0 0 74470 64631

04
04
A USCF Publication $3.95
uschess.org
April 2012
when you combine auto & home insurance with Nationwide®
When things work
they just work better.
TOGETHER,
BUNDLE & SAVE 20%
up
to
For a
FREE
quote
Nationwide may make a financial contribution to this organization in return for the opportunity to market products and services to its members or customers. *Savings compared to stand-alone
price of each policy, based on national customer data from November 2010. Products Underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Aliated Companies. Nationwide Lloyds and
Nationwide Property & Casualty Companies (in TX). Home Oce: Columbus, OH 43215. Subject to underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons
in all states. Nationwide, Nationwide Insurance and the Nationwide framemark are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2011 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. All Rights
Reserved.
AFF-0130ML (05/11)
&
*
Combining just your auto and home policies could save you up to 20%.* We have insurance
available for other things too, including RV insurance. You'll love the convenience of insuring more
with a single insurance company.
Call 1-866-238-1426
Visit www.nationwide.com/USChess
Contact your local Nationwide agent
Plus you'll save with an additional discount you get just for being a United States Chess Federation
member.



































































































E L D N U B









E V AAV S & E









% 0 2 E
*


















with a single ins
wh
available for oth
Combining just y
Plus you'll save









urance company.
o ombine aut ou c hen y
E L D N U B
her things too, including RV insurance. You'll love the convenience of insuring more
your auto and home policies
with an additional disco









RV insurance. You'll love the convenience of insuring more
e w anc o & home insur
E V AAV S & E
could save you up to 20%. cies
ount you get just for being a United States Chess Federation









the convenience of insuring more
wide® tion with Na
o t
up
% 0 2 E
*
* We have insurance o 20%.
g a United States Chess Federation









ng more
ce
Federation









Call 1
e quot
EE R F
or a F
Visit
Cont
member.
y









1-866-238-1426
www.nationwide.com/U
act your local Nationwid









&
USChess
de agent
y g j









&
g


















l a n o i t a n n o d e s a b , yy, c i l o p h c a e f o e c i r p
t n o c l a i c n a n fi a e k a m y a m e d i w n o i t a N
p m o C y t l a u s a C & y t r e p o r P e d i w n o i t a N
) 1 1 / 5 0 ( L M 0 3 1 0 - F F A
. d e v r e s e R
s n I e d i w n o i t a N , e d i w n o i t a N . s e t a t s l l a n i









c u d o r P . 0 1 0 2 r e b m e v o N m o r f a t a d r e m o t s u c
o e h t r o ffo n r u t e r n i n o i t a z i n a g r o s i h t o t n o i t u b i r
3 4 H O , s u b m u l o C : e c O e m o H . ) X T n i ( s e i n a p
e s e r a k r a m e m a r f e d i w n o i t a N e h t d n a e c n a r u s









n a r u s n I l a u t u M e d i w n o i t a N y b n e t t i r w r e d n U s t c
t s e c i v r e s d n a s t c u d o r p t e k r a m o t y t i n u t r o p p
w e i v e r , s e n i l e d i u g g n i t i r w r e d n u o t t c e j b u S . 5 1 2 3
e c n a r u s n I l a u t u M e d i w n o i t a N f o s k r a m e c i v r e
&









i t a N . s e i n a p m o C d e t a i l A d n a y n a p m o C e c n
a p m o c s g n i v a S * . s r e m o t s u c r o s r e b m e m s t i o
a t o n s t n u o c s i d d n a s t c u d o r P . l a v o r p p a d n a , w
e c n a r u s n I l a u t u M e d i w n o i t a N 1 1 0 2 © . y n a p m o C
&









d n a s d y o l L e d i w n o
e n o l a - d n a t s o t d e r a
s n o s r e p l l a o t e l b a l i a v
s t h g i R l l A . y n a p m o C e
IFC_Layout 1 3/14/2012 9:47 AM Page 1



Trophies to top 15 individuals and top 3 teams in each section. 3 or more players
from the same school to make a team (top 3 scores added to give team final stand-
ings). Every player receives a souvenir.
6-SS, G/90, Sections
• 8-years-old and younger
• 10-years-old and younger
• 12-years-old and younger
• 14-years-old and younger
• 16-years-old and younger
• 18-years-old and younger
MAIN EVENT
Friday, April 8
6:00 PM Opening Ceremony
6:30 PM Round 1
Saturday, April 9
10:00 AM Round 2
2:30 PM Round 3
6:30 PM Round 4
Sunday, April 10
9:00 AM Round 5
1:00 PM Round 6
5
SIDE EVENTS
Bughouse Tournament
Friday April 8, 1:00 PM
Entry fee: $25 per team
Blitz Tournament (G/5)
Friday April 8, 3:00 PM
Entry fee: $15 by March 27,
$20 on-site




Hotel Reservations:
Please call (312) 787-6100
Entry & Info
Make checks payable to:
RKnights, Attn: All Girls,
PO Box 1074, Northbrook, IL 60065
Tel: (773) 844-0701
E-mail: renknights@aol.com
Entry Fee
$50 if postmarked by 3/13; $70 by 3/27;
$85 by 4/7 or $90 on-site
USCF membership required
All events held at the Doubletree,
300 East Ohio St, Chicago, IL
O












• 10-years-old and younger
• 12-years-old and younger
• 14-years-old and younger
• 16-years-old and younger
• 18-years-old and younger




















Hotel
Doubletree Chicago Magnificent Mile,
300 East Ohio St, Chicago, IL 60611
Hotel Chess Rate:
$139 if reserved by March 11, 2011



























• 10-years-old and younger
• 12-years-old and younger
• 14-years-old and younger
• 16-years-old and younger
• 18-years-old and younger








































The Eighth Annual All-Girls
Open National Championships
April 8–10, 2011 – Chicago, Illinois
The Ninth
April 20 – 22, 2012 - Chicago, Illinois
Awards
Trophies will be awarded to the top 15 individual players and top three teams in
each section. Three or more players from the same school make up a team (team
scores will be calculated based on the top 3 scores to give teams their final stand-
ings). All players will receive a souvenir to honor their participation.
Swissotel Hotel; 323 E. Wacker Dr,
Chicago, IL 60601
$169 by March 15, 2012
Breakfast included.
888-737-9477
3/25; 4/8
4/19; $90 on site








• 10-years-old and younger
• 12-years-old and younger
• 14-years-old and younger
• 16-years-old and younger
• 18-years-old and younger



















































• 10-years-old and younger
• 12-years-old and younger
• 14-years-old and younger
• 16-years-old and younger
• 18-years-old and younger







































in association with
P



Swissotel Hotel;
323 E. Wacker Dr, Chicago, IL 60611
Online Registration
www.renaissanceknights.org/allgirls






6-SS, G/90, Sections
• 8-years-old and younger
• 10-years-old and younger
• 12-years-old and younger
• 14-years-old and younger
• 16-years-old and younger
• 18-years-old and younger
MAIN EVENT
Friday, April 8
6:00 PM Opening Ceremony
6:30 PM Round 1
Saturday, April 9
10:00 AM Round 2
2:30 PM Round 3
6:30 PM Round 4
Sunday, April 10
9:00 AM Round 5
1:00 PM Round 6
5:00 PM Awards Ceremony
SIDE EVENTS
Bughouse Tournament
Friday April 8, 1:00 PM
Entry fee: $25 per team
Blitz Tournament (G/5)
Friday April 8, 3:00 PM
Entry fee: $15 by March 27,
$20 on-site























Friday, April 20
Friday, April 20
Saturday, April 21
Friday, April 20
Sunday, April 22
2011_allgirls_ad_DL_r5_chess life 11/10/11 8:28 PM Page 4
2 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Chess Life
Editorial Staff
Chess Life Editor &
Director of Publications Daniel Lucas dlucas@uschess.org
Chess Life Online Editor Jennifer Shahade jshahade@uschess.org
Chess Life for Kids Editor Glenn Petersen gpetersen@uschess.org
Senior Art Director Frankie Butler fbutler@uschess.org
Editorial Assistant/Copy Editor Alan Kantor akantor@uschess.org
Editorial Assistant Jo Anne Fatherly jfatherly@uschess.org
Editorial Assistant Jennifer Pearson jenpearson@uschess.org
Technical Editor Ron Burnett
TLA/Advertising Joan DuBois tla@uschess.org
Main office: Crossville, TN (931) 787-1234 • Advertising inquiries: (931) 787-1234, ext. 123 • TLAs: All TLAs
should be e-mailed to tla@uschess.org or sent to P.O Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557-3967 • Letters to the
editor: Please submit to letters@uschess.org • Subscriptions: To subscribe to Chess Life, join the USCF or enter
a USCF tournament, go to uschess.org or call 1-800-903-USCF (8723) • Change of address: Please send to
addresschange@uschess.org • Other inquiries: feedback@uschess.org, (931) 787-1234, fax (931) 787-1200
www.WorldChessHOF.org
For more information on this month’s featured item, please visit:
Located in Saint Louis, Missouri
This photo of Bobby Fischer, taken by the
renowned photojournalist Harry Benson,
graced the cover of LIFE magazine on
November 12, 1971. Fischer had recently
defeated Tigran Petrosian in the 1971
Candidates Tournament in Buenos Aires,
Argentina, qualifying him for the World
Chess Championship match in Reykjavík,
Iceland, in the summer of 1972.
See this and more Fischer archives
and memorabilia including a
photography exhibition:
Bobby Fischer: Icon Among Icons,
Photographs by Harry Benson
at the World Chess Hall of Fame from
March 9 – August 12, 2012.
LETTER OF I NTENT
A Promise For Tomorrow
In future support of the work of the U.S. Chess Trust, I want to provide for future
generations and to ensure the continuity of services by the U.S. Chess Trust.
Therefore,
J I have made provision J I will make provision
to support the U.S. Chess Trust by:
J making a bequest or endowment provision in my Will
J creating a charitable remainder or lead trust naming
the U.S. Chess Trust as a beneficiary.
J establishing an endowment or special fund at the
U.S. Chess Trust.
J directing the trustees or directors of my foundation
to continue beyond my lifetime making an annual
gift to the U.S. Chess Trust.
J Making an outright gift to the U.S. Chess Trust during
my lifetime in the sum of $_____________.
This Letter of Intent represents my commitment to the work of the U.S. Chess Trust.
It does not represent a legal obligation and may be changed by me at any time.
Whatever the amount of your gift, when you leave a legacy for the future of the
U.S. Chess Trust, you are an important part of the Promise for Tomorrow.
Please send with your name, address, phone, and email contact
information and email Barbara DeMaro at bduscf@aol.com
*Please note that there is a required amount in order to be listed as a Future Legacy Donor.
Write or send an email to Barbara DeMaro, bduscf@aol.com for this amount. Donations
to the U.S. Chess Trust are tax-deductible. A 501(c)(3) organization. BD:08/03
USCF Executive Board
President, Ruth Haring PO Box 1993, Chico, CA 95927 ruth@ruthharing.com
Vice President, Gary Walters Thompson Hine LLP, gary.walters@thompsonhine.com
3900 Key Center, 127 Public Square,
Cleveland, OH 44114
VP Finance, Allen Priest 220 West Main Street, Suite 2200 tyron316@hotmail.com
Louisville, KY 40202
Secretary, Mike Nietman 2 Boca Grande Way, Madison, WI 53719 mike.nietman@charter.net
Member at Large, Michael Atkins PO Box 6138, Alexandria, VA 22306 matkins2@cox.net
Member at Large, Jim Berry PO Box 351, Stillwater, OK 74076 jaberrycg@aol.com
Member at Large, Bill Goichberg PO Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577 chessoffice@aol.com
USCF Staff
Executive Director Bill Hall ext. 189 bhall@uschess.org
Chief Operations Officer Patricia K. Smith ext. 133 patsmith@uschess.org
Assistant Executive Director
Director of National Events
Chief Financial Officer Joe Nanna ext. 150 jnanna@uschess.org
IT Director & Webmaster Phillip R. Smith ext.134 philsmith@uschess.org
Director of Quality Control Judy Misner ext. 126 jmisner@uschess.org
Director of Affiliate Relations Joan DuBois ext. 123 jdubois@uschess.org
Chief Accountant Peggy Eberhart ext. 131 peberhart@uschess.org
OTB Ratings/FIDE Walter Brown ext. 142 wbrown@uschess.org
Scholastic Associate Susan Houston ext. 136 shouston@uschess.org
Computer Consultant Mike Nolan ext. 188 mnolan@uschess.org
Membership Services Supervisor Cheryle Bruce ext. 147 cbruce@uschess.org
Mailing Lists/Membership Assoc. Traci Lee ext. 143 tlee@uschess.org
Membership Associate Abel Howard ext. 146 ahoward@uschess.org
Membership Associate Jay Sabine ext. 127 ahoward@uschess.org
Membership Associate Joe Wright ext. 125 joewright@uschess.org
National Events Assistant Cody Stewart 931-787-3976 ahoward@uschess.org
National Education Consultant Jerry Nash 931-787-2756 jnash@uschess.org
Correspondence Chess Alex Dunne cchess@uschess.org
CL_04-2012_masthead_JP_r1_chess life 3/11/2012 11:13 AM Page 2
Chess Life — April 2012 3 uschess.org
April on uschess.org
Spring Scholastic
Trophy Hunting
The season of national
scholastics kicks off with
the National High School
Championships in Minneapolis
from April 13-15 and continues
to San Diego for the National
Junior High Championships
from April 27-29. Look for
results, photos & stories
on uschess.org.
Contributors
FM Mike Klein
(“Looks at Books,” p. 12) is,
to his students, a chess teacher;
to top professionals, he is a
chess journalist; and to old
friends, he is a semi-retired
chess player. He likes the
international appeal of the
game and appreciates all
the chess players that have
shunned the money, fame and
free drinks of the poker table.
Jamaal Abdul-Alim
(“First Moves,” p. 8) is a
journalist and chess teacher
in Washington, D.C.
GM Ian Rogers
(“Wijk aan Zee 2012,” p. 18)
is a frequent contributor of
international event reports
to Chess Life.
Brad Rosen
(“Profile,” p. 26) is a Chicago-
based attorney and freelance
writer. He also serves in
communications/public
relations area for the Chicago
Blaze of the U.S. Chess
League, and is the father
of FM Eric Rosen.
Keith Ammann
(“Cover Story,” p. 32) is a
former journalist and middle
school teacher and a certified
district chess coach and local
tournament director. He is
president of the recently formed
not-for-profit Chicago Chess
Center Inc.
Dr. Steven Dowd
(“Compositions,” p. 36) is
a retired academic from
Birmingham, Alabama, holds
the national master title, and
is a well-known problemist
world-wide, having captured
five first places in international
tourneys. He is the author of a
monthly column at Chesscafe.com,
has contributed to both Chess
Life and Chess Life Online, and
often researches and writes on
chess history as well.
All Roads Lead to Philly
Find coverage, including
a U.S. Chess Scoop video
from the Philadelphia Open,
held from April 4 to 8th
in downtown Philly.
The projected prize fund
is $80,000 and the
nine-round Open section
features norm opportunities.
Follow Chess Life and Chess Life Online on Facebook®!
Get regular updates as part of your newsfeed, post comments,
and easily communicate directly with the editorial staff.
Dr. Dowd on Organ Pipes
In this Chess Life, we celebrate
45 years of Benko’s Bafflers.
CLO expands on this with an article
on one of GM Pal Benko’s favorite
problem themes—Loyd’s organ pipes.
Benko’s very first column in
1967 featured the great Loyd.
A variety of problems,
including Benko’s own world-beater,
will be shown using this famous
interference strategy that
Loyd developed.
All-Girls in Chicago
Stay posted on the the
9th Annual All-Girls
Nationals, presented by the
Kasparov Chess Foundation
and the Renaissance Knights
Chess Foundation.
The event, held from
April 20-22, takes place
in downtown Chicago.
CL_04-2012_CLO_AKF_r6.qxp_chess life 3/12/12 1:29 PM Page 3
Columns
12 LOOKS AT BOOKS
The Chess Kids Are All Right
By FM Mike Klein
14 CHESS TO ENJOY
Just Let it Go
By GM Andy Soltis
16 SOLITAIRE CHESS
The Great Fred Reinfeld
By Bruce Pandolfini
44 BACK TO BASICS
Don’t Retreat—Reload!
By GM Lev Alburt
46 ENDGAME LAB
Pawn Plus
By GM Pal Benko
Departments
3 PREVIEW
6 COUNTERPLAY
8 FIRST MOVES
10 USCF AFFAIRS
50 TOURNAMENT LIFE
70 CLASSIFIEDS
71 SOLUTIONS
On The Cover
For tournament chess players,
the chess clock is almost as
iconic as the pieces themselves.
And while digital clocks have
become the clock of choice for
most players, there is just
something comforting about
a good, old-fashioned, analog
clock and the excitement of
seeing the little red flag rise
(and fall). Our cover story by
Keith Ammann begins on page
32 and looks at the numbered
days of the analog clock.
Cover photo by Caroline Kaye
4 Chess Life — April 2012
April Chess Life
uschess.org
18 WIJK AAN ZEE 2012
Through the Eyes of the Victims
By GM Ian Rogers
GM Levon Aronian convincingly won the first super-tournament
of 2012, the 74th Tata Steel tournament in the Dutch seaside village
of Wijk aan Zee.
26 PROFILE
The Awonder Years
By Brad Rosen
Eight-year-old Awonder Liang, a third-grader at Van Hise Elementary
School in Madison, Wisconsin, is arguably the brightest star to emerge
on the American chess horizon in decades, and perhaps ever.
32 COVER STORY
Winding Down
By Keith Ammann
This year’s rule changes may begin the last chapter in the history of
the analog clock.
36 COMPOSITIONS
45 Years of Being Baffled by Benko
By Steven B. Dowd
In the April 1967 issue of Chess Life, a column appeared by GM Pal Benko
that has had a profound effect on the chess composition community.
P
H
O
T
O
:

C
A
R
O
L
I
N
E

K
A
Y
E
CL_04-2012_TOC_AKF_r6 (1)_chess life 3/14/12 3:55 PM Page 4
2012 Membership Options
Choose Between Premium and Regular USCF Memberships
PREMIUM MEMBERSHIP
PRINTED COPY of Chess Life (monthly)
or Chess Life for Kids (bimonthly) plus
all other benefits of regular membership.
REGULAR MEMBERSHIP
Online-only access to Chess Life or
Chess Life for Kids; TLA Newsletter will
be mailed to you (Adults: bimonthly;
Scholastic: 3 per year)
WHAT YOU GET AS A
REGULAR USCF MEMBER:
The right to play in USCF-sanctioned
tournaments and be assigned an official rating
Access to member-only content on
uschess.org, including our USCF forum
discussion group. (9)
Online access to Chess Life
& Chess Life for Kids.
WHAT YOU GET AS A
PREMIUM USCF MEMBER:
All of the above plus a printed copy of
Chess Life or Chess Life for Kids!
PREMIUM USCF MEMBERSHIP RATES
CATEGORY 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR
ADULT
$
46
$
84
$
122
SCHOLASTIC (1) (6 ISSUES CL4K)
$
24
$
43
$
61
YOUTH (2) (6 ISSUES CL)
$
28
$
51
$
73
YOUNG ADULT (3)
$
33
$
61
$
88
REGULAR USCF MEMBERSHIP RATES
CATEGORY 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR
ADULT
$
40
$
72
$
104
SCHOLASTIC (1)
$
17
$
30
$
42
YOUTH (2)
$
22
$
40
$
57
YOUNG ADULT (3)
$
26
$
47
$
67
OTHER USCF MEMBERSHIP RATES
CATEGORY 1 YEAR 2 YEAR 3 YEAR 4 YEAR
SUSTAINING (4, 8)
$
95
$
190
$
285
$
380
(started prior to 2003)
SUSTAINING (4, 8)
$
120
$
240
$
360
$
480
(started after 2002)
SENIOR (5)
$
40
$
72
$
104 n/a
FAMILY PLAN 1 (6)
$
75 n/a n/a n/a
FAMILY PLAN 2 (7)
$
47 n/a n/a n/a
SENIOR LIFE (5, 8)
$
750 (one time charge)
LIFE (8)
$
1,500 (one time charge)
BENEFACTOR (8, 10)
$
3,000 (one time charge)
BENEFACTOR,
EXISTING LIFE MEMBER (8, 10)
$
1,500 (one time charge)
A $3 affiliate commission will apply to all memberships submitted by affiliates.
OR
CL_01-2012_membership_ad_AKF_r8_Layout 1 12/8/11 1:32 AM Page 1
6 Chess Life — April 2012
Send your letters to letters@uschess.org.
If Chess Life publishes your letter, you
will be sent a copy of Test, Evaluate and
Improve Your Chess (see ad below). Let-
ters are subject to editing for content and
length.
Counterplay
uschess.org
Chess mates
I enjoyed reading “The Mating Game” by
Nelly Rosario (February 2012). Only a
woman could write about how romantic
and sexual a game of chess could be.
She alludes to the fact that men like to
play chess because of the aggressive
nature of their gender, and only hints at
the female’s role. But once the movement
of the queen (the only female piece in the
game) was extended, it became obvious
that it was the female and not the male
that was in control of “the mating game.”
After all, doesn’t the (male) king nor-
mally hide in his well-protected corner
bedroom until all females are off the
board—and only then comes out to strut
around? While it is the queen that makes
moves trying to penetrate his position, cli-
maxing with a mate. Only in a helpmate
problem is the king trying to be mated; it's
the queen that is constantly checking on
the king and at the proper time consum-
mates the action as the king is laid down.
An example of this is the attached prob-
lem composed by Ben Bentrup and
published in the Autumn 2011 issue of
floridaCHESS. White mates in 11 moves.
Though it is not difficult, It shows the
actions of the queen as she moves around
trying to penetrate and mate the central-
ized king, who is hiding “in the caves and
among the rocks of the mountains.” She
first darts around and then sneakily slides
up the mountain one step at a time as the
king keeps trying to avoid her amongst the
rocks. She finally successfully penetrates
and mates.
Ben Bentrup
floridaCHESS, 2011
White mates in 11
Solution
1. Qh1+ Ke5 2. Qh8+ Ke4 3. Qa8+ Ke5 4.
Qa1+ Ke4 5. Qb1+ Ke5 6. Qb2+ Ke4 7.
Qc2+ Ke5 8. Qc3+ Ke4 9. Qd3+ Ke5 10.
Qd6+ Ke4 11. Qf4 mate.
And the queen hits the four corners,
then maneuvers with checks to b1-b2-c2-
c3-d3-d6-f4 and mate. Also, note the king
can’t escape to f3 during the checks along
the b1-h7 diagonal because Qxf5xg4
would give mate instead.
Harvey Lerman
via e-mail
-+-+-+-+
+-+-trl+Q
-vl-+-+R+
+-zp-+p+-
-trP+k+p+
+R+-zP-+-
-+-+p+-+
+-+-+nmK-
Faces Across the Board
Chess Life is soon introducing a
new column, “Faces Across the
Board,” that will highlight class-
level players who have reached a
notable chess milestone or accom-
plishment. Did you win your class
section for the first time? Did you
defeat a titled player? Have you
started a chess initiative in your
hometown? These are just some of
the reasons why you could be
selected to appear in this column.
You must be a current class-level
player or have been a class-level
player at the time of your achieve-
ment (rating of 1999 or below).
If you wish to be considered or to
suggest someone to us, please send
a brief supporting statement to
faces@uschess.org. Include your e-
mail address, phone number, and a
high-resolution photo (head-and-
shoulders or profile picture required).
If we find your story intriguing you
will be contacted by Al Lawrence
who will be writing this column for
us. Lawrence is currently president
of the Chess Journalists of America,
is a frequent Chess Life contributor,
and is a former executive director of
the USCF.
Corrections
February, 2012 issue, “World
Youth,” Yury Lapshun should have
been listed as being with Chess in
the Schools, not Yury Shulman.
CL_04-2012_counterplay_JP_r7_chess life 3/14/2012 10:46 AM Page 6

I
. .


04-2012_USCFSales_inside1_Layout 1 3/11/2012 12:10 PM Page 1
8 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
First Moves
Point-Based Prize Structures
ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND—When players competed in the
Chesapeake Open here earlier this year, they didn’t have to
worry about splitting up the prize money or figuring out how
much the top prize would be.
That’s because the tournament featured a point-based prize
structure that rewards players based on how many games
they win, irrespective of how many other people won the same
amount of games.
Under such a payout scheme, perfect scores—and thus the
top prizes—are highly elusive but not impossible.
Tournament Director Mike Regan—who has used the point-
based prize system at the Chesapeake in recent years—says
the approach balances the risks between the organizer and
the players.
“What I like best about it is that it is a compromise between
a prize fund that is guaranteed and one that is based on
entries,” Regan said. “With a traditional guaranteed prize fund,
if the turnout is low the organizer loses money, and if it is high
the organizer makes money.
“For the players, a low turnout is good since they will divide
the prize fund among a smaller group and have less ties,” Regan
continued. “A large turnout is bad for the players because they
need to get a higher score to win a prize and thus have a higher
chance of ending up tying for a prize and getting less money.”
However, with point-based prizes, attendance doesn’t
affect the prize.
“Instead, their payout is based only on the one thing they con-
trol, how many points they score,” Regan said.
The approach carries pros and cons.
“The downside for the organizer is the payout is less pre-
dictable,” Regan said. “The upside is that the average amount of
prizes you will pay goes up and down with the number of entries.”
Among the players, the point-based prize structure drew
both praise and criticism.
“I like it,” said Travis Pape, a Census Bureau worker from
Alexandria, Virginia, who won $125 for scoring four points in
the Under 1400 section of the tournament.
Five points would have secured a $500 prize, and 4
1
⁄2 would
have secured a $250 prize. By the fourth round, Pape was guar-
anteed to leave the tournament with at least $125.
“I felt a little more relaxed in the last game,” Pape said. “I knew
I was going to get some amount.
“It’s nice to know it’s not going to be up to tiebreaks or that
you won’t get kicked out of first place,” Pape said.
“I prefer this system because it rewards the higher scorer as
opposed to the someone that draws his last game to secure vic-
tory,” said Elan Rodan, a computer systems engineer from
Fairfax, Virginia, who scored 4
1
⁄2 in the Under 2000 section—
netting a prize of $600 and frustrating Bruce A. Till, from
achieving a perfect score of five points—and a prize of $1,200—
in the final round.
Till, a Gaithersburg, Maryland-based chess instructor, said
he favored the point-based prize system as well.
“This way it rewards what you score,” said Till, who won $300
for scoring four points. A score of 4
1
⁄2 would have netted $600.
“The other good thing is as soon as you’re done you get your
money and you’re out,” Till said. “You score what you score and
you get what you get. It doesn’t matter what anyone else does.”
Not everyone is a fan.
Larry Saxby, a self-described “chess junkie” from Philadel-
phia who played in the Under 2000 section, said he prefers prizes
based on place.
“It’s too tough to get first place,” he said in reference to the
top prize. “You gotta have 5 and 0. I don’t like that. It’s much
more difficult than the normal way.”
Others, such as Sathish Nath, a Rockville, Maryland-based
chess instructor, says the score-based system promotes “fight-
ing chess.” “My preference is playing good chess, which this
promotes,” Nath said.
Regan observed that under the regular prize system, players
can agree to a draw in the final round and still take first place.
“You don’t see that happening in this,” Regan said. .
Rewarding players for games won
By JAMAAL ABDUL-ALIM
P
H
O
T
O
:

M
I
K
E
L

L
A
R
R
E
A
T
E
G
I

CL_04-2012_First_Moves_AKF_r6_chess life 3/14/12 12:03 PM Page 8
In Learn to Play Chess with Fritz & Chesster, Fritz is in charge
of the castle when his parents go on vacation. It’s every kid’s
dream until the dastardly King Black challenges the young
stand-in king to a duel!
Explore the kingdom and discover seven arcade-style
games that explain everything from chess basics to master
strategies. Exercise your brain and put what you’ve learned
to the test in the Intelligym, a training ground for future
chess pros. You’ll soon realize that this chess game is every-
thing but child’s play!
Fritz & Chesster’s Chess Complete is all three versions
of the Fritz games and uses the world
famous Fritz engine - serious software
used by real-life chess Grandmasters
to train for the world’s top tournaments.
System Requirements: Windows 7 / VISTA
/ XP, 256 MB RAM, 300 MB free hard drive
space, 500 MHz Processor
WIN0331CB $49.95
3 Games in 1!
Fritz & Chesster’s
Chess Complete
$
7
9
.9
5
If P
u
rc
h
a
s
e
d
S
e
p
a
ra
te
ly
!
04-2012_USCFSales_inside2_Layout 1 3/11/2012 12:16 PM Page 1
10 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
USCF Affairs April
USCF EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT PEGGY EBERHART
Position: Chief Accountant
Peggy Eberhart started with us February 2005. Peggy had the tremendous task of get-
ting our accounting records organized and put in order when the office relocated to
Tennessee. Peggy showed her dedication to the USCF by travelling to our former New
York office to familiarize herself with our accounting records and her daily duties. Peggy
does a fabulous job keeping everything going smoothly by keeping us on track with
paying bills, overseeing payroll, human resources record keeping, preparing 1099’s,
among a variety of other duties as well. Peggy is the mother of a set of twin girls. She
also is a personal trainer in what spare time she has, competing in body-building com-
petitions (and winning!). She is very much into healthy eating and does her best to
help the office staff healthy with great nutritional tips. We all appreciate Peggy very
much for all that she does for U.S. Chess and also as a personal friend to all of us.
Dear USCF Members,
The United States Chess Federation and Nationwide Insurance® are pleased to announce a long-term relationship
that could save USCF members money on their insurance needs.
Nationwide®, based in Columbus, Ohio, is one of the oldest and strongest diversified insurance companies, ranked
#127 on Fortune 500 in 2011. Nationwide® offers a full suite of products to help protect you through all stages of life.
With Nationwide®, you’ll enjoy:
• One Stop Convenience—insurance for your car, home, boat, RV and more!
• On Your Side® Review—free insurance consultation and assessment.
• Outstanding customer and claims services available 24/7: call or click.
• Wide variety of products to choose from.
• Exclusive member-only discounts.
• Innovative policyholder services and benefits.
Visit nationwide.com for more information on the variety of products and services offered by Nationwide®!
Join other USCF members and take advantage of a special discount on your auto insurance with Nationwide® today!
Call 1-866-633-5747 or contact your local Nationwide Insurance Agent, and do not forget to mention you are a USCF
member. Please join me in thanking Nationwide® for their support of the USCF World Youth team.
Regards,
Bill Hall, USCF Executive Director
Nationwide may make a financial contribution to affinity member organization in return for the opportunity to market products and services to
its members or customers. Products underwritten by Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company and Affiliated Companies, Nationwide Lloyds and
Nationwide Property & Casualty Companies (in TX). Home Office: Columbus, OH 43215. Insurance products and services are subject to
underwriting guidelines, review, and approval. Products and discounts not available to all persons in all states. Nationwide, Nationwide Insurance,
and On Your Side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2011 Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. All rights reserved.
&
CL_04-2012_USCF_Affairs_AKF_r6_chess life 3/15/12 1:34 AM Page 10
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 11
I am happy to report that USCF is continuing to have a
healthy recovery as we enter 2012 significantly ahead of budget.
We are encouraged that we will beat budget projections for a mod-
est profit this year. The upside in our financial condition can be
attributed to increased memberships, better than expected
tournament revenues, and continued savings on expenses. Paid
memberships outpace the last three years and the trend for Feb-
ruary is positive for continued increases in revenues.
For context, in a year-over-year comparison, in January
2011 we reported a to-date loss of just over $32K as com-
pared to a profit at the end of January 2012. With regard to our
outstanding legal expenses, I am pleased to report that we are
making great progress in paying down these extraordinary
amounts. Gross legal cost for the unfortunate legal matter
exceeded $800K. USCF’s current situation is that we have
paid off all attorneys except one, with whom we have a payment
schedule which ends with a final payment in September 2012.
USCF also took loans from the life membership assets (LMA)
account and our line of credit (LOC). We hope to pay down the
LOC by the end of 2012. The LMA will take longer. While the
USCF is working diligently to close the books on the legal
tribulations of the past, it is important to note that there was
a terrible opportunity cost to the USCF, and the chess commu-
nity we support, with the expenditure of monies for other than
the promotion and development of chess.
Looking ahead, we have an exciting year of national events
scheduled and our players are enjoying excellent results in
national and international competitions. In the November 2011
World Youth, we had two medalists, Awonder Liang who earned
the gold medal in the Open Under 8 section, and Ruifeng Li who
won the silver medal in the Open Under 10 section. Eric Rosen
earned his first international master norm in the Open Under
18 section, and Sarah Chiang finished fourth in the Girls
Under 14 section. Congratulations to all.
It is of note that internationally our standings on the FIDE
“top lists” include GM Hikaru Nakamura at #6 and GM Gata
Kamsky at #14, with GM Alex Onischuk and GM Yasser
Seirawan making the top 100 ... Robert Hess isn’t far behind.
The U.S. has the potential to not only field the strongest team
in the history of American chess, but to actively compete for first
place at the 2012 Olympiad in Istanbul.
For the ladies, IM Anna Zatonskih stands at #15 and comes
off of an excellent finish in Gibraltar and IM Irina Krush ranks
at #28. Ray Robson claims #11 on the FIDE top 20 juniors list,
but unfortunately we have no player on the FIDE top 20 girls
list. In the December USCF rating list we had twenty girls
under 21 rated 2000 or more, led by Alisa Melekhina rated 2321.
The “girls under 21” is a group we need to put more focus on
in the future including consideration of a “Girls Under 21”
Closed Championship and possible sponsorships for interna-
tional opportunities for these talented young female players.
It is significant for the U.S. chess community to celebrate the
richness that immigrants have brought to our country. Espe-
cially in chess, we welcome visitors from other lands, many of
whom come to visit for a tournament, or come to America with
family or as students, and decide to stay and become perma-
nent residents and later citizens. When our newest members
first arrive they are eagerly sought out to be the “foreigner” in
FIDE norm events and of course everyone is excited to play with
them. Today, I would like to welcome Viktorija Ni, late of Latvia,
who has qualified for an invitation for this year’s U.S. Women’s
Championship and Zonal.
We are fortunate to have outstanding sponsors who are
devoted to the growth and promotion of chess and enriching the
communities they live in by their stewardship on behalf of
chess. Rex Sinquefield and the Saint Louis Chess Club are again
hosting the U.S. Championships which is a USCF premiere event
and a Zonal in 2012. Saint Louis is also hosting the U.S.
Women’s Championship and the U.S. Junior Championship.
2012 is an Olympiad year, and so we are grateful for the excep-
tional support from Saint Louis as we prepare the teams for this
important competition.
The Kasparov Chess Foundation (KCF) provides a grant and
performance bonuses for the Olympiad team. KCF also runs the
All-Girls National which will be held in April in Chicago. Trophies
Plus sponsored the Grand Prix in 2011. Trophies Plus also pro-
vided jackets and plaques for the All America Team and provides
funding for scholarship prizes in the U.S. Junior Girls Open.
And now from sponsors to service, wherein I humbly segue
to a report of my activities. As president, I am personally
devoted to the promotion of chess. My public activities since the
last meeting included visiting the Fresno Chess Club in mid-
December where, for the third year in a row, I gave a talk and
answered questions from members about the USCF, FIDE and
all things chess. Thanks to Bob Rasmussen for continuing to
organize this event and thanks to the Fresno Chess Club mem-
bers for a very entertaining evening. I look forward to visiting
Fresno Chess Club again in 2012.
In early January, I participated in the opening ceremony for
the Northern California International held in Fremont, Califor-
nia at the Nor Cal House of Chess located in Northwestern
Polytechnic University (NPU), along with CalChess President Tom
Langland, NPU President George Hsieh and Milpitas Mayor
Jose Esteves. We all spoke briefly during the opening festivities,
and spoke privately later. The event coalesced with the passion
and dedication of Ted Castro and Arun Sharma who co-organ-
ized the event and created a successful vision for top-level
chess in the Bay Area. GM Sam Shankland won the tournament.
During Valentine’s weekend, I participated in a panel discus-
sion at the Hip Hop Chess Federation fifth anniversary event
where we discussed life strategies and the fusion of chess,
music and martial arts. Hip Hop’s anniversary celebration was
well covered by local media and was quite an impressive and
fun event. Adisa Bonjoko’s Hip Hop Chess Federation was
recently headlined in Chess Life, and I am looking forward to
more innovative promotions from Adisa.
May Caissa inspire all chessplayers in 2012.
Ruth Haring, president, USCF
Chico, California, February, 2012
Across the Board
Call for ADMs
Advance Delegate Motions (ADMs) for the delegates’ meeting at this year’s U.S. Open are due before June 1, 2012.
They can be sent to Cheryle Bruce, c/o USCF, P.O. Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557 or e-mailed to cbruce@uschess.org.
CL_04-2012_USCF_Affairs_AKF_r6_chess life 3/14/12 3:49 PM Page 11
Chess Kids by Lynn Hamrick Productions, the original award-winning film directed by Lynn Hamrick now on DVD plus a 30 minute special edition follow-up of the
original players, 2011, 19.95, www.chesskidsmovie.com. Also available at uscfsales.com(catalog number DVD0005MV).
12 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Looks at Books Looks at Books
I
f you take away some vestiges of the early nineties, Chess
Kids could have been filmed today. Notable anachronisms
include Jerger clocks, “Chess Makes You Smart” buttons and
Romanian protest flags with bowdlerized centers (in her brief
cameo, IA Carol Jarecki looks exactly the same). Now available
on DVD with a 30-minute follow-up piece, Director Lynn Ham-
rick shows us several chess constants. Parents still struggle to
balance motivation and pushiness. Girls are still mysteriously
underrepresented in scholastic tournaments. Pre-teen chil-
dren with missing teeth still make really adorable interview
subjects, even if they are precociously rattling off 20 moves of
Max Lange attack theory.
Chess fans with long memories will recognize many of the top
juniors featured in the documentary, which is set at the 1990
World Youth Chess Festival for peace in Fond du Lac, Wiscon-
sin. Most of them have left the chess arena completely, including
Nawrose Nur, Erez Klein (no relation), Victoria Fossum and
David and Andrea Peterson. Morgan Pehme and Josh Waitzkin
essentially have also, though their exploits were chronicled a
few years later in the film version of Searching for Bobby Fis-
cher, and the former also penned his father’s obituary in these
pages a few months ago. In all, only Judit Polgar is making a
career from the game.
Like Fred Waitzkin’s memoir-cum-Hollywood movie, Chess
Kids is not about the game as much as about tangential sub-
jects of parenting, competition and gender. Rarely does the
viewer even see an unobstructed position, and when we do, the
board is ancillary to the larger point. When Nur sits patiently
licking ice cream during an adjourned endgame (another sign
of bygone chess days), noted authors GM Pal Benko and IM Niko-
lay Minev lob variations back and forth. English player Joseph
Conlon, when he can sit still long enough to be interviewed, gives
several signature quips. When Hamrick begins a sentence with
the intention of Conlon finishing it, the young boy chastises her
in classic British brogue: “Is that supposed to be a question?”
The high-intellect comes crashing down a few scenes later
The Chess Kids Are All Right
Revisiting the kids from Fond du Lac,Wisconsin
By FM MIKE KLEIN
CL_04-2012_Books_AK_FB_JP_chess life 3/14/2012 10:33 AM Page 12
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 13
when Conlon, after spotting the camera focused on him, looks
up from his game and involuntarily smiles in the way that chil-
dren are trained. He furtively raises his hand to wave before
realizing that protocol has been broken. The now fragile Con-
lon pretends to just be reaching to play with his lips. Two
decades removed, Conlon still fidgets during interviews, though
he is less of an obstructionist with Hamrick. “When you look
back and see yourself as a nine-year-old just being ingenious
the way nine-year-olds are, it is embarrassing,” he said. “But
I can see it is me; it’s the same person.”
Hamrick’s biggest coup was interviewing the now-mother
Polgar, who she could not get access to during the original movie.
Polgar joyfully remembers being admired by the younger Peter
Leko at the tournament. The history of the three Polgar sisters’
education is well known, which gives more context when Judit
explains that Fond du Lac was the first time she stayed with
other children during a tournament. Her next comment is
nearly verbatim to Waitzkin’s fearful lament in his biopic. “My
purpose was to win. But it was not a nice feeling to go there and
have to win,” Polgar said.
Waitzkin is still telegenic, even if his hair is a tad shorter than
during his youth. Like Searching for Bobby Fischer, he has
ruminated much on talent, expectations, and loss, eventually
finding solace in meditation. “When I got into Push Hands, which
is the martial embodiment of Tai Chi, all of my chess principals
just simply crossed over. I started having these amazing break-
throughs in chess that immediately launched my martial arts
into another level, and back and forth.”
Pehme, Waitzkin’s childhood friend, has gone on to become
a professor of journalism, film and television, and also helped
produce Hamrick’s follow-up. His recall of a three-day battle
against the junior champion of Mexico was unsurprisingly lit-
erary: “It was like fighting the Iliad. It ended ultimately in a
stalemate in true Grecian terms.”
Hamrick’s epilogue also serves to caution the would-be chess
professional. Gabriel Schwartzman became at 17 the youngest
current grandmaster in the world. Now retired from chess, he
mused about being financially set for life if his dad had nurtured
an athletic talent instead of cerebral one. “That part of it stinks
a little bit,” he said, with a mix of joking and regret.
The notable and perhaps telling absence in the follow-up is
the Peterson family, whom Hamrick could not locate. In the orig-
inal documentary, father Richard is first seen like any other
helpless parent. “Every game that they play is like waiting to
give birth,” he said. “You’re a nervous wreck.” Tiny Andrea, play-
ing in the 8-and-under section, smacks her gum and offers her
reasons for playing chess. “It’s nice. You can’t break your legs
or anything like that, like you could do in running or jumping.”
But after the tournament is over, she sits atop her father’s lap
and says she would have rather been playing with her friends.
“She went through these last six weeks for me, there’s no
question about that,” Richard says, conflicted by his daughter’s
comments versus his desire to pursue her talent.
David and Andrea Peterson would both play chess for a few
more years. According to their Member Services Area pages,
Andrea essentially stopped competing four years later. David
made master and competed nearly every weekend, sometimes
playing in all three national scholastic championships. After
entering 22 tournaments between February and May, 1995, win-
ning the K-9 section of the 1995 National Junior High
Championship with a perfect score along the way and also
playing in the 16th Annual Lina Grumette Memorial Day Clas-
sic from May 27-29, 1995, he abruptly quit chess forever.
Schwartzman is now an officer at a software company. Fos-
sum works on computerized language translation and Nur is
in the process of becoming a dietician. Conlon became a quan-
tum physicist. His boyhood quote proved prescient. “90 percent
of my dreams I don’t know about.” .
CL_04-2012_Books_AK_FB_JP_chess life 3/14/2012 10:33 AM Page 13
14 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
After Veselin Topalov began the 2008
World Championship match with two
losses, he was asked at a press conference
how he managed to deal with defeats.
“Generally I am good at forgetting,” he said
and laughed.
Forgetting is a part of chess—for good
or ill. Sometimes, as Topalov recognized,
forgetting is good. But at other times ...
South by southwest
IM Anatoly Donchenko
FM Vladimir Fedoseyev
Russian Senior Championship 2001
White to play
White should win after 86. a7. Instead
he played the astonishing 86. Qg4+???.
But Black didn’t take the queen. He
replied 86. ... Kf2???. White won after 87.
Qxf5+ and a trade of queens.
What happened was a bizarre attack of
mutual forgetfulness. Both players sim-
ply forgot which direction their pawns
were going.
They mentally turned the board around
by 180 degrees. White didn’t push his
pawn to a7 because he thought it was
actually on h3, not a6. And when he
played 86. Qg4+ he thought it was really
86. Qb5+.
Black didn’t take the queen because he
thought his pawn was coming up the
board, not down. He thought he had to
allow White to play 87. Qxf5+—and wrote
it down as “87. Qxc4+.”
Okay, you can say that old age and
the fatigue of playing 85 moves took their
toll. But consider this example:
Mutual forgetfulness
GM Michael Adams
GM Semion Dvoirys
Biel 1993
After 39. ... Ke6
In his first interzonal tournament, 21-
year-old Michael Adams became desperate
with 40. f4??. After the obvious 40. ... exf3
e.p. followed by 41. N-moves Nxd4 he
could have safely resigned.
But Black replied 40. ... gxf4?? instead.
After 41. Nxf4+ White eventually created
a passed a-pawn and went on to win in
60 moves. With this fortuitous extra point
Adams qualified for a Candidates match
and became an international star.
Why the double-blunder at move 40?
Both players said after the game they
simply forgot about the en passant rule.
Even worse was an incident that GM
Dragoljub Velimirovic recalled at a sym-
posium during last year’s Mikhail Tal
Memorial tournament. Velimirovic made
a move against Tal in a team match more
than 20 years ago and got up to take a
stroll around the playing hall. He was
pleased with himself when Tal studied
the board for 15 minutes. “I surprised
Tal!,” Velimirovic thought to himself.
“But it was my surprise when I returned
to the board of our game and saw that my
last move was bishop from d3 to g5!” he
recalled. Both players somehow forgot that
a light-square bishop can’t go to a dark
square. (After Velimirovic apologized and
took back his move, the game continued.)
These instances are extreme, of course.
But we all have to deal with gaps in our
memory. There are times when masters
help their memory by bending the rules.
Jotting it down
GM Eduard Gufeld
GM Lev Psakhis
USSR Cup 1982
After 17. Be3
Black’s knight had moved four times
when play continued 17. ... Nb6!? 18. b3
Nh7!?. White felt he should punish the
exotic maneuvers. But he felt he had to
remind himself: “In order not to forget
(O, my untrustworthy memory!) I began
to mark every move of a black knight on
the scoresheet with a circle,” he wrote in
the Latvian magazine Shakhmaty.
His opponent became upset because he
thought White was circling every move he
considered a mistake. In fact, Black could
have protested that the circles were ille-
gal. FIDE’s Laws of Chess, 12.3, states:
“During play the players are forbidden to
make use of any notes ...”
Forgetting and remembering play curi-
ous roles when we calculate. In a way,
when you look into the near future you
are using your ability to forget about the
position on the board.
For example, suppose you’re trying to
calculate three moves ahead, starting
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
P+-+RmK-+
+-+-+p+-
-+-wQ-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+k+
tr-+-+q+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+p
-+-+kzp-+
zp-+p+-zpP
P+-zPp+P+
+P+-+-+K
-+n+NzP-+
+-+-+-+-
r+-wqrvlk+
+l+n+p+-
p+-zp-snpzp
+pzpPzp-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-zP-vLNsNP
PzPL+-zPP+
tR-+QtR-mK-
Just Let it Go
By GM Andy Soltis
A good memory is an asset in chess. But sometimes forgetting is vital, too.
Chess to Enjoy
CL_04-2012_soltis_AKF_r7_chess life 3/14/2012 11:28 AM Page 14
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 15
with a move of your bishop from e2 to h5.
To be able to see the future accurately you
have to clear your mind of the mental
picture that had the bishop still standing
on e2. Otherwise you can fall victim to
what GM/psychologist Nikolai Krogius
called the “retained image.” You see vari-
ations in which the bishop can go to,
say, a6 because your memory erroneously
tells you it’s still on e2.
Faulty calculation was the bane of the
annual Melody Amber tournaments, in
which half of the games were played blind-
folded. Here’s one:
The blindfolded leading the
blindfolded
GM Sergey Karjakin
GM Boris Gelfand
Melody Amber 2011
After 35. ... Qa3
White had moved his rook from h1 to
d1 eight moves before. But he left it men-
tally on h1. To meet the (non-existent)
threat of 36. ... Bxh1 he played 36. Be4??
Bxe4+ 37. Qxe4 and resigned after 37. ...
Rxd1+!.
GM Alexander Grischuk solved a mem-
ory lapse during the 2006 Melody Amber
in a simple way. In the blindfold games, the
players would sit at computer monitors
that showed a diagram with an empty
board. During Grischuk’s game against
Vassily Ivanchuk, he became confused
about where his opponent’s pieces were.
“Vasya’s knight constantly jumped here
and there,” Grischuk recalled to 64 mag-
azine.
He found a digital solution, literally: “I
placed one finger on the square on the
monitor where his bishop was and a sec-
ond one performed the role of his knight.”
Grischuk used his other hand to repre-
sent where his own pieces were and
managed to avoid hanging material. He
gave touch-move a new meaning.
The general public thinks that when a
master plays more than one blindfold
game simultaneously he is relying on a
great memory and what the Germans call
aufmerksamkeitsverteilung—the ability
to pay attention to several things at once.
But that’s not quite it. The blindfold
simul giver isn’t thinking of all the positions
at once. He is using his ability to tem-
porarily forget the position on board two
when he begins to concentrate on board
three. When he gets back to board two, he
has to retrieve the forgotten memory.
But he needs empty storage space for
that. When George Koltanowski was train-
ing for his record-breaking 34-board
blindfold exhibition in 1937 he tried to
clear his mind of all chess positions. He
didn’t want an old one stuck somewhere
in his memory where it would interfere
with new ones during the exhibition. He
wouldn’t even look at an empty chess-
board in the days before the simul—and
he became annoyed when his wife bought
checkered white-and-black linoleum for
their dining room.
Koltanowski was later invited to the
Menninger Institute so their psycholo-
gists could study his mind, according to
Reuben Fine. The psychologists weren’t
interested in his memory but in his abil-
ity to forget, Fine said. “It is forgetting
which is the key to success in blindfold,
as in seeing chess,” he wrote in The
World’s a Chessboard. .
Advance Delegate Motions (ADMs) for the
delegates’ meeting at this year’s U.S. Open
in Vancouver, Washington are due before
June 1, 2012. They can be sent to Cheryle
Bruce, c/o USCF, P.O. Box 3967, Crossville,
TN 38557 or e-mailed to cbruce@uschess.
org. Look for more information about the U.S.
Open in the May Chess Life.
-+-tr-+-mk
+-+-+-zpp
-+p+-zp-+
+p+l+P+-
-+-+-wQ-zP
wqP+L+-zP-
P+-+-+-+
+K+R+-+-
2011 World Junior
America’s GM Ray Robson came
close but victory in the 2011 World
Junior went to another 16-year-old,
GM Dariusz Swiercz of Poland. Rob-
son’s 9-4 score was good for a tie for
fourth place in the 125-player field
that assembled in Chennai, India.
The 50th edition of the now-annual
tournament for the best players
under 20 years of age provides our
six quiz problems this month. In
each of the positions you are asked
to find the fastest winning line of
play. This will usually mean the
forced win of a decisive amount of
material, such as a rook or minor
piece. Solutions on page 71.
Problem I
IM Kannappan Priyadharshan
GM Ray Robson
Black to play
Problem IV
IM Jan Krejci
FM Vladislav Kovalev
Black to play
Problem II
GM Ray Robson
Aditya Udeshi
White to play
Problem V
IM Milos Roganovic
GM Maxim Matlakov
White to play
Problem III
GM Samvel Ter-Sahakyan
FM Gabriel Botta
White to play
Problem VI
FM Vladislav Kovalev
GM Tamir Nabaty
White to play
-+-tR-+-+
zp-+-+pmkp
-+-+l+p+
wq-+-vl-+-
-tr-+-+-+
+P+-wQ-+-
P+P+L+PzP
+K+R+-+-
r+-+rmk-vl
+p+n+p+p
pwq-zp-+psN
+-+-+-+-
-wQ-zPP+-+
+l+-vL-zP-
-+-+-+LzP
+-+-tRRmK-
r+-tr-+k+
+p+-+pvlp
-sn-zp-+p+
zpN+-+-+-
Pwq-zPnvL-+
+P+-+-+-
-+-+NzPPzP
tR-+Q+RmK-
-wq-tr-trk+
+-+-tRp+p
-+-+-+p+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+Pvl-vL-+l
P+QsN-zP-+
+-+-tR-mK-
-+-mk-+rtr
zpQ+n+p+-
-+-+pvl-+
wq-+-+p+p
-+-zP-vL-zP
zP-zp-+-zP-
-+P+-zP-+
+R+R+-mK-
-+-tr-+-mk
zpp+-+-+-
-+n+-+Q+
+-+N+-vlL
-+-+P+-zp
+-+-+-+R
PzPPwq-tr-+
+K+-+-tR-
CL_04-2012_soltis_AKF_r7_chess life 3/14/2012 11:28 AM Page 15
16 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
The best chess writer of all time may
have been Fred Reinfeld (1910-64). With
more than 100 titles to his name, he was
certainly one of the most prolific authors
in any discipline, though he did not write
solely about chess. His books range from
coin collecting to political theory, and
frankly he could have written about any-
thing with style and panache. Even
though Reinfeld wrote mainly for instruc-
tion and entertainment, he was, contrary
to popular beliefs, one of America’s
strongest players in the 1930s and ’40s.
Witness the following demolition of the
great Sammy Reshevsky (Black) at the
Western Open of 1932. Not knowing who
played which side, it would be easy to
think that Reinfeld was Reshevsky and
Reshevsky was the misconceived Reinfeld.
But you be the judge. The game began:
Queen’s Indian Defense (E16)
Fred Reinfeld
Sammy Reshevsky
Minneapolis, USA 1932
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2
c5 6. d5 exd5 7. Nh4 g6 8. Nc3 h6 9. 0-0 a6
10. cxd5 d6
Your starting position
Now make sure you have the above
position set up on your chessboard. As
you play through the remaining moves in
this game, use a piece of paper to cover
the article, exposing White’s next move
only after trying to guess it. If you guess
correctly, give yourself the par score.
Sometimes points are also rewarded for
second-best moves, and there may be
bonus points—or deductions—for other
moves and variations. Note that ** means
that the note to Black’s move is over and
White’s move is in the next line.**
11. e4 Par Score 5
White expands in the center.
11. … Bg7
12. f4 Par Score 5
White is already threatening 13. e5 (1
bonus point), and if 13. ... dxe5, then 14.
fxe5 Nfd7 15. e6, when 15. ... fxe6? 16.
dxe6 Bxg2 17. exd7+ wins a piece.
12. … Nfd7
This prevents e4-e5. But for how long
and how does the queen knight come
into play?**
13. a4 Par Score 5
Reinfeld aims to discourage ... b6-b5.
13. … 0-0
14. Be3 Par Score 5
White continues his development.
14. … Kh7
Reshevsky temporizes, adding protec-
tion to his h6-pawn.**
15. Qc2 Par Score 5
This clears the back rank for the queen
rook to come into play. At the same time
the queen lines up with the black king on
the diagonal, so e4-e5 is in the air. Note
also that 15. ... f5 (undermining the cen-
ter) drops a pawn to 16. exf5 gxf5 17. Nxf5
(1 bonus point).
15. … Nf6
This development is playable at the
moment, since 16. e5 is met by 16. ... Ng4,
threatening the e3-bishop and the e5-
pawn. Accept 1 bonus point if you saw it.
In this way Reshevsky clears d7 for his
queen knight to come out.**
16. h3 Par Score 5
This advance prevents Nf6-g4 and once
again renews the threat to play e4-e5.
16. … Nbd7
The queen knight comes out and takes
control of e5.**
17. Rae1 Par Score 5
This supports action along the e-file.
The intention is move the bishop off e3.
17. … Re8
With this development, Black pays
more attention to the e5-square, in an act
of overprotection.**
18. Bf2 Par Score 5
18. … Ng8
Now there are four black units directly
observing e5.**
19. e5! Par Score 6
Reinfeld was intending 19. g4; 20. Bg3;
and 21. e5. Black’s last move has made
this problematical, so the only way to
play e5 is as a sacrifice.
19. … dxe5
20. f5! Par Score 6
Here is an early example of the
Sealer/Sweeper Twist (thank you, Hans
Kmoch). The advance of the e-pawn forces
dxe5, sealing off the e5-square from
Black’s pieces, also closing the e-file and
the long diagonal. Meanwhile, the f-pawn
sweeps past, landing on f5 to begin an
attack on the king. Currently g6 is under
fire (21. fxg6 fxg6 22. Nxg6—please accept
1 bonus point for seeing it) and the f-file
may open at any moment.
20. … Nf8
rsn-wqkvl-tr
+l+-+p+-
pzp-zp-snpzp
+-zpP+-+-
-+-+-+-sN
+-sN-+-zP-
PzP-+PzPLzP
tR-vLQ+RmK-
Solitaire Chess
The Great Fred Reinfeld
By Bruce Pandolfini
The 26th inductee into the U.S. Chess Hall of Fame gives a lesson to an inaugural
inductee.
CL_04-2012_pando_JP_r8_chess life 3/14/2012 11:14 AM Page 16
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 17
ABCs of Chess
These problems are all related to
key positions in this month’s game.
In each case, Black is to move. The
answers can be found in Solutions
on page 71.
April Exercise: This is for those who
want to inspirit their chess with
methods from our golden past. Find
a copy of your favorite chess book.
Also arm yourself with a ream of
paper and a supply of writing imple-
ments that would make an Irish
monk of the tenth century envious.
Proceed to copy out by hand the
entire work you’ve chosen for repro-
duction. Imagine how much you
accomplish by this drudgery in the
realm of the rote, with what someone
else actually wrote. Absurd, you say?
Unfortunately, the way most of us
study chess, the toil, efficacy, and
illogic aren’t very different.
Problem I
Pin
Problem IV
Mating net
Problem II
Fork
Problem V
Mating net
Problem III
Discovery
Problem VI
Mating net
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+kvl-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+p+n
-+-+-zP-zp
+-+-+-+P
-+-+-+-mK
+-+-+R+-
-+-+-+k+
+-+-+pvl-
-+-+psnp+
+-+-zP-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-sN-vL-+-
-+-+-+-zP
+-+-+-mK-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-mk-
-+-+-+p+
+-+-vl-snp
-+-+-zp-zP
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+LmK
+-+-+-sN-
-wq-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-sn-+k
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+P
-+-+Q+LmK
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+k+
+-+-+q+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-tr-+-+LsN
+-+Q+-mK-
-+-+-trk+
+-+-+-zp-
-+-+N+-+
+-wq-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+P
-+-+-tr-+
wQ-+-tR-mK-
The try 20. ... g5 fails to 21. f6+ Kh8 22.
fxg7+ (1 bonus point). If 21. ... e4, then 22.
Nxe4 gxh4 23. Ng5+ Kh8 24. Qh7 mate (2
bonus points). Also rejected was 20. ... gxf5
21. Nxf5 threatening 22. Nd6+ (1 bonus
point).**
21. fxg6+ Par Score 5
The f-file must be opened.
21. … fxg6
22. Be4 Par Score 5
Threatening to take on g6, exposing
the king (1 bonus point).
22. … Qd6
Black strengthens the defense of g6.**
23. Be3 Par Score 5
The bishop returns to e3, clearing the
f-file. Black now has to take the threat to
capture on f8 into account (1 bonus point).
23. … Ne7
Black finds more protection for g6. He
also eyes ... Ne7xd5. Accept 1 bonus point
if you so noticed.**
24. Rf7 Par Score 5
White pins knight and bishop, while
preparing to triple on the file (1 bonus
point).
24. … Kg8
Black unpins the bishop and attacks
the rook.**
25. Ref1 Par Score 4
White strengthens his f-file control. He
can simply answer 25. ... Nf5 with 26.
Nxf5 Kxf7? (better 26. ... gxf5) 27. Nxd6+
(1 bonus point). There’s also 26. Rxb7
Nxe3 27. Qf2; with either (a) 27. ... Nxf1
28. Qf7+ and 29. Qxg7 mate (3 bonus
points); or (b) 27. ... Nf5 28. Bxf5 gxf5 29.
Rxg7+ Kxg7 30. Nxf5+ and 31. Nxd6 (3
bonus points).
25. … Nxd5
26. Rxb7 Par Score 5
The lines are similar to those of the
previous note. Accept only 4 points part
credit for 26. Bxd5 Bxd5 27. Rxg7+ Kxg7
28. Rd1. Also good is 26. Qb3 (full credit)
26. ... Nxe3 27. Rxf8+ Kh7 28. Qg8 mate
(1 bonus point).
26. … Nxe3
This forks queen and rook, but ...**
27. Qf2 Par Score 4
There’s no time for 27. ... Nxf1 because
of 28. Qf7+ Kh7(h8) 29. Qxg7 mate.
Accept 1 bonus point if you saw this at
move 26.
27. … Nf5
Black tries to clog the f-file, but White
has too much power accumulated against
f5.**
28. Nxf5 Par Score 5
White plays for mate. Accept full credit
for 28. Bxf5 gxf5 29. Nxf5, forking queen
and bishop.
28. … gxf5
29. Qxf5 Par Score 5
White threatens mate in two by 30.
Qf7+ (1 bonus point).
29. … Kh8
30. Rf7 Par Score 5
Reinfeld threatens 31. Rxf8+ and 32.
Qh7 mate (1 bonus point). Also strong
(full credit) was 30. Qf7 Ne6 31. Qg6; and
if 31. ... Nf8, then 32. Rxf8+, with mate
next move. After the text, Reshevsky tried
to play 30. ... Ng6, which loses material
to 31. Qxg6, but his flag fell before the
move was completed. So ...
30. … Black lost. .
Total your score to deter-
mine your approximate
rating below:
Total Score Approx. Rating
95+ 2400+
81-94 2200-2399
66-80 2000-2199
51-65 1800-1999
36-50 1600-1799
21-35 1400-1599
06-20 1200-1399
0-05 under 1200
CL_04-2012_pando_JP_r8_chess life 3/14/2012 11:14 AM Page 17
18 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
“Before the Tata tournament I was thinking—‘This might not
be my tournament.’ I felt I had problems in certain areas, and
I would work on them in February [after the tournament].
So I just did my best and [you know the rest]. But I still have
those problems and I will still work on them!” —LEVON ARONIAN
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/13/12 11:05 AM Page 18
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 19
Wijk aan Zee 2012
HIKARU NAKAMURA WAS THE DEFEND-
ING CHAMPION after his breakthrough
win in Wijk aan Zee 2011 but after 13
grueling rounds had concluded, it was
Aronian, 29, who had the 10,000 Euro
first prize and was celebrating with his
girlfriend Arianne Caoili and members of
the Armenian-Dutch community in the
giant tent in the center of the village green,
enjoying a traditional Dutch pea soup din-
ner with the other players and hundreds
of local villagers.
Aronian’s first outright victory in Wijk
aan Zee, held January 13-29, was com-
prehensive, a point clear of a field which
contained the majority of the world’s best
players, Nakamura and Gata Kamsky
among them.
It had been 15 years since two U.S.
players had been invited to the Dutch
super-tournament and, though they
could not repeat the historic shared vic-
tory scored in 1980 by Walter Browne
and Yasser Seirawan, both performed
well. One could argue that there were
actually three top American perform-
ances in Wijk aan Zee A, since Italian
representative Fabiano Caruana was born
in Miami and learned his chess in Brook-
lyn.
Following his victory, Aronian did the
rounds of interviews with newspapers
and television; everyone wanted some
words from the player who had scored, as
he said “the best result of my life.”
World number one Magnus Carlsen
was, as always, also a media favorite but
few sought out the views of the also-
rans—the players whose losses made
Aronian’s victory possible.
So why, in the opinion of Aronian’s fel-
low grandmasters, did the Armenian win
one of the world’s strongest tournaments
so easily? A few responses are under the
photos and scattered through the text.
Nakamura was a victim of Aronian’s
indomitable will to win; a forced queen
sacrifice by Aronian leading to an endgame
which seemed destined for a draw. However
little by little Aronian made progress until
the diagrammed position was reached (see
directly below).
Tightening the noose
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2805, ARM)
GM Hikaru Nakamura (FIDE 2759, USA)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
After 48. ... Qe5
Only one White piece is not contribut-
ing to the attack, so Aronian played ...
49. Kh4! Qd4
Aronian’s point is that 49. ... Qb2 allows
50. Kg5! Ng8 51. Bf5! and Black is helpless.
50. Bg4! Qe5
Now 50. ... Kg8 allows 51. Rf8+!.
51. Ne6 h6 52. Rf8+ Ng8 53. f4 Qb2 54. Kh3!
The king is not needed any more—
Black’s king is in a mating net, with the
noose about to be drawn tight.
54. ... Qa1 55. Bh5 Kh7 56. Rf7+ Kh8 57. Bg6
Nf6 58. Rf8+ Ng8 59. Bf7, Black resigned.
Fabiano Caruana—“Lev was clearly the
best player. I don't think he was playing
at a new level—he always was a very
strong player. He, Carlsen, Kramnik and
Anand are all at a similar level. Here he
was by far the best prepared player; his
preparation against me [was awesome] ...”
Symmetrical English (A34)
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2805, ARM)
GM Fabiano Caruana (FIDE 2736, ITA)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nc6 3. Nc3 e5
Playing for the Botvinnik set-up (... g6,
... Bg7, ... Nge7) which served Grischuk so
well in the Candidates matches in 2011.
4. e3 Nf6 5. d4 cxd4 6. exd4 e4 7. Ne5 Bb4 8.
Be2 Qa5 9. 0-0!
A gambit first played by the German
GM Rainer Buhmann.
9. ... Nxe5 10. dxe5 Qxe5 11. Bd2! Bc5 12.
Nb5 0-0 13. b4 Be7
Caruana improves on 13. ... Bd4 14.
Nxd4 Qxd4 15. Bf4! which left Buhmann
with a great endgame in a 2011 game.
14. f4! Qe6
-+-+-+-mk
+-+-+R+p
-+-+Lsn-+
+-+-wq-+-
-+-+-sN-+
+-+-+PzPK
-+-+-+-zP
+-+-+-+-
Through the Eyes of the Victims
GM Levon Aronian convincingly won the first super-tournament
of 2012, the 74th Tata Steel tournament in the Dutch seaside village
of Wijk aan Zee. By GM IAN ROGERS
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/14/12 1:00 PM Page 19
20 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
“Levon played the best here, the most aggressive chess and
he deserved to win. However it is just one tournament. If he
keep doing this then he will be a very formidable opponent.
Lev has been known as a very solid player, winning a game
here and there, but here he played much more sharply and
was rewarded.”
—Hikaru Nakamura
Wijk aan Zee 2012
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/14/12 1:01 PM Page 20
“Levon was very well prepared. Many times he would
come out of the opening with a good position and
much more time. And when you are on the other side,
looking at a position at the end of his analysis, with
less time and a bad position, I can tell you it sucks!”
—Gata Kamsky
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 21
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/14/12 1:03 PM Page 21
22 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Wijk aan Zee 2012
As recommended by all computer pro-
grams; 14. ... exf3 e.p. 15. Bxf3 is ugly for
Black.
15. Be3! Bxb4
The black queen does not have a safe
square, e.g. 15. ... Qc6 16. Nxa7 Qa6 17.
Nb5 Bxb4 18. a3! (18. Nc7 Qa3!) 18. ...
Ba5 19. c5 and Black is tied up in knots.
16. Nc7 Qc6 17. Nxa8 b6
17. ... d6 was slightly stronger, but
Aronian was ready for this too. In all like-
lihood the position is already close to
winning for White, as Aronian knew before
the game.
18. Rb1! Bc5 19. Bxc5 bxc5 20. Rb8 Bb7 21.
Rxf8+ Kxf8 22. Qb3 g6 23. Rb1 Bxa8 24.
Qb8+ Kg7 25. Qxa7
... and Aronian had a dominating posi-
tion, though he almost let Caruana escape
before winning in 47 moves.
Notably, this was the young Italian’s
only loss of the tournament and his
career-best result could have been even
better had his technique not let him down
in a winning endgame against van Wely.
In the quote on page 21, Kamsky was
thinking of the following game:
(see game top of next column)
Gruenfeld Defense,
Russian System (D99)
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2805, ARM)
GM Gata Kamsky (FIDE 2732, USA)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5.
Qb3 Nb6 6. d4 Bg7 7. e4 0-0
Now Aronian has achieved his aim,
transposing to the Russian system of the
Grunfeld (1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4.
Nf3 Bg7 5. Qb3 dxc4 6. Qxc4 0-0 7. e4
Nfd7 8. Be3 Nb6 9. Qb3) without allow-
ing Black various seventh move options
such as 7. ... a6, 7. ... Na6, etc.
Later in the event, Navara showed that
Aronian’s move order can also have a down-
side. He delayed castling, playing 7. ... Bg4
Naka/Kamsky/Carlsen
Nakamura
After his victory in Wijk aan Zee 2011,
GM Hikaru Nakamura suffered a period
of relatively modest form but his fortunes
started to improve towards the end of the
year—in the months after he had split with
super-coach GM Garry Kasparov. Naka-
mura’s solid result in Tata 2012 indicates
that the 24-year-old is adding consis-
tency to his flair, though Nakamura himelf
was ambivalent: “It's hard to know how to
feel. Plus two [two wins more than losess—
IR] is not a bad result. I started badly,
played well in the middle, played badly
again in rounds 8, 9, 10 and then played
OK again at the finish.”
Nakamura’s best game came in the
fifth round against Czech GM David
Navara.
Nakamura’s best
GM Hikaru Nakamura (FIDE 2759, USA)
GM David Navara (FIDE 2712, CZE)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
After 24. ... h5
White is clearly positionally domi-
nant but the finish was spectacular
25. Nxh5+!! Qxh5 26. Rxf7+ Rxf7 27. Rxf7+
Kh6 28. Qf4+ g5 29. Qf6+ Qg6 30. Qf1!!
The point behind Nakamura’s sacri-
fice, though 30. Qe7 would have been
equally effective. Now the dual threats
of 31. Rf6 and 31. Qh3+ force Black to
tie himself in knots.
30. ... Qh5 31. Rxb7!
With a new set of threats—32. Qxa6+
and 32. Qf6+—and this time there is no
way out.
31. ... c4 32. Qf6+ Qg6 33. Qxd8 Qb1+ 34.
Kf2, Black resigned.
Kamsky
At 37, GM Gata Kamsky was the
third oldest player in the field and his
2/6 start, including heavy losses to
GM Levon Aronian and GM Anish Giri,
made it look as if the modern game
might have passed him by. However
the New Yorker, who challenged for the
world title 16 long years ago, fought
back impressively and a last round vic-
tory over the player he upset in the
2011 Candidates Matches, GM Veselin
Topalov, pushed him above halfway in
the tournament table. “I don't judge
my performance by my result but by
whether I am happy with my game,”
explained Kamsky. “And if I look at my
game here I can say, yes, I am satisfied.
In my first Wijk aan Zee I scored minus
four, my second time 50% and so you
can say it is getting better.”
(see diagram top of next column)
At first sight Topalov seems to be
recovering his lost pawn, but Kamsky
finds a mating attack from nowhere ...
58. Ne8+! Kg8 59. f5! Rh2+
59. ... exf5 60. e6! fxe6 allows 61.
Nf6+ Kh8 62. Rh7 checkmate.
Conjuring a mating attack
GM Gata Kamsky (FIDE 2732, USA)
GM Veselin Topalov (FIDE 2770, BUL)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
After 57. ... Rh4
60. Rd2
The simplest, though walking away
from the checks was also strong, meet-
ing a later ... exf5 with e5-e6 followed
by Rxf7 and Nf6+.
60. ... Rxd2+ 61. Kxd2 exf5
61. ... Be7 is well met by 62. f6! and if
62. ... Kf8 63. fxe7+! Kxe8 64. Kc3 Kxe7
65. b4 leads to a winning pawn ending.
62. Nf6+ Kg7 63. Ke3 Be7 64. Nd7 Bg5+
65. Kf3 Bd2
Desperation, but 65. ... Be7 66. Kf4
is also hopeless.
66. Nxc5 f6 67. e6 Kf8 68. Nd3 Ke7 69. Nf4 Kd6
Has White run out of moves? Not at all!
70. c5+! Kc6 71. Nd5!, Black resigned.
Carlsen
20-year-old GM Magnus Carlsen has
won just about every top tournament in
recent years and opened up a large gap
-+-tr-tr-+
zpp+-+pmk-
n+-+-sNp+
+-zp-wq-+p
-+Q+-+-+
zPP+-zP-zP-
-+-zP-tR-zP
+-+-+RmK-
-+-+-vl-+
+-+R+pmk-
-+-+psN-zp
+-zp-zP-+P
-+P+-zP-tr
+P+-+-+-
-+K+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/13/12 11:08 AM Page 22
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 23
immediately, and had no problems.
8. Be3 Bg4 9. Rd1 e6 10. Be2 Nc6 11. Ng1
Bxe2 12. Ngxe2 Qe7 13. 0-0 Rfd8 14. e5 h6
15. a3!?
After 15. a3
Aronian’s poisonous new move, in a
position where 15. Ne4 Qb4 is considered
fine for Black. After long thought Kamsky
responded with ...
15. ... Na5 16. Qc2 c5 17. dxc5 Nbc4 18. Bc1
Nxe5
... but after ...
19. b4 Nac6 20. Ne4 a6 21. h3
White was slightly better and Aronian
went on to win in 58 moves (aided by a
number of Kamsky time trouble errors).
Anish Giri, the 17-year-old local hero
who started Tata 2012 well before falling
to the basement by losing five consecutive
games, had a similar experience.
Queen’s Gambit Declined (D37)
GM Anish Giri (FIDE 2714, NED)
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2805, ARM)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 Be7
“Adopting the Queen's Gambit with
Black has been a way of improving my
defensive skills,” explained Aronian.
4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Bf4 0-0 6. e3 Nbd7 7. Be2 dxc4
8. 0-0
Aronian has plenty of experience with
this position from the white side, since
Black’s 6. ... Nbd7 system has recently
been adopted by GMs Viswanathan Anand,
Vladimir Kramnik and Boris Gelfand.
r+-tr-+k+
zppzp-wqpvl-
-snn+p+pzp
+-+-zP-+-
-+-zP-+-+
zPQsN-vL-+-
-zP-+NzPPzP
+-+R+RmK-
at the top of the world rankings, so was
expected to be the star of Tata 2012.
However the Norwegian, after a strong
start which included a victory over Aron-
ian, fell back with a round nine loss to
GM Sergey Karjakin. Carlsen then
began taking crazy risks to keep pace
with Aronian, most of which ended with
Carlsen barely hanging on to a draw,
but the following game kept the spec-
tators on the edge of their seats.
Sicilian Defense,
Moscow Variation (B51)
GM Magnus Carlsen (FIDE 2835, NOR)
GM Veselin Topalov (FIDE 2770, BUL)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bb5+ Nd7 4. c3 Ngf6
5. Qe2 a6 6. Ba4 Qc7 7. 0-0 e5!?
7. ... c4 is the more common choice.
8. d4 b5 9. Bc2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Be7 11. Nc3
0-0 12. Bg5 h6 13. Bh4 Bb7 14. Rad1!?
Rac8 15. Bb3 Rfe8 16. dxe5 dxe5 17. Bg3
Bf8 18. h3 Nb6 19. Nh4 Nc4 20. Nf5?!!
Played quickly by Carlsen but he
had forgotten about ...
20. ... Nxb2!
“After he took on b2 there were many
possibilities—21. Nxh6+ followed by
Bh4, or 21. Nd5 Bxd5 22. Rxd5!? but
nothing seems to work,” expained
Carlsen.
(see diagram top of next column)
21. Bh4!
A Tal-like attack commences; one
where the opponent knows the attack
must be unsound but struggles to calcu-
late their way through the complications.
After 20. ... Nxb2
21. ... Nxd1 22. Bxf6 Nxc3 23. Qg4 Bxe4!?
An immediate reply by Topalov,
though with a little more thought he
might have realized that 23. ... Re6 24.
Bxg7 (intending 24. ... Rg6 25. Qxg6!)
fails to 24. ... Kh7!! 25. Bxf8 Rg6!. So
Carlsen would have had to try 24.
Nxh6+ Kh7 25. Nxf7 Qxf7 26. Bxe6
Qxf6 27. Bxc8 when John Nunn in the
press room thought that White might
survive.
24. Nxh6+ Kh7 25. Bxf7
After 25. Bxf7
25. ... Qxf7?
Faced with the apparently crushing
threat of 26. Qh5, Topalov decides to
exchange into an endgame which he
knows should be tenable.
The barely human 25. ... Bd3!! turns
out to be winning, meeting 26. Qh5
with 26. ... Ne2+ and 27. ... Nf4. Both
players probably thought that 26. Re1
would be an adequate answer, but
unfortunately for White after 26. ...
Ne2+! 27. Rxe2 allows 27. ... Qc1+!
and 28. ... Qxh6, winning for Black.
26. Nxf7 gxf6 27. f4 Bg6 28. Qh4+ Kg7?!
28. ... Kg8 was safer, since after 29.
Nh6+ Bxh6 30. Qxh6 Bd3! White can
make a perpetual check but no more.
29. fxe5! Ne4 30. Rxf6! Bc5+ 31. Kh2 Nxf6
32. Qxf6+ Kh7 33. Ng5+ Kh6 34. Ne6!
Rxe6 35. Qxe6 Re8
Black should hold this endgame, but
in the run-up to the time control drops
the a-pawn.
36. Qf6 Be7? 37. Qxa6 b4 38. Qc4 Bf8 39.
g4 Kh7 40. e6 Bd6+ 41. Kg2 Be7 42. Qc7
Kg8 43. Kg3 Kf8 44. Qf4+ Kg7 45. Qd4+
Kg8 46. h4 Rd8 47. Qc4 Bd3?
Missing his last draw chance. After
47. ... Rd3+! 48. Kf4 Bd6+ 49. Kg5
Kg7! Black can force a perpetual check.
48. Qc6 Bb1 49. h5! Bxa2?! 50. Qe4! Kh8
51. h6! Bf6 52. e7 Re8 53. Qf4! Bg7 54.
hxg7+ Kxg7 55. g5! Kg8 56. Qf6, Black
resigned.
An unbelievable game—a triumph of
mind over matter. Second place in such
an elite field could be disappointing
only for a Kasparov or a Carlsen, but
the world number one was happy to
acknowledge that Tata 2012 had
deservedly been Aronian’s tournament.
-+r+rvlk+
+lwq-+pzp-
p+-+-sn-zp
+p+-zpN+-
-+-+P+-+
+LsN-+-vLP
Psn-+QzPP+
+-+R+RmK-
-+r+rvl-+
+-wq-+Lzpk
p+-+-vL-sN
+p+-zp-+-
-+-+l+Q+
+-sn-+-+P
P+-+-zPP+
+-+-+RmK-
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/13/12 11:08 AM Page 23
24 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Wijk aan Zee 2012
GM Boris Gelfand (FIDE 2739, ISR)
GM Hikaru Nakamura (FIDE 2759, USA)
White to play
GM Teimour Radjabov (FIDE 2773, AZE)
GM Sergey Karjakin (FIDE 2769, RUS)
White to play
GM Boris Gelfand (FIDE 2739, ISR)
GM Gata Kamsky (FIDE 2732, USA)
Black to play
GM Vassily Ivanchuk (FIDE 2766, UKR)
GM Anish Giri (FIDE 2714, NED)
White to play
-+-tr-+k+
zp-+-+-+p
-zpR+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+r+-+
vLP+-vl-zP-
P+-+-zp-zP
+R+-+K+-
-+-+-+-+
tr-+-+p+-
-+-+-+p+
+P+-+-+p
P+-mkp+-zP
+-tRlsN-zP-
-+-+-zP-mK
+-+-+-+-
-+-+r+k+
+-+-+p+-
-+-+r+p+
+-wq-+-+-
-+-+-+-wQ
+-+-+-mKP
-+-tR-+P+
+-+R+-+-
-+k+-+-+
+r+-+-+R
p+-+-+-+
+-+-zPpzp-
-+-mK-+-+
+-+-+P+-
-+-+-+-zP
+-+-+-+-
GM Vugar Gashimov (FIDE 2761, AZE)
GM David Navara (FIDE 2712, CZE)
White to play
GM Teimour Radjabov (FIDE 2773, AZE)
GM David Navara (FIDE 2712, CZE)
Black to play
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2805, ARM)
GM David Navara (FIDE 2712, CZE)
Black to play
GM Sergey Karjakin (FIDE 2769, RUS)
GM Boris Gelfand (FIDE 2739, ISR)
Black to play
-+l+-trk+
+-zp-wqpzp-
-tr-+-+-sn
+p+Lzp-+N
p+-+P+-+
+-+P+P+-
PzP-wQ-+P+
+-tR-mK-+R
-+-tr-+k+
+R+-+p+p
-+-zp-+p+
zp-+n+-+-
-+L+-zP-+
zPP+-+-zP-
-+r+-+-zP
+-+-tR-mK-
-+-+-+-wQ
+-+-+k+-
-+-+-+pzp
+-snq+-+-
-+-+-zPPmK
+-+-+-+P
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+p+k
p+-+-+qzp
+p+-+-+-
-+-+-zP-+
+P+Q+Kzp-
P+P+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
IM Tania Sachdev (FIDE 2411, IND)
WIM Lisa Schut (FIDE 2290, NED)
White to play
GM Hans Tikkanen (FIDE 2549, SWE)
IM Sahaj Grover (FIDE 2532, IND)
White to play
GM Sipke Ernest (FIDE 2606, NED)
GM Lazaro Bruzon Batista (FIDE 2691, CUB)
White to play
GM Pendyala Harikrishna (FIDE 2665, IND)
GM Daniele Vocaturo (FIDE 2545, ITA)
Black to play
-+-+-+-mk
+R+-+-+-
-+-+-+-mK
+-+-+-+-
-+l+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
r+-+kvl-tr
zpp+-+p+-
-+p+nzp-+
+-+-+-+-
-+Q+p+P+
+-sN-+-+P
PzP-+-wqL+
+K+R+-+R
r+l+k+-tr
+p+p+pzpp
-+-vL-+-+
wq-+-zp-+-
-+P+-+-+
+pzPQ+-zP-
P+-mKPzPLzP
tR-+-+-+-
-+-+r+k+
zp-+q+pzpp
-+r+-vl-+
+Q+L+-+-
-+-+-+-+
vL-+-+-zP-
P+-+-zP-zP
+R+-+-mK-
Wijk-ie Quickies
(SOLUTIONS ON PAGE 71)
Wijk aan Zee Saying Tata to Sponsorship?
The Indian sponsors of the Wijk aan Zee tournament, Tata Steel, confirmed that they would sponsor the 75th edition
of the tournament in 2013 but after then nothing is clear. The traditional Dutch tournament has been sponsored by the
local steelworks—whose name has changed from Hoogovens to Corus to Tata over the years—since it began in 1938.
Over those years the fortunes of the steel industry have waxed and waned, with the festival occasionally being cut
back to a single grandmaster group during hard times. The Wijk aan Zee festival of chess nowadays is huge, with three
grandmaster tournaments, hundreds of other smaller events and a million dollar budget.
In contrast, Tata Steel has been laying off workers in Europe, trying to work through the economic downturn there.
While it is far from clear that Tata will continue to sponsor the ‘Wimbledon of chess’ beyond 2013, omens are not all
bad. The Tata group has a long tradition of chess sponsorship in India and sponsoring Wijk aan Zee brings kudos at
home in India as well as in Europe.
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/13/12 11:08 AM Page 24
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 25
8. ... Nb6!?
A new idea, which Aronian said should
be met by 9. e4.
9. Qc2 Nh5 10. Be5 f6 11. Ng5
Tempting, but 11. Bg3 is stronger, after
which Aronian thought White might keep
a slight edge.
11. ... fxg5 12. Bxh5 Bd7 13. Bf3
After 13. Bf3
13. ... Rxf3!! 14. gxf3 Bd6!
An unbelievable piece of preparation
by Aronian. For the Exchange, Black has
a pawn and easy development. More
importantly, White has little to do.
15. Qe4 Bc6 16. Qg4 Qe7 17. Bxd6 cxd6 18. Ne4?!
According to Aronian, almost the decisive
error. Apparently 18. e4 was necessary, despite
the horrible weakening of the f4-square.
18. ... h6 19. Qg3 d5 20. Nc3
Giri thought his last chance was 20.
Nc5, despite the danger of the knight
becoming stranded.
20. ... Rf8 21. Ne2 Rf5! 22. Kg2 Nd7 23. Rh1
Nf8!
The rest was easy for Aronian, who fin-
ishes the game in style.
24. h4 Ng6 25. f4 Nxh4+ 26. Kf1 Qb4 27.
Rb1 Be8 28. Nc3 Qe7 29. b4 Rf8 30. Rb2
Bg6 31. Ke1 Bd3 32. fxg5 Nf3+ 33. Kd1
hxg5 34. Qh3 Qf6 35. Kc1 Bg6 36. a4 Rd8
37. Ne2 e5 38. Qg4 exd4 39. exd4 Re8 40.
Qd7 c3 41. Ra2
After 41. Ra2
41. ... Ne1! 42. Rxe1 Qf4+ 43. Kd1 Qe4,
White resigned.
GM Vugar Gashimov—“Half of the field
were playing extremely badly. Look at
what Magnus did in his last games—hor-
rible! Lev deserved to win the tournament,
but even he was not in his best form—oth-
erwise he would have scored +7!”
Simplicity
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2805, ARM)
GM Vugar Gashimov (FIDE 2761, AZE)
Wijk aan Zee 2012
After 40. ... h6
This endgame, similar to the historic
24th game of the 1987 World Champi-
onship match between Kasparov and
Karpov in Seville, looks as if it will be tech-
nically very challenging.
However with one simple plan, Aronian
immediately breaks down Gashimov’s
resistance.
41. f4! h5 42. Kf3! Ra4 43. Ke4! Kh8 44. Ke5!
Kg8 45. Kf6 Ra5 46. e4 Ra4 47. e5 Ra3 48.
Rc8!, Black resigned.
GM Teimor Radjabov had a chance to
catch Aronian had he beaten him in the
final round. Instead Radjabov was so
scared of Aronian’s preparation that he
offered a repetition of moves after five
minutes play, an offer which Aronian had
no reason to decline. .
r+-wq-trk+
zppzplvl-zpp
-sn-+p+-+
+-+-vL-zp-
-+pzP-+-+
+-sN-zPL+-
PzPQ+-zPPzP
tR-+-+RmK-
-+-+r+k+
zpp+Q+-zp-
-+-+-wql+
+-+p+-zp-
PzP-zP-+-+
+-zp-+n+-
R+-+NzP-+
+-mK-+-+R
-+-+-snk+
+-tR-+-+-
-+-+p+pzp
+-+-+-+-
-trL+-+-zP
+-+-zP-zP-
-+-+-zPK+
+-+-+-+-
TATA STEEL CHESS TOURNAMENT—GROUP A WIJK AAN ZEE, THE NETHERLANDS JANUARY 13-29, 2012
# Name Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Score
1 GM Levon Aronian (ARM) 2805 x 0 ½ 1 ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 1 ½ 1 0 9
2 GM Magnus Carlsen (NOR) 2835 ½ x ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 1 1 1 ½ ½ 8
3 GM Teimour Radjabov (AZE) 2773 ½ ½ x ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 8
4 GM Fabiano Caruana (ITA) 2736 ½ ½ ½ x ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 1 1 ½ 8
5 GM Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR) 2766 ½ ½ ½ ½ x ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 1 1 7½
6 GM Hikaru Nakamura (USA) 2759 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ x ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 7½
7 GM Gata Kamsky (USA) 2732 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ x 1 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 1 7
8 GM Sergey Karjakin (RUS) 2769 0 1 0 0 ½ ½ 0 x 1 ½ 0 1 1 1 6½
9 GM Loek van Wely (NED) 2692 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 x ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 5½
10 GM Vugar Gashimov (AZE) 2761 0 0 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ x ½ ½ 1 ½ 5
11 GM Boris Gelfand (ISR) 2739 0 0 ½ 0 1 0 ½ 1 ½ ½ x ½ 0 ½ 5
12 GM Veselin Topalov (BUL) 2770 ½ 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ ½ ½ x 1 ½ 5
13 GM Anish Giri (NED) 2714 0 ½ ½ 0 0 ½ 1 0 ½ 0 0 1 x ½ 4½
14 GM David Navara (CZE) 2712 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 0 0 0 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ x 4½
Read more from Wijk aan Zee by GM Ian Rogers on Chess Life Online at uschess.org, January archives.
CL_04-2012_wijk_AKF_r12_chess life 3/13/12 11:08 AM Page 25
26 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org


CL_04-2012_awonder_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:12 PM Page 26
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 27
Profile
The
Awonder
Years
EI GHT-YEAR- OLD AWONDER LI ANG, A THI RD- GRADER AT
VAN HI SE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL I N MADI SON, WI SCONSI N,
I S ARGUABLY THE BRI GHTEST STAR TO EMERGE ON THE AMERI CAN
CHESS HORI ZON I N DECADES, AND PERHAPS EVER.
n his most recent remarkable triumph, eight-year-old
Awonder Liang captured the gold medal in the Under 8
section of the World Youth Championships (WYCC) held
this past November in Caldas Novas, Brazil. By doing so,
Awonder became the youngest American player to win a
major internationally sanctioned world chess champi-
onship. Awonder won seven matches, drew one and lost one,
and had already clinched a first place finish on tiebreaks before
the final round. Additionally, Awonder already has two national
scholastic championships under his belt (kindergarten and
first grade titles). Add to that, as a first-grader he won the high
school section of the Madison School District Chess Champi-
onships. Awonder is also the youngest player in U.S. history to
attain an “expert” rating (2000 or higher), breaking the previ-
ous record by two months. Awonder had a USCF rating of
2087 heading into the World Youth tournament, and leads the
Top Age 8 player list by a wide margin. These celebrated accom-
plishments have put Awonder on U.S. scholastic and junior
chess maps.
Awonder has certainly caught the attention of those in the
“training young prodigy” business. Former U.S. Champion GM
Yury Shulman, a highly regarded international player and
trainer, runs some of the premier training camps in the nation
for elite junior players, which Awonder has attended on a cou-
ple of occasions. “There is no doubt, he is a very talented boy,”
Shulman observed. Prominent Chicago-based junior trainer
GM Dmitry Gurevich shares these sentiments. “I have played
Awonder and my impression about him is very positive. He is
not only a super talent but also a nice kid.” FM Aviv Friedman,
who for 15 years has coached U.S. junior delegations at inter-
national events concurs. As a long-time battle tested chess
trainer extraordinaire to America’s best and brightest chess
By BRAD ROSEN
I
P
H
O
T
O
:

