after its inception, the Aga Khan
Historic Cities Programme in Hazrat Nizamuddin Basti has been able to usher in visible changes in the life
of the community settled here over centuries. Inspired from similar conservation-based development
projects in Kabul and Cairo, also being carried out by the Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC), the Hazrat
Nizamuddin Basti Urban Renewal Project goes beyond mere restoration of monuments and engages in
activities related to adaptive re-use, contextual urban planning and the improvement of housing,
infrastructure and public spaces. A partnership that includes the Archaeological Survey of India, the
Central Public Works Department, the Municipal Corporation of Delhi and AKTC, the project will unify
three zones — Hazrat Nizamuddin Basti, Sunder Nursery and Humayun’s Tomb — into an urban
conservation area of cultural significance while improving the quality of life for the residents.
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3. EVOLUTION:
The city is developing since the 12TH CENTURY. In this century the most important BAOLI and the LAL
MAHAL, were developed with streets connecting both the architectural elements








With the advent of 13TH CENTURY the rising of KALAN MASJID started and by the end it was completed,
as the largest mosque of the area
By the 14th century the tomb of KHAN-I-JAHAN TILANGANI was constructed in his remembrance.






Figure 3-2 12TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI
Figure 3-1 13TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI
Figure 3-3 14TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI Figure 3-4 15TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI
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By
the starting of 15
th
century the dervish of Ghiaspur was respected so much that his grave was converted
to a tomb with a number of tombs of his followers in that complex. The complex was created for the
followers of Hazrat Nizamuddin to pay their homage. The area was certainly developing by the followers
for their survival. The development of informal markets in the area encashed more followers on the route
to the Dargah.
The 16
th
and 17
th
century brought the basti a
development a walled area with Kotwali and jails. And
Inayat Khan Dargah was developed later with a less
number of followers than the previous. And the Dargah
complex was developed hence forth with religious
commodities like Chaddar, Flowers and Mala etc.
The centuries ahead (18th and 19th century) has seen a
very vast development of the basti with more residential
colonies and other religious and institutional buildings
and other small tombstones within the periphery.
The area was developing in a healthy way till 19th
century, but after that it gained a serious densification of
the area which leads to a chaotic condition at present.
Figure 3-6 DURING 16TH-17TH CENTURY
Figure 3-5 DURING 18TH CENTURY
Figure 3-7 19TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI
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4. CONNECTIVITY
The Nizamuddin Basti, one of the living heritages of the area, is
situated at the junction of Mathura Road and Lodi Road.
It comes under Central Zone D-17 of the zonal development
plan. The area is encompassed by well-known structures, such
as Humanyun’s Tomb, Isa Khan Tomb, Sunder Nagar Nursery,
and CGO complex around it.
The area can be reached by both public and private transports.
The major transport nodes around the area are:
Nearest metro station: Jangpura 1.5km.
Nearest BRT corridor stand: Moolchand 2.2km.
Nearest railway station: Nizamuddin 0.9km.
Nearest domestic airport: IGI airport 13km.


Figure 4-2 ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
Figure 4-3-1CONNECTIVITY AND LOCATION PLAN
Figure 4-4 DARGAH ENTRANCE
Figure 4-6 ROAD TO LODI ROAD
Figure 4-7 ATTAR WALI GALI
Figure 4-5 KOT DARWAZA
Figure 4-3 MATHURA RAOD BUS STAND
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5. LAND USE ANALYSIS:
Existing land use base map of Nizamuddin basti:

Figure 5-1 EXISTING BASE MAP
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Pie chart showing comparison between the proposed distribution of land use in master plan 2021
and existing distribution of land use