E
R
I
C

R
O
S
E
N
CL_04-2012_awonder_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:13 PM Page 27
28 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Profile
youth, Friedman led the 64-player U.S. delegation in Brazil.
“After this event I became quite the believer in Awonder. He
is very good, and not even nine years-old!,” Friedman said.
“With proper guidance and instruction he can go far. It would
be speculative now to guess ‘how far,’ but he is sure worth
investing in to find out!”
While it’s difficult to project just how far any 8-year-old
“phenom” in the world of chess might advance, in Awonder’s
case, the sky appears to be the limit. At this juncture, Awon-
der is in a league of his own ... at least among his
contemporaries. And if he is to be put in any league, that
league would include the great young American players of the
current generation such as GM Robert Hess, GM Sam Shank-
land, GM Ray Robson and yes ... even the ever magnificent
world-class super GM Hikaru Nakamura. But before seeing how
some of Awonder’s key stats and accomplishments line up
against this crème de la crème of great American young chess
players, let’s examine the forces and factors that have led to his
incredible accomplishments.
MADI SON, WI SCONSI N
Great talent does not emerge in a vacuum. It is a function of
place and people, and is cultivated, supported, and nurtured.
Awonder was born on April 9, 2003 in Wisconsin’s state capi-
tal, Madison, a vibrant and visually striking city in America’s
heartland. It is home to the University of Wisconsin, and is known
for its high-end cultural events and diversity. Also heralded as
the Athens of the Midwest, Madison has provided the fertile intel-
lectual soil for Awonder to learn the game of chess, and for his
natural chess talents to blossom.
As chance would have it, in 2008 at the age of 5, Awonder,
and his older brother, Adream, then age 7, met up with a 10
year-old at Van Hise Elementary school by the name of Brian
Luo. At the time, Luo was the highest rated 10-year-old in the
country (2077 USCF ). Luo struck terror in the heart of many
Chicago area tournament chess players as he frequently trav-
eled to “Windy City” environs to sharpen his chess elbows.
Before Luo packed away his chess set later that year to pur-
sue other interests, he taught Awonder and Adream how to
move the chess pieces. After that, life for the Liang family
was never the same.
THE FAMI LY LI ANG
Awonder has also had the benefit of coming from a family where
chess is truly king. His father, Yingming (commonly known as
Will) Liang is a strong A class player. He is as dedicated a chess
dad if ever there was one. Will came to the U.S. from China to
attend the University of Wisconsin nearly 30 years ago, and for
the past 15 years has had his own international trading busi-
ness. In the past few years, Will has crisscrossed the country with
his three sons, Awonder (age 8), Adream (age 10), and Able (age
7), while Will’s wife Liangxing Huang, and Angelva, his 4-year-
old daughter have kept their Madison homestead warm. In the
short span of 3½ years, Will has accompanied Awonder, and the
other boys at times, to 126 chess tournaments including the
2011 WYCC in Brazil, and the 2010 WYCC event held in Porto
Carras, Greece. Awonder finished in ninth place in that tourna-
ment as one of the youngest players in the Under 8 section.
While Will has served as Awonder’s main coach, manager, and
principal financial backer, he has intuitively grasped the notion
that success has 100 fathers, and readily credits others for
playing important roles in Awonder’s success. “Awonder has good
intellectual curiosity and is very hard working. Our family has
been making sacrifices to help him,” Liang notes. “However, with-
out the kind of great support and understanding from his
school, the nurturing community inside and outside of chess in
Wisconsin, Illinois and beyond, Awonder would absolutely not
be where he is today in chess. So the Awonder story is a collec-
tive effort story.”
THE COACHES
Awonder played his first tournament game in July, 2008 in
the Chicago Class and took home a trophy in the U700 section.
“He liked the logical part of the game right way,” Will observed.
“Starting some time in 2009, the boys got good quickly and I took
them to some professional coaches to try things out.” These
coaches included Ashish Vaja, IM Angelo Young, and GM Mes-
gan Amanov. GM Amanov, a dedicated tournament player and
trainer worked with Awonder soon after he returned from the
World Youth Chess Championship in Greece. He was quite
impressed with his natural abilities and work ethic. “Awonder
never blunders, and is a hard worker. He plays very safe, very
smart, and takes no opponent for granted,” Amanov remarked.
“I was amazed at how much chess knowledge Awonder was able
to soak up. Often times, the younger the player, the more their
brains can absorb. Young kids are not spoiled by the distractions
of daily life filling their memories, but Awonder’s ability to com-
prehend complicated combinations and advanced chess concepts
is amazing.” Amanov was also impressed by the active roles Will
plays in Awonder’s development. “After Awonder finishes a
game, Will would then immediately review it with Awonder. He
would also assist Awonder in deep preparation for his opponents,”
Amanov observed.
In the months leading up to the WYCC tournament in Brazil,
Will served as Awonder’s only coach due to financial constraints.
However, after arriving in Brazil, Awonder was suddenly sur-
rounded by America’s top youth trainers who were part of the
U.S. delegation. GM Sam Palatnik was assigned to work with
Awonder. At the onset, the two established a demanding train-
ing regimen. Awonder and GM Palatnik prepared extensively for
every match, and analyzed every game in detail immediately after
its completion in the U.S. delegation’s team room, where all the
coaches and players met to conduct post-match analysis. Palat-
nik also put in quite a bit of extra time with Awonder, and the
two even worked together for a good chunk of time on the rest
day, when many others chose to stay away from the chessboard.
“It was a pleasure to coach Awonder. I prepared him for every
round in the tournament, analyzed his games and shared my
experiences,” Palatnik said. Awonder is definitely a talented
young man, who also has the talent “to listen.” “Of course, his
result at the World Championship was greatly satisfying for me,”
Palatnik continued. Palatnik also witnessed Awonder’s fierce
competitive nature, his determination, and his desire to succeed.
Awonder had won his first seven rounds. However, after round
eight, Awonder was visibly upset as he entered the team room.
“That only led me to one conclusion. I did not even want to ask
the result,” Palatnik recalls. “So, we set on gently looking for the
cause of the loss. Overall, the game was pretty well played, but
at some point there was possibility to create a far advanced
passed pawn on the kingside and Awonder could have won. He
did not, and the game was ... a draw. This result guaranteed Awon-
der a first place finish in the tournament on tiebreaks, and the
title of the World Champion. Yet he was still upset that his win-
ning streak had to be interrupted by a draw, especially since the
win was so close. To me, this proves that Awonder is really a
fighter, and he can go forward in chess as far as he wants.”
In addition to GM Palatnik, other coaches in the U.S. delega-
tion assisted Awonder with game analysis and provided their chess
wisdom and insights, especially as the tournament moved to its
later stages. Senior FIDE Trainer and head coach Michael Kho-
darkovsky helped establish training protocols and also frequently
worked with Awonder. Other coaches, including FM Aviv Fried-
CL_04-2012_awonder_AKF_r9.qxp_chess life 3/12/12 12:42 PM Page 28
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 29
man, GM Nick deFirmian, GM Shulman, IM Armen Ambart-
soumian and GM John Fedorowicz also helped Awonder analyze
his games after some of the rounds. As Will Liang noted, “Every-
body was very helpful to the little guy. Without a doubt, we can
conclude that it was a collective effort for Awonder to have won
the U8 championship in the WYCC 2011 in Brazil.”
THE VAN HI SE
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
AND LOCAL COMMUNI TY
Madison’s Van Hise Elementary
School bills itself as a community of
diverse learners within an inclusive
atmosphere, to assure maximum
educational growth of all students.
The parents of many of the children
enrolled at Van Hise are affiliated
with the University of Wisconsin and
many of the families, like the Liangs,
have come to Madison from over-
seas. At Van Hise, excellence and
diversity is celebrated in all its forms.
Indeed, a visit to Van Hise’s website
(www.madison.k12.wi.us/ 034)
shows that the school provides a
nurturing setting for kids to learn
and grow. Some of the comments
from parents and students include:
“Van Hise Elementary School is great
for learning!,” and “The philosophy
that every child will reach their full
potential is pervasive within the Van
Hise Elementary School environ-
ment,” and finally, Van Hise is “the
coolest school in Madison.”
Awonder has been enrolled in
Van Hise Elementary since kinder-
garten and the school has played an
instrumental role in both Awon-
der’s chess achievements, as well as
his academic and personal develop-
ment. Van Hise principal, Peg
Keeler, though not a chess player
herself, has recognized the role
chess can play in developing a
child’s academic and intellectual
skills. The school’s staff has always
worked to accommodate the Liang
boys’ chess schedules where fre-
quent and prolonged absences are
sometimes involved. As a result,
Awonder has been able to pursue
his chess activities without hesita-
tion or reservation, while still
performing at the highest levels in
his academic pursuits as well. “Mrs.
Keeler and all of the teachers have
done a great job with the boys.
Without this, Awonder would not be
able to allocate so much of his time and energy to chess, and
achieved so many fantastic accomplishments,” Will said.
Not surprising, Awonder is a top notch student and deep
thinker in the classroom, as well on the chessboard. “Awonder
is very well rounded academically. He is a problem solver, with
very strong mathematical skills and he is also very well informed
about current events,” said John Christopherson, Awonder’s sec-
ond grade teacher. “In class, I would employ a process oriented
approach known as Cognitively Guided Instruction (CGI) where
I would give small groups of students very difficult problems,
and they would try to find solutions through collaboration and
shared thinking. I was really impressed by the level of discourse
engaged in by Awonder and his fellow students. These discus-
sions would often become quite
abstract. I have little doubt that
Awonder’s chess experience plays
an important role in his ability to
comfortably discuss complex theo-
retical concepts across a broad
number of topics.”
Despite his extraordinary native
intelligence and monumental suc-
cess on the chess board, most
everyone who meets Awonder, finds
him to be a normal, well-adjusted
and fun loving kid—which is not
always the case in the world of
young chess prodigies. “He is very
modest, and while he is self aware
of his talent, Awonder displays no
arrogance whatsoever. In fact he’s
even shy to show off his trophies,
and he wouldn’t even bring it up
unless you asked,” observed
Christopherson. “Awonder has a
great sense of humor and is very
well liked by his classmates. Awon-
der’s love and enthusiasm for chess
has been infectious as many of his
Van Hise classmates have also taken
up the game. At the beginning of
second grade last year, only three
kids in his class knew how to play
the game. By the end of the first
semester, with Awonder acting as
the “volunteer coach,” nearly all 20
kids in class were able to play a
game of chess. As Will points out,
“this is the one of Awonder’s chess
related accomplishments he is most
proud of.” Chess sets are in abun-
dance at Van Hise Elementary, and
Awonder often leads chess related
activities during recess time. Not
surprisingly, a good number of Van
Hise students have become regular
chess players in their own right.
“When Awonder was playing in
Greece, our second grade class was
totally excited and followed his
progress in every game,” Chisto-
pherson added.
The Van Hise Elementary Com-
munity has done more than just
cheer Awonder on. They provided
key financial support that allowed
Awonder to attend the 2010 WYCC
event in Greece. When it became
doubtful that Awonder would be able to attend the tournament
in Greece due to financial constraints, the Van Hise Parent
Teacher Organization (PTO) stepped up and established the
“Send Awonder To Greece” fund. Together with the Wisconsin
State Journal, support poured in from many in the Wisconsin
community, enabling Awonder and Will to journey to Greece.
Upon their return, the PTO held a large celebratory fundrais-
AWONDER LIANG
Learned to Play
Age 5
Favorite Chess Books
Garry Kasparov on Garry Kasparov
Part 1: 1973-1985;
Chess Duels by GM Yasser Seirawan;
Chess Child by Gary Robson
Favorite Players
Mikhail Botvinnik,
Bobby Fischer,
Anatoly Karpov,
Garry Kasparov,
Alexander Onischuk
Favorite Chess Website:
susanpolgar.blogspot.com
chessgames.com
Favorite Books
Harry Potter (1-7)
Favorite Movie
Terminator
Interests Outside of Chess
Swimming, playing on the beach,
reading, science, math,
computer games
His Advice for Chess Improvement
Play chess with friends for fun;
go to as many tournaments as possible
and use the time to think hard when
playing, because we have more fun when
winning than losing; and having
a good and funny coach is helpful.
FACT FI LE
CL_04-2012_awonder_AKF_r9.qxp_chess life 3/12/12 12:42 PM Page 29
30 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Profile
Sicilian Defense,
Najdorf Variation (B90)
Pawel Teclaf (FIDE 1594, POL)
Awonder Liang (FIDE 1872, USA)
World Youth Chess Championship,
Under 8 Open, Caldas Novas, Goias,
Brazil, 11.20.2011 (4)
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5.
Nc3 a6 6. Be3 e5 7. Nb3 Be7 8. f3 Be6 9.
Qd2 Nbd7 10. g4 b5 11. g5
Opening moves in this game were
played rather hastily. This allows us to
deduce that young players in various
countries are well coached, and well
informed. When training young players,
today’s coaches hope that they have a
superior and close to photographic mem-
ory when it comes to knowledge of rather
lengthy opening theory. There is therefore
a great temptation to catch your opponent
in some sort of an opening variation or
trick. We must remember that seven- or
eight-year-olds playing this game sim-
ply did not spend enough time training yet
to receive full preparation.
There is also a risk involved, in that
a young player can get stagnant in his
overall chess development while trying
to memorize opening variations. Even
when such a player ends up with an
advantageous position with an estimate
+=, an unbalanced chess player might
not be able to materialize the advantage
and finish the fight.
11. ... Nh5
Black is the first to enter unchar-
tered territory. The opening theory
competition could continue with 11. ...
b4 12. Ne2, and now 12. ... Nh5 or 12.
Nd5 Nxd5 13. exd5 Bf5.
12. Nd5 Bxd5 13. exd5 Qc7?!
One more inaccuracy. Here, this
“Sicilian” move is not so important. It
would have been better to play 13. ... Nf4
14. Bxf4 exf4 15. h4 h6.
14. Na5 Nb6
This looks more favorable: 14. ... Nf4
15. Bxf4 exf4 16. Nc6 Ne5.
15. Nc6 Rc8 16. a4
After 16. a4
This is a good move. It was also pos-
sible to play 16. c4, for example 16. …
Nxc4 17. Bxc4 bxc4 18. Rc1, which
would also gain an advantage. We have
to say that in the opening White has
received everything they were expecting,
yet the game did not end there.
16. ... Nc4 17. Bxc4 bxc4 18. a5 Qb7 19. Kf2
0-0 20. Ra4
After 20. Ra4
Things might have been simplified by
an exchange of queens. 20. Qb4 Qxb4
21. Nxb4.
20. ... Rxc6
By sacrificing an Exchange Awonder
refutes the heavy burden of an unfortu-
nately played opening. Such a knight on
c6 can be neither loved nor endured!
21. Rb4 Qc7 22. dxc6 Qxc6 23. Rb6 Qd7
Not deflecting to protect the pawn via
23. … Qc8. When your house is on fire,
you cannot be worried about the
burned-down fence.
24. Kg2
It would have been better to play 24.
Rxa6.
24. ... d5 25. c3 Rd8 26. Rd1 Qf5 27. Rxa6
d4 28. Ra7 Bc5 29. Rb7 g6 30. Rb5
After 30. Rb5
30. ... Rd5!?
Here we see proof of talent! The sud-
den gathering of pieces on the fifth rank
reminds us of an unexpected wave in
the ocean.
31. b4?
White did not receive the tsunami
warning and his position is simply
washed off the board. If there was no
panic on board the ship, it might have
been possible to keep all of his earnings
by 31. cxd4 exd4 32. Rxc5 Rxc5 (or 32.
... dxe3 33. Rxd5 [33. Qxd5? Nf4+] 33.
... Nf4+ 34. Kh1) 33. Qxd4 Rxa5 (33. ...
Rc8 34. a6 [or even 34. Qg4 Ra8 35.
Qxf5 gxf5 36. Rd5]) 34. Qd8+ Kg7 35.
Bd4+ f6 36. gxf6+ Kh6 (36. ... Nxf6 37.
Bxf6+ Qxf6 38. Rd7+) 37. Be3+ Nf4+ (37.
... g5 38. f7 Qxf7 39. Qxa5) 38. Bxf4+
Qxf4 39. Qxa5.
31. ... dxe3 32. Qc1
If 32. Qxd5, then Nf4+.
32. ... Nf4+, White resigned.
Chess matches are not limited to
opening theory!
-+r+k+-tr
+-wq-vlpzpp
psnNzp-+-+
+p+Pzp-zPn
P+-+-+-+
+-+-vLP+-
-zPPwQ-+-zP
tR-+-mKL+R
-+r+-trk+
+q+-vlpzpp
p+Nzp-+-+
zP-+Pzp-zPn
R+p+-+-+
+-+-vLP+-
-zPPwQ-mK-zP
+-+-+-+R
-+-tr-+k+
+-+-+p+p
-+-+-+p+
zPRvl-zpqzPn
-+pzp-+-+
+-zP-vLP+-
-zP-wQ-+KzP
+-+R+-+-
Wave Theory
By GM SAM PALATNIK
This game was played by undoubtedly talented, yet very young, and therefore, still inexperienced chess players.
That is why, in this game’s analysis, I would like to highlight their talent, rather then focus on any inevitable mistakes.
CL_04-2012_awonder_AKF_r9.qxp_chess life 3/12/12 12:42 PM Page 30
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 31
ing dance in Awonder’s honor to help further defray the cost.
Almost all of the Van Hise faculty and staff, and more than 250
parents and students attended the soiree. Needless to say this
outpouring of support has been gratifying to the Liangs. “It was
very touching and encouraging to Awonder and our entire fam-
ily,” Will said.
Awonder’s trip to the 2011 World Youth Chess Champi-
onships in Brazil was also generously underwritten by many in
the Wisconsin community, including the TranSmart Technol-
ogy Company, Mr. and Mrs Buck, and Dr. and Mrs. Ma. Further
support came from the U.S. Chess Trust, all of which made
Awonder’s gold medal quest a reality.
AWONDER AND THE “ NEW GUARD”
In the past few years, a number of rising young players have
taken their place in the upper strata of the U.S. Chess scene.
This phenomena was captured, in part, in Changing of the
Guard: 2009 U.S. Championship, a documentary that was pro-
duced in concert with the Chess Club and Scholastic Center of
Saint Louis. Emerging players highlighted in that video include
Hikaru Nakamura, Robert Hess, and Ray Robson. Other young
players that have played in subsequent U.S. Championships and
would arguably qualify for membership in this “New Guard”
include Sam Shankland and Daniel Naroditsky.
Comparing Awonder’s relatively brief chess career to the
early years of those new guard players lends context to Awon-
der’s brief but amazing career. First off, Awonder played his first
USCF rated chess tournament at the tender age of 5 years 3
months, significantly earlier than any of the new guard. At the
time Awonder captured the gold medal in Brazil, he was 8
years, 7 months, had a 2087 USCF rating, and had been play-
ing tournament chess for 3 years, 3 months.
IM Daniel Naroditsky, the 16-year-old superstar from north-
ern California, is currently rated 2548. Naroditsky captured a
gold medal at the World Youth Chess Championship at age 12.
He played his first rated tournament game when he was 7
years, 4 months, and at Awonder’s age had a rating of 1486.
After Naroditsky had played for the same period of time as
Awonder (3 years, 3 months), he had reached just 1750.
17-year-old Ray Robson, perhaps the most dominating force
on the U.S. junior and scholastic circuits in recent years, is cur-
rently rated 2674. In October 2009, about two weeks before
turning 15, Robson became the youngest U.S. GM-elect in
history, an incredible achievement. Like Awonder, Robson
experienced a rocket-like rise onto the U.S. chess scene. Rob-
son played his first rated tournament game at age 6 years, 11
months. When he was Awonder’s age, his rating was 1585,
although he started playing tournaments almost 2 years after
Awonder had started his. When Robson had played for 3 years,
3 months (the same period of time as Awonder), he was rated
2036. Looking at Awonder’s statistics, they line up favorably with
Robson’s, perhaps the most accomplished junior player under
18 years that has come along on the U.S. chess scene in the
past decade.
Based on the numbers, Awonder is clearly out of the chess
gates much faster than either GM Sam Shankland (USCF
2651) or GM Robert Hess (USCF 2717). At Awonder’s age,
Shankland had not yet played a rated tournament game. That
fateful event didn’t happen until he was 10 years, 2 months.
Meanwhile, Hess was rated 757 when he was Awonder’s age,
and was rated 1863 when he had been playing tournament
chess for the same period as Awonder.
The comparison between a young Hikura Nakamura and
Awonder yields perhaps the most interesting observations. Naka-
mura (USCF 2858) is considered one of the top players in the
world, and has been rated as high as sixth on the FIDE top player
list. Nakamura, undisputedly, is one of the great players in U.S.
chess history. He played his first rated tournament game when
he was 7 years, one month. When Nakamura was Awonder’s age,
he was rated 1579. However, by the time Nakamura had played
for 3 years, 3 months (he was 10 years, 4 months) his rating had
reached 2253. Notably though, Nakamura had the benefit of learn-
ing with his stepfather, a well-regarded scholastic chess instructor,
FM Sunil Weeramantry. Nakamura has also set several “youngest-
ever” records in U.S. chess history, including the youngest player
who defeated an international master in a USCF-rated game (10
years, 0 months). Later that record was surpassed by Praveen
Balakrishnan at 9 years, 29 days. Last summer, that record was
again surpassed, this time by Awonder himself, who defeated IM
Daniel Fernandez at the U.S. Open in Orlando, Florida. Awon-
der was 8 years, 118 days at the time.
THE FUTURE
Sevan Muradian, the founder and driving force behind the
Chicago-based North American Chess Association (NACA) has
closely observed Awonder’s development from the earliest days,
as Awonder has played in numerous NACA events over the years.
Also, NACA periodically runs elite norm tournaments that
attract many of the top junior players from throughout the coun-
try, and Muradian is also involved in FIDE organizational
matters, and is intimately familiar with the top echelons of the
European chess world. “Clearly Awonder is an incredible young
talent who only comes along once in a generation, if that,”
Muradian observed. “If Awonder is to make it to the very top lev-
els on a global scale, the next two years will be crucial. He will
either shoot up or stall as a player—and the key will be whether
or not Awonder has access to consistent top flight training. That
will happen depending on the availability of sizable financial
backing,” Muradian added.
Clearly, Awonder has the talent, work ethic, demeanor, fam-
ily and community support to make a run at becoming one of
the world’s very top players, and perhaps even the greatest to
ever play the game. However, in order to realize Awonder’s full
potential, significant monetary resources will be required.
One global top trainer, who requested anonymity, echoed
Muradian’s sentiments: “It is ‘mad expensive’ to nurture a kid
like Awonder, and the time to ‘push him’ is now, and not let
years go by wasted because of lack of funds. The Liangs
deserve to find some entity or person to help them give Awon-
der the best conditions so he can go as far as he can. That is
not easy, especially in the U.S., where chess is not valued as
it is in other places in the world. If ever there was a deserving
player, Awonder would be it.”
While Will focuses on potential training and sponsorship
opportunities for Awonder, as well the other knotty financial
issues involved in raising a chess superstar, not to mention rais-
ing three other wonderful and talented children, Awonder does
what he does best—and that is being Awonder. Awonder shared
two of his goals, one a non-chess aspiration and the other a tar-
get he has for his chess future. “I hope some day, I could get
so good at chess that I can create the Awonder Liang Founda-
tion, and use my skills to help people in need,” Awonder said.
And his long term chess goal? “Winning and bringing back the
world championship back to America.”
One must remember, Awonder is only an 8-year-old and his
story is really just beginning. But it is a story that reflects well
on Wisconsin and the Midwest—and it is certainly an all-Amer-
ican story. Stay tuned. .
Read more about Awonder in the February 2012 Chess Life
feature “A Wonder in Brazil,” about his World Youth
Championship, with annotations by GM John Fedorowicz.
CL_04-2012_awonder_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:08 PM Page 31
32 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Cover Story
By KEITH AMMANN
“Start your clocks.”
As dozens of players in an echoing hall, almost but not quite all at once, press the buttons on a
roomful of wind-up clocks, their unsynchronized ticking combines into a wash of white noise, like
raindrops hitting pavement. As recently as 20 years ago, such a scene would be repeated countless
times in chess tournaments around the world. Today, though, the ticking sound is fading away, as the
mechanical chess clock with analog dials is displaced by digital models with delay and increment-time
features and by rule changes that no longer treat it as the default timekeeping device. And yet, just
as the typewriter is still the symbol of the professional writer despite its near-extinction, the boxy clock
with two buttons and two dials remains a symbol of the game of chess, nearly as well-recognized
as the checkerboard pattern or the shape of the knight. More than that, it’s a symbol of serious
chess. Two men sitting at a board in a sidewalk café may be friends looking to kill some time pushing
wood. But when you see one pull out a chess clock and begin to set the time, you know it’s about to get
real. Unless he pulls out a digital. Then, if you’re not a player of tournament chess, you may just ask,
“What is that?”
Winding Down
This year’s rule changes may begin the last chapter
in the history of the analog clock
CL_04-2012_clock_AKF_r8_chess life 3/14/12 1:37 PM Page 32
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 33
The Clock of the Century
IF THE ANALOG CHESS CLOCK is more easily recognized and
evokes stronger associations than its digital cousins, there’s a
good reason: It’s had more than a century to embed itself in the
public consciousness.
The chess clock as we know it today was created in 1900 by
a Dutch clockmaker. A description appears in Scientific Amer-
ican Supplement No. 1566 on May 26, 1906:
“A small clock designed especially for chess players has been
designed by Herr Veenhoff of Groningen. This apparatus is
composed of two similar small clocks, mounted side by side on
a wooden platform. Behind the clocks a mechanism is installed,
designed to be set in action and to stop according to the move-
ments of the players. It consists of a long double lever, pivoting
at the middle on a support fixed to the platform and is furnished
with a button at each of its extremities. ... When pressure is
applied on one of the buttons of the lever, the corresponding bal-
ance is disengaged, while the other continues locked until the
other extremity of the lever is depressed.”
Top-level chess games had begun to lengthen dramatically in
the 19th century as players spent more and more time on
each move; a nine-hour game was typical. The trend peaked at
an 1843 match between Howard Staunton and Pierre St.
Amant: their 21st game lasted 14½ hours, earning a scolding
from the French master Alexandre Deschapelles and the propo-
sition that any rematch between the two should be played
under a time limit. Similar complaints followed the first world
tournament in London, 1851. Tournament organizers thus
began limiting players’ thinking time using 3-hour sand timers
or “recording secretaries” who kept track of players’ time with
pocket watches. In 1867, the Paris International Tournament
allotted players 1 hour for every 10 moves and fined players who
exceeded this allotment 5 francs (equivalent to about 10
today, or $13) for every 15 minutes of excess time.
Then Thomas Bright Wilson of Manchester, England, invented
the “tumbling clock”: two small clocks mounted on a rocker, in
such a way that while one was upright, the other would be
tilted, stopping the action of its pendulum. The clock—along with
the rule that a player who ran out of time would thereby forfeit
the game—was introduced at the London 1883 world tournament,
which was won by Johannes Zukertort over Wilhelm Steinitz.
By 1886, chess clocks were being marketed to the public, and
they underwent a series of refinements, including the addition
of the flag, proposed by H.D.B. Meijer, secretary of the Dutch
Chess Federation, to remove any ambiguity about whether
time had run out. (Even so, claiming a win on time would be
considered unsportsmanlike for another 20 years.) The clock
evolved quickly into its current form: two movements mounted
within a single compact box, operated by buttons on top. It
reached its epitome in Veenhoff’s design and has not changed
significantly ever since.
Twentieth-century chess was regulated by this clock and its
descendants. A portentously ticking BHB clock makes its appear-
ance just 30 seconds after the title sequence of the 1963 film From
Russia With Love; James Bond himself doesn’t show up for
another 11½ minutes. Speaking of people who took their time
to show up, for the first tense minutes of game one of the 1972
World Chess Championship, the figures on stage were not Boris
Spassky and Bobby Fischer but Boris Spassky and the clock (the
tardy Fischer pleaded bad traffic). Whenever the grandmasters
were on screen, there was the clock in the background, imper-
turbable. In Steven Zaillian’s 1993 movie Searching for Bobby
Fischer, the clock is everywhere, adding energy to scenes in the
park and tournament hall alike (at climactic moments, more
romantically than realistically).
The Elegant Machine
IN 2011, U.S. CHESS FEDERATION delegates enacted two rule
changes that became effective January 1 of this year, that sug-
gest that the analog clock era is coming to an end. One change
repeals rule 5Fa (Standard timer for sudden death), which
allowed tournament directors to shorten the basic time control
for players with delay-capable clocks by a number of minutes
equal to the length of delay in seconds, to ensure that they
received about the same amount of time as players without
delay. The other modifies rule 42D (Delay clock preferable in sud-
den death) to narrow further the occasions on which an analog
clock may be used and adds an analogous rule 42E for increment
time controls. A player with choice of equipment may now use
an analog clock only in games with no sudden death time, when
both players have the same type of non-delay clock, or in a non-
delay time control (see sidebar, “New Rules”).
Some affiliates have gone even further. The Evanston (Illinois)
Chess Club, a Chicago-area club where I’ve played in many a
tournament, has disallowed analog clocks at its events for
about the last two years.
Nearby, the North Shore Chess Center in Skokie, Illinois, side-
steps the issue by supplying all equipment at its tournaments—
and providing only digital clocks.
Five-second delay has been the USCF standard for sudden-
death play since 1996, when rules 5E and 5F were enacted in
CL_04-2012_clock_AKF_r8_chess life 3/14/12 4:46 PM Page 33
34 Chess Life — April 2012
Cover Story
their current forms; officially, analog clocks are standard only
for games with repeating time controls and situations in which
no digital delay clock is available. Yet some players remain
attached to their analog clocks, and some tournament organ-
izers remain hesitant to split them up.
“There are still a lot of ‘old-timers’ around, especially in the mid-
dle of the country away from the major chess centers,” says Tom
Braunlich, a tournament organizer in Tulsa, Oklahoma. “You
see a lot of players who got into chess in the ’60s or ’70s, during
the Fischer days, and who bought a nice clock then that they’ve
always loved and kept well maintained. ... They smile when dig-
ital owners fumble with their clocks at the start of the tournament
and have to ask a TD or the nearest 12-year-old for help. The ease
of using an analog clock is one of its advantages.”
David Long of the Springfield (Illinois) Chess Club, a longtime
tournament director, is one of those old-timers, whose attachment
to his analog clocks (a black Rolland Meisterschach from Germany
and a wooden Aradora from Romania) is not only sentimental and
functional but also philosophical. “I am old-fashioned and dis-
trustful of modern technology,” he declares. “With electro-
mechanical machines, I can take them apart, experiment and tin-
ker with them, modify them at will, disable unwanted features,
repair them. This is often much harder or impossible with chips
and electronic black boxes, which are more likely to be capable
of doing things I find undesirable. I like to control my own life and
do my own thinking. ... Thinking gives us power and makes us
human, and every time we delegate thinking to devices whose
manufacturers put their own best interests ahead of ours, we lose
an element of control over our lives and destinies.”
Moreover, he considers time management an essential part
of the game: “It is my opinion that delays or other forms of free
thinking time for every move constitute an undeserved bailout
for players who can’t or won’t budget their time properly,” he
says, “and it removes a lot of the excitement from games that
might otherwise go down to the wire.”
Braunlich notes that some of his players think the same way.
“Analog lovers have somewhat of a perverse love of the ‘fickle
flags of fate’ when they’re hanging at the approach of zero,” he
says. “The flag fall on an analog clock is more exciting.”
The romantic attraction of the analog clock isn’t just for
golden-agers, he adds: “There are a few younger players who
prefer analog out of what you might call a heightened appre-
ciation for retro aesthetics. For them, the elegance of chess is
a primary part of its attraction, and analog clocks are more
appealing than the dry, technical look of the digitals.”
From my own experience working in schools, if I ever met a
kid who preferred an analog clock over a digital, I’d assume he
was Amish. So unless the USCF includes a cadre of twen-
tysomething steampunk tinkers, I imagine that I’m the sort of
“younger player” whom Braunlich is talking about (I’m 43). But
it’s true: While I take a Chronos II Touch to tournaments, I also
have a Rolland analog, the same kind Long has, which I bought
in 1997, and I can’t bear to part with it.
To me, the appeal of the analog clock is that using it is a mul-
tisensory experience. Pressing the button, feeling the resistance
as it pushes the rocker lever within the clock, is gratifying: it’s
the instinctive pleasure of working a simple machine. The tick
of the clock reminds us of the passage of time and helps us focus
New Rules
The following material comes directly from the 2012 USCF rulebook
changes, with minor edits.
The following rule changes affecting the use of analog clocks
took effect January 1, 2012:
5F. Standard timer for sudden death.
Variation 5Fa, subtracting time for using a delay clock, has
been deleted. All clocks, including digital, delay, analog, etc.,
are to be set for the same base (starting) time. Example: If the
TLA indicates G/30, d/5, then there is no subtraction of 5 min-
utes on the delay clocks. Both analog and delay clocks (with
the delay set for 5 seconds) are set for 30 minutes at the start
of the game.
42D. Delay clock preferable in sudden death. A properly set
clock with time-delay or increment capability is preferable to
any other clock in a game with any sudden death time con-
trol. Therefore, if White has such a clock available and Black
does not, White’s clock should be used. If either player arrives
late for the start of the game, and a clock without time-delay
or increment has already been started, the player has the right
to furnish and substitute a properly set time-delay or incre-
ment clock, prior to the determination of Black’s first move.
The player substituting the time-delay or increment clock
must also transfer the elapsed times shown on the non-delay
clock to the delay or increment clock, without any additional
adjustments (except to correct any errors in the display of the
elapsed time). The player substituting the delay or increment
clock must have arrived at the board before the grace period
for forfeit loss of the game by nonappearance (13D) has
expired. Notwithstanding the above, the only occasions where
Black retains the right to use his/her non-time-delay clock are
in games with no sudden death time control, in cases where
both players have the same type of non-time-delay clock, or
if the delay mode were not being used in a sudden death time
control game; and if, in all these cases, Black has arrived in
time for the start of the game (or, if White is late, before
White has arrived). In any particular game, if the delay clock
cannot be properly set, then the opponent of the player pro-
viding the delay or increment clock may choose which legal
clock is to be used (5F).
TD TIP: Please note that this revised rule has the same clas-
sification as the old rule; however, there is added wording
regarding the replacement of nonstandard or analog clocks with
more standard delay or increment clocks when one of the play-
ers is late. TDs and organizers who prefer the old rule 42D (no
replacement of non-standard or analog clocks if one of the
players is late, as per the 5th edition of the rules) should
announce that procedure in their pre-tournament publicity.
42E. Increment clock preferable in increment time controls.
A properly set clock with time increment capability is prefer-
able to any other clock in a game stipulating increment time
controls. Therefore, if White has such a clock available and
Black does not, White’s clock should be used. The only occa-
sion where Black retains the right to use the clock of his/her
choice is if both players have an increment clock or if White
is late for the game, the game is started, and Black has
already set up the equipment. In any particular game, if the
digital clock cannot be properly set, then the opponent of the
player providing the clock may choose which legal clock is to
be used. Order of standard clock preference is given in 5F1.
uschess.org
CL_04-2012_clock_AKF_r8_chess life 3/14/12 1:38 PM Page 34
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 35
our minds on the problems before us by giving us something else
to tune out. And we admire finer analog clocks for the visual and
structural qualities that make inanimate objects come to life.
Consider the Rolland. The dials draw the eye: good shapes,
circles, symmetrically placed, bounded by bright, assertive
brass rings and echoed by the two round, symmetrically placed
brass buttons above them. The contrast of black hands, black
numbers, black tick marks against white faces, white faces
against black body—not to mention the Damoclean red dagger
of the flag. (Black, white, red: the three colors for which every
language on earth has words.) The symmetries created by the
alternating repetition of the tick marks—four thin, one thick,
four thin—and by the Hebraically square digits on the clock face,
the 10 condensed to balance the 2. The smooth, empty space
on the top of the clock, between the widely spaced buttons. And
the shape of the clock itself, another elementary figure: a com-
pact rectangle.
Not all analog chess clocks are beautiful, but all beautiful
chess clocks are analog. As useful as digital chess clocks are,
no one has yet made a beautiful one. (Saitek comes closest with
the Competition Pro. It’s cool. It’s not beautiful.
The Element of Uncertainty
TO A TOURNAMENT DIRECTOR (TD), beauty may be nice,
but accuracy and fairness are mandatory. And like any machine,
an analog clock, even at its best, can only approximate the accu-
racy of a digital.
To Sevan Muradian, the proprietor of the North Shore Chess
Club and a FIDE arbiter, that’s the most important factor,
even more than whether a clock has increment or delay capa-
bility. “You can immediately see with your eyes when it’s ticking
down in the seconds, rather than watching the little flag go up
and waiting for it to fall,” he says. “It does make a difference to
players, knowing exactly how much time they have.” With an
analog clock, “they don’t know—do they have 30 seconds or 20
seconds?”
Braunlich identifies a “finicky flag mechanism” as the main
drawback of the BHB analog clock, an omnipresent accessory
from its introduction in 1950 until recent years. And, he notes,
during a time scramble, rough treatment can cause the flag of
an analog clock to fall at the wrong moment.
As delay- and increment-capable digital clocks replace analog
as the norm, organizers including Muradian welcome this year’s
rule change, believing that it’s not fair to penalize players with
a time deduction for having the most up-to-date equipment.
Analog clock users may view the change as penalizing them
instead, giving them less total time than players with digital
clocks receive, but “it’s part of evolution and part of the [ongo-
ing] improvement of the game and its conditions,” Muradian
says. “You’re not going to please everybody all of the time.”
Maret Thorpe and Tom Sprandel, the co-organizers and TDs
of the Evanston Chess Club, decided about two years ago to
require digital delay clocks at all their tournaments. “No player
should have to lose a winnable endgame on time,” Thorpe
says. “If a player knows his stuff, a five-second delay is enough
to win a won game. To me, that’s more in keeping with the spirit
and intent of chess competition back before the days of sud-
den death. Naturally, what makes a ‘winnable endgame’ will vary
according to the strength of the players at a board, but that’s
the beauty of a delay or increment: It puts the result in the hands
of the players. ... I don’t want to be in the position of having to
either adjudicate someone’s game or find a stronger player to
do it for me.”
Thorpe is talking about the complicated and controversial rule
14H (Claim of insufficient losing chances in sudden death),
which allows a player using an analog clock, with less than 2
minutes remaining, to claim a draw based on the assertion that
a class C player in the same position could easily win or draw
against a master if both had time to play it out. It’s a subjec-
tive call in many cases, and it invites argument if the TD’s
endgame knowledge is less than the players’. The rule was
changed in 2010, then changed back in 2011, but with the addi-
tion of variation 14H6, which permits TDs to disallow all
insufficient losing chances claims—and doesn’t require the
policy to be announced in advance. But even without this vari-
ation, rule 14H is moot if a game is played with delay or
increment active. In Thorpe’s opinion, that’s reason enough not
to allow analog clocks.
Some players have come to the same conclusion on their own.
Bill Smythe, who ran a club in Chicago in the 1990s, tells of a
class A player who routinely ran low on time and had to settle
for 14H draws instead of wins in “crushing positions” against
two much weaker players. “Immediately after that second
occurrence, he purchased a Chronos, and as far as I know has
used it ever since,” Smythe says.
The Final Countdown?
“THE LOUD, MONOTONOUS TICKING [of the mechanical chess
clock] dins the ear of the combatant, diverting his attention from
the game, if not unstringing his nerves and involving his fac-
ulties in hopeless confusion,” wrote George Alcock MacDonnell
in The Knights and Kings of Chess (1894). “When I am heavy-
headed, I play slowly and at times cease altogether to think about
my move in order to listen to the tick, which my little enemy
grunts out as though it were pronouncing upon me sentence
of death, and fain would hurry me on to an early grave.”
The grave may soon be that of the analog clock itself. Jerger,
the top name in mechanical chess clocks, folded in the 1970s,
apparently because the owner committed suicide. The Swiss
watch company Heuer stopped selling chess clocks in 1980 when
Looping SA, the company that made movements for the clocks,
went bankrupt. Borcherdt GmbH, the German maker of the
BHB, closed up shop in 2009 and sold the brand name to
Texma Poland PPH, a supplier of game products; RCR Terry,
manufacturer of the Rolland, went out of business in 2010. The
inexpensive “regulation plastic mechanical chess clock” sold by
many U.S. equipment dealers and the Diamond quartz analog
(also sold as Royal Crest) are both made in China by the Ningbo
Anbaote Industry Co., which also manufactures soccer balls,
silicone kitchenware and “mosquito repellent wristbands.”
Sales of analog clocks have declined sharply over the past
few years, according to Shawn Sullivan, managing director of
House of Staunton and USCF Sales. He reports that in 2011,
digital clocks outsold analogs 4 to 1, and “well over 90 percent”
of those analog sales were to schools and other organizations
seeking to buy equipment in bulk at the lowest possible cost.
At tournaments, he says, buyers now favor digital over ana-
log by about 30 to 1.
In 1993, analog clocks were everywhere in Searching for
Bobby Fischer. But when Hélène enters the Ajaccio Open in Car-
oline Bottaro’s recent Queen to Play (2009), there are no ticking
clocks; a DGT XL sits beside every board, and when the rounds
begin, the clock presses fill the reverberant room not with
white noise but with an irregular staccato, like popcorn pop-
ping. The only analog chess clock in the film resides in the house
of Dr. Kröger, the self-absorbed romantic, melancholy and tem-
peramental, who hasn’t played in public in years. Neither one
has much time left. .
See uscfsales.com for all of your chess clocks needs (both
analog—get’em while you can!—and digital).
CL_04-2012_clock_AKF_r8_chess life 3/14/12 1:38 PM Page 35
36 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Compositions
45 YEARS OF BEING
Baffled
by
Benko
In the April 1967 issue of Chess Life, a column appeared by GM Pal Benko
that has had a profound effect on the chess composition community.
orty-five years ago this month, a
new column started with little fan-
fare in the pages of Chess Life.
Called “Benko's Bafflers,” the
author hoped that the column would “be
the first of what I hope will be a long and
entertaining—and I hope, instructive—
series of columns for Chess Life.” Perhaps
the best “all-rounder” of any generation—
a grandmaster player, a grandmaster
composer, and an analyst of both endings
and openings—with his own openings
named after him, no less—Pal Benko has
indeed provided us with all he hoped for
and more. I don't plan to feature Benko’s
own compositions—that he has done so
well in Pal Benko—My Life, Games, and
Compositions, Siles Press, 2003—if you
don’t own a copy, you should.
Many experienced composers took part
in Benko’s column over the years, which
started as a general problem column fea-
turing directmates, helpmates, and
studies, and then, with time, graduated to
a studies column as a part of his
“Endgame Lab” articles. My focus in this
celebratory article will be on individuals I
consider to be “students” of Benko—peo-
ple who learned the art of chess by
participating in his column. Benko not
only encouraged composers; he also got
many players involved in composing,
something they probably never would
have done without his column.
Noam Elkies
Noam Elkies is one of those phenomenal
multi-talented individuals. A world cham-
pion and grandmaster in problem-solving,
he quit playing competitive chess as a
young man even though he was already a
master, to pursue an academic career. He
was the youngest winner of the William
Lowell Putnam Mathematical Competition
for undergraduates when he was 16 and
had a Ph.D. in math from Harvard at the
age of 20. He was the youngest full profes-
sor of math ever at Harvard (he even
teaches a seminar on chess and math at
Harvard), is especially well-known in proof
games, but has composed just about every-
thing. Once a chess prodigy, he has skills
in the big three areas we find prodigies—
chess, math, and music. This little number
was published when Noam was only 12
years old, but what is especially fantastic
is that this was not his first published
study—that was at age 11 in the Israeli
chess magazine Shahmat.
(see diagram top of next column)
Noam Elkies
Benko's Bafflers 1980
White to play and draw
White looks lost, how can he stop the
pawn from queening? He can’t, and will
even walk into the promotion check! 1.
Rxf3! e2 2. Rxf4! (threatens mate but
places himself in check) 2. ... Bxf4+ 3.
Ke6!! (the point is that 3. Ke7? loses to 3.
... Kg8!) 3. ... e1=Q+ 4. Kf7 Bxh6 5. Bg7+!
Bxg7, stalemate.
Noam shared a sentiment with me that
was common amongst his “students,” his
first exposure to Benko was not through
the column but through the then revolu-
tionary Benko Gambit:
The notion of sacrificing a pawn in the
-+-+-vL-mk
+-+-+-+p
-+-mK-+-zP
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-sn-+
+-+-zpp+-
-+-vl-+-+
+-+-+R+-
By STEVEN B. DOWD
z z
F
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:51 PM Page 36
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 37
opening with the main aim of reaching an
advantageous ending while remaining a
pawn down(!) seemed remarkably auda-
cious to one who had only recently learned
the rudiments of chess strategy, and still
seems an amazing concept in the present
age of 3200+-rated chess computers.
As a student, Noam was lucky enough
to attend a lecture by GM Benko and
also get continually “hammered” in the
endgame of two bishops versus one
knight, where he struggled to draw but
Benko always prevailed. Noam also found
himself drawn to chess puzzles through
Benko. He uses many of these puzzles in
his course—if you want to see if you could
pass muster in a Harvard seminar on
chess then go to: math.harvard.edu/
~elkies/FS23j.06/init.pdf.
So what is Noam doing today? Let’s
look at some of his “recent” compositions,
although he notes he does not compose
much these days, with his own analysis.
Noam Elkies
The Problemist Supplement 1998
White to play and mate in three
1. Ne2! (-) takes one flight, gives two, and
offers a second knight.
1. ... Kg2 2. Qh1+! Kxh1 3. Bxd5 mate.
1. ... Kxe2 2. Qe3+ Kd1/Kf1 3. Nf2/Qf2
mate.
1. ... Kxg4 2. Qf4+ Kh5/Kh3 3. Be8/ Qg3
mate.
1. ... Ke4 2. Bxd5+! Kxd5/Kd3/Kf5 3.
Qc6/Qe3/Qh5 mate.
Extended star-flights, each of White’s
four officers is sacrificed in one of the four
variations, and the roster of eight mates
includes only one symmetric pair (for
Kh3/Kf1), not the three that the matrix
suggests (d1/h5 and d3/f5 are asymmet-
ric).
This one is my favorite:
(see diagram top of next column)
Yes, that is a mess of promoted bishops
you see. Black is in check and has only
one move to start: 1. ... Kh2 2. Bh1 Kxh1
3. Bbd3 Kh2 4. Bac4 Kh1 5. Bab5 Kh2
6. a4 Kh1 7. a5 Kh2 8. a6 Kh1 9. a7
Kh2 10. a8=R Kh1 11. Rh8 mate. Do you
see the wit in the above? It is also a fully
Noam Elkies
The Problemist 2004
Black to play and helpmate in ten
correct directmate in 10
1
⁄2; that is, a mate
in 10 with Black to move. The solution is
the same whether it is a helpmate (all
Black can do is shuffle) or a directmate.
Interestingly, Noam didn’t see this possi-
bility when he composed it, although
David Moulton found this when Noam
sent him this problem!
Dan Meinking
Dan is a long-time USCF master from
Cincinnati, and holds an FIDE master
title in chess composition. He co-founded
the internationally respected U.S. chess
problem magazine StrateGems and has
published over 400 problems. Here is
one of his Bafflers.
Dan Meinking
Benko's Bafflers, 1984
White to play and mate in three
Dan himself describes the ambush key
(the bishop prepares to go to h5 to
“ambush” the king) as “shocking.” 1. Be8!
(1. Bc6? Ke1!) 1. ... Kxd1 2. Re4 Kc1 3.
Re1 mate; 1. ... Ke1 2. Rg1+ Ke2 3. Bh5
mate; 1. ... Kf1 2. Bh5 Ke1 3. Rg1 mate,
a nice little inversion of moves between the
two variations at the end. Dan composed
this one sans voir, without view of the
board, a more common occurrence than
one might think.
Dan had a unique opportunity to co-
compose with Benko. In a study with one
line, which won 4th honorable mention in
the column in 1983, Benko found after
several years, a way to give the study two
fully viable lines. They polished it and pub-
lished it in StrateGems. It’s an extremely
complex piece of work, and your computer
will probably be of little help in solving it,
as it finds lines to be wins that are dead
drawn. Take a look for yourself.
Dan Meinking and Pal Benko
StrateGems 2000
White to play
Black’s first idea is to threaten mate. 1.
e6 b5 2. e7 b4 3. e8=Q b3 4. Qe1+ (4. Qc6+?
allows 4. ... Kb4! drawing. The black king
cannot be allowed to safely reach the a4-
b4-b5-a5 haven. If it does, the black knight
becomes untouchable, and the a3-pawn
can never be won by force.) 4. ... Kc2 Black
must avoid losing the a3-pawn 5. Qf2+
Kd3 6. Qf1+ Kd2 7. Qf4+ Ke2 8. Qc4+ Kf3 9.
Qc6+ Black cannot avoid losing the a3-
pawn in two more moves.
The second line, where he tries to queen
his own pawn: 1. ... Nb3+ 2. Kxa2 Nc1+ 3.
Kxa3 b5 4. e7 b4+ 5. Ka4 b3 6. e8=Q b2 7.
Qg6! (7. Qe4? Nd3 8. Qb7?? Nc5+) 7. ... Nd3
8. Qb6 Kd2 9. Ka3 and wins.
Today Dan is discovering new ideas in
problem chess, including “parry-series”
which work like a traditional series-mover,
but allows for “parry” moves (responses to
checks) and Cap-zug, which is a prob-
lem in which one side is put into a position
where they are compelled to capture. Here
is an example of a parry-series problem.
Dan Meinking and George Sphicas
StrateGems 2009
pser-h#14
Black to play
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+p
-+L+-+-wQ
+P+p+-+-
-+-+-sNN+
+-+-+k+-
-+-+-+-+
+K+-+-+-
L+-+-+-+
+-+L+-+-
L+-+-+-+
+L+-+-+-
L+-+-+-+
+L+-+-+-
P+-+LmK-+
+-+-+-+k
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
L+p+-+R+
+-mK-+-+-
-+-+k+-+
+-+N+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+p+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-zP-+-
-+-+-+-+
zp-mk-+-+-
p+-+-+-+
mK-sn-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+K+-+-zp-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-sN-+-+-
-+-+P+-+
+-+-+k+-
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:51 PM Page 37
38 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Compositions
This is a parry-series helpmate in 14,
which, as Dan explains, means Black
will play 13 consecutive moves, White
moving only when parried, and at the
end we then have a conventional helpmate
in one, where Black will make one move
and then White will mate him. The solu-
tion runs: 1. ... g5 2. ... g4 3. ... g3 4. ... g2 5.
... g1=Q 6. ... Qg2+ 7. e4 (the first parry) 7.
... Qb2+ 8. Kc7 Qh2+ 9. e5 (note how Black
helps the pawn forward with his maneu-
vers) 9. ... Qh7+ 10. Kc8 Qf5+ 11. e6 Qc5+ 12.
Kd8 Qg5+ 13. e7 Qg8+ 14. e8=Q Qg1 15. Qe2
mate! The black queen returns to the pro-
motion square, serving as a block, and the
white queen returns to the square where
it started as a pawn, mating Black.
Gianni Donati
Gianni turned out to have the best stories
of all of Benko, and it seemed a shame to
ruin them with my own “translation”—so
I present his verbatim:
I subscribed to Chess Life fresh out of
college, in the mid-1970s, hoping it would
turn me into a better player. That wasn’t
going to happen, but Pal’s column became
my reason for sticking with the magazine.
The column, and Pal’s occasional arti-
cle about chess problems, were a solitary
pleasure. This was before personal com-
puters and the Internet, so there was no
way to share my excitement and no way
to solve a problem except by dint of my
own effort. If a problem stumped me, I had
to wait two months for the solution.
One of Pal’s articles challenged me to try
my hand at composing, and when I began
submitting my efforts, the waiting became
agony. Instead of the immediate e-mail
response we have come to expect today,
back then news that a problem was
accepted or was cooked came in the form
of a postcard, often months after the prob-
lem was submitted. The delay was not
merely due to the mail; Pal was often trav-
eling abroad, not waiting by his post office
box in New York City. (One postcard began:
“Back from Brazil after 7 months, soon
leave for Europe.” Sure enough, there had
been a long hiatus between postcards,
and now I knew why.)
Pal’s postcards mixed encouragement
with honest criticism and helpful advice.
A problem inspired by a Benko helpmate
showing the black king making a cross
was horribly cooked. (“I recommend to get
rid of the rooks and knight. In helpmates
every white piece should be employed in
every mate, but here not, only they mak-
ing cooks. Please study more helpmates
and try again.” I took Pal’s advice to heart
and finally made my problem sound.
Gianni Donati
Benko's Bafflers, 1977
Black to play and help White mate
in two (h#2; 4 sol.)
1. Kc4 Ke6 2. Qb3 Qa6 mate; 1. Kd5 Kf7 2.
Qc4 Qa8 mate; 1. Kd3 Kf5 2. Bc2 Qf1 mate;
1. Ke4 Kg6 2. Bd3 Qh1 mate.
Other advice: “Not nice to take Black
pieces!” “Not worth to work on three pro-
motions. I make much better with four
promotions already and many others.
Take more time! Better to make one good
one than five mediums!” (Gianni notes
that Pal’s English was a bit “fractured” in
-+n+-+-vL
+-+-+-+-
-+-zp-mK-+
+-zp-+-+-
-zp-mk-vl-+
+-+-+-+-
qzp-zp-zP-+
wQl+-+-+-
BELOW: The first column. The full column from April 1967 can be seen on Chess Life Online.
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:51 PM Page 38
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 39
those days; today it is near perfect).
Once Pal added a twin to a helpmate I
sent him: “Your 3x twin I made 4x. I hope
you like it. Otherwise was not good
enough to publish.”
Gianni Donati
Benko's Bafflers 1977
Black to play and help White mate
in three (h#3, with twins.)
Twins: (b)(c)(d) Kd7->e7->f7->g5
(a) 1. ... Bf6 2. Bh6 Bg5 3. Bf8 Bf4 4. Bg7 mate;
(b) 1. ... Bg7 2. Bg5 Bh6 3. Bh4 Bf4 4. Bf6 mate;
(c) 1. ... Kd6 2. Bg5 Bd4 3. Bd8 Ke5 4. Bc7 mate;
(d) 1. ... Ke6 2. Ne4 Bd4 3. Nc5+ Ke5 4. Bf4 mate.
In 1976 Pal ran a competition for “help-
notmates,” a genre that—no surprise—
never flourished. Pal’s own example—in
which the sides cooperate so that White
doesn’t mate in three moves—was enough
to inspire my own entry. I had a small
interest in retro problems at the time and
I refused to assume that the convention
about en passant keys (i.e., that an e.p.
key is legal only if Black’s last move can
be shown to have been the applicable
two-step pawn move) would apply to new
genres, so I made a problem in which it
had to be shown that an en passant key
was not possible. Pal didn’t mind. (The
prize—a gift certificate—allowed me to
buy the chess set that I still use.)
Gianni Donati
Benko’s Helpnotmate Contest, 1976
White to move and not mate in three moves
1. e6 (not 1. exd6 e.p. This would imply
Black’s Bf5 is promoted and the original
black Bc8 was captured at home. This is
impossible: six black units are missing
and the white pawns have made six cap-
tures.) 1. ... c1=B+ 2. Kd1+ Bd2 3. Kxd2.
I finally met Pal in the late 1990’s at
Andy Kalotay’s apartment in New York
City. My nervousness vanished the moment
we met: Pal turned out to be a normal per-
son—just smarter than most. He enjoyed
the problems Andy and I showed as much
as he enjoyed showing his latest studies.
Usually these get-togethers occurred right
after Pal had returned from Hungary or
right before he was leaving again.
My only other encounter with Pal was
at a chess camp not far from my home.
I happily remember Pal’s impromptu
endgame analyses, and I have been
unable to forget how easily Pal’s wife
trounced me in a couple of offhand games.
When asked for a recent problem,
Gianni gave several. My favorite of the
bunch was this proof game:
Gianni Donati
Thema Danicum 2006 First Prize
Proof Game in 24 moves
After 24. ... Kg5
1. d3 h5 2. Bf4 Nh6 3. Bd6 exd6 4. Nc3 Qg5
5. Qb1 Qc1+ 6. Nd1 g5 7. a3 Bg7 8. Qa2
Bxb2 9. Qc4 f6 10. Qg4 Kf7 11. Nf3 Re8 12.
Nd2 Re3 13. Nb1 Rh3 14. e3 Kg6 15. Be2 Nf7
16. Bf3 Nh8 17. Bc6 dxc6 18. 0-0 c5 19. Ndc3
Nc6 20. Qd1 Bg4 21. Kh1 Be2 22. f3 Bxf1 23.
Ne2 g4 24. Ng1 Kg5
Robert Lincoln
Bob Lincoln is well-known as the world’s
foremost composer of two-mover minia-
tures, author of the book series Fun with
Chess Miniatures, wrote a column for
Chess Life for a few years called, “Easy
Does It,” and is an inspiration to many of
us, as finding original ideas in minia-
tures—problems with less than seven
pieces—is not a simple endeavor. What is
amazing is that he composes these not just
with an eye to “mate-building” (making
problems with correct mates but little
thematic content) but often his problems
show multiple themes in the same man-
ner much heavier problems do.
Interestingly, most of Bob’s early two-
movers were rather heavy affairs. As he “took
lessons” from Benko, his problems became
smaller but richer. Here is one example.
Robert Lincoln
Benko's Bafflers 1977
White to play and mate in two
1. Nf5! threat Ne3 mate 1. ... Bc4 2. Qxc4
mate; 1. ... Nb5 2. Qxb3 mate; 1. ... Nxf3 2.
Qxf3 mate; 1. ... Nxf5 2. Qe5 mate; 1. ... Nc6
2. Rd6 mate; 1. ... Ne6 2. Nf6 mate; 1. ... Re7
2. Nxe7 mate.
A good effort, but look at what Bob is
up to these days. This one helped him to
win the 2001 World Championship for
miniature two-movers.
Robert Lincoln
StrateGems 2001
White to play and mate in two
There are two tries. Try: 1. Nc4? with
the idea of 2. Qa5 mate; 1. ... c6 2. Qb6
mate; but 1. ... Qf5! refutes. Try: 1. Be4?
with the idea of 2. Bd3 mates 1. ... Qf5 2.
Bb7 mate, but 1. ... Qb8!
1. Nc6! (idea: 2. Nb4) 1. ... Qb8 2. Nxb8 mate;
1. ... Qb7 2. Qa5 mate; 1. ... Kb7 2. Qa7 mate.
GM Benko, in many of his articles on
problems over the years, has stressed
economy. Bob appears to be one of his
most successful “pupils” in this area.
James Walters
Walters was a strong USCF postal player
r+-+-+-sn
zppzp-+-+-
-+nzp-zp-+
+-zp-+-mkp
-+-+-+p+
zP-+PzPP+r
-vlP+-+PzP
tRNwqQ+lsNK
-+-+N+-+
+-+p+-+r
Lwq-sN-+Rzp
+-+k+-+-
-+-sn-zP-+
+lwQ-+P+-
-+-+-vL-+
+-+-+-+K
-+-+-+-vl
+-+K+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+pmk-+-
-zp-+-+-+
+-+-+-sN-
-+-+-+-+
+-vL-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+p+-zp-+-
-zp-+-+-+
vlP+pzPl+-
Lmk-zP-zp-+
+P+-+p+-
PzPpmK-zP-+
+-+-vL-+-
-+q+-+-+
+-zp-+-+-
k+-+-+-+
sN-wQ-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-mK-+-+L
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:51 PM Page 39
40 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Compositions
from the “Show-Me” state; his last rating
when active was 2262 in 1987. He was a
very good study composer; Bill Jones,
another successful study composer with a
number of international awards to his
credit, once told me that the best way to get
ideas for studies was by playing correspon-
dence chess. Here are two of his studies; the
first one Benko noted was a very game-like
position. The means by which White extri-
cates himself from the two blind pigs on the
seventh is indeed baffling.
James Walters
Benko’s Bafflers 1980
White to play and win
1. axb6! (1. a6 only draws) 1. ... Rbb2 2.
Kh1! Rxg2 3. Rxg7+!! Kxg7 (3. ... Rxg7 leads
to the same end) 4. Rg1 Rxg1+ 5. Kxg1 and
Black can’t stop the pawns.
Here Walters uses the familiar, but
always attractive method of driving the
opposing king into the corner. Again, the
black pawns appear unstoppable.
James Walters
Benko’s Bafflers 1980
White to play and win
1. Bb1! Kxb1 (1. ... a2 2. Bxa2 Kxa2 3.
Re4) 2. Kd2 a2 3. Re1+ Kb2 4. Ra1! a3 (4. ...
Kxa1 5. Kc2 and White mates) 5. Kd1,
White wins, Black’s hopes of queening
are now a distant memory.
Richard Becker
There is no doubt that Richard Becker of
Oregon, an aerospace engineer, is Benko’s
most successful student. He regularly
wins first place in most of the competitions
he enters, and got his start in Benko’s col-
umn. He is a player, having won the
Oregon Junior Championship, and most
of his studies look like “real endings.”
There is no doubt he will soon be a grand-
master in chess composition. I present
first several of his Bafflers efforts and
then his amazing first prize in the 2011
World Cup.
Richard Becker
Benko’s Bafflers 1983 3rd Prize
(version)
White to play and win
1. g4+! Kh6 2. Qh2+ Kg7 3. Qb2+ Kg8 4.
Qb3+ d5 5. Qxd5+ Kg7 6. Qf7+ Kh6 7. g7 (7.
g5+? Kxg5 8. g7 Qd8+ 9. Kxb7 Kh6) 7. ...
Qd8+ 8. Kxb7 Qg5 9. Ka6!! and now Black
is in Zugzwang: 9. ... Qxg4 10. g8=N+ Kg5
11. Qf6+ Kh5 12. Qh6 mate. The underpro-
motion is a nice touch, and this indeed
looks like a real ending that could occur
in practice.
Richard Becker
Benko's Bafflers 1985, 2nd
Commendation
White to play and win
Here the goal is to invert the battery, so
the black king is driven all over the place:
1. Bh2+ Ke4 2. Qg4+ Kd5 3. Qf5+ Kc6 4.
Qe6+ Kb7 5. Qd7+ Ka8 6. Qd5+ Ka7 7. Qf7+
Ka8 8. Qf3+ Ka7 9. Qf2+ Kb7 10. Qg2+ Kb6
11. Qg1+ Kc6 12. Qh1+ Kd7 13. Qd5+ Ke7 14.
Bd6+ Kd7 15. Be5+ wins the black queen.
And then finally, his World Cup problem:
(see diagram top of next column)
Here your computer will probably tell
Richard Becker
1st Prize, World Cup 2011
White to play and draw
you initially that 1. exf4 draws as well. It
is worth your while to figure out why not.
Instead: 1. Rb7+! Kc1 2. exf4 gxh5 3. Rxh7
a6! 4. Rh6! h4 5. Rxh4 a5 6. Rh5! Rxf4 7. Ke3
Rf1 8. Ke2 Rf4 9. Ke3 Re4+ 10. Kd3 Re5 11.
Kd4 Rb5 12. Kc4 Rb4+ 13. Kc3! And the
pawns on the fifth rank hang. Drawn.
If you would like to study more of
Becker’s works, try the site http://www.
jmrw.com/Chess/Becker/base.htm.
Some of the “old-timers”
As I noted, many of the established Amer-
ican composers took part in Benko’s
column; I'll give a few examples. The first
is by another dean of American problem
chess, Edgar Holladay, for years the best
American-born composer, and one of the
few to earn an international title (interna-
tional master). When I looked at this first
one, I was disappointed—“Oh, the old
knight trick again”—but then realized
what Holladay had done.
Edgar Holladay
Benko’s Bafflers 1980
White to play and mate in two
The key is 1. a8=N! which has the obvi-
ous threat of 2. Nxb6 mate. But that is not
the main idea; that is all the other mates
that arise when Black defends against this:
1. ... Rb5 2. Qd4 mate; 1. ... Rd5 2. Qa4
mate; 1. ... Ra6 2. Qc6 mate; 1. ... Qd5 2.
Nge5 mate; 1. ... Qxf7 2. Ne3 mate. Note
-+-+-+-+
+-tR-+-zpk
-zpP+-zp-+
zPp+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+r+-zP-+-
-+r+-+PzP
+-+-+RmK-
-+-+-+-+
+-zp-+-+-
-+-zpR+-+
+-+P+-+-
p+-+L+-+
zp-+-+-+-
-mk-+K+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-wq
+p+-+-+-
-mK-zp-+P+
+-+-+-+k
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+Q+-+P+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-wq
+-+Q+-+-
p+-vL-+-+
+p+k+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+K+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
zp-tR-+-+p
-+-+-+p+
+-+-+p+P
r+-+-zp-+
+-+KzP-+-
-+-+-+-+
+k+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
zP-+Q+L+-
-zp-+q+r+
tr-+-+-+-
-+k+-+Nzp
+-zpN+-+K
-+P+-+-+
+-+-+-vL-
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:51 PM Page 40
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 41
how each defense opens up another mat-
ing opportunity; for example, both 1. ...
Qxf7 and 1. ... Qd5 frees the rook to
defend b6 but gives up control of e3 and
e5 (the queen is pinned and has blocked
his own rook in this second example).
Another name I have seen dating back
to compositions in the 1930s was O.
Aarhus. He published snappy, classical
three-movers, although not much can be
found about him. I believe he was still
publishing in his eighties, and lived to
nearly one hundred from what I can find
in the Social Security Death Index. There
is a great reprint of an old newspaper
story on him called “The Pawn Pusher”
from 1943 at blogs2.startribune.com/
blogs/oldnews/archives/48; it is well-
worth a read. Here is what I found to be
his best Baffler.
O. Aarhus
Benko’s Bafflers 1977
White to play and mate in three
The play is extremely variation-rich
and has its share of sacrifices, with rook,
knight, and white-squared bishop all
being sacrificed: 1. Bc4! a5 (if 1. ... Kxd4
2. Ba7+ Kxc4 3. Qg8 mate; 1. ... Ne2 2.
Rxd3+ exd3 3. Nf5 mate) 2. Bxd3 Kxd4 (2.
... exd3 3. Nc2 mate; 2. ... Ne2 3. Qxe4
mate) 3. Ba7 mate. A very well-presented
problem, one I would love to have com-
posed myself.
Bill Barclay is co-author, with Tom
Sweeney, of the little-known book, Beauty
is Where You Find It, (Pageant, 1972) a
simple and concise introduction to the
chess problem art. It is relatively easy to
find a good, cheap used copy of the book
from various sites and if you have any
interest at all in learning the basics of
chess problems, I recommend it highly.
Here is one of Bill’s efforts from the first
year of Benko’s column.
(see diagram top of next column)
Another variation-rich problem: 1. Ba1!
Bxb1 2. Bc4 mate; 1. ... Bb3 2. Qxb3 mate; 1.
... Bc4 2. Bxc4 mate; 1. ... Nc3 2. Nxc3 mate;
1. ... Rc2 2. Rd4 mate; 1. ... Rb2 2. Qd3 mate;
1. ... Rxd1 2. Qxa2 mate; 1. ... Rd3+ 2. Qxd3
William Barclay
Benko’s Bafflers 1967
White to play and mate in two
mate; 1. ... Rd4 2. Rxd4 mate; 1. ... d6 2. Qb7
mate; 1. ... Re5 2. Rxe5 mate; 1. ... Rxe4 2. Qxe4
mate; 1. ... Ne3 2. Nxe3 mate. Such problems
remind me of Charles Hertan’s comment
in Forcing Chess Moves regarding “Mate in
Two” problems: “a genre which I specifically
designed to confound human biases, as
you will discover if you become addicted to
solving them as I have.” As he notes, solv-
ing such problems give you what he calls
“computer eyes,” the ability to see things
we would not normally see.
Richard Kujoth is another player many
of you are familiar with, although he
never made master, he is well-known for
the famous game against Fashingbauer
(considered in many sources to be a fake,
but Kujoth has proven the veracity of the
game many times over) with only the first
ten moves given, all of them pawn moves
by White: 1. e4 c5 2. b4 cxb4 3. a3 Nc6 4.
axb4 Nf6 5. b5 Nb8 6. e5 Qc7 7. d4 Nd5 8. c4
Nb6 9. c5 Nd5 10. b6 Qd8 and a later 1-0.
He composed a few problems, but only
one study. If you are going to be known
for just one study, this is it:
Richard Kujoth
Benko’s Bafflers, 1972. 4th prize-winner
White to play
Another example of forcing moves.
Black is threatening mate. In his book,
Chess is an art, Kujoth gives both
Reshevsky and his capacity to fall into
unwitting draws, and Alekhine’s point
that “a series of moves, when ‘forcing,’
should be pursued to the end, regardless
of how preposterous components of the
series may appear,” as inspirations for this
study. Benko noted in the solutions to this
one, that, “usually Black chases White’s
king into stalemate—this different
approach is more paradoxical.”
1. Rxa7+! Nxa7 (If 1. ... Kb6 2. Qc7+ Kc5
3. Qe5+ Kb6 [3. ... Qd5+?? 4. Qxd5+ cxd5
5. Rxb7 loses] and a perpetual) 2. Nc7+ Kb6
3. Na8+ Qxa8 (3. ... Ka6 4. Nc7+ would
lead to another perpetual) 4. Qb8 Qxb8,
stalemate! An unfortunate flaw in this
study, that I have not seen discussed
before, is that 1. Nc7+ also seems to draw,
for example: 1. Nc7+ Kb6 2. Qb2+ Kxc7 3.
Qe5+ Nbd6 4. Qa5+ Kd7 5. Qxa7+ Nxa7
6. Rxg8 Ke6 7. Kxh2 Kd5 8. Rg5+.
SOME OTHER YOUNG
PLAYER-COMPOSERS
Kenneth Regan
Kenneth Regan is, as is our next subject,
a prodigy who eschewed professional
chess for an academic career. He was
one of our most promising juniors in the
1970s. He has not turned his back on
chess entirely, in fact his website,
http://www.cse.buffalo.edu/~regan/,
contains much interesting chess-related
material, including that on computer
cheating. He notes, “Answering Frederic
Friedel’s open request for help evaluating
Silvio Danailov’s statistical allegations of
cheating in the 2006 Kramnik-Topalov
match drew me back into chess as a
research activity, and I now have several
published papers on my probabilistic
model of move-choice and skill evaluation.
This underlies my anti-cheating work,
including private but official involvement
in the Sebastien Feller case.” When asked
for his reminiscences about Benko, he
noted that “it was a thrill to be published
so early as a kid. His columns and
Reuben Fine’s book drew me in to the
endgame, which I actually studied as
opposed to the openings.”
He, like Noam, lists Benko as his most
important influence as a player. In fact he
has toyed with writing a column on the
games that most influenced his chess
education, all of them draws against
Benko. Never having had formal lessons,
these games shaped his development as
a player. Since he may someday still write
that article, I leave those to him to pres-
ent at a future date.
Here is his study, published at the age
of 12. The staircase theme with the queen
is probably easy to see once you get there,
but how many of you, without a com-
puter, see the rook sacrifice?
(see diagram top of next page)
QvL-+-+L+
+-+-+-+-
p+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
P+-sNpzP-+
+R+pmk-sn-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-mK-+-
-+R+-+-+
+-+p+NvL-
-+-+r+-+
+-zPk+-+-
n+-+R+-+
mK-+-+P+-
l+-trL+-+
+Q+N+n+-
R+n+-+q+
zpn+-+-+-
k+p+-+-+
+N+-wQ-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+p
-+-+-+-zp
+-+-+-+K
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 4:48 PM Page 41
42 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Compositions
Kenneth Regan
Benko’s Bafflers, 1972 (Special Prize)
White to play
1. a4 seems to win here as well, so it is
probably best to consider the study after
the first set of moves: 1. Kf2 h3, and now
2. Rg3? g1=Q+ leads to stalemate, so 2. a4!
bxa4 3. b5 a3 4. b6 a2 5. b7 a1=Q 6. Rxg2+!!
Kh1 (6. ... hxg2 and Black is mated in
two) 7. Rh2+! Kxh2 8. b8=Q+ Kh1 and now
the staircase maneuver of the queen
begins: 9. Qb7+ Kh2 10. Qc7+ Kh1 11. Qc6+
Kh2 12. Qd6+ Kh1 13. Qd5+ Kh2 14. Qe5+ Kh1
15. Qe4+ Kh2 16. Qf4+ Kh1 17. Qf3+ Kh2 18.
Qg3+ Kh1 19. Qxh3 mate.
At that age, I was still trying to figure
out smothered mates. Sigh.
Stuart Rachels
Stuart was most definitely the most promis-
ing player to come out of Alabama, at one time
he held the record as the youngest master,
and became U.S. co-champion. Despite the
fact that he held two grandmaster norms, he
turned his back on competitive chess, as
many do when they realize the rewards are
few, and took up “the family business” of
philosophy. He is now a professor of philos-
ophy at the University of Alabama. He hasn’t
turned his back on chess completely, and
wrote an interesting essay on chess for the
book, Philosophy Looks at Chess, by Ben-
jamin Hale. Reviews consistently cite his
essay as one of the best in the book.
Here is a small but neat little problem
he composed at the age of 12:
Stuart Rachels
Benko’s Bafflers 1983
White to play and mate in two
If the white king held d2, the simple 1.
Rxf4 would mate here. But if 1. Ke1?,
then 1. ... f3 and there is no mate in two,
so the need to control f3 and block the f-
pawn comes from 1. Nf3!, and if 1. ... Kxf3
2. Qxf4 mate; 1. ... exf3 2. Re6 mate and
finally 1. ... c2 2. Qa3 mate.
It occurs to me that Benko has pro-
duced more university professors in his
“students” than many a professor himself.
Is it the studious approach he has always
advocated towards chess?
Steven Dowd (?)
I hope the reader won’t think it so much
hubris if I add myself as a student of Benko.
I actually did not become involved in chess
problems until 2004, as the mantra I heard
time and again when I began playing chess
was that they were bad for my game. Such
nonsense! Appreciating chess in another
way must surely be one of the keys to real
mastery of the game.
As an author, I have only participated
in the Bafflers as part of the Endgame
Lab, when I was trying to compose stud-
ies. One of the things I learned, and
perhaps not quickly, was that I was not
a natural study composer, but Pal was
always very helpful and even helped me
convert a few “good idea, bad implemen-
tation” studies into something worthy of
his column. But one way I really learned
about composing—especially directmates
—was by reviewing the Bafflers year by
year. I often found ideas I could use in my
own small compositions. One inspiration
was the following by a frequent contrib-
utor to the column.
Tom Rogalski
Benko’s Bafflers 1983
White to play and mate in three
It's obvious that a promotion to queen
or rook stalemates Black, since the g7-
pawn is pinned. So the solution for this
snappy miniature is 1. e8=B! Kg8 (if 1. ...
Kh8 2. Rf8+ Kh7 3. Bg6 mate) 2. Kg6 Kh8
3. Rf8 mate.
From studying this one, I wondered if
a longer implementation might be possi-
ble, with more of an Indian-like maneuver
and also a sacrifice of a bishop, which
would give the problem the additional
theme of a Phoenix, which is the rebirth
of a sacrificed piece by promotion. After
some weeks, I found the following:
Steven B. Dowd
Heilbronner Stimme 2007
White to play and mate in six
The solution runs 1. Rb5! Kh8 2. Rb8+
Kh7 3. Bb6! axb6 4. c7 b5 5. c8=B! Kh8 and
now a discovered mate 6. Bf5 mate. Not a
deep problem, but one for solvers, which
is why I published it in a small column in
Germany, where the acclaim was great.
Sometimes it is all about just composing
what you love and hoping that readers and
solvers appreciate your efforts.
Conclusion
Such a celebratory article can only cover
a small portion of the excellence Benko
provided us over the last 45 years. If I
have missed anyone who considers them-
selves a student of Benko’s, I am sorry;
please feel free to write the editor to tell
of your experiences and your problems
that were published in the column. I hope
GM Benko features some of what he con-
siders to be the best efforts from his
column over the next few months, and I
particularly hope to be able to write
another column in five years for his golden
anniversary. .
-+-+-+R+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+p+-+-+-
-zPp+-+-zp
+-zP-mK-+-
P+-+-+pmk
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-wQ-tR-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+pzp-+
+-zp-mk-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+KsN-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-zPRzpk
-+-+-+-zp
+-+-+K+P
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
vL-zp-+p+k
-+P+-zP-zp
+-+-+R+P
-mK-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
More Bafflers
See Chess Life Online’s April section
for more material by Dr. Dowd: Three
additional compositions by Victor
Baja that didn’t quite fit in this arti-
cle. Also, the full April 1967 “Benko’s
Bafflers” column is posted.
Of course, this month’s “Bafflers” can
be found as usual in his “Endgame
Lab” column, which begins on page 46.
Congratulations, GM Pal Benko,
for 45 years of inspiring the entire
chess community from the pages of
Chess Life!
CL_04-2012_baffled_AKF_r9_chess life 3/14/12 1:51 PM Page 42
Chess Magnet new:chess life 12/3/2008 5:28 PM Page 1
44 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Back to Basics
As long as you have at least one (prac-
tical) chance in a thousand to save the
game, do not resign! (Of course, if your
next round starts in two hours, one-in-a-
hundred may suffice).
White to play
Should Black resign here? Perhaps yes
—if White plays 1. Qg2+, as coming mates-
in-two are simple. But if 1. Qe3+, then
quickly play 1. ... Kd1, hoping for 2. Kc3
or 2. Kd3, both of which are stalemates.
(In severe time pressure, even world cham-
pions have made such a blunder!)
Now let’s go to our game and notes of
the month and its author, Michael Robert-
son. Writes Michael:
In the final position my opponent
resigned, thinking that I had a forced
mating net. I did have a forced mate, but
I did not see it. The continuation that I
saw and that I had planned to play would
have lost for me, and if he had played just
one more move he would have seen that.
So the lesson here is “When is it too early
to resign”?
I really hope this is a good lesson and
hope people get something out of this
game.
(Lev’s further comments will be in italics).
Closed Sicilian (B23)
Michael Robertson (1781)
Todd Imada (1874)
4th Annual Louisville Open 2011 (1)
1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. f4 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Bb5
Nd4 6. 0-0 Nxb5 7. Nxb5 d5 8. exd5 a6 9. Nc3
Nf6
After 9. ... Nf6
10. d3
More accurate is 10. d4.
10. ... Nxd5 11. Ne4 Qc7 12. Kh1 0-0 13. Ne5
I had already planned on sacrificing
the pawn, I just didn’t know how he would
accept it.
13. ... Nxf4 14. Bxf4 Bxe5 15. Qd2 b6 16.
Rae1
After 16. Rae1
White has—at least—some compensa-
tion for a sacrificed pawn. And to attack
is usually easier than to defend.
16. ... f5
I don’t know if opening his king up was
best, but it did surprise me, I thought his
only option was 16. ... Bxf4. (16. ... Bb7??
17. Bxe5 Qxe5 18. Nf6+).
17. Bxe5 Qxe5 18. Nc3
18. Qh6 would have been interesting
but he could just retreat his queen to
g7. (Not 18. ... Qxb2 19. c3!)
I’d prefer 18. Ng5—closer to the black
king.
18. ... Qd6 19. Qg5 Ra7 20. Re3 e5 21. Rfe1
After 21. Rfe1
21. ... Re7
This move allows 22. Nd5. Thus: 21. ...
Re8!.
22. Nd5 Re6 23. c4 b5 24. h4
Our local club had split on if 24. h4 was
better than 24. b3. I felt that c4 was
already protected. I wanted to produce my
own threats.
Yes: 24. h4!.
24. ... Bb7 25. Nf4
Using the pin on e5.
25. ... Ree8 26. R3e2?
This move was slow and too defensive,
I had illusions of him loading up on g2.
Yes, 26. R3e2 isn’t necessary. But even
after 26. h5, is White’s attack worth a
pawn?
26. ... Kg7
26. ... Bc6!—L.A.
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-wQ-
-+-mK-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+k+-+
+-+-+-+-
r+lwqk+-tr
+p+-zppvlp
p+-+-snp+
+-zpP+-+-
-+-+-zP-+
+-sN-+N+-
PzPPzP-+PzP
tR-vLQ+RmK-
-+l+-trk+
tr-+-+-+p
pzp-wq-+p+
+-zp-zppwQ-
-+-+-+-+
+-sNPtR-+-
PzPP+-+PzP
+-+-tR-+K
r+l+-trk+
+-wq-zpp+p
pzp-+-+p+
+-zp-vl-+-
-+-+NvL-+
+-+P+-+-
PzPPwQ-+PzP
+-+-tRR+K
Don’t Retreat—Reload!
And in a lost position—reload with traps.
By GM Lev Alburt
CL_04-2012_alburt_JP_r8_chess life 3/14/2012 9:57 AM Page 44
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 45
27. h5 Bc6 28. h6+ Kf7 29. Nh5! Kg8 30. b4!?
I was trying to force the queen away
from f6.
Michael is a persistent attacker! His
shots repeatedly missing the target, he
doesn’t give up—just keeps reloading.
30. ... cxb4 31. c5 Qd8
At this point I felt like the queen trade
was forced and I was losing steam in the
attack.
32. Qxd8 Rxd8 33. Ng7 Rxd3 34. Rxe5
After 34. Rxe5
34. ... Rd2?!
I think 34. ... Rh3+ would have been
stronger. My opponent said he saw this
but felt like his rook would be in a bad
position, but I thought winning that pawn
would have been crushing.
After 34. ... Rh3+ 35. Kg1 Rxh6 36. Ne6
White is three pawns down, but the game
isn’t over yet, as the black pieces aren’t
well coordinated (rook on h6!), the black
king is somewhat vulnerable—plus,
White’s passed pawn is also a factor!
35. R1e2 Rxe2
(35. ... Rfd8!—L.A.)
36. Rxe2 Be4 37. Rd2 Rc8 38. Ne6 a5 39. Rd7
a4 40. Rg7+ Kh8 41. Ng5
After 41. Ng5
With a mate threat at f7.
Almost from nowhere Michael—again—
creates serious threats.
41. ... Bd5 42. Rxh7+ Kg8 43. Rd7 Bxa2 44.
c6 Be6
A difficult move to make, but this would
have worked if he had not resigned.
Rather, it might have worked.
45. Nxe6 Rxc6
After 45. ... Rxc6
46. Rg7+
Here 46. Ng5 wins—easily! White threat-
ens 47. Rd8 checkmate. If 46. ... Kf8, then
47. h7; 46. ... Rc8 47. Rg7+ (now!) 47. ...
Kf8 (47. ... Kh8 48. Nf7 mate) 48. Ne6+ Ke8
49. h7; 46. ... Rf6 47. Rd8+ Rf8 48. h7+
Kg7 49. Rxf8.
46. ... Kh8 47. Ng5, Black resigned.
After 47. Ng5
My opponent resigned here. This is the
main position for us to look at. We have
a local player, Dr. Ronnie Barnes, who
has always told me “Never give up”! This
would be a great example of resigning
too soon. I was expecting my opponent to
play 47. ... Rf6, the forced move to stop
the mate threat. I had planned to play 48.
Nf7+ anyway to win the Exchange and be
a rook up, but that would have been a
horrible mistake and would have lost the
game.
(Moral: always check—time permitting,
of course—a “pre-planned move” when
the position actually occurs on the board.
Do it on EVERY move, every step of the
“forced” variation.—L.A.)
Although there IS a forced mate here,
I did not see it and I doubt I would have
found it over the board. If my opponent
had played one more move he would have
seen that I did not see the forced mate and
won the game: 47. ... Rf6 48. Nf7+?? Rxf7
49. Rxf7 b3 and now the clumsy rook is
unable to stop the pawns.
This is the forced mate that I did not see
at the time; 48. Rb7 Rf8 49. Rh7+ Kg8 50.
Rg7+ Kh8 51. Nh7
Analysis after 51. Nh7
51. ... Rg8 52. Rf7 b3 53. Nf6 Rd8 54.
Rh7 mate.
Of course Todd had to play his only
defensive move, 47. ... Rf6!. However, I
think Michael is too pessimistic about his
chances to see the trap (with black pawns
beating the rook) and thus avoiding it,
perhaps even finding a win (as he did
later).
Some advice: before making a “win-
ning” move, think! Doublecheck! Then—if
there is a danger—reassess the position
calmly. At worst, after 47. ... Rf6 48. Rb7
Rf8 White has a perpetual check: 49. Rh7+
Kg8 50. Rg7+. Next step—to look for a
win —and to find a winning line with 51.
Nh7, and then Nf6 and Rh7, the Arabian
Mate. .
Look for GM Alburt’s new book, A Fresh
Look at Chess, which is a collection of his
“Back to Basics” columns. It is available
now on uscfsales.com.
-+-+-trk+
+-+-+-sNp
p+l+-+pzP
+pzP-tRp+-
-zp-+-+-+
+-+r+-+-
P+-+-+P+
+-+-tR-+K
-+r+-+-mk
+-+-+-tRp
-+-+-+pzP
+pzP-+psN-
pzp-+l+-+
+-+-+-+-
P+-+-+P+
+-+-+-+K
-+-+-+k+
+-+R+-+-
-+r+N+pzP
+p+-+p+-
pzp-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+P+
+-+-+-+K
-+-+-+-mk
+-+-+-tR-
-+r+-+pzP
+p+-+psN-
pzp-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+P+
+-+-+-+K
-+-+-tr-mk
+-+-+-tRN
-+-+-+pzP
+p+-+p+-
pzp-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+P+
+-+-+-+K
Send in your games!
If you are unrated or were rated
1799 or be low on your Chess Life
(CL) label, then GM Lev Alburt invites
you to send your most instructive
game with notes to:
Back to Basics, c/o Chess Life
PO Box 3967 Crossville, TN
38557-3967
Or to backtobasics@uschess.org
GM Alburt will select the “most
instructive” game and CL will award
an autographed copy of Lev’s newest
book, Chess Training Pocket Book II
(by Lev Alburt and Al Lawrence) to
the person submitting the most in -
structive game and annotations.
Do not send games with only a
few notes, as they are of little instruc-
tive value and can’t be used. Writing
skills are a plus, but instructiveness
is a must! Make sure your game (or
part of it) and your notes will be of
interest to other readers.
CL_04-2012_alburt_JP_r8_chess life 3/14/2012 9:57 AM Page 45
46 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Endgame Lab
Pawn Plus
Endings from Moscow to London
By GM Pal Benko
Here is a selection of interesting and
instructive endings from two of 2011’s
top events, the traditional Tal Memorial
in Moscow and the London Classic.
Piece for pawns
GM Levon Aronian (FIDE 2802, ARM)
GM Peter Svidler (FIDE 2755, RUS)
Moscow, Tal Memorial 2011
White to play
The material is equal but the black
king is in a rather odd location.
42. Qxh4!?
The consequences of this knight sac are
hard to calculate. Players looking for a
calmer game would have chosen 42. Ne2.
42. ... Qxc3 43. g4+ Ke5 44. Qh8+ f6 45.
Qb8+
So this was the point of the sac. The far
advanced b-passed pawn is a permanent
danger as the white queen is free to con-
tinue her assault.
45. ... Kd5 46. Qxb7+ Qc6 47. Qb8 Nc5 48.
Qg8+ Qe6
Another way is 48. ... Ke5 49. Qxg6
Qd7.
49. Qxg6
Nabs the third pawn, clearing a path for
the h-pawn to advance.
49. ... Kc4?
Either 49. ... Nd7 or 49. ... Kd6 50. h4
Nd7 51. h5 Ne5 would have given more
chances for counterplay.
50. h4 Kd3 51. h5 Ke2
Black’s counterplay is a phantom. He
has no remedy against the passed pawns
on both sides. There is no perpetual
check, even after 51. ... Qb3 52. Qf5.
52. h6 Qc4 53. h7 Ke1 54. Qxf6, Black
resigned.
Outside passed pawns
GM Vassily Ivanchuk (FIDE 2775, UKR)
GM Peter Svidler (FIDE 2755, RUS)
Moscow, Tal Memorial 2011
White to play
White has an extra pawn and the
bishop pair, but the b-pawn is blockaded
and the g-pawns are doubled. White’s
aim is to eliminate these factors.
45. Kg1 Nc2
Black goes pawn-hunting. Reasonable
would have been 45. ... f5 followed by …
Kf7 since Bxb4 results in a drawn oppo-
site-color bishop-ending.
46. Bd2 Bb6 47. Kf2 d4 48. e4
48. exd4 Nxd4 49. Be3 Bc5!
48. ... d3+ 49. Kf1 Ne3+ 50. Ke1 Nxg2+ 51.
Kd1 h4
Retreating with 51. ... Ne3+ would be
more advisable but Black’s position has
definitely worsened.
52. gxh4 Nxh4 53. b4!
The blockade has been broken.
53. ... axb4 54. Bxb4 Nf3 55. a5 Bd4 56. Be7
Also good enough is 56. Bxd3.
56. ... f5?
This only accelerates the end. There
was still time for 56. ... f6 puts up more
resistance.
57. exf5 gxf5 58. Bd8 Kf7 59. Bb6 Ke6 60.
Bxd4 Nxd4 61. Bxd3, Black resigned.
There is no defense against the passed
pawns on both sides of the board. White
only has to avoid the knight being sacked
for the a-pawn that would result in the
bad-corner (h8), bishop draw.
Connected Passed Pawns
GM Vladimir Kramnik (FIDE 2800, RUS)
GM Ian Nepomniachtchi (FIDE 2730, RUS)
Moscow, Tal Memorial 2011
Black to play
White is in trouble. His only hope is in
the opposite-color bishops.
35. ... Kf7 36. f4
A better try is 36. Kf1 Ke6 37. Ke2 fol-
lowed by h4-h5. White has to trade his
kingside pawns in order to blockade or
give up his bishop for a draw.
36. ... Ke6 37. Kf2 Kd5 38. Ke2 Kc5 39. Kd2
a5 40. f5?
Better is 40. g4.
40. ... a4! 41. Bc2
If 41. fxg6 b4!, the black pawns prevail,
-+-+-+-wQ
+p+-+p+-
pzPq+n+p+
zP-+-+k+-
-+-+p+-zp
+-sN-zP-+P
-+-+-zPP+
+-+-+-mK-
-+-+-+k+
+-vl-+p+-
-+-+-+p+
zpL+p+-+p
Psn-+-+-+
+P+-zP-zPP
-+-+-+P+
+-+-vL-+K
-+-+-+k+
+-+-+-+p
p+-+-+p+
+p+-+-+-
-+-+-+-zP
+-+L+-zP-
-vl-+-zP-+
+-+-+-mK-
CL_04-2012_benko_JP_r8_chess life 3/14/2012 10:21 AM Page 46
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 47
transforming his advantage into two
passed pawns far from each other.
41. ... a3 42. Bb1
After 42. Bb3 gxf5 43. Kc2 Be5 44. Be6
Kd6! 45. Bg8 h6 46. Kb3 Bxg3 there is a
similar win as in the game.
42. ... gxf5 43. Kc2 Kb4 44. Ba2 Be5 45. Be6
a2 46. Bxa2 Bxg3 47. h5 h6 48. Kd3 Ka3 49.
Bd5 b4 50. Kc2 Be5 51. Bb3 f4 52. Bd5 Bf6
53. Kb1 b3, White resigned.
Advanced Pawns
GM Hikaru Nakamura (FIDE 2758, USA)
GM Magnus Carlsen (FIDE 2826, NOR)
Moscow, Tal Memorial 2011
Black to play
White sacrificed (or possibly overlooked)
a pawn earlier but unfortunately he faces
further disadvantages.
33. ... Be2!
That’s all she wrote! This imprisons
the white king, with his own king soon to
arrive on d3. Therefore White is forced to
give away another pawn.
34. f4 gxf3 e.p. 35. Bf2 d3 36. Be1 Kg7 37.
Kf2 Kf6 38. Ke3 Kf5 39. h3 h5 40. Bd2 Bf1
41. Be1
Two alternatives here are 41. h4 Kg4 or
41. Kxf3 Bxh3, but the black bishop always
gets free. Next step is to attack the a2-
pawn with the bishop, creating holes for the
king to use to break through. All lines are
worth studying.
41. ... Bxh3 42. Kxd3 Bf1+ 43. Ke3 Kg4 44.
Kf2 Bb5 45. Bc3 Bc6 46. Be5 b5 47. Bb8 a6
48. Bc7 f5 49. b3 Bd5 50. Bd6 f4!
White could not stop his opponent from
creating another passed pawn. After 51.
Bxf4 h4 52. Bd6 h3 53. Kg1 h2+ wins.
51. gxf4 h4 52. f5 Kxf5 53. Ke3 Kg4 54. Kf2
h3 55. Ke3 Be4 56. Kf2 Bb1 57. a3 Ba2 58.
b4 Bf7, White resigned.
Liberating the black king with ... Bh5-
... Kf5-... Bg4 also will win the a3-pawn
and obtains a third passed pawn which
ends all resistance.
Pawn Race
GM Vladimir Kramnik (FIDE 2800, RUS)
GM David Howell (FIDE 2633, ENG)
London, London Chess Classic 2011
White to play
Besides being a pawn up, the white
pieces are also on better squares. The
a- and b-pawn race starts with these
favorable conditions for White.
28. a5 Bc3 29. Rd5 Qc2 30. Qb7
Leaves the e-pawn unprotected for the
quick advance of the a-pawn.
30. ... b3
After 30. ... Qxe4 31. a6 Qe8 32. a7 h6
33. Ra5 Qa8 34. Rb5 wins.
31. a6 b2 32. Rb5 Qa4 33. a7 h6 34. e5 Kh7
35. Rb3 Qa2 36. h4 Kg8 37. h5 Qa5 38. Qb8
Simpler was 38. Qe7 followed by Rb8
after which resignation is reasonable.
38. ... Qa2 39. Rxc3? b1=Q 40. Rc8
And Black resigned! Both players obvi-
ously overlooked that after 40. ... Qf1+ 41.
Kxf1 Qa6+ 42. Kg2 Rxc8 Black could put
up still more resistance.
Mating Attack with Pawn
GM Hikaru Nakamura (FIDE 2758, USA)
GM Michael Adams (FIDE 2734, ENG)
London, 2011
Black to play
A sharp, tactical position.
36. ... Bxe3+?
Fails to simplify into a better ending. As
36. ... Qb6!? 37. Qc1 (Worse is 37. Bxc5
Rxc5 38. Qd4 R5xc6!) 37. ... Bxe3+ 38.
Qxe3 Qxe3+ 39. Rxe3 b3 while 37. Bf2
Bxd5! 38. Nxd5 Qxc6 39. Bxc5 Rxc5 40.
Qxb4 Rxd5, or 37. Rxf3 gxf3 38. Kf2 Re8
39. Ne6 Rxe6 40. dxe6 Bxe3+ 41. Rxe3
Re5 42. Qb3 Kg7 yet this is too much to see
in such a short time.
37. Rxe3 Qb6 38. Rfe1 b3?
The tide has turned. Instead, 38. ...
Ra5 39. Kf1 Ra1 should have been tried
to evade the storm.
39. Qc3 Rf8 40. Ne6 b2 41. c7!, Black
resigned.
A deadly thrust. Black resigned, since
41. ... b1=Q 42. Qxf6+! leads to mate. .
-+-+-+k+
zp-+-+p+p
-zp-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-zp-+p+
+-+-+lzP-
PzP-+-zP-zP
+-+-vL-mK-
-+-+-trk+
+-+-+pzpp
Q+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
Pzp-+P+-+
+q+-+NzP-
-vl-tR-zPKzP
+-+-+-+-
-wqr+-+-mk
+-+-+-+p
-+P+-zp-+
+rvlP+-+-
-zpQ+-sNp+
+-+-vLl+-
-+-+-+-zP
+-+-tRRmK-
Benko’s Bafflers
Most of the time these studies
resemble positions that could actu-
ally occur over the board. You must
simply reach a theoretically won or
drawn position for White.
Solutions can be found on page
71.
Please e-mail submissions for
Benko’s Bafflers to:
pbenko@uschess.org
Problem I
J. Mikitovics 2010
White to play and win
Problem II
J. Timman 2010
White to play and draw
-tr-vL-+N+
+P+-+-+-
-+-+-+-mK
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-zP-mk-+
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+K+
+-zpk+-+-
-+-zpN+-zP
+-+-+-+-
-+-+-+-+
+-+-+-+-
p+-+R+-+
tr-vl-+-+-
CL_04-2012_benko_JP_r8_chess life 3/14/2012 10:21 AM Page 47
2012 TROPHIES PLUS GRAND PRIX SUMMARY
Trophies Plus awards $12,500 in cash prizes in the 2012 Grand Prix!
Trophies Plus:
IT’S NOT JUST A TROPHY.
IT’S THE BEGINNING OF A LIFETIME OF ACHIEVEMENT.
Proud sponsor of USCF National Scholastic
tournament awards since 1999.
Proud sponsor of the USCF 2007-2011 All-America Team.
315 W. 1st St., Templeton, Iowa 51463 | 800.397.9993 | www.trophiesplus.com
2012 TROPHIES PLUS GRAND PRIX STANDINGS
The following point totals reflect all rated event
information as of March 8 for the 2012 Grand Prix.
All Grand Prix updates are unofficial and subject
to change during the year or until year-end
tabulation is complete.
K
U
D
R
I
N