Existing land use distribution consists of 44% Residential land, 25% Recreational land, 10% of both
Government and Utility land, also 7% of Public and Semi-Public use. The area is having very less
percentage of Commercial land i.e. 2%, which also scattered everywhere but there is no commercial
center for the area. The Basti is very pedestrian friendly only in the daytime, but becomes spooky during
the night for women of the area. With only 2% Transportation land use the area becomes very congested
often.
The proposed land use distribution has been assigned in accordance with the Master Plan Delhi 2021. The
Residential land use has been converted to 34% which was the earlier reason for the over congestion. The
area is also lacking for various playgrounds and other Recreational land, which has been exceeded to
34%. The Government land use has been reduced and converted to 5% with a complex for them. The
Utility area is covering 1/10 of the land which has been reduced to 3%. Even if the commercial center is
absent at present but the land use allocation for Commerce has been exceeded to 3% of the area. The
area has been developed for the vehicular and pedestrian movement with extension of 10% of land use.

Figure 5-2 PROPOSED LAND USE DISTRIBUTION
Figure 5-3 EXISTING LANDUSE DITRIBUTION
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5.1. RESIDENTIAL LAND USE
Hazrat Nizamuddin Basti remains a
densely populated and congested
urban settlement. As per Master
Plan of Delhi 2021, the land allocated
for Residential land use is 34 % while
the existing land allocation of Basti
for residential land use is 44 % which
is 10% more, that means the density
of area is very high which leads to
encroachment of other land use
areas . No provision for developed
land and the growing need of
residence leads to the more
haphazard growth of the Basti and
also resulting into accumulation of
slum or JJ clusters. As per the M.P.D
stipulation only professional offices are permitted in this area and no retail shops
and household industry are allowed. But due to no provision of commercial
complex or area in close proximity to residences leads to the use of ground floor for
retails shop which ultimately leads to the mixed land use. A series of development
initiatives to improve the overall urban environment should implement.
5.1.1. INFERENCES
Density of the area is very high. The whole area needs a development control
regulations for the buildings. The Peoples are still living in the urban village but
there is a need of green space to increase the standard of living. There are very less
open spaces therefore there is a need of community gathering space .the inheritors
are taking on the commercial occupation that they inherited from their forefathers,
but they are quite scattered for the
basti to take advantage as a
commercial complex, therefore there
is a need of commercial complex for
the basti.
Figure 5-5 RESIDENTIAL LAND USE
Figure 5-4 VISUAL CONJECTION
Figure 5-8 VISUAL CONJETION 1
Figure 5-6 ENCROACHMENT ON R.O.W
Figure 5-7 HIGH DENSIFICATION
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5.2. COMMERCIAL LAND USE:
According to M.P.D the proposed area for
commercial land use is 3% while in
Nizamuddin Basti the commercial stretch is
only 2% which is less for the stipulated
population. Most of the commercial area
developed near the mosque. The
commercial stretch is not in proximity to the
residential area which leads to the
conversion of residential into retail area. The
weekly market sets up on every Monday
around Alvi Chowk and the whole stretch
becomes very congested due the
encroachment by hawker. (The
infrastructure does not support the whole
environment).
5.2.1. INFERENCES
The commercial development of the basti is very scattered and somewhere clubbed. These shops are in
the ownership of the house whose ground floor has been converted to, the shops popup around the very
dense residential areas. There should be a segregation of vehicular and pedestrian path. The Monday
weekly market need a separate space rather than in the alleys of the basti. And there is a need of
pedestrian movement demarcation between the neighborhood and
the commercial streets.