C
O
U
R
T
E
S
Y

O
F

M
O
N
R
O
I
.
C
O
M
;

L
E
N
D
E
R
M
A
N

B
Y

C
H
R
I
S

B
I
R
D
CATEGORIES AND PRIZES
$
12,500
IN CASH PRIZES!
FIRST PRIZE: $5,000!
2nd: $2,500 | 3rd: $1,000
4th: $900 | 5th: $800
6th: $700 | 7th: $600
8th: $500 | 9th: $300
10th: $200
NAME STATE PTS.
1 IM Justin Sarkar NY 72.50
2 GM Mikheil Kekelidze NY 60.00
3 GM Alexander Ivanov MA 49.00
4 GM Sergey Kudrin CT 43.83
5 GM Melikset Khachiyan CA 38.60
6 IM Enrico Sevillano CA 38.33
7 GM Timur Gareyev TX 34.00
8 FM Alexandre Kretchetov CA 30.33
9 IM Raymond Kaufman CA 28.66
10 GM Gregory Kaidanov KY 26.33
11 IM Tegshsuren Enkhbat MD 25.50
12 GM Eugene Perelshteyn MA 24.50
13 FM Victor C. Shen NJ 22.00
14 IM Jay Richard Bonin NY 20.91
15 GM Alex Yermolinsky SD 20.66
GM ALEX LENDERMAN (right) seemed to have a stranglehold on the
Grand Prix after winning three years in a row, but GM SERGEY
KUDRIN (left) managed to break through last year as Lenderman
fell to ninth place. As we start the 2012 Grand Prix, will we see a
new face rise to the top?
OVERALL STANDINGS
CL_04-2012_gp_AKF_r7.qxp_chess life 3/13/12 9:46 AM Page 48
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 49
ChessMagnetSchool.com is the sponsor of the 2012 Junior Grand Prix (JGP). Official standings for events received and processed by March 7, 2012
are unofficial and subject to change during the year or until year-end tabulation is complete. 2012 JGP prizes were not available as of press time and
will be announced at a later date. The method for calculating points has been modified; see uschess.org for the most up-to-date information.
Chess Magnet School provides computer-based online chess training for both adults and children, including those who study independently and those
who study under the guidance of a coach or teacher, as well as support for chess coaches and others who teach chess. Chess Magnet School has
been a partner with USCF on a number of projects and activities since 2006, and has provided the free program that teaches the rules of chess to
newcomers in the “New to Chess” section of USCF’s website. USCF members are invited to learn more about Chess Magnet School at www.Chess-
MagnetSchool.com.
2012 CHESSMAGNETSCHOOL.COM JUNIOR GRAND PRIX TOP OVERALL STANDINGS
Name State Pts.
REAVES, JAYDEN NY 3086
YU, JENNIFER R VA 2935
SHI, JEFFREY NY 2824
ULRICH, ANNE E WI 2752
TANENBAUM, ZACHARY CHEN CT 2743
BEHAL, ADITYA CA-N 2726
MCGREEN, MAYA NY 2635
AZVOLINSKY, ARTHUR PA 2596
CHAVEZ, JOSE PA 2450
MIZUSHIMA, DEREK MD 2398
RUSH, DECLAN NY 2393
ELBIEH, ERIK M MA 2390
PORTER, NATHAN I OR 2344
VASAN, VIKRAM CA-N 2335
CLARE, ZACHARY A DC 2327
LUO, MAGGIE VA 2306
BASHKANSKY, NAOMI WA 2232
CHERIN, SAM NY 2223
KRISHNAN, AJAY CA-S 2219
PATEL, ADVAIT WV 2167
Name State Pts.
JIANG, KELVIN CA-N 2134
CARLOS, TIMOTHY NY 2100
SHARMA, VINAY 2100
CHANG, JEFFREY E MD 2055
PARK, JONATHAN JONGWON GA 2008
CORRIGAN, KEVIN NJ 2006
TURGUT, AYDIN IL 2005
TAYLOR-BRILL, SETH NC 1977
CARDINI, NICK PA 1960
KOBLA, VISHAL VA 1933
RAJASEKARAN, VIGNESH VA 1904
SNYDER, DAVID A MD 1897
DOUGLAS, THEOPHILUS, JR NY 1872
FLOOD, CHRISTIAN NJ 1866
WANG, ANDREW B VA 1864
CAO-DAO, VIVIAN VA 1860
LAMBRECHT, AARON MITCHELL WI 1853
LEE, GI YUN AL 1836
FRAGOLA, SAM NY 1834
POPESCU, ROMAIN NY 1833
TO ENTER: 800-903-USCF(8723) OR FAX 931-787-1200 OR ONLINE AT WWW.USCHESS.ORG
Name_________________________________________ USCF ID#_______________________________________
Address _______________________________________ City___________________ State ___ ZIP ____________
Phone __________________________ E-mail____________________________________ Est. Rating __________
Credit card # (VISA, MC, Disc., AMEX) _________________________________________ Exp. date ________________
If using VISA, need V-code ________________ qCheck here if you do not wish to have an opponent who is incarcerated.
*Note: This may slow down your assignment.
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO U.S. CHESS AND MAIL TO: JOAN DUBOIS, USCF, PO BOX 3967, CROSSVILLE, TN 38557
USCF’s 65
th
ANNUAL
2012 Open Correspondence Chess Golden Knights Championship
$1,000 FIRST PRIZE
(plus title of USCF’s Golden Knights Champion and plaque)
2nd place $600 • 3rd place $400 • 4th place $300 • 5th place $200
6th thru 10th place $100 each • ENTRY FEE: $25
These USCF Correspondence Chess events are rated and open to all USCF members who reside on the North American continent,
islands, or Hawaii, as well as those USCF members with an APO or FPO address. USCF members who reside outside of the North
Am erican continent are welcome to participate in e-mail events. Your USCF membership must remain current for the duration of
the event, and entry fees must be paid in U.S. dollars. Those new to USCF Corre spond ence Chess, please estimate your strength:
Class A: 1800-1999 (very strong); Class B: 1600-1799 (strong); Class C: 1400-1599 (intermediate); Class D: 1399 and below
(beginner level). Note: Prize fund based on 300 entries and may be decreased proportionately per number of entries assigned.
USCF’s 9
th
ANNUAL
2012 E-mail Correspondence Chess Electronic Knights Championship
(Seven-player sections, one game with each of six opponents.)
$700 FIRST PRIZE
(plus title of USCF’s Electronic Knights Champion and plaque)
2nd place $400 • 3rd place $300 • 4th thru 10th place $100 each • ENTRY FEE: $25
These USCF Correspondence Chess events are rated and open to all USCF members with e-mail access. Your USCF
membership must remain current for the duration of the event, and entry fees must be paid in U.S. dollars. Maximum
number of tournament entries allowed for the year for each player is ten. Note: Prize fund based on 200 entries
and may be decreased proportionately per number of entries assigned.
CORRESPONDENCE CHESS MATCHES (TWO PLAYERS)
Two or six-game options. ENTRY FEE: $5.
Win A Correspondence Chess Trophy
Four-player, double round-robin with class-level pairings.
1st-place winner re ceives a trophy.
ENTRY FEE: $10.
Victor Palciauskas Prize Tournaments
Seven-player class-level pairings, one game with each
of six opponents.
1st-place winner receives $130 cash prize and a certificate
signed by Victor Palciauskas.
ENTRY FEE: $25.
John W. Collins Memorial Class Tournaments
Four-player, double round-robin with class-level pairings
(unrateds welcome).
1st-place winner receives a John W. Collins certificate.
ENTRY FEE: $7.
E-MAIL RATED EVENTS (NEED E-MAIL ACCESS):
Lightning Match
Two players with two or six-game option. ENTRY FEE: $5.
Swift Quads
Four-player, double round-robin format.
1st-place prize merchandise credit of $30.
ENTRY FEE: $10.
Walter Muir E-Quads (webserver chess)
Four-player, double round-robin e-mail format tournament
with class-level pairings.
1st-place receives a certificate.
ENTRY FEE: $7.
Please circle event(s) selected.
NOTE: Except for Lightning Matches, Swift Quads, Walter
Muir E-Quads & Electronic Knights, players will use post
office mail, unless opponents agree to use e-mail.
CHECK OUT USCF’S CORRESPONDENCE CHESS RATED EVENTS!
CL_04-2012_jgp_AKF_r3_chess life 3/14/2012 10:52 AM Page 49
50 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
Organizing a 2012 Grand Prix Event
To qualify, an event must be USCF-
rated (regular or quick) and meet these
criteria:
• All USCF-rated players over 2199 must be
eligible to play in the top (or only) section.
• The prize fund for which all masters
are eligible MUST: a) equal or exceed
$300 guaranteed; $150 be guaranteed
to first place; no more than one prize
may count towards the Grand Prix (GP)
total; and prizes below the maximum
entry fee do not count towards the GP
total.
• Class prizes for Under 2300 or a higher
rating requirement qualify towards GP
points, but if they exceed 25% of the total
qualifying GP money, they count as 25%
of the total.
• Other than entry fees and USCF dues, no
charges over $25 are permitted.
• The tournament must be submitted for
the Tournament Life section of Chess
Life and designated by the submitter as
a GP tournament.
• Only players who are USCF members
during the tournament may earn GP
points. Foreign grandmasters, interna-
tional masters, women grandmasters,
and women international masters can
play without being members, but they
will not obtain GP points unless they
join.
• Conditions concerning USCF GP tourna-
ments are subject to review and adjustment
by the USCF executive director.
The top prizes must be unconditionally
guaranteed (or if a GP event’s prize fund
is based on entries, only the absolutely
guaranteed minimum payout counts for
point awards) and an nounced in Chess
Life.
Even if prizes are raised at the tourna-
ment, no additional points can be award-
ed because the bonus would be unfair to
players who may otherwise have entered.
If you have questions about the Grand
Prix, please contact Walter Brown at
wbrown@uschess.org or 931-787-1234
ext. 142.
Organizers, TDs and Affiliates
To speed up the processing of rating
reports, USCF now asks that wherever
possible these reports have IDs for every
player. If you collect a new membership,
do not submit your rating report until
your disk and paper reports include that
player’s ID number.
To assist tournament directors (TDs)
in doing this, we have made several
enhancements to our web server which
will speed up on line membership pro-
cessing and give TDs a quick way to
obtain USCF IDs for new memberships.
We also recommend that TDs use the
Member Services Area to check for mem-
ber IDs. The search capabilities of MSA
have been enhanced to assist TDs in find-
ing existing member IDs.
For more details, please check the USCF
website: www.uschess.org/rtgchange.php.
Professional Players Health and
Benefits Fund
Many GP tournament organizers will
contribute $1 per player to the
Professional Health & Benefits Fund. All
GP tournaments that participate in this
program are entitled to be promoted to the
next higher GP category—for example, a
6-point tournament would become a 10-
point tournament. Points in the top
category are promoted 50 percent.
No Tournaments in your area?
Why not organize one?
It’s not much work to hold a small
tournament, and there is little risk if you
use a low-cost site and avoid guaranteed
prizes. You might even make a profit!
Either a based-on Swiss with projected
prizes up to $500, a quad format, or a tro-
phy tournament will virtually guarantee
taking in more in fees than you pay out
in prizes.
The affiliation fee is just $40 a year. You
will have access to the TD/Affiliate area
of our website.
Remember, you can both run and play
in a small event. Many of them wouldn’t
be held if the organizer/TD couldn’t play.
Want to know more? Contact Joan Du -
Bois at joandubois@uschess.org.
We’ll be glad to help you be part of the
promotion of American chess!
Submissions
If at all possible, please e -mail your
TLAs. This will help to reduce errors.
tla@uschess.org
fax: 931-787-1200
TLA Department
U.S. Chess Federation
PO Box 3967
Crossville, TN 38557
TLAs received after the 10th of the
deadline month will not appear in the
issue currently being pro c essed. .
Information for Organizers, TDs, and Affiliates
Guaranteed Grand Prix points awarded for:
Top Prizes 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th Tot
$300-$499 6 6
$500-$749 8 2 10
$750-$999 10 5 15
$1,000-$1,499 12 8 20
$1,500-$1,999 14 10 6 30
$2,000-$2,499 16 12 8 4 40
$2,500-$2,999 18 14 10 6 2 50
$3,000-$3,999 20 16 12 8 4 60
$4,000-$4,999 22 18 15 12 8 5 80
$5,000-$5,999 24 20 17 14 11 8 6 100
$6,000-$9,999 26 22 19 16 13 10 8 6 120
$10,000-$29,999 30 26 23 20 16 13 10 8 4 150
$30,000 & up 36 32 29 26 21 18 14 12 8 4 200
$ (Enhanced) 54 48 44 39 31 27 21 18 12 6 300
Points involved divided equally (rounded to two
decimal points) among tied players.
Chess Life TLA Deadlines
Cover TLA must be Tournaments Expected
date received by beginning release
Jan. Nov. 10 Jan. 15 End Dec.
Feb. Dec.10 Feb. 15 End Jan.
March Jan. 10 March 15 End Feb.
April Feb. 10 April 15 End March
May March 10 May 15 End April
June April 10 June 15 End May
July May 10 July 15 End June
Aug. June 10 Aug. 15 End July
Sept. July 10 Sept. 15 End Aug.
Oct. Aug. 10 Oct. 15 End Sept.
Nov. Sept. 10 Nov. 15 End Oct.
Dec. Oct. 10 Dec. 15 End Nov.
USCF Membership Rates
Premium (P) and Regular (R)
(U.S., CANADA, MEXICO)
Type 1 yr 2yr 3yr
Adult P $46 $84 $122
Adult R $40 $72 $104
Senior (65+) $40 $72 $104
Young Adult P (U25)* $33 $61 $88
Young Adult R (U25)* $26 $47 $67
Youth P (U16)* $28 $51 $73
Youth R (U16)* $22 $40 $57
Scholastic P (U13)* $24 $43 $61
Scholastic R (U13)* $17 $30 $42
Premium membership provides a printed copy
of Chess Life (monthly) or Chess Life for Kids
(bimonthly) plus all other benefits of regular
membership. Regular membership provides
online-only access to Chess Life and Chess
Life for Kids; A tournament life announcement
newsletter will be mailed to adults bimonthly
and to scholastic members three times per
year. Youth provides bimonthly Chess Life,
Scholastic bimonthly Chess Life for Kids,
others listed above monthly Chess Life. See
www.us chess.org for other membership cat-
egories. Dues are not refundable and may be
changed without notice.
*Ages at expiration
CL_04-2012_tlaOrg&Players_JP_r1_chess life 3/7/2012 3:05 PM Page 50
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 51
Tournament Life
If not a member, add dues to advance
entry fee or pay them with entry fee at site.
U.S. Championship Qualifier. Tournament
in which qualification spots for the U.S.
Championship are awarded.
American Classic. Generally, an event that
has been held by one organizer for the last
three years and has attracted more than
400 players each year.
Heritage Event. Tournament held for at
least 25 years.
Quick Chess. Tournaments with time con-
trols of G/5 to G/29. There is a separate
“quick” or “overall” rating system that
includes these events, and games played
in these tournaments will not affect a
player's regular rating. Games played
with a time control of G/30 through G/60
will be rated in both the quick/overall
system and the regular system.
Rating Classes
In most events, you don’t have to win
the tournament to win a prize—you can
win a class prize as a top scorer of your
rating group, or a section prize in a sec-
tion restricted to your rating group. These
rating groups are:
Senior Master - 2400 & up
Master 2200-2399 Class C 1400-1599 Class G 600-799
Expert 2000-2199 Class D 1200-1399 Class H 400-599
Class A 1800-1999 Class E 1000-1199 Class I 200-399
Class B 1600-1799 Class F 800-999 Class J 199/below
Some tournaments use different groups
such as 1900-2099, and some have
“under’’ prizes or sections including all
below a specified level.
Ratings Information
You never lose your rating, no matter
how long it has been since you last played.
If you return after a long absence, please
tell the director and USCF your approx-
imate rating and last year of play.
If you have a FIDE rating, or a rating or
category from any other country, no mat-
ter how many years ago, you are not
unrated. FIDE or foreign ratings may be
rejected or have adjustment points added.
If details are not announced, players
wishing to use such ratings should con-
tact the organizer in advance.
For foreign players with multiple ratings
(USCF, FIDE, CFC, FQE, other foreign),
the highest rating is used, with possible
adjustment points added, unless other-
wise announced.
Ratings based on 4-25 games are called
“provisional ratings” to indicate they are
less reliable than established ratings.
However, such ratings are valid for pair-
ing and prize purposes at all USCF-rated
events, unless otherwise stated.
A tournament director (TD) may assign
an estimated rating to any player, and
may expel an improperly rated player
from an event.
Hotel-Motel Rates
Rates listed are often special chess
rates—you must request “chess rates’’ or
you will be charged more. The chess rates
may be unavailable if not reserved several
weeks in advance, or if the block of chess
rooms is used up. Hotel-desk personnel
are often poorly informed about chess
rates—if that is the case, ask for the Sales
Office or contact the tournament organ-
izer.
What to Take to a Tournament
Along with a pen or pencil and your
USCF ID card (or current Chess Life),
take a chessboard, set, and clock if you
have them.
For prizes of $600 or more, bring your
U.S. Social Security card. If you have no
Social Security number, the organizer
must deduct 30% from your prize for the
IRS (this includes foreigners).
Warning! The use of a cell phone in the
tournament room is prohibited at most
tournaments. If your cell phone rings in
a room with games in progress, you could
be penalized, or even forfeited.
How to Enter in Advance
Entering by mail or online (if available)
is easier for both you and the tourna-
ment
organizer and often costs less. Check the
TLA ads for entering options. Along with
entry fee, send full name, address, USCF
ID number, expiration date, and section
desired (if any). Also, give your last offi-
cial USCF rating from your magazine
label (first 4 numbers on top row). If you
are unrated, or have a rating from many
years ago, be sure to indicate this. Your
official USCF rating is on the top line of
your mailing label: Regular, Quick, and
Correspondence.
Mailed entries are usually not acknowl-
edged unless you enclose a self-addressed
postcard. If entering online, print confir-
mation of entry. They are refundable if you
withdraw before Round 1 is paired, unless
otherwise stated.
For national events, refund requests
must be submitted in writing no later
than 30 days after the tournament ends.
Any requests made after this date may not
be honored.
If You Must Withdraw
If you enter by mail and cannot attend,
or must drop out of a tournament in
progress, it is important you give notice
before pairings are started, so no one is
deprived of a game. Mail entrants should
send withdrawal notices at least a week
beforehand—phone any later than this. To
withdraw by phone on tournament day,
call the site and ask specifically for “the
chess tournament.’’ E-mail withdrawals
several days in advance are acceptable if
the TD’s e-mail address is listed. Any
later than this, both e-mail your with-
drawal and call the tournament site as the
TD might not have access to his (her) e-
mail account. If you forfeit without notice,
you may be fined up to the amount of the
entry fee.
Tournament Directors
Tournament director certification is an
endorsement of professional competence
only. Such certification does not in itself
render any tournament director an agent
of the USCF, nor is any affiliate an agent
of the USCF. .
All tournaments are non-smoking with no comput-
ers allowed unless otherwise advertised by S
and/or C (see below for explanations).
QC: Quick Chess events .
$$Gtd: Guaranteed prizes.
$$b/x: Based-on prizes, x = number of entries
needed to pay full prize fund. At least 50% of the
advertised prize fund of $501 or more must be
awarded.
Bye: Indicates which rounds players who find it
inconvenient to play may take ½-point byes instead.
For example, Bye 1-3 means ½-point byes are avail-
able in Rounds 1 through 3.
C: Computers allowed.
CC: Chess club.
EF: Entry fee.
Enhanced Grand Prix points (see previous
page).
Ent: Where to mail entries.
FIDE: Results submitted to FIDE for possible rat-
ing.
G/: Game in. For instance, G/75 means each side
has 75 minutes for the entire game.
GPP: Grand Prix Points available.
HR: Hotel rates. For example, 60-65-70-75 means
$60 single, $65 twin, $70/3 in room, $75/4 in room.
JGP: Junior Grand Prix
Memb. req’d: Membership required; cost fol-
lows. Usually refers to state affiliate.
Open: A section open to all. Often has very strong
players, but some eligible for lower sections can
play for the learning experience.
OSA: Other states accepted. Refers to state dues.
PPHBF: Professional Players Health and Benefits
Fund.
Quad: 4-player round robin sections; similar
strength players.
RBO: Rated Beginner’s Open.
Rds: Rounds; scheduled game times follow. For
example, 11-5, 9-3 means games begin 11 a.m. &
5 p.m. on the first day, 9 a.m. & 3 p.m. on the sec-
ond day.
Reg: Registration at site.
RR: Round robin (preceded by number of rounds).
S: Smoking allowed.
SASE: For more info, send self-addressed stamped
envelope.
SD/: Sudden-death time control (time for rest of
game follows). For example, 30/90, SD/1 means
each player must make 30 moves in 90 minutes,
then complete the rest of the game in an hour.
Section: A division of a tournament, usually exclud-
ing players above a specified rating. Players in a
section face only each other, not those in other
sections.
SS: Swiss-System pairings (preceded by number of
rounds).
T/Dx: Time delay, x = number of seconds.
Unr: Unrated.
USEF: Combined entry fee & USCF dues.
W: Site is accessible to wheelchairs.
WEB: Tournaments that will use a player’s on-line
rating.
Information for Players
Tournament Life Abbreviations & Terms
USCF MEMBERSHIP IS REQUIRED FOR ALL EVENTS.
CL_04-2012_tlaOrg&Players_JP_r1_chess life 3/7/2012 3:05 PM Page 51
52 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
SEE TLA IN THIS ISSUE FOR DETAILS
2012 National High School (K-12) Championship April 13-15 • Minneapolis, Minnesota
2012 All-Girls National Championships April 20-22 • Chicago, Illinois
2012 National Junior High (K-9) Championship April 27-29 • San Diego, California
2012 National Elementary (K-6) Championship May 11-13 • Nashville, Tennessee
2012 U.S. Amateur West Championship May 26-28 • Tucson, Arizona
68th Annual (2012) U.S. Amateur East Championship May 26-28 or 27-28 • Somerset,
New Jersey
2012 U.S. Amateur South Championship June 9-10 • Memphis, Tennessee
2012 U.S. Game/10 Championship June 14 • Las Vegas, Nevada
2012 National Open June 15-17 or 16-17 • Las Vegas, Nevada
2012 U.S. Senior Open Championship July 9-14 • Houston, Texas
2012 U.S. Junior Open Championship July 13-15 • Houston, Texas
113th annual (2012) U.S. Open Aug. 4-12, 7-12 or 9-12 • Vancouver, Washington
FUTURE EVENTS (Watch for details)
2012 U.S. Game/60 Oct. 27 • Pleasanton, California
2012 U.S. Action Game/30 Oct. 28 • Pleasanton, California
2012 National Scholastic (K-12) Nov. 30-December 2 • Orlando, Florida
2013 SuperNationals V April 5-7 • Nashville, Tennessee
2013 National Scholastic (K-12) December 13-15 • Lake Buena Vista, Florida
2014 National High School (K-12) Championship April 4-6 • San Diego, California
2014 National Elementary (K-6) Championship May 9-11 • Dallas, Texas
2014 National Scholastic (K-12) December 12-14 • Orlando, Florida
2015 National Elementary (K-6) Championship May 8-10 • Nashville, Tennessee
2015 National Scholastic (K-12) December 5-7 • Orlando, Florida
Bids
Note: Organizers previously awarded
options for USCF National Events must
still submit proposals (including sample
budgets) for their events.
NOW PAST DEADLINE OF
JULY 1, 2011:
2012 U.S. Amateur
(North)
2012 U.S. Class Championship
2012 U.S. Masters Championship
DEADLINE JULY 1, 2012:
2013 U.S. Amateur Team Championship
(North, South, West)
2013 U.S. Amateur
(East, North, South, West)
2013 U.S. Senior Open
2013 National Open
2013 U.S. Game 10 Championship
2013 U.S. Game/15 Championship
2013 U.S. Game 60 Championship
2013 U.S. Action G/30 Championship
DEADLINE JULY 1, 2013:
2014 U.S. Senior Open
OVERDUE BIDS
Please contact the National Office if
you are interested in bidding for a
National Event. The USCF recom-
mends that bids be submitted ac-
cording to the following schedule.
However, bids may be consi- dered
prior to these dates. *USCF reserves
the right to decline all bids and
organize the event itself.
Tournament Life
USCF National Events
Note: Tournament memberships not valid for National events
The TLA pages “Information for Organizers, TDs, and Affiliates” and “Information for Players” can now be found online at main.uschess.org/ go/tlainfo.
Rating supplements will be updated EACH MONTH on the USCF website, and each monthly rating supplement will be used for all tournaments beginning
in that month, unless otherwise announced in Chess Life. The USCF website at www.uschess.org also frequently lists unofficial ratings.The purpose of unof-
ficial ratings is to inform you of your progress; however, most tournaments do not use them for pairing or prize purposes. If you would otherwise be unrated,
organizers may use your unofficial rating at their discretion, even without advance publicity of such a policy.
All tournaments are non-smoking with no comput-
ers allowed unless otherwise advertised by S
and/or C (see below for explanations).
QC: Quick Chess events .
$$Gtd: Guaranteed prizes.
$$b/x: Based-on prizes, x = number of entries
needed to pay full prize fund. At least 50% of the
advertised prize fund of $501 or more must be
awarded.
Bye: Indicates which rounds players who find it
inconvenient to play may take ½-point byes
instead. For example, Bye 1-3 means ½-point
byes are available in Rounds 1 through 3.
CC: Chess club.
EF: Entry fee.
Ent: Where to mail entries.
FIDE: Results submitted to FIDE for possible
rating.
G/: Game in. For instance, G/75 means each
side has 75 minutes for the entire game.
GPP: Grand Prix Points available.
HR: Hotel rates. For example, 60-65-70-75 means
$60 single, $65 twin, $70/3 in room, $75/4 in
room.
JGP: Junior Grand Prix.
Memb. req’d: Membership required; cost fol-
lows. Usually refers to state affiliate.
Open: A section open to all. Often has very
strong players, but some eligible for lower sec-
tions can play for the learning experience.
Quad: 4-player round robin sections; similar
strength players.
RBO: Rated Beginner’s Open.
Rds: Rounds; scheduled game times follow. For
example, 11-5, 9-3 means games begin 11 a.m. &
5 p.m. on the first day, 9 a.m. & 3 p.m. on the sec-
ond day.
Reg: Registration at site.
RR: Round robin (preceded by number of rounds).
SD/: Sudden-death time control (time for rest of
game follows). For example, 30/90, SD/1 means
each player must make 30 moves in 90 minutes,
then complete the rest of the game in an hour.
SS: Swiss-System pairings (preceded by number
of rounds).
T/Dx: Time delay, x = number of seconds.
Unr: Unrated.
W: Site is accessible to wheelchairs.
WEB: Tournaments that will use a player’s on-line
rating.
Tournament Life Abbreviations & Terms
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:45 PM Page 52
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 53
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
The Tournament Announcements on the following pages are provided
for the convenience of USCF members and for informational pur-
poses only. Unless expressly indicated otherwise, neither the U.S.
Chess Federation nor Chess Life warrants the accuracy of anything
contained in these Tournament Announcements. Those interested
in additional information about or having questions concerning any
of these tournaments are directed to contact the organizer listed.
Chess Life will exercise all due diligence in providing accurate
typesetting of non-camera-ready copy but assumes no responsibil-
ity for errors made in such work.
SUBMISSIONS: If possible e-mail your tla to: tla@uschess.org
(Joan DuBois). For tla deadline schedule, formatting help and Grand
Prix information see September 2011 Chess Life pg. 49 and 69 or
check http://main. uschess.org/ go/tlainfo. Payment can be done
online through the TD/Affiliate area or sent to: U.S. Chess, TLA Dept.,
PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557.
Nationals
Apr. 13-15, Minnesota
2012 National High School (K-12) Championship
(Apr. 12 – Bughouse & Blitz) 7SS, G/120. Hyatt Regency Minneapolis,
1300 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55403, 612-370-1234. Chess Rate
$125. 5 Sections: K-12 Championship, K-12 Under 1600, K-12 Under
1200, K-12 Under 800, K-12 Unrated. April Rating Supplement will
be used. Unrated players may play in the Championship or Unrated sec-
tion only. One 1/2-point bye for any round, except Rd. 7, if requested in
advance. EF: $50 if by March 25, $70 if by April 8, $85 by 6 PM CDT on
April 12 or $90 at site. Mailed entries must be p/m by April 8. $5 extra
for all phone registrations, $20 change fee for roster or section changes
after April 8. Onsite registration: Thurs. 9am-10pm & Fri. 8am-10am.
Players registering after 10am will get 1/2-point for Round 1. Awards:
A minimum of 1 individual trophy per 10 players and 1 team trophy per
15 players (average attendance in the past two years, not incl. SN IV)
plus plaques for 4 players and coach of top five teams in each section.
Class trophies to the top three in the following classes: K-12 Cham-
pionship: 1900-1999; 1800-1899; 1700-1799; 1600-1699; 1500-1599;
1400-1499; 1300-1399; 1200-1299; U1200, K-12 UNR. All participants will
receive a commemorative medal at the completion of the final round.
Teams: A team must have at least two players, although no maximum
number of players. The top four scores in any section will count for the
team score. All on team must attend the same school. Opening Cere-
mony: 12:30pm Friday. Main Event rounds: Friday 1pm, 7pm; Saturday
9am, 2pm, 7pm; Sunday 9am, 2pm. Awards Ceremony: Approx 7pm Sun-
day. Special Events: National High School Bughouse Championship:
Thursday 11am; EF: (On site only) $25 per team. Bughouse registration
ends at 10am Thurs. National High School Blitz Championship: Thurs-
day 5pm; EF: $15 per player, $20 after April 8 or on site. Scholastic
Meeting: 3pm Saturday. Parents and Friends Tournament: 4SS, G/30,
Saturday 10:30am, 12:30pm, 2:30pm, 4:30pm. Onsite registration only.
Rated and Unrated sections. Trophies for Parents/Friends, participant and
student combined results. ALL: Please bring clocks. Sets and score
sheets provided. USCF membership required. Mail entries to: U.S.
Chess Federation, Attn: High School, P.O. Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557.
Additional details, updates, corrections and on-line registration:
www.uschess.org/tournaments/2012/hs. Chess Magnet School
JGP.
Apr. 20-22, Illinois
2012 All-Girls National Championships presented by the Kasparov
Chess Foundation in association with the Renaissance Knights
Chess Foundation & USCF
6SS, G/90 d5. Swissotel, 323 E. Wacker Dr., Chicago, IL 60601, 888-737-
9477, Hotel Rate includes full breakfast & children under 18 stay
free. 6 Sections: 8 years old and younger; 10 and younger, 12 and
younger, 14 and younger, 16 and younger, 18 and younger. Age as of
4/1/2011. USCF membership required. EF: $50 if postmarked/online by
3/25; $70 if by 4/8; $85 by 4/19; $90 after/on-site. Do not mail after 4/13
as your entry may not be received on time. Opening Ceremony: 6pm,
Friday. Rounds: Rd. 1 – 6:30pm Fri; Rounds 2-4 – Sat 10am, 2:30pm,
6:30pm; Rounds 5-6 – Sun 9am & 1pm. Awards Ceremony: Sun. 5pm.
Trophies to top 15 indiv & top 3 teams (top 3 players added for team
scores). Bye: One 1/2-pt bye available, any round, if requested before
end of Rd. 2 and if player has not received a full-point bye. Side Events:
Bughouse Tournament – Fri. 1pm, EF $25/team. Blitz Tournament –
Fri. 3pm, EF $15 by 4/19, $20 after or on site. HR: $169-169 includes full
breakfast, children under 18 stay free, 888-737-9477, reserve by 3/15
or rate may increase. Entries: online/info at: www.renaissanceknights.
org/allgirls or mail to RKnights, Attn: All Girls, PO Box 1074, North-
brook, IL 60065, include name, section, rating, USCF ID#, date of birth,
grade, school name city & state. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 27-29, California, Southern
2012 National Junior High (K-9) Championship
(Apr. 26 – Bughouse & Blitz) 7SS, G/120. Town and Country, 500 Hotel
Circle North, San Diego, CA 92108, 1-619-291-7131 or 800-772-8527,
Chess Rate $125. 6 Sections: K-9 Championship, K-9 Under 1250, K-
9 Unrated, K-8 Championship, K-8 Under 1000, K-8 U750. April
Rating Supplement will be used. Unrated players may play in the Cham-
pionship or Unrated sections only. One 1/2-point bye for any round,
except Rd. 7, if requested in advance. EF: $50 if by April 8, $70 if by April
22, $85 by 6 PM PDT on April 26 or $90 at site. Mailed entries must be
p/m by April 22. $5 extra for all phone registrations, $20 change fee for
roster or section changes after April 22. On-site registration: Thurs. 9am-
10pm & Fri. 8am-10am. Players registering after 10am will get 1/2-point
for Round 1. Awards: A minimum of 1 individual trophy per 10 players
and 1 team trophy per 15 players (average attendance in the past two
years, not incl. SN IV) plus plaques for 4 players and coach of top five
teams in each section. Class trophies to the top three in the follow-
ing classes: K-9 Championship: 1400-1599; 1200-1399; 1000-1199;
U1000; Unrated. K-8 Championship: 1500-1599; 1400-1499; 1300-1399;
1200-1299; 1100-1199; 1000-1099; U1000; UNR. All participants will
receive a commemorative medal at the completion of the final round.
Teams: A team must have at least two players, although no maximum
number of players. The top four scores in any section will count for the
team score. All on team must attend the same school. Opening Cere-
mony: 12:30pm Friday. Main Event rounds: Friday 1pm, 7pm; Saturday
9am, 2pm, 7pm; Sunday 9am, 2pm. Awards Ceremony: Approx 7pm Sun-
day. Special Events: National Junior High Bughouse Championship:
Thursday 11am; EF (on site only) $25 per team. Bughouse registration
ends at 10am Thurs. National Junior High Blitz Championship: Thurs-
day 5pm; EF $15 per player, $20 after April 22 or on site. Scholastic Meet-
ing: 3pm Saturday. Parents and Friends Tournament: 4SS, G/30, Sat-
urday 10:30am, 12:30pm, 2:30pm, 4:30pm. Onsite registration only.
Rated and Unrated sections. Trophies for Parent/Friends participant
and student combined results. ALL: Please bring clocks. Sets and score
sheets provided. USCF membership required. Mail entries to: U.S. Chess
Federation, Attn: Junior High, P.O. Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557. Addi-
tional details, updates, corrections and on-line registration: www.us
chess.org/tournaments/2012/jhs. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 11-13, Tennessee
2012 National Elementary (K-6) Championship
(May 10 – Bughouse & Blitz) 7SS, G/120, K-1 G/90. Gaylord Opryland,
2800 Opryland Dr., Nashville, TN 37214. 615-889-1000 or 888-777-6779
Chess Rate $139. 9 Sections: K-6 Championship, K-6 Under 1000, K-
6 Unrated, K-5 Championship, K-5 Under 900, K-3 Championship,
K-3 U800, K-3 Unrated, K-1Championship. May Rating Supple-
ment will be used. Unrated players may play in the Championship or
Unrated sections only. One 1/2-point bye for any round, except Rd. 7, if
requested in advance. EF: $50 if by April 22, $70 if by May 6, $85 by 6
PM CDT on May 10 or $90 at site. Mailed entries must be p/m by May
6. $5 extra for all phone registrations, $20 change fee for roster or sec-
tion changes after May 6. On-site registration: Thurs. 9am-10pm & Fri.
8am-10am. Players registering after 10am will get 1/2-point for Round
1. Awards: A minimum of 1 individual trophy per 10 players and 1 team
trophy per 15 players (average attendance in the past two years, not incl.
SN IV) plus plaques for 4 players and coach of top five teams in each sec-
tion. Class trophies to the top three in the following classes: K-6
Championship: 1300-1399; 1200-1299; 1100-1199; 1000-1099; 900-999;
800-899; U800; UNR. K-5 Championship: 1300-1399; 1200-1299; 1100-
1199; 1000-1099; 900-999; 800-899; U800; UNR. K-3 Championship:
1100-1199; 1000-1099; 900-999; 800-899; 700-799; 600-699; U600;
UNR. K-1 Championship: All players in this section receive a trophy. All
participants will receive a commemorative medal at the completion of the
final round. Teams: A team must have at least two players, although no
maximum number of players. The top four scores in any section will count
for the team score. All on team must attend the same school. Open-
ing Ceremony: 12:30pm Friday. Main Event rounds: Friday 1pm, 7pm;
Saturday 9am, 2pm, 7pm; Sunday 9am, 2pm. Schedule for K-1: Friday
1:30pm, 6:30pm; Saturday 9:30am, 1:30pm, 6:30pm; Sunday 9:30am,
1:30pm. Awards Ceremony: Approx 7pm Sunday. Awards Ceremony
for K-1: Approx 5:30pm Sunday. Special Events: National Elementary
Bughouse Championship: Thursday 11am; EF (on site only) $25 per
team. Bughouse registration ends at 10am Thurs. National Elementary
Blitz Championship: Two sections: K-6 and K-3. Thursday 5pm; EF
$15 per player, $20 after May 6 or on site. Scholastic Meeting: 3pm Sat-
urday. Saturday. Parents and Friends Tournament: 4SS, G/30, Saturday
10:30am, 12:30pm, 2:30pm, 4:30pm. Trophies for Parents/Friends, par-
ticipant and student combined results. Mail entries to: U.S. Chess Fed-
eration, Attn: Elementary, P.O. Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557. Additional
details, updates, corrections and on-line registration: www.uschess.
org/tournaments/2012/elem. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 26-28, Arizona
2012 U.S. Amateur West Championship
Holiday Inn Palo Verde, 4550 S Palo Verde Rd., Tucson, AZ 85714, 520-
746-1161. SECTIONS: Championship (U2200), Reserve (U1600), Booster
(U1200), Scholastic I (must be K-6 and U1000) and Scholastic II (must
be K-6 and U600). Scholastic sections are 6 separate 1-day tourna-
ments. SCHEDULE: (Championship, Reserve, and Booster) 6/SS, 40/2,
25/1. Reg.: 5/26, 8:30 - 9:30 AM. Rds.: 10-4, 10-4, 9-3. (Scholastic I and
II) 4/SS, G/40. Reg.: 8:30 - 9:30 AM each day. Rds.: Round 1 at 10 AM
then as available for Rounds 2-4. PRIZES: (Championship) Digital
Clock + plaque to Top 3, Top 1900-1999, 1800-1899, 1700-1799, 1600-
1699, and U1600; Plaque to top Senior 50+, Junior U20 and Junior U14.
(Reserve) Digital clock + plaque to Top 3, Top 1300-1399, 1200-1299,
and U1200; Plaque to top Senior 50+ and Junior U14. (Booster) Digi-
tal clock + trophy to 1st; Trophy to 2nd - 5th, Top Unrated and Junior U11.
(Scholastic I each day) Digital clock + trophy to 1st; Trophy to 2nd -
5th. (Scholastic II each day) Trophy to 1st-5th. SPECIAL PRIZES: 1st
Place in Championship and Reserve will receive a FREE ENTRY to the
2012 National Open. Top 2 Family Pairs in the non-scholastic sections.
Biggest Upset of each round in the non-Scholastic sections. Digital clock
to Scholastic I player with the highest combined score over the three 1-
day tournaments. EF: (Championship & Reserve) $60 if rec'd by 5/23, $70
if after 5/23. (Booster) $40 if rec'd by 5/23, $50 if after 5/23. (Scholas-
tic I and II) $15 each day or $40 for all three days if by 5/23, additional
$10 if after 5/23. ALL: Half-point byes allowed for all rounds but must
be requested prior to start of Round 2. SIDE EVENT: Blitz tournament
Friday 5/25; G/5, 5 Rounds, Double SS; Entry Fee: $10 ($15 to non-tour-
nament players); Reg.: 6:00–6:45pm at site; Rounds: begin at 7:00pm
Prizes: ($$b/20) $75-$45, Top U1600 $30, Medallion to top K-12, K-8, K-
6. ENTER: http://www.sazchess.org/store/store.php or mail to (make
checks payable to "SACA"): SACA, Attn: US Amateur West, PO Box 36149,
Tucson, AZ 85740 or at site. HR: $71 (single/double) or $86 (suite) if by
5/11, mention "SACA". INFO: Karen Pennock, 520-261-6149, email: kpen-
nock_83@yahoo.com, web: www.sazchess.org. NC. NS. W. Chess
Magnet School JGP for Championship and Reserve.
A Heritage Event!
May 26-28 or 27-28, New Jersey
68th Annual U.S. Amateur East Championship
6-SS, 50/2, SD/1. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 110 Davidson Ave., Somerset, NJ,
Telephone 732-560-0500 (NYC train to Bound Brook 1 miles away). In 3
Sections: Championship (U2200), Reserved (U1800), Booster (U1400).
2-day & 3-day schedules. 3-Day Registration: Saturday May 26, 9:30-
10:45 am. Schedule: Rounds 12-6, 11-5, 9-3. 2-Day Registration: Sun-
day May 27, 8:30-9:30 am. Schedule: First 3 games, 5/27, G/60. Rounds
10-12:15-2:30. All schedules merge in round four. Each Sections: Tro-
phies to top five and top Senior 55/over and Jr's under ages 16 & 13.
Championship: Trophies to top U2000, U1900 and U1850. Reserve: Tro-
phies to top U1600 and U1500. Booster: Trophies to top U1200, U1100,
U1000, U900 and U800. EF: $49 if postmarked by May 23, or paid online
via EntryFeesRus.com. EF: at site $60 cash. Byes: Three 1/2 point byes
allowed in rounds 1-5. Ent: Ken Thomas, 115 W. Moore St., Hackettstown,
NJ 07840. Checks to NJSCF. Info: 908-619-8621 or acn@goes.com. NS.
NC. W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 9-10, Tennessee
2012 U.S. Amateur South Championship
University of Memphis, University Center, 499 University St., Memphis,
TN 38152. SECTIONS: Championship (U2200) & Reserve (U1600). SCHED-
ULE: 5/SS, G/90 td/5. Reg.: Sat. 9:00-9:45AM. Rds.: Sat. 10-2-6; Sun.
9:30-1:30. PRIZES: $1000 of Gift Certificates and awards based on 60
paid entries. (Championship): 1st-“River Cup” trophy + $150 GC, 2nd-
plaque +$100 GC, 3rd-plaque+$75 GC; U2000 1st-small trophy+$50
GC. (Reserve): 1st-large plaque+$125 GC, 2nd-plaque+$75 GC, 3rd-
plaque+$50 GC; U1400 1st-small trophy+$50 GC; Unrated 1st-$50 GC.
EF: $40 ($10 less to Juniors under age 18 or Seniors over age 60), $50
on-site. MISC: One requested half-point bye allowed, any round, must
request before the start of Round 3. SIDE EVENT: SATURDAY ONLY—
Scholastic (K-12) sections in a separate room from main tournament:
U1000, U550, & Unrated. 4/SS, G/30 td/5. Reg. 11-11:45AM. Rd. 1 at
12PM, rest ASAP. EF-$15 by two days before the event, $20 after & on-
site. Trophies or Medals for all Side Event players! ADDL. DETAILS:
www.shelbycountychess.org. ENTRY: Online entry at www.cajunchess.com
or mail registration to Shelby County Chess, ATTN: Amateur South, 1614
Vance Ave., Memphis, TN 38104. INFO: Arlene Kleiman, midsouthchess@
hotmail.com; Korey Kormick, kjkormick@hotmail.com. Chess Magnet
School JGP for main event.
June 14, Nevada
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 80 (Enhanced)
2012 U.S. Game/10 Championship (QC)
6SS, G/10. FIDE Rated. Riviera Hotel and Casino, 2901 Las Vegas Boule-
vard South, Las Vegas 89109. $$G 5,000. 1500-800-500, U2300 450,
U2100 400, U1900 350, U1700 300, U1500 250, U1300 200, U1100 150,
unrated 100. There must be 3 players eligible for each prize to be award-
ed. EF: $69 by 5/28, $79 by 6/13 $100 on site. REG.: 2-4 p.m. Rds.: 5-5:30-
6-6:30-7-7:30. Higher of regular or quick rating used. Bring clocks. 1/2
point bye available in any round (limit 2). HR: $59 single or double ($89
Friday and Saturday nights). 1-800-634-6753 or (702) 734-5110. ENT:
National Open, PO Box 90925, Henderson, NV 89009-0925, on line www.
VegasChessFestival.comor fax at (702) 933-9112. NS. NC. W.
Effective with TLAs submitted after November 10, 2010, the fol-
lowing additional rules apply to Grand Prix tournaments:
1) The guaranteed first prize must be at least $150.
2) No more than one prize under $100 may count towards the
Grand Prix point total.
3) Prizes below the maximum entry fee do not count towards
the Grand Prix point total.
USCF Membership Rates
Premium (P) and Regular (R)
(U.S., CANADA, MEXICO)
Type 1 yr 2yr 3yr
Adult P $46 $84 $122
Adult R $40 $72 $104
Senior (65+) $40 $72 $104
Young Adult P (U25)* $33 $61 $88
Young Adult R (U25)* $26 $47 $67
Youth P (U16)* $28 $51 $73
Youth R (U16)* $22 $40 $57
Scholastic P (U13)* $24 $43 $61
Scholastic R (U13)* $17 $30 $42
Premium membership provides a printed copy
of Chess Life (monthly) or Chess Life for Kids
(bimonthly) plus all other benefits of regular
membership. Regular membership provides
online-only access to Chess Life and Chess Life
for Kids; a tournament life announcement
newsletter will be mailed to adults bimonthly
and to scholastic members three times per
year. Youth provides bimonthy Chess Life,
Scholastic bimonthly Chess Life for Kids, oth-
ers listed above monthly Chess Life. See
www.uschess.org for other membership cat-
egories. Dues are not refundable and may be
changed without notice.
*Ages at expiration
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 53
54 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
A Heritage Event!
An American Classic!
June 15-17 or 16-17, Nevada
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 200 (Enhanced)
2012 National Open
6-SS, 40/2, SD/1 (2 day option rds 1-3 G/45). Riviera Hotel and Casino,
2901 Las Vegas Boulevard South, Las Vegas 89109. $80,000 Guaran-
teed Prize Fund will not be reduced. Championship. $$: 6400-3200-1600-
800-500-300-300-300-300-300-200-200-200-200-200, under 2500 1600,
under 2400 1200, under 2300 1000. $2,000 EXTRA for perfect score. The
winner of the Championship section also receives a replica of the Edmond-
son Cup. Under 2200. $$: 3200-1600-800-500-400-250-250-250-250-250-
200-200-200-200-200. Under 2000. $$: 3200-1600-800-500-400-250-250-
250-250-250-200-200-200-200-200. Under 1800. $$: 3200-1600-800-500-
400-250-250-250-250-250-200-200-200-200-200. Under 1600. $$: 3200-
1600-800-500-400-250-250-250-250-250-200-200-200-200-200. Under
1400. $$: 2000-1000-700-400-300-250-250-250-250-250. Under 1200.
$$: 1200-600-400-300-250-200-200-200-200. Unrated, $$: 500-300-
200. Plus Score Bonus ($14,000 guaranteed) in addition to any other
prizes, every player who finishes with 3-1/2 points or better wins a $50
gift certificate. Plus score certificates will be awarded on site only. Play-
ers under age 15 are eligible for best game prizes including the Freddie
award plus $200 (donated by Fred Gruenberg). Top 2 sections FIDE
rated. EF: $169 by 2/29, $199 by 5/28, $219 by 6/13, $240 on site. $40
discount for seniors 65 and over. Add $120 for adults rated under 2100
or juniors under 2000 playing in the Championship Section. This is an open
tournament - you may play in any section at or above your rating level;
unrated players may play only in Unrated or Championship Section. Pro-
visionally rated players may not win more than 3rd prize in any section
except Championship. CCA minimum ratings or other ratings may be used
if higher than USCF June Supplement. Reg.: 3 p.m.-10 p.m. Thursday, 8-
9:30 a.m. Friday. Rds.: 11-6, 10-5, 10-5. 2-day schedule: Reg.: 8-9 a.m.
Saturday. Rds.: 10-12-2-5: merge with 3-day in round 4. Half point byes
available in any round, but round 5 or 6 byes must be requested before
the start of round 2. Chess sets and boards provided for tournament play
only, not for skittles. Please bring chess clocks! The LAS VEGAS INTER-
NATIONALCHESSFESTIVALfeatures theNational Open, theU.S Game/10
Championship, the International Youth Championship and other events.
Many free extras and surprises! Free parking. Free raffle with great
prizes. Free GM Lectures. Free GM analysis of your games. Grandmas-
ter Chess Camp for all ages on Thursday. U.S. Game/10 and Grand-
master Simuls Thursday afternoon. Youth Tournaments Friday, Sat-
urday & Sunday. Poker Tournament Monday morning. LOW room
rates! HR: $59 single or double ($89 Friday and Saturday nights).
1-800-634-6753 or (702) 734-5110. Don't be shut out; make your
reservations early and be sure to ask for the chess rates; The Riv-
iera sells out most weekends. Cutoff for special hotel rate is May 28th.
Rates may be as high as $150 a night later. RESERVE NOW! Credit
card or one night room deposit will be required to hold reservation, may
be canceled 72 hours in advance for nominal fee. Tournament Regis-
tration: National Open, PO Box 90925, Henderson, NV 89009-0925, on
line at www.VegasChessFestival.comor by fax at (702) 933-9112. Info:
(702) 560-0955 and leave a message. NS. W. FIDE. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
July 9-14, Texas
2012 U.S. Senior Open
6SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (3-Day Option, Rounds 1-3 G/55, d/5). Marriott Hous-
ton South at Hobby Airport, 9100 Gulf Freeway, Houston, TX 77017,
www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/houhh-houston-hobby-airport-mar-
riott/. Free parking! $79 HR valid until 6/30 (includes free hot breakfast
buffet!), Reserve early! 713-943-7979, Group Code: CHESS. Eligibility: Open
to USCF members born on or before July 9, 1962. Prizes: $5,000 GTD!
1st-$1250, 2nd-$800, 3rd-$500, 4th-$300, U2300: $500-300, U2000:
$300-150, U1800 $300-150, U1500/UNR $300-150. Awards: Commem-
orative Clocks for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd and plaques for each champion, ages
50-54, 55-59, 60-64, 65-69, 70-74 and over 75 (a player may win a place
award and an age award). World Senior Entrant: Top finisher born on or
before January 1, 1952 receives: 1) official USCF entrant in the World Sen-
ior Championship, and 2) a $500.00 USCF stipend towards expenses at
the WSC. EF: $95 if rec'd by 6/30, $115 after or on site. Registration until
6 pm on July 9 (or until 9am July 12 for 3-Day Schedule). Registrations
after that time may require byes. Rounds: Monday to Friday one round
daily at 6:30 pm, Saturday one round at 11 a.m. 3-Day Schedule: Rounds
Thursday at 10m, 12:30pm, 3pm; Merges with 6-Day Schedule on Round
4. Awards Banquet: Saturday at 7 p.m. Byes: Two 1/2 –point byes avail-
able if req. before end of rd 2. Entries: Mail to Francisco L. Guadalupe,
305 Willow Pointe Dr., League City, TX 77573. Info: flguadalupe@aol.com.
Enter online: www.active.com/event_detail.cfm?event_id=2015413.
Note: Active.com charges a small fee. Phone entries: (713) 530-7820. Add
$5 (per player) for phone entries. Tournament website link at http://
main.uschess.org/content/view/10014/95. FIDE.
July 13-15, Texas
2012 U.S. Junior Open
6SS, G/120,d5. Marriott Houston South at Hobby Airport, 9100 Gulf
Freeway, Houston, TX 77017. www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/houhh-
houston-hobby-airport-marriott/. Free parking! $79 HR valid until 6/30
(includes free hot breakfast buffet!), Reserve early! 713-943-7979, Group
Code: CHESS. 4 Sections based on age as of 1/1/2012: Under 21,
Under 15, Under 11 and Under 8. July Rating Supplement. U21:
$500+entry to 2013 US Junior Closed - $250-$125-$75-$50. Individual
plaques to top five overall, plaques for best player age 18, 17, 16, 15,
Under 15, and for ratings U1600, U1400, U1200. U21 is also FIDE rated.
U15: Individual trophies to top ten overall, trophies for best player age
14, 13, 12, 11, Under 11, and for ratings U1400, U1200, U1000. U11: Indi-
vidual trophies to top ten overall, trophies to best player age 10, 9, 8, 7,
Under 7, and for ratings U1200, U1000, U800. U8: Individual trophies to
top ten overall, best player age 7, 6 & Under, and for ratings U1000, U800,
U600; honorable mention trophies for all others U8. Commemorative
medals for all participants. Teams: Trophies to top three school teams
and top club team in each of the four sections. Top four scores, minimum
of three, count towards team score in each section. Byes: One half-point
NATIONAL SPRING
SCHOLASTIC
CHAMPI ONSHI PS
NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL
(K-12) CHAMPIONSHIP
APRIL 13–15, 2012
Hyatt Regency Minneapolis
1300 Nicolett Mall
Minneapolis, MN 55403
612-370-1234
Chess rate: $125
single/double/triple/quad
NATIONAL JUNIOR HIGH
(K-9) CHAMPIONSHIP
APRIL 27–29, 2012
Town and Country Resort
500 Hotel Circle North
San Diego, CA 92108
1-800-772-8527
Chess rate: $125
single/double/triple/quad
NATIONAL ELEMENTARY
(K-6) CHAMPIONSHIP
MAY 11–13, 2012
Gaylord Opryland Resort and
Convention Center
2800 Opryland Drive
Nashville, TN 37214
615-889-1000 or 888-777-6779
Chess rate: $139
single/double/triple/quad
FOR MORE DETAI LS VI SI T USCHESS. ORG
2012
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 54
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 55
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
bye, any round except Rd 6, if requested before Rd 1. EF: $35 postmarked
or on line by 7/2, $50 after 7/2; no checks on site. Schedule: Onsite reg-
istration, Fri 8:30 – 11:00am. Opening Ceremony, Fri 12:45pm. Rounds,
Fri 1pm & 6pm; Sat 9:30am & 2:15pm; Sun 9am & 1:30pm. Awards Cer-
emony 6:00pm (approx). Side Events: Blitz, U21 & U11. Sat 6:30pm, EF:
$15 by 7/2, $20 on site. Bughouse: One section, Sat ASAP after Blitz,
EF: $25 per team, on site only. Parents and Friends Tournament (not
rated): 3SS, G/30, Sat, Rds 10:30, 2:30 & 4:00pm. EF: $20, on site only.
Prizes: Trophies to top three plus one USCF Premium membership for
each five participants. ENTRIES: Mail to Francisco L. Guadalupe, 305 Wil-
low Pointe Dr., League City, TX 77573. Info: flguadalupe@aol.com. Enter
online at: www.active.com/event_detail.cfm?event_id=2015371. Note:
Active.com charges a small fee. Phone entries: (713) 530-7820. Add $3
(per player) for phone entries. Tournament website link at http://main.us
chess.org/content/view/10014/95. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
Aug. 4-12, 7-12 or 9-12, Washington
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 300
113th annual U.S. Open
Includes traditional one game per day schedule (9 days), also 6-day slow
time control option, and 4-day option requiring only 3 nights hotel stay
for most players. 9SS, 40/2, SD/1 (4 day option, Rds. 1-6, G/60). Hilton
Vancouver Washington, 301 W. 6th Street, Vancouver, WA 98660. Self-
Parking $13.00, valet $17.00 per night. HR: $110 single/quad,
360-993-4500, reserve by July 12 or rate may increase. $50,000 in
prizes based on 500 paid entries, else proportional, $40,000 (80% of each
prize) minimum guaranteed. Special prizes based on Life Titles. A one
section tournament with Class prizes. Entry Fee: Online, $145 by 6/17,
$165 by 7/29, $185 after 7/29. By mail, $147 postmarked by 6/17, $167
postmarked by 7/29; do not mail after 7/29! By phone, $150 by 6/17, $170
by 7/29, $185 after. No phone entries after 8/2 (close of business at the
Office)! At site, all $190; GMs free. All entries must be made at least 2
hours prior to your first game. Current USCF membership required.
August official ratings used; unofficial ratings used if otherwise
unrated. CCA ratings used if above USCF. Foreign player ratings: usually
100 points added to FIDE or FQE, 200+ added to most foreign national
ratings, no points added to CFC. Highest of multiple ratings generally used.
Entries: USCF, ATTN: 2012 U.S. Open, PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557.
Online entry: https://secure2.uschess.org/webstore/tournament.php?wk
event=2012USOPEN. Phone entry: 800-903-8723. FIDE rated, No cell
phones. Bring a clock -- none supplied. Sets/boards supplied for tour-
nament but not for skittles. Side Events: Inaugural Women's US Open,
2012 Denker Tournament of HS Champions, the 2012 Barber Tour-
nament of K-8 Champions, and the 2012 Trophies Plus U.S. Girls'
Junior Open, U.S. Open Blitz Championship, Weekend Swiss, US
Open Scholastic, US Open Quads, Open Bughouse, US Open G/15
Championship. Additional details next month!
Grand Prix
Apr. 4-8, 5-8, 6-8 or 7-8, Pennsylvania
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 200 (Enhanced)
6th annual Philadelphia Open
In 8 sections. Open Section, Apr 4-8: 9SS, 40/90, SD/30, inc30. GM &
IM norms possible, FIDE rated. U2200 to Under 1200 Sections, Apr
5-8, 6-8 or 7-8: 7SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (3-day option, rds. 1-2 G/75, d/5,
2-day option, rds. 1-4 G/40, d/5). Under 1000 Section, Apr 7-8: 7SS,
G/40, d/5. At the upscale, luxury Loews Philadelphia Hotel, rated
Four Diamonds by AAA, 1200 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19107. Prizes
$80,000 based on 500 paid entries (seniors, re-entries, GMs, IMs,
WGMs count as half entries, U1200 Section 40%entries, U1000 Section
15% entries), else proportional, minimum $60,000 (75% of each prize)
guaranteed. Open: $7000-4000-2000-1000-800-700-600-500-400-400,
clear or tiebreak first $200 bonus, FIDE Under 2400/Unr $2000-1000.
Under 2200, Under 2000, Under 1800: each $5000-2500-1200-800-600-
500-400-300-300-300. Under 1600, Under 1400: each $4000-2000-1000-
700-500-400-300-200-200-200. Under 1200: $1500-800-500-300-200-200-
200-100-100-100. Under 1000: $400-200-100, trophies to first 5, top U800,
U600, U400, Unrated. Prize limits: 1) If official rating 4/11-3/12 or unof-
ficial post-event rating posted at uschess.org 4/4/11-4/4/12 is more than
30 points over section maximum, prize limit $1500. 2) Unrated (0-3 life-
time games rated) cannot win over $200 in U1000, $400 U1200, $800
U1400, $1200 U1600, $1600 U1800, or $2000 U2000. Unofficial
uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. 3) Provisional (4-
25 lifetime games rated) cannot win over $300 in U1000, $800 U1200,
$1500 U1400, or $2500 U1600. 4) Balance of any limited prize goes to
next player(s) in line. Open EF: free to GMs, IMs, WGMs; $150 deducted
from prize. US players with current or former FIDE ratings of
2200/over: $225 mailed by 3/27 or online by 4/2, $250 at site. Foreign
FIDE rated players: $175 mailed by 3/27 or online by 4/2, $200 at site,
Others: $375 mailed by 3/27 or online by 4/2, $400 at site. U2200
through U1400 Sections EF: 4-day $224, 3-day $223, 2-day $222
mailed by 3/27, $225 online by 4/2, $250 at site. U1200 Section EF: 4-
day $84, 3-day $83, 2-day $82 mailed by 3/27, $85 online by 4/2, $100
at site. U1000 Section EF: $32 mailed by 3/27, $35 online by 4/2, $50
at site. Phone EF: All $5 more than online EF, 406-896-2038 (entry only,
no questions), available only through 4/2. Online late entry after 4/2:
available until 2 hours before your first game, same price as entry at site.
EF $100 less to rated seniors 65/over in U2200 through U1400. Spe-
cial 1 year USCF membership with magazine if paid with entry: Online
at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed,
phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. No
checks at site, credit cards OK. Re-entry: $100, no re-entry from Open
Section to Open Section. 5-day schedule (Open only): Reg. ends Wed
6 pm, rds. Wed. 7 pm, Thu 12 & 7, Fri 11 & 6, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30.
4-day schedule (U2200-U1200): Reg. ends Thu 6 pm, rds. Thu 7 pm, Fri
11 & 6, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 3-day schedule (U2200-U1200): Reg.
ends Fri 10 am, rds Fri 11, 2:30 & 6, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 2-day
schedule (U2200-U1200): Reg. ends Sat. 9am, rds Sat. 10, 12, 2, 3:45
& 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 4-day, 3-day, & 2-day merge & compete for same
prizes. Under 1000 schedule: Reg. ends Sat. 9 am, rds Sat 10, 12, 2 &
3:45, Sun 10, 12 &2. Byes: NOTE CHANGE: Half point byes OK all rounds,
limit 4 byes, Open Section must commit before rd 2, other sections
before rd 4. Bring sets, boards, clocks if possible- none supplied. HR:
$98-98-123-123, 215-627-1200, reserve by 3/21 or rate may increase.
Parking: Hotel has valet parking only, with a special chess rate of
$30/day. Many parking lots nearby charge much less, with rates lowest
on the weekend. Gateway Garage, 1540 Vine St. (1 block from Sheraton
Hotel) is about $5/day Sat & Sun, $18/day other days. Car rentals: Avis,
800-331-1600, use AWD #D657633 or reserve car online at chesstour.
com. Ratings: FIDE used for Open, USCF April list for U2200 & below;
note that ratings after the April list (see above) may result in a $1500
prize limit. Foreign player ratings: For U2200 and below, usually100
points added to FIDE, 100 to FQE, 100/more to most other foreign, no
points added to CFC, PR or Jamaica. Some foreign ratings not accepted
for U2000 or below. Highest of multiple ratings usually used. Players who
fail to disclose foreign or FIDE ratings may be expelled. Special rules:
Players must submit toa search for electronic devices if requested by Dir-
ector. In round 3 or after, players with scores of 80% or over and their
opponents may not use headphones, earphones or cell phones or go to
a different floor of the hotel without Director permission. Ent: Continen-
tal Chess, Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. Questions: www.chesstour.
com, DirectorAtChess.US, 845-496-9658. You may request “lowest pos-
sible section” if April rating unknown. $15 service charge for refunds. Ad-
vanceentries will bepostedat chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 6-8, Nevada
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 150 (Enhanced)
12th Annual Reno-Larry Evans Memorial (formerly Far West Open)
OPEN. 6SS,40/2,20/1,G/1/2. Sands Regency Hotel/Casino, 345 N. Arling-
ton Ave., Reno, NV 89501.1-866-386-7829 or (775) 348-2200. $$21,000
b/250. $$14,000 Gtd. (Prizes 1-10 in Open Section Gtd. plus 1/2 of all
other prizes). 5 Sections. Open (2000 & above) EF: $137, (1999 & below
= $151) (GMs & IMs free but must enter by (3/10) or pay late fee)
.$$2,000-1,200-1000-700-500-400-300-300-300,300, (2399/below)-
$1,000, (2299/below)- $1,000,(2199/below) -$1000-500-300-200 (If a tie
for 1st thenaplayoff for $100 out of prize fund plus trophy). Sec.”A” (1800-
1999) EF: $136; $$1,000-500-400-300-200-100-100-. Sec.”B” (1600-
1799) EF: $135; $$900-500-400-300-200-100-100. Sec.”C” (1400-1599)
EF: $134; $$700-500-400-300-200-100-100. Sec.”D”/under (1399-below)
EF: $133;$$600-400-300-200-100-100-100; Top Senior (65+) -$200;
Club Champ.-$400-200. ALL: Entries must be postmarked by 3/10 or pay
late fee-$11 until 3/31 (do not mail after 3/31), $22 at site. All classes
have trophies 1st – 3rd. Unrated players are free entry but not eligible
for cash prizes- must join USCF for 1 full year thru this tournament. 1st
Unrated =trophy +1 yr. USCF Mem. $10 discount to Seniors (65+ yrs.).
Players may play up. Provisionally rated players may only win 1/2 of 1st
place money. CCA ratings may be used. Note: pairings not changed for
color unless 3 in a row or a plus 3 and if the unlikely situation occurs 3
colors in a row may be assigned. SIDE EVENTS: Thurs. (4/05) 6-7:15pm
Lecture by IM John Donaldson (FREE); 7:30pm- GM Alexander Ivanov -
Simul ($15); 7:30pm-Blitz (5 Min) tourney ($20) 80% entries = Prize Fund.
Sat. (4/07) (3-4:30pm) Free Game/Position Analysis - IM John Donald-
son. ALL REG: (4/05) 5-10pm, (4/06) 9-10am. RDS: (Fri) 12-7, (Sat) 10-6,
(Sun) 9:30-4:30. Byes available any round (if requested by Rd.1). ENT:
make checks payable and send to: SANDS REGENCY (address listed
above), postmarked by 3/10. $11 late fee if postmarked after 3/10 and
before 3/31. Do not mail after 3/31 or email after 4/03. $22 late fee at
site. HR: (Sun-Thurs. $27!) (Fri. & Sat. $47!) + tax.1-866-386-7829 men-
tion (Code) CHESS405 (Reserve by 3/26/12) to get Chess rate. INFO: Jerry
Weikel, 6578Valley Wood Dr., Reno, NV 89523, (775) 747-1405, wackyykl@
aol.com or check out our website at: www.renochess.org/fwo. To verify
entry check website. FIDE. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 14-15, Missouri
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 30
Saint Louis Open
5/SS, G/120. Chess Club & Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, 4657 Mary-
land Ave., Saint Louis, MO 63108. Free entries for GMs and IMs. EF: $60,
$50 for annual members of the club if registered by 4/13. Two Sections:
Open & U2000. Prize Fund: $4,050 UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED!!
Open: $750-$500-$325-$225-$150. Under 2200-$300-$200-$100. FIDE.
Under 2000 Section: $400-$250-$200. U1800: $225-$175. U1400: $150-
$100. Winner of each Section qualifies for the 2013 Club Championship.
Reg.: 9-9:45. Rds.: Saturday 10, 2:30, 7. Sunday 10, 2:30. Two half point
byes available if declared before Round 2. MCA Membership required from
$5. OSA. Ent: 4657 Maryland Ave., Saint Louis, MO 63108, or online at saint
louischessclub.org Info: 314-361-CHESS, info@saintlouischessclub.org.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 14-15, Texas
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 20 (Enhanced)
2012 DCC Fide Open III
5SS, G/90inc30. Dallas Chess Club, 200 S. Cottonwood Dr #C, Richard-
son, TX 75080. One Section $$750G. Open: This section is FIDE rated but
uses USCF Rules. $500-$250. EF: $75, Senior/Hcap/Additional Family
Member $50, plus $5 non-DCC membership fee if applicable. Registra-
tion: 9:45 -10:15 am. Rds.: Sat 10:45-3:10-7:16, Sun 10:45-3:10. One Bye
allowed if requested before rd 2, withdrawals and zero point last round
byes are not eligible for prizes. Small appearance fee to the First two
GM/IM who apply. GM/IM must play all rounds to get appearance fee.
Ent: Dallas Chess Club, see address above. Info: 214-632-9000, info@
dallaschess.com NS. NC. FIDE. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 14-15, Virginia
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15
Kingstowne Chess Festival - 10th Annual!
6450 S. Van Dorn St., Alexandria, VA 22315. 4 Sections: Open (FIDE-
rated): 4SS, 40/100 SD/60 d/5. EF: $50 if received by 4/11, $65 at site.
If joining USCF for 1st time, USEF: $94 if received by 4/11, $109 at site.
Prizes $$1,000G: $400-250-125. U1800-U1600-Unr. each $75. Rds.:
11-5, 10-4. Amateur (U1800-Unr.): 5SS, G/100 d/5. EF: $20 if received
by 4/11, $35 at site. If joining USCF for 1st time, USEF: $64 if received
by 4/11, $79 at site. Prizes $$500 b/32: $180-100-70. U1600-U1400-
Unr. each $50. No unrated may win more than $140. Rds.: 11-3-7,
11:30-4. Booster (U1600-Unr): 5SS, G/100 d/5. EF: $15 if received by
4/11, $30 at site. If joining USCF for 1st time, USEF: $59 if received by
4/11, $74 at site. Prizes $$370 b/32: $150-80-50. U1400-U1200-Unr. each
$30. No unrated may win more than $100. Rds.: 11-3-7, 11:30-4. Novice
(U1400-Unr): 6SS, G/75 d/5. EF: $10 if received by 4/11, $25 at site.
If joining USCF for 1st time, USEF: $54 if received by 4/11, $69 at site.
Prizes $$285 b/32: $100-70-40. U1200-U1000-Unr. each $25. No unrated
may win more than $80. Rds.: 11-1-4-7, 12:30-4. All: One half-point bye
allowed in Open, two in other sections. Last round bye must be requested
by end of section's play Sat. and irrevocable. Drawing before start of last
round for "Titanic trilogy:" DVDs of A Night to Remember, Titanic (1953),
and Titanic (1996) for 100th anniversary of sinking. Reg.: 8:30-10:15. Ent
(checks payable to): Don W. Millican, P.O. Box 2902, Springfield, VA
22152. Opening ceremony 10:45. FIDE. W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 15, Massachusetts
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10 (Enhanced)
22nd Massachusetts G/60 Championship
4-SS, G/60 d/5. Best Western Royal Plaza Hotel, 181 Boston Post Road
West, Marlboro, MA (I-495, exit 24B, Rt. 20W, one mile from exit). 508-
460-0700 or 888-543-9500. $$ 2,000 b/80 paid entries, 75% G. 5 sects.
Open Section: $300-150, Top U2200 $150. Under 2000 Section: $250-
125. Under 1750 Section: $250-125. Under 1500 Section: $200-100,
Top U1350 $75. Under 1200 Section: $125-75, Top U1000 $75. Unrated
prize limits: $75 in U1200, $100 in U1500, $150 in U1750, $200 in
U2000. EF: $34 if postmarked by 4/10 or online by 4/13, $40 at site. $10
discount to unrated and to players in U1200 Section. GMs and IMs free.
Reg.: 8:30-9:30 a.m. Rds.: 10-1-3:30-6. Other: Bye 1-3 with entry, limit
1. MACA memb. req. for Mass. residents ($12 adult, $6 jr. U18, add $8
for Chess Horizons subscription). Ent: Bob Messenger, 4 Hamlett Dr. Apt.
12, Nashua, NH 03062 or online (PayPal) at www.MassChess.org. Make
checks payable to MACA. Info: (603) 891-2484 or send email to info@
masschess.org. NS. W.
Apr. 17, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15 (Enhanced)
Marshall Masters!
4-SS, G/25d5. Third Tuesday of every month. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St.,
NYC. 212-477-3716. Open to players rated over 2100 (plus all players scor-
ing over 50% in any MCC Open or U2300 tournament since the prior
month's Masters). EF: $40, members $30, GMs free. $$G250-150-100.
Prizes to U2400, U2300 and biggest upset. Reg.: 6:15-6:45 pm. Rds.: 7-
8:15-9:30-10:45. One bye available (Rd 1 or 4 only), request at entry.
www.marshallchessclub.org.
Apr. 20-22 or 21-22, Indiana
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10
Indiana Memorial Open
5SS, Game/90 inc/30. Clarion Hotel & Conference Center, 2930 Water-
front Pkwy., West Dr., Indianapolis, IN 46214. EF: $60 rcvd by 4/17, $70
at site. (2-day option EF: $59/$70 at site). u1200 EF: $10/15 at site (2-
day option EF: $9/$15 at site). Memb. Req'd: ISCA Reg. $15. OSA.
$$GTD: $500-230. Class A $190-75, Class B $185-75, Class C $180-75,
Class D $175-75. u1200 1st, 2nd, 3rd Trophies only. Upset $40. Reg: ends
Fri. 6:30pm (2-day option: Regs. ends Sat. 9:30am). Rds: Fri. 7pm, Sat.
10-5, Sun. 10-2:30 (2-day option: Sat. 10-1:30-5, Sun. 10-2:30). ENT: ISCA,
C/o Gary Fox, P.O. 114, Logansport, IN 46947. INFO: info@indianachess.
org. HR: $69 (317) 299-8400. www.indianachess.org. All Prizes Uncon-
ditionally Guaranteed. NS. NC. W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 20-22 or 21-22, Iowa
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10
6th Annual Okoboji Open, Reserve (U1600) & Scholastics (K-12)
Arrowwood Resort & Conference Center, 1405 Highway 71 S, Okoboji, IA
51355. In 3 Sections. Okoboji Open: 5SS, Game/120 (2 games at G/90
if playing in 2 day option), EF: $50 if registered by 4/13/2012, $60 on site.
Jr. and Sr. ($40 if pre-registered), GM's and IM's free entry. $$b/30
(top 3 guaranteed): $325+T-250-150. Experts/Class A/Class B: $100-
$60 each; Class C and below $50. State membership required, other states
VERMONT RESORT OPEN, April 27-29 or 28-29
NEW SITE! Holiday Inn Rutland/Killington, Vermont’s most upscale
Holiday Inn, near intersection of US-4 and US-7. Free parking, free wireless,
heated pool, exercise room, free shuttle to Amtrak, bus terminal or Rutland
Airport, restaurants within walking distance. $2000 guaranteed prizes. See
“Grand Prix” this issue for full details.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 55
56 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
accepted. 2 day round times: April 21: 9-1-4:30. April 22: 9-2:30. 3 day
round times: April 20: 6:00. April 21: 9-4:30; April 22. 9-2:30 (2 and 3
day options merge after round 2). On Site Reg: 4/20 5:00-5:45, 4/21 8:00-
8:45. Okoboji Reserve: 5SS, 2 games at G/90 (4/21 (9:00-1:00), 3
games at G/120, Open to 1599 & under. EF: $40 if registered by
4/13/2011, $50 on site. $$b/20: $125+T-80-60. Class D: $60 - $30; Class
E: $30; Class F/Unrated $30. Rounds: April 21: 9-1-4:30 April 22: 9-2:30
On Site Reg: 4/21 8:00-8:45. Okoboji Scholastics (K-4 and K-12)
4/21/2011: 5SS, Game 30, EF: $10. Prizes: Trophies to first place,
medals to second and third (K-4 and K-12). On Site Reg only 8:00-8:30.
Rounds: 8:45, 10, 11:30, 4 & 5 ASAP. ALL: 1 half point bye per player allow-
ed if requested in advance. Advance Registration: Jodene Kruse, 934
6th St., Sibley, IA 51249. INFO: Jodene Kruse, sibley@fiorechess.org. HR:
$89if reservedby April 3rd, 1-800-727-4561. NS. NC. SIDE EVENT: IM John
Bartholomew will be giving a lecture/simul on 4/20 at 4PM, Simul cost
$10, lecture $5 (free to players). Chess Magnet School JGP for main
event.
Apr. 20-22, Kentucky
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15
4th Annual WKU Open
5 SS, G/120, 2-day event. Western Kentucky University Campus, 1906 Col-
lege Heights Blvd., Bowling Green, KY 42101 (www.hilltopperchess.net).
EF: $70 (by 4/14; GM/IM free entry; College $35), $75 on site. Prizes:
$5,000 b/75 ($3,000 gtd); GM/IM & college = half entry. In 6 sections:
1st-5th place: $625, 475, 250, 175, 110; Class A $225, 175, 125, 75, 75;
Class B$225, 175, 125, 75, 75; Class C$225, 175, 125, 75, 75; Class D $165,
140, 125, 70, 70; Class E and below $165, 140, 125, 70, 70; Unrated $125,
75. Unrated in any section can only win unrated prizes. Sections under
8 players will be combined. Rds.: Sat. 10-2:30-7; Sun. 10-2:30. Side Event:
SOKY G/10 Championship. Fri 4/20. 5 SS, G/10. EF: $15 (by 4/14; dis-
count: G/10 + Open = $75; College = $45 by 4/14). Prizes (b/25): $250,
$150, $75, $25. Bring your own clocks. Rds.: 7 pmthen ASAP. Side Event:
SOKY Scholastic Chess Championship. Sat only 4/21. 5 SS, G/30. USCF
rated. Prizes: top 3 overall winners in 9-12 will receive WKU Academic
Scholarships (1) Full tuition and fees annual scholarship, (2) $3,000
annual room and board scholarship, (3) $500 annual book scholarship
(conditions apply, see website for details); Trophies to top five teams in
each section, and top 8 individuals in each section. SECTIONS: High School
(k-12), Jr. High (k-8), Elementary (k-5), Primary (k-3, & k-1). EF: $15 by
4/14, $25 on site. Reg.: Sat. 4/21 8-9 am or online by 4/14. Rds.: 10 am,
2-5 ASAP. Location: Warren South High School, 8140 Nashville Rd., Bowl-
ing Green, KY 42101. Side Event: Friends and Family Tournament. Sat.
4/21 only. 5 SS, G/30. Non-rated. EF: $8. Reg/Rds/Location: see scholas-
tic. Prizes: Trophies to top 3 individuals in sections: Adult (18+), Seniors
(50+), High-school (k-12), Primary (k-1). Trophies to top ten in sec-
tions: Jr. High (k-8), Elementary (k-5), Primary (k-3). Hotel Rates: Must
mention "WKU Chess" for special rate: News Inn $49/room 3160 Scotts-
ville Rd., Bowling Green, KY-42104; Tel: 270-781-3460 (only 20 rooms
available so reserve early!). Overflow: Country Inn & Suites $79/room
includes hot breakfast (behind News Inn). Byes: 1/2 point each (limit 1),
must commit by 2nd rd. Mail EF to: Dr. Dale Rigby, c/o WKU Chess Club,
110 A Cherry Hall, 1906 College Heights Blvd., Bowling Green, KY 42101.
Chief TD: Chris Prosser. For more info: Samuel J. Hunt (918) 809 6278,
hilltopperchess@live.com, www.hilltopperchess.net. Chess Magnet
School JGP for Main Event.
A State Championship Event!
Apr. 21, New Hampshire
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
New Hampshire Quick Chess Championship (QC)
Now in a new location! 8SS, GAME/25 Delay/3, Holiday Inn Portsmouth,
300 Woodbury Ave., Portsmouth, NH 03801. EF: $20 postmarked by 14
April, $25 at site. Memb. Req'd: $8, Juniors $6. OSA. $$GTD: $200-100.
U2000 $100. U1600 $100. Plaque to top finishing NH resident. Reg.: 9:00-
9:45. Rds.: 10-11-1-2-3-4-5:30-6:30. Byes available any round, limit two.
Must be requested before round four. ENT: Alex Relyea, 49 Technology Dr.
#89, Bedford, NH 03110. INFO: Alex Relyea relyea@operamail.com. HR:
(603) 431-8000. www.relyeachess.com. NS. W.
Apr. 21, Tennessee
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
Bluff City Open
4SS, G/60. Greater Memphis Chess Center, 5796 Shelby Oaks Dr., Suite
11, Memphis, TN 38134. $500 prizes GTD. 3 Sections: Open, Amateur
(U1600) and Scholastic(U1200). Prizes: Open: 1st $200, 2nd $100.
Amateur: $125, $75. Scholastic: Trophies to top 3. Open and Amateur
EF: $30 ($25 for MCC and GMCC members). Scholastic EF: $15 ($12 for
members). Rounds: 10-1-3-5. Registration 04/21: 8:30-9:30am. Friday
night side event: Bluff City Blitz. G/5, 5 rds, double-swiss. 1st round at
7:30pm. EF: $12 ($10 for members). Prizes: 1st 35%, 2nd 20%. Entries:
Memphis Chess Club Inc. PO Box 17864, Memphis, TN 38187-0864, www.
memphischess.com, gpylant@gmail.com.
Apr. 21, Texas
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
Temple Chess Club Spring Swiss 2012
3-SS, G/90 w/5 Sec delay. Playing Site: Holiday Inn, 5247 S. General
Bruce Dr., (Service road on East side of I-35 just North of Midway exit
# 297), Temple, TX 76502, (254) 778-5511. Gtd. Prizes $600. 2 Sections
Open to all. Prize fund $375 - 1st = $200, 2nd = $100, U1700 = $75;
Reserve U1400: Prize fund $225 - 1st = $100, 2nd = $75, U1200 = $50.
All: EF: $25 if paid in advance, $30 on site. $5 discount for current Texas
Chess Association members. Reg.: 8-8:45. Rds.: 9 am, 1 pm, 4:15 pm.
USCF membership required. No State membership. UR placed at the dis-
cretion of the TD. Advanced entry: Forrest Marler, 4102 West Adams Ave.,
#104, Temple, TX 76504-3551. 254-231-7026. fzmarler@gmail.com. NS,
NC, W.
Apr. 21, Wisconsin
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10
Hales Corners Challenge XV
4SS, G/60. 2 Sections: Open & Reserve (under 1600). Wyndham Milwau-
keeAirport Hotel, 4747 S. Howell Ave., Milwaukee, 414-481-8000. (mention
Southwest Chess Club for $79 room rate). EF: $35-Open, $25-Reserve,
both $5 more after 4/18. Comp EF for USCF 2200+. $$ Open =1st-$325
(guaranteed), 2nd-$175 (guaranteed), A-$100, B & Below-$75; $$
Reserve =1st-$100, 2nd-$75, D-$50, E & Below-$40. Reg.: 8:30-9:30.
Rds.: 10-1-3:30-6. Entries to: Allen Becker, N112 W17033 Vista Court,
Apt. D, Germantown, WI 53022; allenbecker@wi.rr.com. Questions to TD:
Robin Grochowski, (414) 861-2745 (cell).
Apr. 21-22, California, Northern
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
7th Annual Frank Doyle Open
Frank DoyleOpenExchangeBank, 444Aviation Blvd., Santa Rosa, CA 95401.
4 round Swiss, G/120. In 3 Sections, Open: $$GTD: $250-175. Reserve:
Open to 1899 &under. $$GTD: $200-125. Booster: Open to 1499 & under.
$$GTD: $150-100. Unr. must play in Booster Section. Unrated players win-
ning prizes will only receive half of the prize. ALL: EF: $35 advance until
4/18, $45 at site. Reg.: 04/21 8:30am-9:30am. Rds.: Sat 10,3; Sun 10,3.
ENT: Paul Stagnoli, 4233 Kintyre Rd., Santa Rosa, CA 95409-4127. INFO:
(707)478-4385 paulgs@sonic.net. No phone or e-mail entries. Bring
equipment, none provided. No Cell phones allowed. NS. NC. W. Chess
Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 22, California, Southern
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
LACC - 2012 Westwood Spring Open
5SS, G/45. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA 90025, 2nd fl. 2 sections: Open
& U1800; EF: $55 ($50 by 4/21); $50 LACC members ($45 by 4/21). Reg.:
9:00-9:45 am. Rds.: 10:00, 11:30, 1:30, 3:15, 4:45. Byes: Up to two 1/2
pt. byes available. Prizes: $$ 1,500 (b/45 - 50% Guaranteed). 1st-5th
$400-200-100-50-50 U2000: $100. U1800: $200- $100; U1600: $100–Dig-
ital Clock; U1400: $100-$50-Clock. Ent: LACC Box 251774, LA, CA 90025.
Info: Mick Bighamian: Cell (310) 795-5710; Mick@LAChessClub.com or
www.LAChessClub.com. Parking: Free street & BoA Parking; or building
basement ($3).
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, Florida
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 40
19th Space Coast Open
5SS, Top section FIDE rated at G/100+Increment 30. Lower sections
G/120+Delay 5. (2-day Rd. 1for all sections G/60+Delay 5). DoubleTree
Hotel Cocoa Beach Oceanfront, 2080 North Atlantic Avenue. (Hwy A1A),
Cocoa Beach, FL. $$10,000 b/165 pd., 72% Gtd. 6 Sections: Master/
Expert: $1200+trophy-700-300, U2400 $600+trophy, U2200 $600+tro-
phy-300. Class A: $600+trophy-300-200. Class B: $600+trophy-300-200.
Class C: $600+trophy-300-200. Class D: $600+trophy-300-200. U1200:
$600+trophy-300-200, U1000 $300+trophy-200, U800 $200+trophy-
100, trophies to top Brevard County scholastics players in K-3, K-5, K-8,
K-12, book to plus score not winning other prize. All: Rated players may
play up one class only. Unr. may play in Master or U1200. Unr. limited to
$100 prize unless place prize in Master. Prizes for 1st-3rd brilliancy and
biggest upset rds 1-4. EF: $79 via mail or on-line by 4/20, $90 on-line by
4/26 or at site (no credit cards); $20 less if Unr. or under age 18. Re-entry
$40 by round 3 (1/2 point Byes for earlier rounds). GM/IM free entry avail-
able on-line until 3/31, else $80 from prize. Special EF for Brevard
County students in any section: $20 on-line by 4/20, $25 on-line by 4/26
or at site (counts as 1/4 entry for based on prize fund). Reg.: ends 1 hr.
before 1st rd. Rds.: Rd. 1 8pm Fri (2-day 10am Sat. at G/60), Rds. 2-5
Sat. 1-7, Sun. 9-2:30. Side events: Space Coast Open Blitz. 4-SS (2
games/Rd), G/5. Prizes: Cash prizes based on entries. EF: $10. Rds Sat.
12:30-6:30, Sun. 8:30-2:00. (i.e., Blitz rounds are prior to rounds 2-5 of
main tournament). Other events: see sco2012.eventbrite.com. HR: $99-
99-109-109, $129 oceanfront (King only), $129 suite ($139 triple/quad
occupancy). 800-552-3224 or 321-783-9222, ask for Space Coast Chess
rate, reserve by 4/7. Ent: Space Coast Chess Foundation, c/o Harvey Ler-
man, 921 N. Thistle Ln., Maitland, FL 32751 or sco2012.eventbrite.com.
Info only: Peter Dyson 321-452-9863, peter200@modusoperandi.com.
FIDE, W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, Maryland
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 50
2012 Maryland Open
5SS, 40/100, SD/45 inc/30, (Rnd 1 G/90 inc/30) (2-day schedule: rds 1-
2 G/45 inc/30) U1200 G/120 d/5(2-day option, rds 1-2 G/60 d/5).
Rockville Hilton, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852, 301-468-1100.
All prizes guaranteed. 4 sections: Open FIDE: $1200-600-300-200-100,
top U2201 $125, top Life Master $100. Amateur Section (U2000):
$800-400-250-125-75, top U1800 $125, top 1st Cat $90. Reserve Sec-
tion (U1600): $650-350-200-100-75, top U1400 $110, top 3rd Cat $80.
Novice (U1200): $500-250-150-100-75, top U1000 $100, top unrated $70.
Unrated may not win over $200 in U1200 or $300 in U1600. A free con-
tinental breakfast for participants will be provided on Sunday
morning. We will optionally text your pairings to your cell phone. EF: $60
by 4/12 mail or online, $70 by 4/24 online, $75 by 4/26 online, and $80
at the door. Special EFs: GM&IMs free; $60 deducted from prize. Spe-
cial HR: $99, ($25 EF discount if staying in hotel) may not be avail after
4/12, free Sat. night room for GMs registering early. Open, U2000, &
U1600 3-day schedule: Reg ends Fri 7 pm, rds Fri 8, Sat 11&6, Sun 9&3.
Open, U2000, & U1600 2-day schedule: reg ends Sat 10am rds 11-2:15-
6, 9-3 U1200 3-day schedule Reg. ends Fri 7 pm, rds Fri 8, Sat 11&3:30,
Sun 9&1:00 U1200 2-day schedule Reg. ends Sat 10am rds 11, 1:15 & 3:30,
Sun 9&1:00. Ent: MCA, c/o Michael Regan, 1827 Thornton Ridge Rd., Tow-
son, MD21204. Online entry and link to roomreservations at: http://the
mdopen.com. Questions: mregan@baltimorechess.org. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, Vermont
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 20 (Enhanced)
23rd annual Vermont Resort Open
5SS, 30/90, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/60, d/5). Holiday InnRut-
land/Killington, 476 Holiday Drive (near intersection US-4 and US-7),
Rutland, VT 05701. Free shuttle to Amtrak, bus terminal or Rutland Air-
port. Free parking, free wireless, heated pool, whirlpool, exercise room;
restaurants within easy walking distance. $2000 guaranteed prizes.
In3sections. Open: $400-200-150, topUnder 2010/Unr $220-110. Under
1810: $300-150-80, top Under 1610 $160-80, no unrated may win over
$150. Under 1410: $100-50, trophies to first 3, top Under 1210, Under
1010, Under 810, Unrated. Top2sectionsEF: 3-day $68, 2-day $67 if check
mailed by 4/20, all $69 online at chesstour.com by 4/25, $75 phoned to
406-896-2038 by 4/25 (entry only, no questions), $80 at site. Under 1410
Section EF: All $40 less than top 2 sections EF. All: No checks at site, credit
cards OK. Special 1 year USCF dues with paper magazine if paid with
entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15.
Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20.
Re-entry $40, not available in Open. GMs & IMs free; $60 deducted from
prize. 3-day schedule: Reg. ends Fri 6:30 pm, rds Fri 7, Sat 11 & 5, Sun
9 & 2:15. 2-day schedule: Reg ends Sat 10:30 am, rds. Sat 11, 2 & 5,
Sun 9 & 2:15. Half point byes OK all, limit 2; must commit before rd 2.
HR: $89-89, 802-775-1911, reserve by 4/13. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-
1600, AWD #D657633, or reserve car online at chesstour.com. Unofficial
uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Ent: Continen-
tal Chess, PO Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. DirectorAtChess.us,
chesstour.com, 845-496-9658. $15 service charge for refunds. Advance
entries posted at chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 28, Virginia
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
2012 Walter Muir Memorial
3-Round Swiss System Game/90 w/5 second delay. St. John's Lutheran
Church, 4608 Brambleton Ave. SW, Roanoke, VA 24018. GUARANTEED
PRIZES: Top Section: $125-$100-$75. Additional Sections: If Octagonals,
Each is guaranteed $125-$100, If Hexagonals, Each is guaranteed $100-
CONTINENTAL CHESS SCHEDULE
Visit our website at www. chesstour. comfor
late news, results, games, CCA minimum ratings,
advance entries, and more!
Most tournaments have alternate schedules
playing less or more days than listed below.
Asterisk means full details in this issue-
otherwise, see future issues or our website.
4/4-8: Philadelphia Open, Philadelphia PA*
4/27-29: Green Mountain Open, Rutland VT*
5/4-6: Western Amateur, Los Angeles CA*
5/18-20: New York State Open, Lake George NY*
5/24-28: Chicago Open, Wheeling IL*
6/8-10: Northeast Open, Stamford CT*
6/29-7/3: Philadelphia International, Philadelphia PA*
7/4-8: World Open, Philadelphia PA*
7/20-22: Chicago Class, Wheeling IL*
7/20-22: Pacific Coast Open, Agoura Hills CA*
7/27-29: Southern Open, Orlando FL*
7/27-29: Bradley Open, Windsor Locks CT*
8/3-5: Cleveland Open, Cleveland OH*
8/10-12: Continental Open, Sturbridge MA*
8/17-19: Indianapolis Open, Indianapolis IN
8/17-19: Manhattan Open, New York NY*
8/17-19: Central California Open, Fresno CA
8/24-26: Atlantic Open, Washington DC
9/1-3: New York State Championship, Albany NY
9/14-16: New England Senior, Windsor Locks CT
9/15-16: Hartford Open, Windsor Locks CT
9/21-23: Louisville Open, Louisville KY
10/4-8: Continental Class, Arlimgton VA
10/5-7: Los Angeles Open, Los Angeles CA
10/12-14: Midwest Class, Wheeling IL
10/19-21: Boardwalk Open, Asbury Park NJ
10/24-28: Bahamas International, Nassau, Bahamas
11/2-4: Eastern Team Championship, Stamford CT
11/9-11: Kings Island Open, Mason OH
11/23-25: Natiional Chess Congress, Philadelphia PA
12/26-29: North American Open, Las Vegas NV
For later events, see chesstour.com.
WARNING!
THE USE OF A
CELL PHONE
IN THE TOURNAMENT ROOM IS
PROHIBITED!
AT MOST TOURNAMENTS!
IF YOUR CELL PHONE RINGS IN A ROOM WITH
GAMES IN PROGRESS, YOU COULD BE SEVERELY
PENALIZED, MAYBE EVEN FORFEITED!
TURN IT OFF!
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 56
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 57
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
$75, If Quads, Each is guaranteed $100. ENTRY FEE: If received by April
27, $30.00. At site, $40.00. REGISTRATION: 6-9pm on 4/27; 8:30-9:30am
on 4/28. ROUNDS: 10-2-6. BYES: One only per tournament; must request
before 1st round begins. ADVANCE ENTRIES: Roanoke Valley Chess Club,
P.O. Box 14143, Roanoke, VA 24038. PHONE: (540) 344-4446. EMAIL:
info@roanokechess.com. WEB PAGE: roanokechess.com. NS. NC. W.
Apr. 28, Virginia
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
Sterling Chess April Open and RBO
Hilton Inn & Suites Dulles, 22700 Holiday Park Dr., Sterling, VA 20166.
Three sections: Open 4SS, G/61 d5, $$300 Gtd., 150/100/50. U1600
4SS, G/61 d5, medal to winner. U1000 4SS, G/25 d5, medal to winner.
Rds.: Open and U1600 11:15, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00. U1000 11:30, 12:45, 2:00,
3:15. Doors open 10:30. EF: Open $25, U1600 $20, U1000 $15. Unrateds
free. Entries limited: Register online at www.meetup.com/sterling-
chess-tournaments. Pay on website. Info: news@serranoassociates.com.
Bye: Half-point, any round. Chess Magnet School JGPfor toptwo sec-
tions.
Apr. 28-29, Missouri
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
Joplin Benefit Tournament
100% of entry fees will be donated to the Joplin Habitat for Human-
ity to support building for tornado impacted families. 5SS, G/90,d/5.
La Quinta Inn (Room A), 3320 South Rangeline Rd., Joplin, MO 64804. 2
sections: Open, U1600. Sections may be combined for pairing purposes.
$$Gtd. $490. Open: $150-100-60. U1600: $80-60-40. EF: $40 (by 04/27),
$50 on site. Cash only on site. Registration: 8:30-9:45. MCA Member-
ship required from$5.OSA. Rounds: Sat: 10:00, 1:30, 5:00. Sun: 10:00,
1:30. One 1/2 point bye if requested before round 3. Ent: info@joplin
chess.org with cash on-site or mailed to Joplin Chess Club, 2609 New
Hampshire, Joplin, MO 64804. Checks payable to Martin Stahl. HR: $69
plus tax by 3/27, after based on availability. 417-781-0500, mention Chess
Tournament. Info: www.joplinchess.org, info@joplinchess.org or 417-
483-1554. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 28-29 or 29, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10 (Enhanced)
Marshall April Grand Prix!
4-SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716.
EF: $50, members $30. $$625 Gtd: 275-150, U2200/unr. $105, U2000 $95.
Reg. ends 15 min. before round. Rds.: 2 schedules: 2-day, Rds. 12:30-
5:30PM each day; 1-day, (Rds. 1-2 G/25d5) 10-11:15AM-12:30-5:30PM
Sun; both merge rd. 3. Limit 2 byes, request at entry. NO RE-ENTRY. FIDE
(G/30 not FIDE ratable). www.marshallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
A State Championship Event!
May 4-6 or 5-6, Georgia
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 40
2012 Georgia Chess Championship
Crowne Plaza Hotel, 6345 Powers Ferry Rd., Atlanta, GA 30339. (770)-
955-1700. $10,000 b/150, 1st place in each section GTD, others 50%
GTD. In 5 sections: Championship: FIDE RATEDwith U.S.C.F. rules. 5-SS,
G/90 with 30 second increments, (2-day option Rd. 1 G/90, d/5). $1,000-
500-300-200; u2200: $400, u2050: $400. Under 1900: $700-300-200-100:
u1800: $200. Under 1700: $700-300-200-100: u1600: $200. Under
1500: $600-300-200-100; u1350: $200. Under 1200: $600-300-200-
100, U1000: $200. Lower 4 sections: 5-SS, G/120 (2-day option Rd. 1 G/90,
d/5). ALL: EF: $84 2-day, $85 3-day in advance: $90 at site. Free to GM's
and IM's, $50 taken from winnings. Juniors playing in Under 1200: $50
for no prizes. Unrateds: $50, can win 100% Championship and $200 in
lower sections. Re-entry: $35. No re-entry for Championship section. May
play up 1 section only. Byes: limit 2, not 5th, must request before 1st round.
G.C.A. membership required, other states ok. 3-day schedule: Reg.: ends
7 p.m. Friday. Rounds: 7:30 p.m., 2:30-7:30, 10-3:15. 2-day schedule:
Reg.: ends 10 a.m. Rounds: 1st at 10:30 a.m., then merges with 3-day.
5/6: Georgia Chess Business Meeting- 2:30 p.m. Hotel: $79 for single
or double. Mention Georgia Chess. Info: Thad Rogers member2@geor-
giachess.org. or (478)-973-9389. Enter: Online at georgiachess.org or
mail to G.C.A., P.O. Box 2584, Suwanee, GA 30024. NS. NC. W. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
May 4-6 or 5-6, Ohio
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 60 (Enhanced)
48th Cincinnati Open
5SS; Hilton Garden Inn, 5200 Natorp Blvd., Mason, OH 45040. Five Sec-
tions: Open, U2200, U1900, U1600, U1300. Time Control: 40/2, SD/60
d/5; 2-day rds 1&2 G/75 d/5. Prizes: Open: $1,000-750-500-250; U2200:
$700-500-300-150; U1900: $400-300-200-100; U1600: $300-200-150-
100; U1300: $225-150-125-100. Open section prizes guaranteed; other
prizes in the under sections based on 100 total entries for the tourna-
ment, else proportional. (No unrated may win more than the third-place
prize amount except in Open.) Entry fee: $95 if mailed/emailed by April
30, 2012; $115 after April 30/onsite. Re-entry $50. Free entry to GMs/IMs
who complete schedule; $95 deducted from prize. Registration: Friday,
May 45:00-6:30; Saturday, May 59:00-10:30. 3-day schedule: Friday 7:00,
Saturday 11:00 and 5:30, Sunday 9:30 and 4:00. 2-day schedule: Sat-
urday 11:00 and 2:00, then merge with 3-day. Byes: Maximum two half-
point byes, must commit beforeround3. HR: $99, groupcode COT, reserve
by 4/13/2012 or rate may go up; reservations 800-560-7843 or 513-204-
6000 or www.cincinnatimason.hgi.com. Bring sets and clocks. Advance
entries: Cincinnati Open, PO Box 499006, Cincinnati, OH 45249-9006 or
by email to a.hodge195@gmail.com. Registration form and complete infor-
mation at www.Chessinnati.com. Questions: Alan Hodge 513-697-6930,
a.hodge195@gmail.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 10, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10 (Enhanced)
10 Grand Prix Points Tonight!
4-SS, G/25 +td/5 or G/30 +td/0. Chess Center at the Marshall Club,
23 West 10 St., bet. 5-6 Ave, NYC: 212-477-3716. EF: $35, Club membs
$25, GMs free ($20 from prize), specified Greater NY Scholastic prizewin-
ners free. $$560 b/32 paid entries (may be limited to 1st 36 to enter),
top 2 Gtd: $$ 200-110-50, Top U2200/unr $105, U2000 $95. Limit 2 byes
(1 bye for U2000), commit by 8:15. Reentry $15. CCA ratings may be used.
Class pairings OK rd. 4. Reg ends 10 min before game. Rds. 7-8:15-9:30-
10:45 pm. Phone entry often impossible!
May 12, Vermont
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10
White River Open
Fairfield Inn and Suites, 102 Ballardvale Dr., White River Junction, VT
05001. In 3 Sections, Open: 4SS, GAME/65, D/5, $$GTD: $275-150-75.
U2000 $100 U1750 $100. U1500: 4SS, GAME/65, D/5, Open to 1499 &
under. $$GTD: $150-50. U1250 $100. U1000: 4SS, GAME/65, D/5, Open
to 999 & under. Open to Adult Unrated not allowed in U1000. $$GTD: $100.
ALL: EF: $28 postmarked by 5 May, $33 at site. Reg.: 9:00-9:45 AM. Rds.:
10:00-1:00-3:30-6:00. One half point bye available rounds 1-3. ENT: Alex
Relyea, 49 Technology Dr. #89, Bedford, NH 03110. INFO: Alex Relyea
relyea@operamail.com. HR: 802-291-9911. www.relyeachess.com.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 15, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15 (Enhanced)
Marshall Masters!
4-SS, G/25d5. Third Tuesday of every month. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St.,
NYC. 212-477-3716. Open to players rated over 2100 (plus all players scor-
ing over 50% in any MCC Open or U2300 tournament since the prior
month's Masters). EF: $40, members $30, GMs free. $$G250-150-100.
Prizes to U2400, U2300 and biggest upset. Reg.: 6:15-6:45 pm. Rds.: 7-
8:15-9:30-10:45. One bye available (Rd 1 or 4 only), request at entry.
www.marshallchessclub.org.
May 18-20 or 19-20, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 20 (Enhanced)
20th annual New York State Open
5SS, 30/90, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/60, d/5). Tiki Resort (for-
merly Howard Johnson), 2 Canada St., Lake George, NY 12845. $$G 3000.
In 4 sections. Open: $$ 400-200-150, top Under 2010 $230-120, top Under
1810/Unr $220-110. Senior, open to under 1910 or unrated born before
5/21/62. $$ 300-150-80, top Under 1710 $120-60. Under 1610: $$ 300-
150-80, Under 1410 $120-60, unrated limit $150. Under 1310: $100-50,
trophies to first 3, top U1000, U800, Unr. All: 1 year NYSCA membership
prizeto NY residents who are not members. EF: 3-day $78, 2-day $77 mail-
ed by 5/11, both $79 online at chesstour.com by 5/16, $85 phoned to
406-896-2038 by 5/16 (entry only, no questions), $90 at site. No checks
at site, credit cards OK. Entry fee $50 less to all in U1310. Special 1 year
USCF dues with magazine if paid with entry- online at chesstour.com,
Adult $30, Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site,
Adult $40, Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. Re-entry $40, not available
in Open Section. GMs free, $60 deducted from prize. 3-day schedule:
Reg ends Fri 6:30 pm, rds. Fri 7, Sat 12 & 6, Sun 10 & 3:15. 2-day sched-
ule: Reg ends Sat 11:30 am, rds Sat 12, 3 &, 6, Sun 10 & 3:15. Half point
World’s biggest open tournament!
40th Annual
WORLD OPEN
Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel
Mostly 9 rounds, July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 2012
$250,000 projected prizes, $200,800 minimum guaranteed!
In 13 sections- some can play in more than one section. Free GM lectures & analysis!
A HISTORIC SITE!
The World Open returns to the
Sheraton Philadelphia Hotel, near many
historic landmarks including Independence
Hall, the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia
Museum of Art, and the Liberty Bell, as well
as restaurants, theaters, museums and
shopping. Special room rate $99.
Parking $10 with guest room, $20
without; public lot a block away is about $18
weekday and only $5 on weekend.
SPECIAL FEATURES!
1) Schedule options. 5-day is popular,
7-day leisurely, others save time and money.
2) GM & IM norms possible in Open.
Open, U2400, and U2200 are FIDE rated.
3) Anti-sandbagging rule: $2000 prize
limit if rated more than 30 points over the
class maximum on any list 7/11-6/12.
4) Above rule now also applies if any
post-event rating posted 7/3/11-7/3/12 was
more than 30 points over class maximum!
5) New sections for seniors, women, and
two under 13 sections- and you can play in
both these and the main overall 9 round
sections, without a long delay in between!
6) International 6/29-7/3: many foreign
GMs already entered; see chesstour.com
7) Unique- big money U2400 Section!
8) Many side events; see chesstour.com
or Pennsylvania TLAs, this issue.
9) Free analysis by GM Sam Palatnik
7/4-7/8. Free GM lectures 7/6 & 7/7, 9 am.