Figure 5-9 COMMERCIAL LAND USE
Figure 5-13 MIX OF VEHICULAR AND
PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT
Figure 5-12 ENCROACHMENT BY ROADSIDE
HAWKERS.
Figure 5-10 WEEKLY MARKET INFLUENCE ZONE Figure 5-11 COMMERCIAL INFLUENCIAL ZONE
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5.3. RECREATIONAL LAND USE
The urban village of Nizamuddin
Basti, west of Humayun’s tomb, is a
compact, self-contained district with
a high count of landmark structures
dating to the Mughal and pre-
Mughal periods. Shrines,
mausoleums and baoli (step well) in
Nizamuddin are located within
relatively short distances of one
another and are well integrated with
a vibrant community centered
around the Dargah of the 14th
century Sufi saint Hazrat Nizamuddin
Auliya. But due to the violation of
rules, byelaws by the public and
residents and lack of integration of
heritage concerns with planning
process has led to the loss of heritage of the Basti. This continued
negligence of heritage areas can also lead to loss in tourism revenues.
The highly congested Nizamuddin Basti area has several open spaces and
parks along the periphery, all poorly maintained and under-utilized –
mostly used as a sorting ground for recycling waste or parking space.
5.3.1. INFERENCES
The area is having very precious architectural heritage monument of the
past. They are in very rough conditions therefore there is a need of
development control over the building around the heritage for its
preservation. The green spaces are left alone because it’s not at the right
positions therefore redesigning of the green spaces is needed. The green
spaces are converted into waste dumping sites therefore there is a need
of separate space for sorting of the recycling waste. The floating
population of the basti comes majorly by public transport but there is a
need of separate parking lot provided for the visitors to park.

Figure 5-16 RECREATIONAL LAND USE
Figure 5-15 OPEN SPACES FOR GARBAGE
SORTING
Figure 5-14 FAMILY RESIDING ON BAOLI
ARCADE
Figure 5-17 FAMILY AROUND BAOLI
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5.4. GOVERNMENT LAND USE
Government land have been encroached
by the residents of the area for their
living, which has to be cured for the
redevelopment and urbanization for the
inadequacies in the sewerage, solid
waste, and drainage in the area. The
Government lands use percentage at the
present time is much greater than that of
the proposal. There are parks and open
spaces and government land like post
offices and treatment plants with a small
office of J.E. (sewerage) on the site, but
on the periphery. The public convenience
has been put up but the maintenance has
not been up to the mark. There are also
green spaces which can be developed for
the future purpose. The parks more
commonly known for the very few open spaces in the area the site are
being under the different authorities for that purpose the visual
appearance for the present time is being deteriorating.
5.4.1. INFERENCES
The area has many government official offices but those are unevenly
distributed therefore, there is need of commonly local authority office
complex to identify and regularize problems. The Police station area,
that comes inside the basti covers much space of the basti therefore there is a need of redesigning of the
complex to have more developmental area for the basti. There is a need of sewage water treatment plant
to be installed to minimize the load on the okhla sewage treatment plant.

Figure 5-19 GOVERNMENT LAND USE
Figure 5-18 DRAIN EXPOSED TO NALA
Figure 5-20 POST OFFICE IN LOW CONDITION
Figure 5-21 HOPE FOND. OFFICE CLOSE IN
DAY TIME
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Figure 5-22 UTILITY LAND USE
5.5. UTILITY LAND USE
The Basti is well connected to regional
supply chains such as gas pipeline and
water pipeline by MCD. There is no
sewage treatment plant around the area
for the treatment of soil waste. Drainage
and rain water pumping station is there to
drain the excess water during rain, which
is disposed in nearby Barapullah drain.
Lack of solid waste management facilities
(for treatment and disposal) in the area is
leading to indiscriminate dumping of
garbage and land pollution. Assessment
studies on the Nalla (storm water drain)
have found it to be polluted with
sewerage and household waste from the
Basti.
5.5.1. INFERENCES
The area is having an unregularised connection of electricity supply,
which has to be cured for the record and proper channelization of the
wires has to done. The nalla has not been under supervision what else it
receives from the area there fore there is a need to take care of the
disposal waste going to the nalla. The street around the area commonly
known as GALI’s goes dark even before sunset, therefore a proper
installation of night lamp posts are required


Figure 5-23 WEB OF ELECTRICITY SUPPLY
Figure 5-25 L.P.G. PIPELINE Figure 5-24 GARBAGE AREA NOT ATTENEDED
FOR DAYS
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5.6. PUBLIC AND SEMIPUBLIC LAND USE
The area proposed by M.P.D for public and
semi-public spaces is about 8% and that of
stipulated in Nizamuddin Basti is about 7%
which is somewhat in congruence with
what is proposed. The placement of the
mosque like Kalan Masjid, Bagdad Masjid,
Kot masjid etc. is such that it can effectively
serve the residents of Nizamuddin Basti.
But if we talk about education which is the
important constituent for the urban
renewal is less in this area. There is only
one primary school, one madrasa and one
secondary school which is serving the
whole (15000 residential population)
Nizamuddin Basti.
5.6.1. INFERENCES
The area is being catered by the one and
only school administered by the government, therefore there is a need of
more no. of school up to the senior secondary level studies. The girls are not
allowed to study, that has been a cultural barrier for them; therefore there
should be an education reformation need for the inhabitants to open their
horizon beyond their own area. The area, when deals with community
gathering, doesn’t has sufficient area of open space for the same. Therefore
there is a need of ample open space for a successful community gathering.

Figure 5-26 PUBLIC AND SEMI PUBLIC LAND USE
Figure 5-28 INFLUENCE AREA OF MASJID
Figure 5-27 INFLUENCE AREA FOR SCHOOL
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5.7. TRANSPORT LAND USE
The whole area can be accessed on
foot but as for the residents of the
Basti, they use two-wheelers and
somewhere four-wheelers for
accessibility. The region is
encompassed by Mathura Road on
the east and Lodi Road on the north
side and Lal Bahadur Shastri road
on the west. The internal road
becomes narrower as we go inside
especially around the Kot Mohalla.
The roads are very much pedestrian
friendly, but the vehicles are erasing
the effects of walking around the
heritages around the site. There is a
heritage walk organized by Aga
Khan Trust for Culture around the
site which encourages the tourists and the villagers
protecting their heritage buildings.
5.7.1. INFERENCES
The pathways which is so called pedestrian friendly,
doesn’t have a separated pathway for the pedestrian to
walk which in turn converts the paths in to WOONERF,
where the vehicular movement is governed by the people
on the streets. The pedestrian network doesn’t have a way finding element for the new tourists.
Therefore for a better pedestrian network, proper way finding need to be installed at appropriate places.
Figure 5-30 TRANSPORTATION LAND USE
Figure 5-32 PARKING
ENCHROCHING ROAD
Figure 5-31 ROAD SIDE
PARKING
Figure 5-33 SEPARATE PARKING LOT
PROVIDED
Figure 5-29 GREEN SPACE USED BY PARKING
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6. DESIGN PROPOSALS:
Nizamuddin basti, situated at the junction of NH-2 and Lodi road. The area is encompassed by well-
known locations such as Humayun’s tomb, Nizamuddin railway station, Lodi road complex. Its historical
background is very rich.
The community is considered the living heritage of the capital- one can see a visible transition. Small
eateries, attar shops and heritage structures still dot the streets, but what comes as a surprise is the
feverish activity going on in the area. The revamped MCD School is a buzz with children, the community
center has women cutting out design on paper, a queue snakes out of the polyclinic and workers
reconstruct collapsed portion of an ancient baoli.
6.1. THE CONCEPT:
The concept, and intent behind the redevelopment proposals is to create strong opportunities like a
MAGNET, for the native people of basti to improve their livable condition as the present condition of the
infrastructure of basti in terms of open spaces and livable condition is very weak to cater the native, as
well as floating population coming to visit Dargah every day.
There should be an attractive opportunity created for the native population to enhance their skills and
productivity in fields of art and craft to support their economic structure.
Based on our analysis and concept we have identified opportunity sites on which the commercial
redevelopment proposal is majorly focused.
Main points of concern on which the analysis done
are
1. The Existing Heritage walk is also been taken
into consideration, the route through which the
walk proceeds.
2. The interventions identified are on the basis of
commercial movement of public in the area.
3. The shops will be aligned in such a way that it
will act as way finding for the incoming tourists.