A HISTORIC SITE!
The World Open returns to the
Sheraton Philadelphia Hotel, near many
historic landmarks including Independence
Hall, the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia
Museum of Art, and the Liberty Bell, as well
as restaurants, theaters, museums and
shopping. Special room rate $99.
Parking $10 with guest room, $20
without; public lot a block away is about $18
weekday and only $5 on weekend.
SPECIAL FEATURES!
1) Schedule options. 5-day is popular,
7-day leisurely, others save time and money.
2) GM & IM norms possible in Open.
Open, U2400, and U2200 are FIDE rated.
3) Anti-sandbagging rule: $2000 prize
limit if rated more than 30 points over the
class maximum on any list 7/11-6/12.
4) Above rule now also applies if any
post-event rating posted 7/3/11-7/3/12 was
more than 30 points over class maximum!
5) New sections for seniors, women, and
two under 13 sections- and you can play in
both these and the main overall 9 round
sections, without a long delay in between!
6) International 6/29-7/3: many foreign
GMs already entered; see chesstour.com
7) Unique- big money U2400 Section!
8) Many side events; see chesstour.com
or Pennsylvania TLAs, this issue.
9) Free analysis by GM Sam Palatnik
7/4-7/8. Free GM lectures 7/6 & 7/7, 9 am.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 57
58 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
byes OKall, must commit before rd 2; limit 2 byes (limit 1 bye if under 1810/
unr in Open). HR: 65-65 (poolside), 75-75 (regular), call 518-668-5744 Mon-
Fri 9 am-5pm, reserve by 5/4 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-
331-1600, use AWD #D657633, or reserve car online through chesstour.
com. Unofficial uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Ent:
Continental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. www.chesstour.
com, DirectorAtChess.us, 845-496-9658. $15 service charge for refunds.
Advance entries posted atchesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 19-20 or 20, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10 (Enhanced)
Marshall May Grand Prix!
4-SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716.
EF: $50, members $30. $$625 Gtd: 275-150, U2200/unr. $105, U2000
$95. Reg. ends 15min. beforeround. Rds.: 2 schedules: 2-day, Rds 12:30-
5:30PM each day; 1-day, (Rds. 1-2 G/25d5) 10-11:15AM-12:30-5:30PM
Sun; both merge rd. 3. Limit 2 byes, request at entry. NO RE-ENTRY. FIDE
(G/30 not FIDE ratable). www.marshallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
An American Classic!
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, Illinois
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 200 (Enhanced)
21st annual Chicago Open
Open Section, May 24-28: 9SS, 40/90, SD/30, inc/30, GM & IM norms
possible, all Open entry fees $100 more than below for US players never
rated 2200/over by FIDE. Under 2300 to Under1300, May 25-28, 26-
28 or 27-28: 7SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (3-day option, rds 1-2 G/75, d/5; 2-day
option, rds. 1-4 G/40, d/5). Under 1100, (NOTE CHANGE), May 26-28
or 27-28: 7SS, G/90, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-4 G/40, d/5). Under 900,
May 27-28: 7SS, G/40, d/5. All: No 5 minute time deduction. At Westin
Chicago North Shore Hotel, 601 North Milwaukee Ave, Wheeling IL 60090
(from Chicago, I-294 north to US-45 north; from Milwaukee, I-94 east to
Lake Cook Rd to US-45 south.) Free parking. Free analysis of your games
by GMJohn Fedorowicz, beginning two hours after the start of each 4-day
round. Free lectures by GM Fedorowicz 5pm Friday, 9 am each day Sat-
urday, Sunday, Monday. $100,000 guaranteed prize fund. In 9 sections.
Open: $10000-5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-500-400-300, clear or tie-
break winner bonus $200, top FIDE Under 2500/Unr $2000-1000. FIDE
rated, GM and IM norms possible. Under 2300: $5000-2500-1200-900-
700-600-500-400-300-300. FIDE rated. Under 2100: $5000-2500-1200-
900-700-600-500-400-300-300. Under 1900: $5000-2500-1200-900-700-
600-500-400-300-300. Under 1700: $5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-500-
400-300-300. Under 1500: $4000-2000-1000-800-600-500-400-400-300-
300. Under 1300: $4000-2000-1000-800-600-500-400-400-300-300.
Under 1100: $1500-700-400-300-200-200-100-100. Under 900: $500-
300-200, trophies to first 5, top U700, U500, U300, Unrated. Prize limits:
1) Players with under 26 lifetime games rated through 5/12 list may not
win over $800 U1100, $1500 U1300 or $2500 U1500. Games rated too
late for 5/12 list not counted. 2) If official rating 5/11-4/12 or unofficial
post-event rating posted 5/24/11-5/24/12 was more than 30 points over
section maximum, prize limit $1500. 3) Unrated (0-3 lifetime games
rated) cannot win over $200 inU900, $400 U1100, $700 U1300, $1000
U1500, $1500 U1700, $2000 U1900 or $2500 U2100. Unofficial uschess.org
ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. 4) Balance of any limited
prize goes to next player(s) in line. Top 7 sections Mailed EF: 5-day Open
$205, 4-day $204, 3-day$203, 2-day $202 mailed by 3/29; 5-day $225,
4-day $224, 3-day $223, 2-day $222 mailed by 5/16; all $250 at site. No
checks at site, credit cards OK. Top 7 sections online EF at chesstour.
com: $207 by 3/29, $227 by 5/21, $250 after 5/21 until 2 hours before
rd 1. Top 7 sections phoned EF at 406-896-2038 (entry only, no ques-
tions): $230 by 5/21 (entry only, no questions). No phone entry after 5/21.
GMs, IMs, WGMs, foreign FMs free in Open; $200 deducted from
prize. All Open Section EF $100 more for US players never rated 2200 or
over by FIDE. EF $100 less to seniors age 65/over in top 7 sections.
Under 1100 EF: $85 mailed by 5/16, $87 online at chesstour.com by 5/21,
$100 at site. Under 900 EF: $35 mailed by 5/16, $37 online at
chesstour.com by 5/21, $50 at site. Online or mailed EF $5 less to ICA
members; join at il-chess.org. An ICA Tour Event. Special 1 yr USCF dues
with magazine if paid with entry: Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young
Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young
Adult $30, Scholastic $20. Re-entry: $100, no re-entry from Open to Open.
5-day schedule (Open): Reg. ends Thu 6 pm, rds Thu 7 pm, Fri 12 & 7,
Sat 11 & 6, Sun 11 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30. 4-day schedule (U2300 to U1300):
Reg. ends Fri 6pm, Rds. Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 11 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30.
3-day schedule (U2300 to U1300): Reg. ends Sat 10 am, Rds. Sat 11,
2:30 & 6, Sun 11 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30. 2-day U2300 to U1300 sched-
ule: Reg. ends Sun 9 am, Rds. Sun 10, 12, 2, 3:45 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30.
4-day, 3-day & 2-day U2300 to U1300 schedules merge & compete for
same prizes. 3-day Under 1100 schedule: Reg. Ends Sat. 1 pm, Rds Sat
2 pm & 6 pm, Sun 10, 2 & 6, Mon 10 & 2. 2-day Under 1100 schedule:
Reg. ends Sun 9 am, Rds Sun 10, 12, 2, 3:45 & 6, Mon 10 & 2. 3-day &
2-day U1100 schedules merge & compete for same prizes. Under 900
schedule: Reg. ends Sun 9 am, rds Sun 10, 12, 2 & 3:45, Mon 10, 12, 2.
Byes: OK all, limit 4 (limit 2 in last 4 rds), Open must commit before rd
2, others before rd 4. Hotel rates: $103-103-103-103, 800-937-8461, 847-
777-6500, reserve by 5/11 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-
331-1600, AWD #D657633, or reserve car online through chesstour.com.
Foreign player ratings: Usually 100 points added to FIDE, 100 to FQE,
200/more to most other foreign, no pts added to CFC or Jamaica. Some
foreign ratings not accepted for U1900 or below. Highest of multiple rat-
ings usually used. Players who fail to disclose foreign or FIDE ratings may
be expelled. US player ratings: May official ratings used; FIDE ratings
used for Open Section. Unofficial uschess.org ratings usually used if oth-
erwise unrated. Special rules: 1) Players must submit to a search for
electronic devices if requested by Director. In round 3 or after, players
with scores of 80% or over and their opponents may not use head-
phones, earphones, cellphones, or go to a different floor of the hotel
without Director permission. Ent: Continental Chess, Box 249, Salis-
bury Mills, NY 12577. Questions: DirectorAtChess.US, 845-496-9658,
www.chesstour.com. You may request “lowest possible section” if May
rating unknown. $15 service charge for refunds. Advance entries will be
posted at chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 60
The 2nd Annual New Yorker Open!
7-SS, 40/2, SD/1 +d5 (3-Day Option, rds. 1-2 G/75 + d/5; 2-Day Option,
rds. 1-4 G/45 + d5). Chess Center of New York at the historic New Yorker
Hotel, 481 Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station, NY City. Free
analysis of your games by former US Open Champion GM Mike Rohde
and USCF’s Most Active Player IM Jay Bonin! $10,000 Guaranteed! In
5sections. Open: $1,000-500-300-150, top U2450 $450-250. FIDE. Under
2300: $800-400-200-100, U2150 $350-150. FIDE. Under 2000: $800-400-
Cajun Chess
7230 Chadbourne Drive
New Orleans, LA 70126
504-208-9596
cajunchess@yahoo.com
www.cajunchess.com
Chess Club and Scholastic
Center of St. Louis
4657 Maryland Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63108.
314-361-CHESS
info@stlouischessclub.org
www.stlouischessclub.org
Continental Chess
Association
PO Box 249, Salisbury Mills,
NY 12577.
845-496-9658
chesstour@aol.com
www.chesstour.com
Dallas Chess Club
200 S. Cottonwood Dr. Suite C
Richardson, TX 75080
972-231-2065
info@dallaschess.com
www.dallaschess.com
International Chess Academy (NJ)
28 Canterbury Lane
New Milford, NJ 07646
201-287-0250
diana@icanj.net, www.icanj.net
Shore HS Chess League
PO Box 773
Lincroft, NJ 07738
shorehschessleague@yahoo.com
New Jersey State
Chess Federation
c/o Roger Inglis, 49-A Mara Rd.
Lake Hiawatha, NJ 07034
973-263-8696, rwij@njoychess.com
www.njscf.org
New York City Chess Inc
c/o Russell Makofsky
230 Thompson Street
New York, NY 10012, 212-475-8130
info@chessnyc.com
www.chessnyc.com
North American Chess Association
4957 Oakton Street, Suite 113
Skokie, IL 60077, 888.80.Chess
sevan@nachess.org
www.nachess.org
PaperClip Pairings
c/o J. Houghtaling Jr & Remy Ferrari
6005 Forest Blvd
Brownsville, TX 78526, 956-459-2421
jejrhoughtaling@bisd.us
San Diego Chess Club
2225 Sixth Avenue
San Diego, CA 92101, 619-239-7166
chucnglo@aol.com
http://sdchessclub.multiply.com
Texas Tech University SPICE
Box 45080
Lubbock, TX 79409
806-742-7742
SPICE@ttu.edu
www.SPICE.ttu.edu
Tri-State Chess
The Chess Exchange
325 East 88th Street
New York, NY 10128
212-289-5997
info@TriStateChess.com
www.TriStateChess.com
Village Chess Shop of NYC
c/o Michael Propper
230 Thompson Street
New Yor k, NY 10012
212-475-9580
info@chess-shop.com
www.chess-shop.com
Western PA Youth Chess Club
Attn: Jerry Meyers
4101 Windsor Street
Pittsburgh, PA 15217
412-422-1770
catnipper99@yahoo.com
www.youthchess.net
Bay Area Chess (CA)
www.BayAreaChess.com
Beverly Hills Chess Club (CA)
www.bhchessclub.com
En Passant Chess Club (TX)
td_edg@sbcglobal.net
Indiana State Chess Association
www.indianachess.org
Long Island Chess Nuts (NY)
516-739-3907
Marshall Chess Club (NY)
www.marshallchessclub.org
Michigan Chess Association
www.michess.org
Monmouth Chess School & Club (NJ)
www.monmouthchess.com
Oklahoma Chess Foundation
www.OKchess.org
Our Lady of Sorrows Academy (AZ)
professor.revesz@gmail.com
Silver Knights (PA)
www.silverknightschess.com
Sparta Chess Club (NJ)
www.spartachessclub.org
GOLD & SILVER
AFFILIATES
GOLD
Any affiliate that has submitted at least 50
USCF memberships during the current or
previous calendar year, or is the recognized
State Affiliate, is eligible to become a Gold
Affiliate. Gold Affiliates are honored in a
special list in larger type in Tournament
Life each month, giving the affiliate name,
address, phone number, e-mail address,
and website. Gold Affiliation costs $350 per
year, and existing affiliates may substract $3
for each month remaining on their regular
affiliation, or $20 for each month remaining
on their Silver Affiliation. As of August 6,
2007, by paying an annual payment of $500
(instead of $350), Gold Affiliate status may
be obtained with no minimum requirement
for memberships submitted.
SILVER
Any affiliate that has submitted at least 25
USCF memberships during the current or
previous calendar year, or is the recognized
State Affiliate, is eligible to become a Silver
Affiliate. These affiliates will be recognized
in a special list in Tournament Life each
month, giving the affiliate name, state, and
choice of either phone number, e-mail
address, or website. Silver Affiliation costs
$150 per year, and existing affiliates may
subtract $3 for each month remaining on
their regular affiliation. As of August 6, 2007,
by paying an annual payment of $250.00
(instead of $150), Silver Affiliate status may
be obtained with no minimum requirement for
memberships submitted.
SILVER AFFILIATES
GOLD AFFILIATES
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 58
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 59
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
200-100, top U1800 $350-150. $300 limit to Unr. Under 1600: $700-350-
200-100, top U1400 $250-150, $200 limit to Unr. Under 1200: $400-200-
100, $100 limit to Unr. NEW!! Mixed Doubles Bonus Prizes! Best male/
female2-player teamcombinedscoreinall sections: $500-250-150 (team-
mates' average rating must be Under 2200, teammates may play in dif-
ferent sections; teammate pairings avoided but possible, teams must de-
clare by rd. 4). EF: 4-Day $104, 3-Day $103, 2-Day $102 if postmarked
by 5/18, $100 on-line thru 5/23 at www.chesscenter.cc, $110 by phone
thru 5/23, $120 at site; all EF $20 less to players rated U1400 in U1600
Section, $60 less to unrated players in Under 1600 Section (only players
with 3 games or less are unrated), $60 less to all in Under 1200 Section,
GMs free ($90 from prize). Re-entry $70 except from Open to Open. 4-
Day Schedule: reg. ends Fri 6pm. Rds Fri. 7, Sat. 11 & 6, Sun.11 & 6, Mon.
10 & 4:30. 3-Day Schedule: Reg. ends Sat. 10 am. Rds. Sat. 11, 2:30 &
6, Sun. 11 & 6, Mon. 10 & 4:30. 2-Day Schedule: Reg. ends Sun 9:30 am.
Rds. Sun. 10, 12, 2, 4, 6, Mon. 10 &4:30. All schedules merge and compete
for same prizes. Limit 3 byes, Open must commit before rd. 2, others
before rd. 4. Prize limit $450 for players with any post-tournament rat-
ing after 4/6/12 on uschess.org more than 30 points over section limit.
Balances of all limited prizes go to next eligible player(s). Unofficial rat-
ings at us.chess.org usually used if otherwise unrated. $15 charge for
refunds. HR: 212-971-0101 Free Digital Clock Setting Seminar by IA
Carol Jarecki: 5pm Sat. (for players too embarrassed to ask the TD to
set their clocks and for TDs too embarrassed to admit they can’t.)Ques-
tions, chesscentr@aol.com or 845-569-9969, credit card phone
entries (but no questions) thru 5/23: 406-896-2191. After 5/23, enter
at site only (no checks, credit cards OK). CCA ratings may be used. Ent:
Chess Center of NY, PO Box 4615, New Windsor, NY 12553. Bring sets,
clocks, boards! W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
A State Championship Event!
May 25-28 or 26-28, Texas
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 30 (Enhanced)
Texas State and Amateur Championships
7SS. Sheraton Dallas North Hotel, 4801 Lyndon B. Johnson Fwy., Dallas,
TX 75244. $$ 8,350 b/175, full entries in Championship and Amateur sec-
tions, 2 scholastic side events that do not count toward base. Champion-
ship: (This section is FIDE rated but uses USCF rules. Must be rated 2000
or above by either USCF or Fide to play in this section. Defending Ama-
teur Champion may also play in this section. Texas Scholastic High School
Champions may also play in this section. Foreign unrateds may play in
this section.) G/90 with 30 sec. increment: $$ 1,000-500-250, 2200-2399
$700, U2200 $800. Amateur: U2000 & unrated. Rds. 1-7 30/90 d5,
SD/1 d5, rd. 1 of three day is G/115 d5. $$ 800-400-200. B $$ 600-300-
150, C 500-250-125, U1400 $500-250-125, U1200 $400, U1000 $300
Unrated $200. Both: TCA membership required. Other states accepted.
EF: $88 if received by 5/18, else $99. $80 Junior(U19) if received by 5/18
else $90 (juniors count as 90%toward base), Senior (over 65)/Handicap
ped/ additional family participant $52 if receive by 5/18 else $65 (Sen-
ior/Handicap/ Additional family participant counts 60% toward base). Add
$5 for CCphone entries; pre-reg requires pre-payment. After 5/23/12 all
registration and changes on site only; all changes including withdrawals,
$10 after 5/23/12. 4 day: Reg. Friday 5/25, 6:15 pm-7:15. Rds. Fri.: 7:45,
Sat: 2:30 pm- 8:00, Sun.: 11:00 am- 5:15 pm, Mon.: 9 am - 2:45 pm. 3 day:
Reg. Sat. 5/26, 9-9:30 am, Rd. 1 at 10 am then merge with 4 day. Foreign
Unrated must play in Championship section. Registrations that do not indi-
cate 4 or 3 day schedule will be put in the 3 day. HR: $75/75/75/75, $75
rate includes full breakfast buffet, 972-661-3600 or 888-627-8436 reserve
by 5/11/12 and ask for Dallas Chess Club rate. Free Parking. Up to two
1/2 pt byes available if requested before end of rd. 2, but byes for both
rd. 6 AND 7 not permitted. K-12 Scholastic on Saturday, 5/26. 5-SS, Rds.
G/30 d5, EF: $29 by 5/18, $44 after; Pre-reg. requires pre-payment. After
5/23/12 all registration and changes on site only; all changes $10 after
5/23/12. No refunds after 5/23/12, $10 handling fee for refunds before
5/23/12. Entries do not count toward base in Championship and Ama-
teur. Registration 8:15-8:45 am, Rd. 1 at 9:30 am, rest ASAP with small
lunch break. Sections: K-12 Championship and K-12 U1000. 5/26. 5-
SS, Rds. G/30 d5. Prizes: Trophies to top 12 individuals, five teams in each
section. K-12 U1000 also top three unrateds. Medals to those who do not
win a trophy. Ent: Dallas Chess Club, C/O Barbara Swafford, 2709 Long-
horn Trail, Crowley, TX 76036. Info: Barb Swafford, 214-632-9000, info@
dallaschess.com www.dallaschess.com NS. NC. W. FIDE. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
May 26, Tennessee
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
Rutherford County Open
5-SS, rd.1 G/25d5, rd.2 G/55d5, Rds.3, 4, 5 G/70d5. Grace Lutheran
Church, 811 E. Clark Blvd., Murfreesboro, TN. EF: $25 by 5/24, $30 at site.
$$ (1160, top 2 G, class prizes b/6 entries per class, else proportional):
$200-120, X, A, B, C, D, E/below, Unr. each $120. Reg.: 8:00-8:45am. Rds.:
9:00-10:00-12:30-3:00-5:30. Ent: Rutherford County Chess Club, P.O. Box
1593, Murfreesboro, TN 37133. http://rccc.us/ (with map to site), rccc@
rccc.us, 615-895-7989. NS. NC. W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 26-28 or 27-28, California, Northern
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 100 (Enhanced)
Best of the West Class Championship
6SS 30/90 sd/60 (2-day rds 1-3 G/60 merge in rd4). Marriott, 2700 Mis-
sion College Blvd., Santa Clara, CA. Hotel $89. Prize: $17,000 b/264
(2/3rd guaranteed). 6 sections. Open (2200+ FIDE rated 82% Gtd): 2500-
1200-600-200, top u2300 300-100. Expert/A/B/C: 1200-600-300-100-100-
100. D/E/unr: 1000-400-200-100, top u1200 600-300-100. Unr max $300
exc in Open. EF by 5/22: $99. Onsite +$25, Play-up +$20. r/e $40. Econ
Opt: EF-20 & 2/3 calc prize (not avail in Open). GMs/IMs free: prize-EF.
May 2012 Supp, CCA min, & TD disc to place players. Sched: 3-day Reg
Sa 10-11, Rds Sa/Su 11:30-5:30, Mo 10-3:30; 2-day Reg Su 9-9:30, Rds
Su 10-12:30-2:50-5:30, Mo 10-3:30. Max two 1/2-pt byes, commit bef rd
3. Parking $5. Ent: Bay Area Chess, 1639AS. Main St., Milpitas, CA 95035.
Rfnd fee $20. Info: BayAreaChess.com/bestwest. E: ask@BayAreaChess.
com. T: 408.786.5515. NS, NC, W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 26-28 or 27-28, California, Southern
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 40 (Enhanced)
2012 Lina Grumette Memorial Day Classic
6-SS, 3-day 40/2, SD/1, 2-day rds. 1-3 G/1 then merges. Hilton Ontario
Airport, 700N. Haven Ave., Ontario, CA 91764. $10,000 b/200, 50% of each
prize guaranteed. In five sections: Open: $$T+1700-750-400-300-200,
U2400 400, U2200 700-300-200. Premier (under 2000): $$750-300-200-
100. Amateur (Under 1800): $$750-300-200-100. Reserve (Under
1600): $$750-300-200-100. Booster (Under 1400/unrated): $$400-200-
100, U1200 150, Unr 150. (Unrated may win Unrated prizes only.) EF: $88
by 5/24, $99 at door. Booster (U1400) section EF: $72 by 5/24, $85 door.
Reg.: ends 10:30am 5/26, 9:30 am 5/27. Rds.: 3-day: 11-6, 11-6, 10-
4:30. 2-day: 10-1-3:30 (G/1), then merges with 3-day at 6. All: SCCF
membership req. ($18 re, $10 jr), OSA. $25 Best Game prize, all sections
eligible. 1 half-point bye if requested at least 1 round in advance, rd. 6
must berequestedwithentry. HR: $89, (909) 980-0400, code CHS, reserve
by 5/4. Parking free. Free wireless in public areas, 24-hour airport shut-
tle. Info: randallhough@yahoo.com. Website, On-line entry: www.scchess.
com. Ent: SCCF, PO Box 205, Monterey Park, CA 91754. NS. NC. F. State
Championship Qualifier. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
A State Championship Event!
May 26-28 or 27-28, Massachusetts
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 40 (Enhanced)
81st Massachusetts Open
6SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day schedule, G/45, d/5 in rounds 1-3. No 2-day
schedule in Open sect.) Best Western Royal Plaza Hotel, 181 Boston Post
Road West, Marlboro (I-495, exit 24B, Rt. 20W, one mile from exit). 508-
460-0700 or 888-543-9500. $$ 5,000 b/120 paid entries ($30 off EFs
count half), 75% G. Top 3 prizes in the Open sect. are 100% G. 6 sects.
Open: $1000-400-200, U2300 $200-150. FIDE rated. 3-day schedule
only. U2200: $350-150-100. U2000: $350-150-100. U1800: $350-150-100.
U1600: $300-150-100. U1400: $250-125-100, U1200 125-100. State
championship title to high scoring Mass. resident or student in each sect.
Unrated prize limits: $200 in U2000, $150 in U1800, $125 in U1600, $100
in U1400, can't win title except in Open. Prizes for most interesting
games in each sect. (100% G): Open $300, U2200 $250, U2000 $200,
U1800 $150, U1600 $125, U1400 $100, plus DVDs to each. EF: $69 for
3-day, $68 for 2-day if mailed by 5/22 or online by 5/24, $80 at site. GMs
and IMs free. $30 discount to unrated and to players in U1400 sect. rated
under 1000. Special EF: Under age 23 or age 60 and older: $30 in 3-day,
$29 in 2-day, $35 at site, no other discounts apply. 3-Day Schedule: Reg.
Sat. 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Rds. Sat. 10:30-5:30, Sun. 10-5, Mon. 9:30-4:30.
2-Day Schedule: Reg. Sun. 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Rds. Sun. 10-12:30-2:45-
5, Mon. 9:30-4:30. Schedules merge in round 4. Byes: 1-5, limit 2, rds.
4-5 must commit before rd. 2. Memb. req.: MACA $12 adult, $6 jr. U18,
add $8 for optional Chess Horizons subscription, OSA. Massachusetts
Blitz Championship: Sun. 5/27. Reg. ends 9:15 p.m. 5SS (dbl). 75% of
EFs returned as prizes. EF: $10 if playing in main tmnt, else $15. MACA
Annual Meeting: Mon. 5/28 at 9 a.m. HR: $92-92, reserve by 5/14 and
mention chess tnmt. Ent: payable to MACA and mail to Robert Messen-
ger, 4 Hamlett Dr., Apt. 12, Nashua NH 03062, or enter online (PayPal) at
www.MassChess.org. Info: send email to info@masschess.org or phone
603-891-2484. NS. NC. W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
May 26-28, Oklahoma
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 20
31st NAO FIDE Open
8-SS, G/90+30spm, (Reserve: 10-SS, G-50+15 spm dual rated). Reg.:
9-9:45. $$G 1,900. Quality Inn-Stillwater, 2515 W. 6th Ave. (Hwy-51) Still-
water, OK 1-405-372-0800. HR: 68-68. Wi-Fi, EF: Open: $55, Reserve: $30
(deduct $10only if ck postmarked before May 22): OCF $10 required OSNA.
Two Sections: Open (FIDE): Gtd 1st 500, 300, 200, X: $200 A: $200-100,
B: $200, C+UNR: $200, Rds at 10-2:30-7, 10-2:30-7, 9-1:15. 2 half pt byes
rds 1-8, Reserve: U-1400 and Unrated 1st $100, Other class prizes per
entrees; Rds at 10-1-4-7, 10-1-4-7, 9-Noon. 3 half pt byes rds 1-10 for
Reserve, LS, W, Free Parking. Frank Berry, 402 S. Willis St., Stillwater, OK
74074. FKimBerry@AOL.com, 405 372-5758. Chess Magnet School JGP
for Open Section.
May 27, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15 (Enhanced)
2nd Annual New Yorker Open Blitz Championship (QC)!
5-SS, G/5 + d/0 (5 double rounds, 10 games total). Chess Center at the
New Yorker Hotel, 481 Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station,
NYC (see New Yorker Open, 5/25-28). EF at site only: $40, $20 if rated
Under 1800, GMs free ($25 from prize), specified Greater NY Scholas-
tic prizewinners free. $$1,000 b/40 paid entries (U1800 count 1/2), top
3 Gtd: $$ 300-200-100, Top U2400/unr $150, U2200 $130, U2000 $120.
Byes OK rds. 1-2 (1 bye for U2000). CCA ratings may be used. Reg 7-10
pm. Rds. 10:15-11-11:30-12-12:30. Quick-rated (will not affect regular
ratings) but prizes, pairings based on higher of Regular or Quick rating.
May 31, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 20 (Enhanced)
The New Yorker Masters!!
4-SS, G/25 +d5 or G/30 +d/0. Chess Center of New York at the historic
New Yorker Hotel!, 481 Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station,
NYC. 2 sections. Masters, open to players currently or formerly rated
over 2200 USCF or FIDE, or any player scoring 2 1/2 or more points in
any “4 Rated Games Tonight!” Thursday Night Action tournament since
Jan. 2011. $1,500 Guaranteed Prizes! $400-200-100, top U2400 150.
Under 2200: $200-100, top U1800 $100. NEW!! Mixed Doubles Bonus
Prizes: best male/female 2-player team combined score in either sec-
tion: $150-100 (teammates’ average rating must be Under 2200; team-
mate pairings avoided but possible, teams must declare by 8:15). Choice
of 2schedules! 7:00 Schedule, rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. 7:30 sched-
ule, rd. 1 (G/15 + td/3) at 7:30 pm, score carries over into round 2 of
7:00 schedule at 8:15 pm. EF: Masters Section $40, Under 2200 Section
$30, $5 less to anyone who played in 4 or more “4 Rated Games Tonight!”
Thursday Night Action tournaments since Jan. 2011, GMs free ($25
from prize). Limit 2 byes (limit one bye towards class prize), must com-
mit by 8:15 pm. Re-entry: half-price. Reg. ends 10 min. before game. CCA
ratings may be used.
A Heritage Event!
June 1-3 or 2-3, Ohio
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 40
54th Gem City Open
5SS at the Dayton Chess Club, 18 W. 5th St., Dayton, OH. Time Controls:
3 day-G/150, td/5. 2 day option Rs 1&2 G/75, td/5 then merge in R3 with
3 day schedule and time controls. $$5,000 Gtd. 4 sections: OPEN
(FIDE Rated): $1000- $550- $350-$250, U2000: $500-$300-$150, U1700:
$500- $300-$150, U1400: $500-$300-$150. Unrated prizes limited to 1/3
except in OPEN w/bal to next player(s). EF: 3-day $67, 2-day $65 if mailed
or registered online or at Dayton Chess Club by 5/25, thereafter $77 for
2 or 3 day. Free to GMs or IMs who complete their schedule. No cks at
site, MC/Visa ok. DCC Mbrs $5 discount. 3-Day Reg: Fri 6pm - 7:30pm.
3 Day Rounds: Fri 8 pm R1, Sat 11-6 Rs 2&3, Sun 9-3:30 Rs 4&5. 2-Day
Reg Fri nite & Sat 9am-1030am, 2 Day Rounds: Sat 11-2:30 Rs 1&2, then
3 day schedule. Sun DCC Opens 8 a.m. Byes: 2 ok - must commit by R2,
1if R5. Hotel: CrownPlaza $92 (1-4), 937.229.9835. Ask for the Gem City
Open Group Rate. Register online at www.DaytonChessClub.com or mail
to Dayton Chess Club, 18 West 5th St., Dayton, OH 45402. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
June 2-3, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 6
6th Annual Buffalo International Chess Championships 2012
Old First Ward Community Center, 62 Republic St., Buffalo, NY. Two day,
World Chess Federation (FIDE) and USCF Open rated Championships, 5
games, Swiss, Game 120 with 5 sec delay. Payments must be received
by May 19, 2012. Online Registrations with reply to: arcangel8chess@
yahoo.com. For more information, www.buffalochess.blogspot.com.
Canadians and FIDE rated players are Welcomed $10 less! Sat and Sun-
day, Sections are FIDE Open & FIDE Womens, games on Sat at 10am,
2:30pmand 7pm, Sunday at 9:30am and 2pm. Cash Prizes based on 24
players, EF $55, $80 after. Canadians and FIDE rated players $10 less,
GMs & IMs are free entry. Cash Prizes are $260, $190, $130 and $70. One
Byes are available! Saturday, June 2, 2012 Only! U1900, U1500 and Schol-
astics K-12: U1900 and U1500, 5 games, Swiss, Game 60; d5, USCF rated,
EF $40, $65 after! Games will start on Sat only at 10am, Noon, 2pm, 4pm
and 6pm. One Bye Available! Cash Prizes are based on 24 players, $150,
$90, $60, U1700 and U1200 - $55. Scholastic TEAM K-12 Champion-
ships, Saturday Only, 5 games, Swiss, Game 30, Teams consist of 4 play-
ers or more. Team EF $80 or $25 per player, $35 after. Sections of play
are K-2, 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12 grades, Team Trophies awarded to the Top 4
and Top 5 winners, Medals awarded to players who score 2pts. Games
start at 11am, Noon, 1pm, 2pm and 3pm. Buffalo FIDE Championship
Hotel: Comfort Inn and Suites, 475 Dingens St, Buffalo, NY 14206, Phone
716-896-2800, HR: $119.99 per night. Chess Magnet School JGP for
main event.
June 3, New Jersey
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15 (Enhanced)
Dr. David Ostfeld Memorial ICA Summer 2012 Open Championship
4SS, G/60. BergenAcademy, 200Hackensack Ave., Hackensack, NJ 07601.
Open To All Ages With Rating above 1400. U. S. Chess Federation Mem-
bership Required. Prize Fund ($$ b/40) 1st-3rd $300, $250, $200,
U2200, U2000, U1800, U1600 each $100. Best Under 13 Years Old $75,
Best Over 55 Years Old $75. Prize Fund Will Not Be Reduced Below 70
%. Reg. Ends at 9 AM Only one requested 1/2-point bye allowed, if
requested before the start of round two. EF: Adv (pmk. By May 30th) $40,
AT Site $45. GMs Free Entry. INFO: 201 287 0250 or 201 833 1741,
Email: Diana@icanj.net (Web Site Entries: www.icanj.net). Rds.: 9:30 AM,
11:45 AM, 2:15 PM, 4:30 PM. ENT: Make EF and/or USCF Membership
checks payable to: International Chess Academy. Mail To: Diana Tulman,
28 Canterbury Ln., New Milford, NJ 07646. NS. NC. W.
June 8-10 or 9-10, Connecticut
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 50 (Enhanced)
18th Annual Northeast Open
5SS, 40/2, SD/1 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75). Sheraton Hotel (formerly
Holiday InnSelect), 700MainSt., Stamford, CT 06901. Free parking. $8,000
guaranteed prize fund. In 4 sections. Open: $1000-500-300-200, U2250
$600–300. FIDE. Under 2050: $800-400-300-200, top U1850 $500-250.
Under 1650: $700-400-250-150, top U1450 $400-200. Under 1250:
$300-150-100, trophy to top U1000, U800, U600, Unrated. Unrated may
not win over $150 in U1250 or $400 in U1650. Top 3 sections EF: 3-day
$88.50, 2-day $87.50 if check mailed by 5/30, all $89 online at chesstour.
com by 6/6, $95 phoned to 406-896-2038 by 6/6 (entry only, no questions),
$100 at site. No mailed credit card entries. U1250 Section EF: all $40
less than above. No checks at site, credit cards OK. GMs free, $80 deduct-
ed from prize. Mailed EF $3 less to CSCA members. Re-entry $50; not
available in Open Section. Unofficial uschess.org ratings usually used if
otherwise unrated. Special 1 year USCF dues with paper magazine if
paid with entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young Adult $20,
Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young Adult $30,
Scholastic $20. 3-day schedule: Reg ends Fri 6:30 pm, rds. Fri 7 pm,
Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. 2-day schedule: Reg ends Sat 10:30 am, rds.
Sat 11, 2:30 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. Bye: all, limit 2; must commit before rd
2. HR: $94-94, 800-408-7640, 203-358-8400; reserve by 5/25 or rate may
increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-1600, AWD D657633, or reserve car
online through chesstour.com. Ent: Continental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury
Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge for refunds. Questions: www.chess
tour.com, 845-496-9658. Advance entries posted at chesstour.com.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 8-10 or 9-10, Florida
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 20
Sunshine Summer Open & Scholastic Chess Tournament (formerly
the After Memorial Open, now more sections)
DoubleTree Hilton Orlando Downtown, 60 South Ivanhoe Blvd., Orlando,
FL 32804 (I-4 Exit 84). $7,000/b130 (Scholastic = 1/2 entry). 70%
Guaranteed. 5SS, G/120 (2-day. Rnd 1 G/60). 4 Sections: OPEN: $1000-
500-300, U2210 & U2010 $300-200 ea.; U1910: $700-300-150, U1710
$300-200; U1510: $700-300-150, U1310 $300-200; Scholastic U1310:
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 59
60 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
$300-200-100, U1110 & U910 $150 ea. Trophy to top each age “7 & under”
thru14withat least 2 players. Unrateds limited to $100, unless Place prize
in Open. Rated players can play-up if rated within 60 points of top of their
section. EF: 3-day $75, 2-day $74, Scholastic U1310: EF: $35; After
May 31, EF: $80, ($45 for Scholastic). Reg.: ends 1/2 hr. before 1st Rd.
Scholastic (Sat & Sun only). Rnd 1: 7pm Fri (or 10am Sat at G/60). Re-
entry $40. Rds 2 thru 5: Sat 1 & 6, Sun 9 & 2. 1/2-pt. byes if req'd before
Rnd 2 (max 2). HR: $79 (407) 425-4455; (Mention “Chess”) or http://
tinyurl.com/June2012Hotel. Reserve by May 15. Hot Breakfast Buffet
at $5/person/day with room at checkin. Complimentary parking, Fitness
Center, and Internet with sleeping rooms. Other covered Day parking avail-
able at $7/day. Ent: CFCC, c/o Harvey Lerman, 921 N. Thistle Lane,
Maitland, FL 32751 or online at http://2012sunshine.eventbrite.com
(by 6/7). Info: call (407)629-6946 or www.centralflchess.org. Chess
Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
A State Championship Event!
June 9-10, Kentucky
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15
2012 Kentucky Open
5SS, G/90. $$3725 b/120. Registration: 9-9:45am. Rounds: June 9th:
rd 1-3 10am, 2pm, 5:30pm, June 10th: rd 4-5 9am, 2pm. 1 half point bye
available rd 1-4 if noted by rd 2. Entry Fee: $42 in advance, $50 on site.
KCA dues ($8) required for all players. Prizes: Open: $800-400-200-100;
X: 200-100; A: 200-100; U1800: 400-200-100-50; B: 100-50; C: 100-50;