Figure 6-1 CONCEPT
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FIGURE 6-3 POINT OF CLASH BETWEEN
MOVEMENT AND HERITAGE WALK
FIGURE 6-4 INFLUENTIAL AREAS IDENTIFIED
Figure 6-2EXISTING COMMERCIAL
MOVEMENT
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The identified areas are:
6.2. THE PHOOL WALI GALI
The Phool Wali Gali intervention will be done to create a nodal point and a point of attraction and as a
space for gathering of Pilgrims and the tourist visiting Dargah; we will be providing a food kiosk, fast food
shops and a large seating space. This will also act as a point for cutting vehicular traffic.
6.3. THE COMMERCIAL STREET
The commercial street will be developed taking the consideration of both the heritage walk and the daily
needs of the natives so we will be a part for tourist and the rest aligned in one direction for the natives.
The inner portion of the commercial street will be developed for the residents displaced.
6.4. THE NALLA
The Nalla Front is for the upliftment of the local craft practiced by the women of the basti. Another major
problem is the weekly bazaar which creates a chaos on the Alvi Chow every Monday so we will be shifting
this market to the Nalla front.
Another problem is the lack of
open spaces in the area so we will
be providing some open spaces
for the improvement of the health
of the neighborhood people.
The detail discussion has been
done in the next chapters….

Figure 6-5 PROPOSED BASE MAPS
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Figure 7-3 EXISTING CONDITION AND SITE INDENTIFICATION
Figure 7-2 INTERNAL VIEW OF THE OPEN SPACE
7. THE PHOOL WALI GALI
The area identified on the basis of analysis; previously, the area
was not at all a common place of gathering. A vehicular path
leading to Lodi road encompasses the area and the MARKAZ,
which is an organising committee for the Jamaat held all over
India. The area congested with bike parking, beggar strolling
around the restaurant’s hawking for their customers, the
inhabitants and visitors have a very wrong impact on the area
for which is cognizant as The Basti.
We have identified the area as the attraction point to the
Phool Wali Gali which leads to the Dargah on the other end.
There are small road side shops which encroached most of
the entry space and left is another gali leading to the same
open space.
The objectives which we have taken into consideration are:
1. Retaining major restaurants.
2. Parking of bikes, not allowed.
3. Open space proposal for a gathering.
4. Accessibility to commercial streets.











Figure 6-1 GALI TOWARD THE SITE
Figure 7-4 THE PHOOL WALI GALI
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MAZAAR-E-GHALIB
PHOOL WALI GALI
The plan consists of different segments in which there is a semi-covered open space for seating, small
kiosks for the religious and craft material, and some fast-food joints including Tikki, Chaat Papdi, etc. The
road beside will be having the vehicular movement and there is a barrier for vehicle to entre by creating
bollards and differentiating with pathway material.
The path way is completely for pedestrian and connects to the central commercial street to enhance
commerce for the area.
The seating space will be used by the restaurants as well as the fast food joints. The visitors after visiting
The Dargah can come and sit here for a nice cup of tea or anything
for relaxing for a moment.
There is also a preserved complex, i.e. Mazaar-E-Ghalib, which was
renovated by the AGA KHAN TRUST. This will also attract the floating
population to gather and have a look on the grave of the great Urdu
Poet.










Figure 7-5 PHOOL WALI GALI INTERVENTION PLAN
Figure 7-6 KEY MAP OF PHOOL WALI GALI
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Figure 7-7 PROPOSAL VIEW
Figure 7-11 PROPOSAL VIEW OF SEATING
Figure 7-10 MODEL IMAGE 2

The area will be looking after the intervention will
be:
Figure 7.7 signifies the gali connecting the central
commercial street with the site.
Figure 7.8 signifies the view from the vehicular road
and bollards protecting the pedestrian pathway.
Figure 7.9 gives the panoramic view of the layout of
seating and the shops in the intervention.



Figure 7-8 PROPOSAL VIEW
Figure 7-9 MODEL IMAGE 1
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Figure 8-2 EXISTING VIEW OF QAWWALI HALL STREET
Figure 8-4 VIEW OF OPEN GROND
BEHIND THE WALLS
Figure 8-3 EXISTING BASEMEAP AND SITE IIDENTIFICATION
8. COMMERCIAL STREET
The commercial street, identified on the basis of analysis, has an
opportunity for the commercial oriented peoples to come together and
do commerce, which will allow the basti a common commercial street
and no scattering of the shops here and there around.
The area is encompassed by major buildings like Bagdad wali Masjid,
Kot Masjid, Qawwali hall, Imambara; and Alvi chowk known for its
Monday weekly market. Area doesn’t even have complete sun light
during the summer. Therefore there was need of open sky, for sun light
and proper ventilation of the whole street.
The area was also important for intervention because, the
existing heritage walk organized by AGA KHAN TRUST, moves
from here. Therefore there was a need of tourist oriented
shops which will cater the incoming tourists in the heritage
walk.
The major shop categories on which the whole street will be
divide as:
1. Food
2. Tourist
3. Retail
4. Medical
5. Electronic
6. Workshop
7. Miscellaneous

Figure 7-1 EXISTING VIEW OF STREET
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The area will be divided as per the figure:






The whole chunk of land will be re-designed for the commercial street. The residential household units
that are blocking the design will be shifted to the upper level of the site, i.e. the first floor with a still floor
on the ground for servicing and parking.
The site is divided into 2 segments viz. private and public spaces.
The private spaces will be having the residences that were displaced. Previously, there were 13
household units, now after the intervention there will be 23 units with 2-bhk configuration and added
two wheelers parking space at the ground level. The entry for the residential part is different from that of
the commercial street.
The designing part of the residences is not in our scope therefore there is blank area left for the
residential development.
The public space will be having different kinds of shops and open pathway for the movement.
The types of shops for proposal are:
1. Book/stationary store
2. Cloth store
3. Grocery store-4
4. Supermarket
5. Bakery
6. Chemist-2
7. Hardware store
8. Nursery/garden centre
9. News stand
Figure 8-5 SCHEMATIC LAYOUT OF SHOPS
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10. Boutique
11. Cyber cafe
12. Computer related store
13. Beauty parlour
14. Utensil & kitchen goods
15. Men’s saloon
16. Fishmonger
17. Optical
18. Chai Walla
19. Cobbler
20. Watch shop
21. Dry cleaner
22. ATM
23. Mobile accessories-
24. Clinic
25. Archie’s gallery
26. Meat shop
27. Jewellery store
28. Milk booth/dairy
29. Tent house
30. Lighting store
31. Homeopathic store
32. Yunani medicine
33. Carpenter
34. Mechanics/car bike
35. Kendriya Bhandaar

After the design, there will be 28% more shops than earlier, i.e. 99 shops in lieu of 77 earlier shops.
Detail designs of the selected shops are as follows:



Figure 8-6 CRAFT SHOP
Figure 8-7 FAST FOOD SHOP
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Figure 8-8 MEN'S SALOON
Figure 8-10 MEDICAL STORE
Figure 8-11 SUPERMARKET
Figure 8-9 GROCERY STORE
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Figure 8-12 HOMEOPATHIC CLINIC Figure 8-13 ELECTRONIC STORE
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9. NALLA FRONT DEVELOPMENT
The area was chosen for the development of open spaces for the nearby residential areas, and also a light
commercial street to enhance the commercial aspect of basti. The nalla front can be a powerful
intervention, if done; it will be generating more economy for the basti.
The area is encompassed by pure residential area such as Kot Moholla and Khusro Nagar where a single
green space isn’t available anywhere. Therefore it will work for the residents of the adjacent areas.
The nalla front is designed on the basis of the following figure:
Figure 9-2 CONCEPTUAL SKETCH OF NALLA
There are three nodes creating according to the accessibility
from the basti. They are viz. from Alvi chowk Khusro Nagar
and from Kot Moholla. The development will be on a
concrete platform just like Dilli haat. The three nodes will
Figure 9-1 CONCEPTUAL SKETCH
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be acting as three different attraction points for three different categories of people.
The entry from Alvi Chowk and back of the school premises the adjacent children park will be extended
for the younger generation. And it will be having a dedicated space for the daily moving hawkers to sell
their good around the evening time.
The entry from the Alvi Chowk, through Khusro Nagar, will be another attraction point for the tourist to
come for shopping in the temporary structure, where the craft shops, a medium for the women
population of the basti to show their talent in various arts and crafts within their own community. The
craft shops will be available for the people, with a token for the development and maintenances of the
area. Coming from Khusro Nagar, on the left hand side there has been a space provided for the weekly
Monday market to be held. This will also generate a periodic incoming of inhabitants to the nalla front, if
not then it will not be doing any worth for the population and will go under ruins.
Figure 9-3 SEATING DESIGN
Figure 9-4 CRAFT SHOP DESIGN
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The entry from the Kot Moholla will be having two open grounds, one for the children and one for their
parents. The children play ground will be installed with swings and many other playing equipment’s. On
the right hand side of the entry there is an open space provided for the basti to cater any big public
functions such as Qawwali’s and Sham-e- Shayeri and other such things. This will be done around the site
for the weekly Monday market. That is how the open space will be re-utilized with other functions.
There are different kinds of architectural features used in the stretch, life use of light weight structures
and Pseudo columns. The temporary shops are constructed with timbers and there is a seating provided
as the resting place for the tired ones.
Figure 9-6 SECTION AA
Figure 9-5 SECTION BB
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Figure 9-8 DETAIL PLAN
Figure 9-7 ELEVATION
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LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1 Kevin Lynch .......................................... 2
Figure 3-1 13TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI ... 5
Figure 3-2 12TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI ... 5
Figure 3-3 14TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI ... 5
Figure 3-4 15TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI ... 5
Figure 3-5 DURING 18TH CENTURY ...................... 6
Figure 3-6 DURING 16TH-17TH CENTURY ............ 6
Figure 3-7 19TH CENTURY NIZAMUDDIN BASTI ... 6
Figure 4-3-1CONNECTIVITY AND LOCATION PLAN7
Figure 4-2 ZONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN .............. 7
Figure 4-3 MATHURA RAOD BUS STAND .............. 7
Figure 4-4 DARGAH ENTRANCE ............................ 7
Figure 4-5 KOT DARWAZA .................................... 7
Figure 4-6 ROAD TO LODI ROAD ........................... 7
Figure 4-7 ATTAR WALI GALI ................................ 7
Figure 5-1 EXISTING BASE MAP ............................ 8
Figure 5-2 PROPOSED LAND USE DISTRIBUTION .. 9
Figure 5-3 EXISTING LANDUSE DITRIBUTION ....... 9
Figure 5-4 VISUAL CONJECTION ......................... 10
Figure 5-5 RESIDENTIAL LAND USE ..................... 10
Figure 5-6 ENCROACHMENT ON R.O.W ............. 10
Figure 5-7 HIGH DENSIFICATION ........................ 10
Figure 5-8 VISUAL CONJETION 1 ......................... 10
Figure 5-9 COMMERCIAL LAND USE ................... 11
Figure 5-10 WEEKLY MARKET INFLUENCE ZONE 11
Figure 5-11 COMMERCIAL INFLUENCIAL ZONE .. 11
Figure 5-12 ENCROACHMENT BY ROADSIDE
HAWKERS. ........................................................... 11
Figure 5-13 MIX OF VEHICULAR AND PEDESTRIAN
MOVEMENT ........................................................ 11
Figure 5-14 FAMILY RESIDING ON BAOLI ARCADE
............................................................................ 12
Figure 5-15 OPEN SPACES FOR GARBAGE
SORTING ............................................................. 12
Figure 5-16 RECREATIONAL LAND USE ............... 12
Figure 5-17 FAMILY AROUND BAOLI .................. 12
Figure 5-18 DRAIN EXPOSED TO NALA ............... 13
Figure 5-19 GOVERNMENT LAND USE ................ 13
Figure 5-20 POST OFFICE IN LOW CONDITION ... 13
Figure 5-21 HOPE FOND. OFFICE CLOSE IN DAY
TIME .................................................................... 13
Figure 5-22 UTILITY LAND USE............................ 14
Figure 5-23 WEB OF ELECTRICITY SUPPLY .......... 14
Figure 5-24 GARBAGE AREA NOT ATTENEDED FOR
DAYS ................................................................... 14
Figure 5-25 L.P.G. PIPELINE ................................ 14
Figure 5-26 PUBLIC AND SEMI PUBLIC LAND USE
............................................................................ 15
Figure 5-27 INFLUENCE AREA FOR SCHOOL ....... 15
Figure 5-28 INFLUENCE AREA OF MASJID .......... 15
Figure 5-29 GREEN SPACE USED BY PARKING .... 16
Figure 5-30 TRANSPORTATION LAND USE ......... 16
Figure 5-31 ROAD SIDE PARKING ....................... 16
Figure 5-32 PARKING ENCHROCHING ROAD ...... 16
Figure 5-33 SEPARATE PARKING LOT PROVIDED 16
Figure 6-1 CONCEPT ........................................... 17
Figure 6-2EXISTING COMMERCIAL MOVEMENT 18
FIGURE 6-3 POINT OF CLASH BETWEEN
MOVEMENT AND HERITAGE WALK ................... 18
FIGURE 6-4 INFLUENTIAL AREAS IDENTIFIED ..... 18
Figure 6-5 PROPOSED BASE MAPS ..................... 19
Figure 6-1 GALI TOWARD THE SITE .................... 20
Figure 7-2 INTERNAL VIEW OF THE OPEN SPACE20
Figure 7-3 EXISTING CONDITION AND SITE
INDENTIFICATION ............................................... 20
Figure 7-4 THE PHOOL WALI GALI ...................... 20
Figure 7-5 PHOOL WALI GALI INTERVENTION
PLAN ................................................................... 21
Figure 7-6 KEY MAP OF PHOOL WALI GALI ........ 21
Figure 7-7 PROPOSAL VIEW ............................... 22
Figure 7-8 PROPOSAL VIEW ............................... 22
Figure 7-9 MODEL IMAGE 1 ............................... 22
Figure 7-10 MODEL IMAGE 2 ............................. 22
Figure 7-11 PROPOSAL VIEW OF SEATING ......... 22
Figure 7-1 EXISTING VIEW OF STREET ................ 23
Figure 8-2 EXISTING VIEW OF QAWWALI HALL
STREET ................................................................ 23
Figure 8-3 EXISTING BASEMEAP AND SITE
IIDENTIFICATION ................................................ 23
Figure 8-4 VIEW OF OPEN GROND BEHIND THE
WALLS ................................................................ 23
Figure 8-5 SCHEMATIC LAYOUT OF SHOPS ........ 24
Figure 8-6 CRAFT SHOP ...................................... 25
Figure 8-7 FAST FOOD SHOP .............................. 25
Figure 8-8 MEN'S SALOON ................................. 26
Figure 8-9 GROCERY STORE ............................... 26
Figure 8-10 MEDICAL STORE .............................. 26
Figure 8-11 SUPERMARKET ................................ 26
Figure 8-12 HOMEOPATHIC CLINIC .................... 27
Figure 8-13 ELECTRONIC STORE ......................... 27
Figure 9-2 CONCEPTUAL SKETCH OF NALLA ...... 28
Figure 9-1 CONCEPTUAL SKETCH ....................... 28
Figure 9-3 SEATING DESIGN ............................... 29
Figure 9-4 CRAFT SHOP DESIGN ......................... 29
Figure 9-5 SECTION AA ....................................... 29
Figure 9-6 SECTION BB ....................................... 29
Figure 9-7 ELEVATION ........................................ 29
Figure 9-8 DETAIL PLAN ..................................... 29