U1400: 200-100-50-25; D: 50-25; E: 50-25; Top Jr. 50. Go to kcachess.org
for more info. Annual meeting of the KCA Board between rds 4 and 5. St.
Francis High School, 233 West Broadway (entrance is on 3rd Street),
Louisville, KY 40202. Contact: Steve Dillard, stevedillard@hotmail.com,
502-641-1948 or Daniel Brennan, cyberdaniel82@hotmail.com, 502-645-
4202. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 14, Nevada
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 80 (Enhanced)
2012 U.S. Game/10 Championship (QC)
See Nationals.
A Heritage Event!
An American Classic!
June 15-17 or 16-17, Nevada
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 200 (Enhanced)
2012 National Open
See Nationals.
June 22-24 or 23-24, California, Northern
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 15 (Enhanced)
Summer Open
6SS, G/90 (2day rds 1-2 G/40). 1639A S. Main St., Milpitas, CA 95035.
Park free. Prize $2,400b/55. 3 sects. 1900+: guar 85% $300 200 100
u2100: 100 80. 1500-1899: $300 200 70 u1700:100 70 70. U1500: $300
200 70 u1300: 100 70 70. Unr max $100 exc Open. EF: $67 by 6/20, Onsite
+15 Playup +20. Econ: EF-20, 1/2 prize. GMs/IMs free: prize-EF. Jun
12 Supp, CCA min & TD discr. Sched: Reg. F 6-6:30p, Rds. F 7, Sa 9 12:15
3:30, Su 9 12:15 (2day Reg. Sa 8-8:30am rds Sa 9 10:35 merge rd3). Max
2 1/2pt byes by rd 3. Info: BayAreaChess.com/summer12. E: ask@Bay
AreaChess.com, NS, NC. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 22-24 or 23-24, Georgia
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 80
2012 Castle Chess Grand Prix
5-SS, G/120 (2 day schedule, rd 1 G/90). Cox Hall, Emory University, 569
Asbury Cir., Atlanta, GA 30322. $8,675 G! Six sections: Premier (over
1999): $1,500-1000-500; U2400/Unr: $700-400; U2200: $600-375; Class
A: $550-325; Class B: $500-$300; Class C: $450-275; Class D: $400-250;
U1200: $350-200; U1000: Trophy. Non-campers may play one section
above current rating. Campers may play one section above lifetime peak
rating. All players are eligible for all prizes in the section in which they
play. EF: $69 if received by 6/21. $79 later or at site. Free to GM, IM or
USCF 2400. Unrated Players: $50; no discount to Unrated in Premier Sec-
tion. Unratedmay enter any section, except need TD's OK to enter Premier
Section. Unrated may not win over $150 in U1200, $ 200 in D, $250 in C,
$300 in B or $350 in A. Balance of any limited prize goes to next player(s)
in line. 3 day schedule: Reg.: 6:30-7:30 pm on 6/22. Rds.: 8; 1:30-6:30;
9-1:30. 2 day schedule: Reg.: 8:30-9:30 am on 6/23. Rd 1 at 10 am, then
merges with 3 day schedule. HR: University Inn, 404-634-7327. Half point
bye any round. Limit 2. Must commit before starting play. No changes. Ent:
5025 Antebellum Dr., Stone Mtn., GA 30087. Make check payable to: Cas-
tle Chess, Inc. Info: Scott Parker, 770-939-5030 tournament@castlechess.
org, on-line registration at www.castlechess.org NS, NC, W. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
June 22-24 or 23-24, Ohio
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 80 (Enhanced)
2012 Columbus Open
5-SS, 30/90, SD/60 (2-day schedule, rd. 1 G/90), ALL PRIZES UNCON-
DITIONALLY GUARANTEED. 3 sections: Open, open to all. G $1200, 800,
500, 400, 300; U2000, $500, 300; Premier, open to 1799/below: $500,
300; U1600: $500, 300; Reserve, open to 1399/below: $500, 300;
U1200: $500, 300. All EF: $85 if rec’d by 6/16/2011. $95 at site. Free
to Sr. Master/above who complete their schedule. ($85 EF deducted from
winnings.) 3-day schedule: Reg. Ends Fri. 6:30 p.m., Rds: Fri. 7 p.m.;
Sat. 2 p.m., 7:30 p.m.; Sun. 9:30 a.m., 3 p.m. 2-day schedule: Reg. Ends
Sat. 9:30 a.m. Rd 1 at 10 a.m., then merges with 3-day schedule. Re-entry:
$20. Any player who loses Fri. night may re-enter for $20 and loss will
not count in tournament standings! One 1/2-pt. Bye available in Rds 1-
4 (request required prior to Rd 1). Unrated players may play in any
section. $25 upset prize each section. HOTELS: HOLIDAY INN DOWN-
TOWN CAPITAL SQUARE, 175 E. TOWN ST., COLUMBUS, 43215.
(614)221-3281. ROOM RATE: $99.00 plus tax (includes parking). Hotel
remodeled, with expanded playing space, skittles room, many amenities.
Chess rate available through June 1st, code CCC. (note: there is a large
convention in Columbus this weekend; rooms scarce.) Alternative hotel:
The German Village Inn, one mile from playing site, 920 S. High St., (614)
443-6506, $59.00 plus tax. Free parking: Bd. of Ed. Lot between 5th and
6th St., on Capital St., 5 min. walk from site. ENT: C/O Lou Friscoe, 1645
Glenn Ave., Columbus, OH 43212. Inquires: (614) 486-6856 or (614)
228-8111. Entry forms available at our website: www.centralchess
club.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 29-July 3 (New date), Pennsylvania
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 150 (Enhanced)
9th annual Philadelphia International
9SS, 40/90,SD/30, 30 second increment. Sheraton Philadelphia City
Center Hotel, 17th & Race Sts., Philadelphia, PA 19103. Parking $10/day
chess rate with guest room at Sheraton, $20/day chess rate without guest
room, parking lot next to hotel may be much less than $20. $$G 8000:
$2000-1200-800-700-600-500-400-300, top FIDE under 2300 or unrated
$1000-500. Minimum prize $800 to foreign GMs who complete all games
with no byes (limited to first 5 foreign GMs to enter), $300 to US GMs,
foreign IMs & foreign WGMs (all must complete all games with no byes.)
IM& GM norms possible; FIDE rated. EF: Free to GMs, IMs, WGMs. For-
eign FIDE rated players: $125 mailed by 6/18, $127 online by 6/23, $150
at tmt. USA current or former FIDE 2200/up rated players: $225 mailed
by 6/18, $227 online by 6/23, $250 at tmt. Others: $325 mailed by 6/18,
$327 online by 6/23, $350 at tmt. All: No checks at site, credit cards OK.
Special 1 year USCF dues with magazine: see World Open. Schedule:
Late reg. ends Fri 10 am, rds Fri through Mon 11 & 6, Tue 11. Two half
point byes available (must commit before rd 2); norm not possible if tak-
ing bye. HR: $99-99, 215-448-2000, reserve by 6/5 or rate may increase.
Bring sets, boards, clocks if possible- none supplied. Ent: Continen-
tal Chess, PO Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge for
refunds. Questions: 845-496-9658, www.chesstour.com. Advance entries
posted at chesstour.com. Invitations: GoAtChess.us (use @ instead of
at). Chess Magnet School JGP.
July 4, Pennsylvania
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10 (Enhanced)
World Open 7-Minute Championship (QC)
Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel (see World Open). 5-SS, double
round (10 games), G/7, d/2. Prizes $1200 based on 40 entries, else in
proportion except half each prize guaranteed. $300-200-100, U2100
$160-80, U1800 $130-70, U1500/Unr $110-50. EF: $40, at site only, no
checks. Reg. ends 12:30 pm, rds. 1:00, 2:00, 2:50, 3:40, 4:30. One pair
of 1/2 pt byes available, must commit before rd 2. Quick rated (will not
affect regular ratings), but higher of regular or quick used for pairings
& prizes.
A Heritage Event!
An American Classic!
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, Pennsylvania
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 300 (Enhanced)
40th Annual World Open
9SS (Senior Amateur, Women's Championship and Under 13 Booster are
6SS). Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel, 17th & Race Streets,
Philadelphia, PA 19103. For shuttle info from Philadelphia Airport, call 800-
559-2040 or 215-616-5370. Parking $10/day chess rate with guest room
at Sheraton, $20/day chess rate without guest room, Gateway lot at 1540
Vine, 1 block from hotel, is about $5/day Sat & Sun, $18/day other days.
In 13 sections with $250,000 projected prizes, $200,000 minimum. 80%
of each prize guaranteed based on 1180 paid entries total in first 9
listed sections, all prizes guaranteed in Senior Amateur, Womens Cham-
pionship, Under 13 Championship, and Under 13 Booster. GMs, IMs,
WGMs, Under 1200, seniors count as 50% entries, Under 900 as
15%entries. Free analysis of your games by GM Sam Palatnik 7/4-8; free
GM lectures 9 am 7/6 & 7/7. Time controls: Open 40/90, SD/30, 30 sec-
ond increment. U2400, U2200, U2000, U1800, U1600, U1400, U1200
40/2, SD/1, d/5 (4-day option rds 1-2 G/75, d/5, 3-day option rds 1-5
G/45, d/5). U900, Under 13 Championship, Under 13 Booster G/65,
d/5. Senior Amateur, Womens Championship 40/2, SD/1,d/5. Open,
9SS, July 4-8 or 2-8: $20000-10000-5000-2500-1200-1000-800-700-600-
500, clear winner bonus $300, top FIDE U2500 $2000-1000. If tie for first,
top 2 on tiebreak play speed game 11:30 pm 7/8 for title & bonus prize.
GM & IM norms possible. FIDE rated. Under 2400/Unr, 9SS, July 4-8,
5-8, 6-8 or 2-8: $13000-7000-3000-1500-1000-900-800-700-600-500, top
U2300/Unr $2000-1000. FIDE rated. Under 2200/Unr, 9SS, July 4-8, 5-
8, 6-8 or 2-8: $13000-7000-3000-1500-1000-900-800-700-600-500, top
U2100 (no unr) $2000-1000. FIDE rated. Under 2000/Unr, 9SS, July 4-
8, 5-8, 6-8 or 2-8:$13000-7000-3000-1500-1000-900-800-700-600-500,
top U1900 (no unr) $2000-1000. Under 1800/Unr, 9SS, July 4-8, 5-8,
6-8 or 2-8: $13000-7000-3000-1500-1000-900-800-700-600-500, top
U1700 (no unr) $2000-1000. Under 1600/Unr, 9SS, July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8
or 2-8: $11000-6000-3000-1500-1000-900-800-700-600-500, top 1500 (no
unr) $2000-1000. Under 1400/Unr, 9SS, July 4-8, 5-8 or 6-8: $10000-
5000-2500-1200-1000-800-700-600-500-400, top U1300 (no unr)
$1600-800. Under 1200/Unr, 9SS, July 4-8, 5-8 or 6-8: $5000-2500-
1200-1000-800-700-600-500-400-300, top U1100 (no Unr) $1200-600.
Under 900/Unr, 9SS, July 6-8: $1000-700-500-400-300-300-300, tro-
phies to first 10, top U700, U500, U300, Unrated. Senior Amateur, 6SS,
July 1-3: Open to Under 2010 or unrated born before 7/4/62. $$ 500-
300-200, topU1810 $280-140, top U1610/Unr $250-130, top U1410 $200.
Women's Championship, 6SS, July 1-3: Open to all females. $$ 500-
300-200, top U1800 $240, U1600 $220, U1400 $200, U1200 $180, U1000
$160, trophy to top U800, U600, Unrated. FIDE rated. Under 13 Cham-
pionship, 9SS, July 1-3: Open to all born after 7/3/99. Trophies to top
10, 1st C, D, E, Unrated. Free entry to all CCA tournaments 7/15/12-
12/31/12 to 1st. Under 13 Booster, 6SS, July 4-5: Open to all born after
7/5/99 rated under 1000 or unrated. Trophies to top 10, 1st U800, U600,
U400, U200; free entry to all CCA tournaments 7/15/11-10/31/11 to1st.
Prize limits: 1) Players with under 26 games played as of 7/12 official
list may not win over $600 inU900, $1500 in U1200, $3000 in U1400 or
U1600. Games rated too late for 7/12 list not counted. 2) If official rat-
ing 7/11-6/12 or unofficial post-event rating posted 7/3/11-7/3/12
was more than 30 points over section maximum, prize limit $2000. 3)
Unrated (0-3 lifetime games rated) cannot win over $300 in U900, $800
U1200, $1200 U1400, $1600 U1600, $2000 U1800, or $2500 U2000. 4)
Balance of any limited prize goes to next player(s) in line. Open, U2400,
U2200, U2200, U1800, U1600, U1400 EF: Mailed by 2/15, all 5-day $305,
4-day $304, 3-day $303, 7-day $307. Open has 5-day and 7-day only; no
7-day in U1400 or U1200. Mailed by 5/15 all $10 more, mailed by 6/20
all $20 move. Online at chesstour. com, all $307 by 2/15, $317 by 5/15,
$327 by 6/25, $350 6/26 to 2 hours before round 1 or at site. Phoned
to 406-896-2038, all $330 by 6/25. At site, all $350; nochecks, credit cards
OK. GMs free in Open; $200 deducted from prize. IMs, WGMs EF $100
less, $100 deducted from prize. All Open Section EF $100 more for US
players never rated 2200 or over by FIDE. Under 1200 Section EF: all
$150 less. EF for U900 Section, or unrated in U1200 Section: $43
mailed by 6/20, $47 online at chesstour. com by 6/25, $60 online to 2 hours
before round 1 or at site. Rated seniors 65/up in U1400 or over: all
$150 less. Senior Amateur or Women's Championship EF: $76 mailed
by 6/20, $78 online by 6/25, $90 at site. Under 13 Championship or
Under 13 Novice EF: $39 mailed by 6/20, $41 online by 6/25, $50 at site.
No checks at site; credit cards OK. Re-entry: $160, no re-entry from Open
to Open. $20 fee for switch-ing section after 7/3. Special 1 year USCF
dues with magazine if paid with entry: Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30,
Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40,
Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. Open to U1200 5-day schedule: Wed
7 pm, Thu 11 am & 6 pm, Fri 11 am & 6 pm, Sat 11 am & 6 pm, Sun 10
am & 5 pm. U2400 to U1200 4-day schedule: Thu 11, 2:30 & 6, Fri 11
& 6, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 5. U2400 to U1200 3-day schedule: Fri 11,
1:30, 3:30, 6 & 8:30, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 5. Open to U1600 7-day sched-
ule: Mon-Wed 7 pm, Thu-Fri 6 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 5. All above
schedules merge &compete for same prizes. Under 900 schedule: Fri
11 am, 2 pm & 5 pm, Sat & Sun each 10 am, 1 pm, 4 pm. Senior Ama-
teur & Women's Championship schedule: Sun 11 am & 6 pm, Mon 10
& 5, Tue 10 & 4:30. Under 13 Championship schedule: Sun 11 am, 2
pm & 5 pm, Mon 10, 1 & 4, Tue 10, 1 & 4. Under 13 Booster schedule:
Wed 11 am, 2 pm & 5 pm, Thu 10, 1 & 4. Half point byes OK all, limit 4
(limit 2 in last 4 rds), Open must commit before rd 2, others before rd
4. Limit 1 half point bye in 6 round sections. Entries, re-entries close 1
hour before your first game. Bring sets, boards, clocks if possible- none
supplied. HR: $99-99, 215-448-2000, ask for chess rate, may sell out about
May 31, two night minimum July 6-7. Special car rental rates: Avis, 800-
331-1600, AWD #D657633, or reserve car online through chesstour.com.
Foreign player ratings: Usually 100 pts added to FIDE (except Open Sec-
tion), 100 to FQE, 200or moretomost foreign, no pts added to CFC, Puerto
Rico or Jamaica. Some foreign ratings not accepted for U2000 or below.
Highest of multiple ratings usually used. Players who fail to disclose for-
eign or FIDE ratings may be expelled. US player ratings: Official July
ratings used; FIDE ratings used for Open Section only. Unofficial
uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Special rules:
1) Players must submit to a search for electronic devices if requested
by Director. In round3 or after, players with scores of 80% or over and
their opponents may not use headphones, earphones, cell phones or go
to a different floor of the hotel without Director permission. Ent: Conti-
nental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. Questions:
www.chesstour.com, DirectorAtChess. US, 845-496-9658. You may request
“lowest possible section” if July rating unknown. $15 service charge for
refunds. Advance entries will be posted at chesstour.com. Bring set,
board, clock if possible-none supplied. Chess Magnet School JGP.
July 7, Pennsylvania
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 10 (Enhanced)
World Open 10-Minute Championship (QC)
5SS, G/10, d/2. Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel (see World
Open). Prizes $2000 based on 67 entries, else in proportion except half
each prize guaranteed. In 2 sections. Open Section: $400-200-100,
top U2300/Unr $220, U2100/Unr$200. Under 1900 Section: $280-140-
70, top U1700 $160, U1500 $130, U1300 $100, no unrated may win over
$150. Entry fee: $40, at site only, no checks. Reg: 7-10 pm, rounds 10:15
pm, 11pm, 11:35 pm, 12:10 am, 12:45 am. 1 half point bye available, must
commit before rd 2. Quick-rated (will not affect regular ratings), but higher
of regular or quick used for pairings & prizes.
July 8, Pennsylvania
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 30 (Enhanced)
World Open Blitz Championship (QC)
5SS, G/5 (double round, 10 games). Sheraton PhiladelphiaCity Center
Hotel (see World Open). $2500 guaranteed prizes. In 2 sections: Open
Section: $500-300-200, top U2400 $220, U2200/Unr $200. Under 2000
Section: $300-150-80, top U1800 $180, U1600 $160, U1400 $130, U1200
$80, no unrated may win over $150. Entry fee: $40, at site only, no checks.
Reg.: 6-11 pm, rounds 11:15 pm, 12 midnight, 12:30 pm, 1 am, 1:30 am.
Bye: OK rd 1. Quick-rated (will not affect regular ratings); prizes based
on higher of regular or quick ratings.
July 19-22, 20-22 or 21-22, California, Southern
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 100 (Enhanced)
17th annual Pacific Coast Open
6SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-3 G/45,d5). Under 900 Section,
July 21-22 only, G/70, d/5. Sheraton Agoura Hills Hotel, 30100 Agoura
Rd., Agoura Hills, CA 91301 (US-101 to Reyes Adobe Road exit). Adjacent
DROPPING OUT?
Have to miss a round?
It is very important that you
NOTIFY THE DIRECTOR
before pairings are made, so no one
is deprived of a game! If you forfeit
without notice, you may be FINED
up to the amount of the entry fee!
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 60
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 61
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
to the Santa Monica Mountains, 26 miles west of Burbank, 12 miles from
Malibu, 28 miles from Ventura. Free parking. Prizes $25,000 based on
230 paid entries (re-entries count half, Under 900 one-third), minimum
$15,000 (60% each prize) guaranteed. In 7 sections. Open: $3000-1500-
700-400, clear or tiebreak win $100 bonus, top U2300/Unr $1600-800.
FIDE. Under 2100: $2000-1000-500-300. Under 1900: $2000-1000-500-
300. Under 1700: $1800-900-500-300. Under 1500: $1500-700-400-200.
Under 1200: $1200-600-300-200. Under 900: $300-200-120-80, trophies
to top 7. Unrated may enter any section, with prize limit U2100 $1000,
U1900 $800, U1700 $600, U1500 $400, U1200 $200, U900 $100; balance
goes to next player(s) in line. If any post-event rating posted at uschess.
org 7/18/11-7/18/12 is more than 30 points over section maximum, prize
limit $600. Top 6 sections EF: 4-day $134, 3-day $133, 2-day $132
mailed by 7/10, all $135 online at chesstour.com by 7/15, $140 phoned
by 7/15 (406-896-2038, entry only, no questions), $150 (no checks,
credit cards OK) at tmt. No mailed credit card entries. GMs free; $120
deducted from prize. Under 900 Section EF: all $90 less than above.
SCCF membership ($18, jrs $10) required for rated Southern CA res-
idents. Re-entry $70; not available in Open Section. Unofficial uschess.
org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Special 1 year USCF dues
with magazine if paid with entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young
Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young
Adult $30, Scholastic $20. 4-day schedule: Reg Thu to 6:30 pm, rds Thu
7 pm, Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 3-day schedule: Reg. Fri to
11 am, rds Fri 12 & 7, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 2-day schedule: Reg
Sat to 9 am, rds Sat 10,12:45, 3:15 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. Under 900 sched-
ule: Reg Sat to 9 am, rds 10, 1:15, 4:30 each day. All schedules: Half
point byes OK all, limit 2, Open must commit before rd 2, other sections
before rd 4. HR: $87-87, 818-707-1220, request chess rate, reserve by
7/5 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-1600, use AWD
#D657633. Ent: Continental Chess, PO Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY
12577. $15 service charge for refunds. Questions: www.chesstour.com,
845-496-9658. Advance entries posted at chesstour.com. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
July 20-22 or 21-22, Illinois
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 120 (Enhanced)
5th annual Chicago Class
5SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75, d/5). Westin Chicago
North Shore Hotel, 601 North Milwaukee Ave., Wheeling, IL 60090 (from
Chicago, I-294 north to US-45 north; from Milwaukee, I-94 to Lake Cook
Rd to US-45 south). Free parking. $20,000 guaranteed prize fund. In
8 sections; no unrated allowed in Master or Expert. Master (2200/up):
$2000-1000-600-400, clear win or 1st on tiebreak $100, top U2400 $800-
400. FIDE. Expert (2000-2199): $1400-700-400-200. Class A (1800-1999/
Unr): $1400-700-400-200. Class B (1600-1799/Unr): $1400-700-400-200.
Class C (1400-1599/Unr): $1200-600-400-200. Class D (1200-1399/Unr):
$1000-500-300-200. Class E (Under 1200/Unr): $1000-500-300-200.
Under 1000 (Under 1000/Unr): $200-100-60-40, trophies to first 5, top
Under 800, Under 600, Unrated. Rated players may play up one section.
Prize limits: Unrated may not win over $100 in U1000, $200 E, $300 D,
$500 C, $700 B, or $900 A. If any post-event rating posted at uschess.org
7/19/11-7/19/12 is more than 30 points over section maximum, prize
limit $500. Top 7 sections EF: 3-day $103, 2-day $102 mailed by 7/11,
all $104 online at chesstour.com by 7/16, $110 phoned to 406-896-2038
by 7/16 (entry only, no questions), $120 at site. Under 1000 Section EF:
all $70 less than above. All: No mailed credit card entries. No checks at
site, credit cards OK. Online or mailed EF $5 less to ICA members; join/
renew at il-chess.org. An ICA Tour event. Unofficial uschess.org ratings
usually used if otherwise unrated. Special 1 year USCF dues with paper
magazine if paid with entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young Adult
$20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young Adult
$30, Scholastic $20. Re-entry $50; not available in Master Section. GMs
$80 from prize. 3-day schedule: Reg. ends Fri 6 pm, rds. Fri 7, Sat 11
& 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 2-day schedule: Reg. ends Sat 10 am, rds. Sat 11,
2:30 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. Bye: all, Master must commit before rd 2, oth-
ers before rd 3. HR: $103-103-103-103, 800-937-8461, 847-777-6500,
reserve by 7/6 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-1600, use
AWD #D657633. Ent: Continental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY
12577. $15 service charge for refunds. Questions: chesstour.com, 845-
496-9658. Advance entries posted at chesstour.com. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
July 27-29 or 28-29, Connecticut
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 50 (Enhanced)
17th Annual Bradley Open
5SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75, d/5). Sheraton Hotel,
1 Bradley Airport (visible at airport entrance), Windsor Locks, CT 06096
(I-91 Exit 40 to Rt. 20). Free parking. $8000 guaranteed prize fund. In
5 sections. Open: $1000-500-300, U2300 $450. FIDE. Under 2100: $800-
400-200, top U1900 $450. Under 1800: $800-400-200, top U1600 $450.
Under 1500: $700-400-200, top U1300 $300. Under 1200: $250-125-75,
trophies to 1st place, top U1000, U800, U600, Unrated. Unrated may not
win over $150 in U1200, $300 in U1500 or $500 in U1800. Top 4 sec-
tions EF: 3-day $88, 2-day $87 if check mailed by 7/18, all $89 online at
chesstour.com by 7/24, $95 phoned to 406-896-2038 by 7/24 (entry
only, no questions), $100 at site. No mailed credit card entries. U1200
Section EF: all $40 less than above. No checks at site, credit cards OK.
GMs free, $80 deducted from prize. Mailed EF $3 less to CSCA or WMCA
members. Re-entry $50; not availableinOpen Section. Unofficial uschess.
org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Special 1 year USCF dues
with paper magazine if paid with entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30,
Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40,
Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. 3-day schedule: Reg ends Fri 6:30 pm,
rds. Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. 2-day schedule: Reg ends Sat
10:30 am, rds. Sat 11, 2:30 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. Bye: all, limit 2; must com-
mit before rd 2. HR: $89-89, 860-627-5311; reserve by 7/13 or rate may
increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-1600, AWD D657633, or reserve car
online through chesstour.com. Ent: Continental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury
Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge for refunds. Questions: www.chess
tour.com, DirectorAtChess.US, 845-496-9658. Advance entries posted at
chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
July 27-29 or 28-29, Florida
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 80 (Enhanced)
20th Annual Southern Open
5SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75, d/5). Wyndham
Orlando Resort, 8001 International Dr., Orlando 32819. Free parking.
$$16,000 based on 200 paid entries (re-entries & $50 off entries count
half), $12,000 (75% each prize) minimum guaranteed. In 5 sections.
Open: $2000-1000-500-300, clear or tiebreak winner $100 bonus, top
Under 2300/Unr $800, Under 2200/Unr $700. Under 2100: $1400-700-
400-200, top Under 1900 (no unr) $500. Under 1800: $1400-700-400-200,
top Under 1600 (no unr) $500. Under 1500: $1200-600-300-200, top Under
1300 (no unr) $400. Under 1200: $800-400-200-100, trophies to top
Under1000, Under 800, Under 600, Unrated. Unrated may not win over
$150 in U1200, $300 U1500, or $500 U1800. Top 4 sections EF: 3-day
$103, 2-day $102 mailed by 7/18, all $105 online at chesstour.com by 7/24,
$110 phoned to 406-896-2038 by 7/24 (entry only, no questions), $120
(no checks, credit cards OK) at site. GMs free; $100 deducted from prize.
EF for all in U1200 or unrated in U1500: all $50 less than above. Unof-
ficial uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Special
1 year USCF dues with paper magazine if paid with entry. Online at chess-
tour.com, Adult $30, Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or
paid at site, Adult $40, Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. Re-entry $60;
not available in Open Section. 3-day schedule: Reg ends Fri 6 pm, rds.
Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. 2-day schedule: Reg ends Sat 10
am, rds. Sat 11, 2:30 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. All: Half point byes OK all, limit
2, Open must commit before rd 2, others before rd 3. HR: $71-71 plus
resort fee (currently 7.5%), 1-800-421-8001, 407-351-2420; reserve by
7/13 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-1600, AWD D657633,
or reserve car online through chesstour.com. Ent: Continental Chess, Box
249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge for refunds. Ques-
tions: www.chesstour.com, Director@Chess.US, 845-496-9658. Advance
entries posted at chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
July 28-Aug. 1, Maryland
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 150
2012 Washington International
9SS, 40/90, SD/30 inc/30. Rockville Hilton, 1750 Rockville Pike, Rockville,
MD 20852, 301-468-0308. Guaranteed Prizes: $5000-3000-2000-1000-
900-800-700-600-500-500, top U2500 $700-300, top U2300 $700-300.
(minimum 2100 FIDE to play. FIDE ratings used for pairings and
prizes). Sets, board and clocks provided. GM and IM norms pos-
sible. Free Continental breakfast every morning. Optionally, pairings
can be texted to your phone. EF: GMs, non-US IMs, or FIDE over 2500
Free, US IMs, non-US FIDE rated, or FIDE over 2400 $200, FIDE over 2300
$300, FIDE over 2200 $400, FIDE under 2200 $500. All $25 more after
6/1, $50 more after 6/29, $75 more after 7/24, $100 more at the door.
Special EFs: ALL EFs $50 less, if staying at the Hilton. Schedule: Reg
ends Sat 10 am, rds 7/28-7/31:11&6, Wed 8/1 10am. HR: $98. Ent: MCA,
c/o Michael Regan, 1827 Thornton Ridge Rd., Towson, MD 21204. More
information, link for hotel reservation & online entry at: http://washing-
toninternationalchess.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Aug. 3-5 or 4-5, Ohio
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 100 (Enhanced)
Cleveland Open
5SS, 40/2, SD/1 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75). Sheraton Cleveland Air-
port Hotel, 5300 Riverside Dr. (inside Cleveland Airport; free shuttle),
Cleveland, OH 44135. Free parking, free airport shuttle. $16,000 guar-
anteed prize fund. In 6 sections. Open: $2000-1000-600-300, clear or
tiebreak winner $100 bonus, top Under2200/Unr $1200-600. FIDE.
Under 2000: $1400-700-400-200. Under 1800: $1400-700-400-200.
Under 1600: $1200-600-300-200. Under 1300: $1000-500-300-200.
Under 1000: $300-200-100, trophies to top U800, U600, Unr. Unrated
may not win over $150 in U1000, $300 U1300, $500 U1600, or $800 U1800.
Top 5 sections EF: 3-day $103, 2-day $102 mailed by 7/25, all $105 online
at chesstour.com by 7/31, $110phoned to 406-896-2038 by 7/31 (entry
only, no questions), $120 (no checks, credit cards OK) at site. No mailed
credit card entries. GMs free; $90 deducted from prize. EF for all in
U1000 or unrated in U1300: $70 less than above. Unofficial uschess.
org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Special 1 year USCF dues
with paper magazine if paid with entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30,
Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40,
Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. Re-entry $50; not available in Open Sec-
tion. 3-day schedule: Reg ends Fri 6 pm, rds. Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun
10 & 4:15. 2-day schedule: Reg ends Sat 10 am, rds. Sat 11, 2:30 & 6,
Sun 10 & 4:15. All: Half point byes OK all, limit 2, Open must commit before
rd 2, others before rd 3. HR: $85-85-85-85, 216-267-1500, request chess
rate, reserve by 7/20 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-
1600, AWD D657633, or reserve car online through chesstour.com. Ent:
Continental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge
for refunds. Questions: www.chesstour.com, DirectorAtChess.US, 845-
496-9658. Advance entries posted at chesstour.com. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
Aug. 4-12, 7-12 or 9-12, Washington
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 300
113th annual U.S. Open
See Nationals.
A Heritage Event!
Aug. 9-12, 10-12 or 11-12, Massachusetts
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 120 (Enhanced)
42nd annual Continental Open
6SS, 40/2, SD/1 (2-day option, rds 1-3 G/50). Host Hotel at Cedar Lake,
366 Main St. (Rt 20 West), Sturbridge, MA 01566 (I-84 Exit 3, near I-90).
Free parking. Experience early 19th century America at Old Sturbridge
Village (see www.osv.org). Prizes $30,000 based on 250 paid entries (re-
entries & $60 less EF count half), minimum $21,000 (70% of each prize)
guaranteed. In 7 sections. Open: $3000-1500-700-400-300, clear or tie-
break win $100 bonus, top U2400/Unr $1800-1000. FIDE. Under 2200:
$2000-1000-600-400-200. Under 2000: $2000-1000-600-400-200. Under
1800: $2000-1000-600-400-200. Under 1600: $1800-900-500-400-200.
Under 1400: $1500-800-400-300-200. Under 1100: $700-400-250-150-
100. Unratedmay enter any section, with prize limit U2000 $1000, U1800
$800, U1600 $600, U1400 $400, U1100 $250; balance goes to next
player(s) in line. Top 6 sections EF: 4-day $149, 3-day $148, 2-day $147
mailed by 7/31, all $149 online at chesstour.com by 8/6, $155 phoned by
8/6 (406-896-2038, entry only, no questions), $160 (no checks, credit cards
OK) at tmt. No credit card mailed entries. GMs free; $140 deducted from
prize. EF for all in Under 1100 Section & unrated in Under 1400: all
$60 less. All: Advance EF $5 less to MACA members; may join/renew at
masschess.org. Re-entry $80; not available in Open Section. Unofficial
uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise unrated. Special 1 year
USCF dues with paper magazine if paid with entry. Online at chesstour.
com, Adult $30, Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid
at site, Adult $40, Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. 4-day schedule: Reg
Thu to 6:30 pm, rds Thu7 pm, Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 3-day
schedule: Reg. Fri to 11 am, rds Fri 12 & 7, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:30.
2-day schedule: Reg Sat to 9 am, rds Sat 10, 12:45, 3:15 & 6, Sun 10
& 4:30. All schedules: Bye all, limit 2, Open must commit before rd 2,
other sections before rd 4. HR: $89-89-99, 800-582-3232, 508-347-7393,
request chess rate, reserve by 7/26 or rate may increase. Car rental:
Avis, 800-331-1600, use AWD #D657633. Ent: Continental Chess, PO Box
249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge for refunds. Ques-
tions: www.chesstour.com, DirectorAtChess.us, 845-496-9658. Advance
entries posted at chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Aug. 17-19 or 18-19, New York
Trophies Plus Grand Prix Points: 150 (Enhanced)
11th annual Manhattan Open
6-SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75, d/5). New Yorker Hotel,
481 Eighth Ave at 34th St. across from Penn Station, New York 10001.
$35,000 guaranteed prizes. Open & U2300 Sections are FIDE rated.
In 10 sections: Open: $2500-1500-1000-700-500-400, clear or tiebreak
first $200 bonus, top Under 2500/Unr $1200. Under 2300, Under 2100,
Under 1900, Under 1700: each $1500-1000-700-500-400-300. Under
1500, Under 1300: each $1200-800-600-500-400-300. Under 1100:
$700-400-300-200-100-100. Under 900: Trophies to first 10, top Unrated.
Under 700: Trophies to first 10, top Under 500, Under 300, Unrated. Prize
limits: 1) If any post-event rating posted at uschess.org 7/19/11-7/19/
12 is more than 30 points over section maximum, prize limit $800. 2) Un-
rated (0-3 lifetime games rated) cannot win over $200 in U1100, $400
U1300, $600 U1500, $800 U1700 or $1000 U1900. 3) Balance of limited
prize goes to next player(s) in line. Top7 sections EF: 3-day $163, 2-day
$162 if check mailed by 8/8, all $165 online at chesstour.com by 8/13,
$170 phoned to 406-896-2038 by 8/13, $180 at site. Under 1100 Sec-
tion EF: 3-day $83, 2-day $82 if check mailed by 8/8, all $85 online at chess
tour.com by 8/13, $90 phoned to 406-896-2038 by 8/13, $100 at site.
Under 900 or Under 700 Section EF: 3-day $33, 2-day $32 if check mailed
by 8/8, all $35 online at chesstour.com by 8/13, $40 phoned to 406-896-
2038 by 8/13, $50 at site. No phone entry after 8/13. Online late entry
is available between 8/14 and two hours before round 1, with same fee
as at site. Unofficial uschess.org ratings usually used if otherwise un-
rated. Special 1 year USCF membership with paper magazine if paid
with entry: Online at chesstour.com, Adult $30, Young Adult $20, Scholas-
tic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult $40, Young Adult $30,
Scholastic $20. No checks at site, credit cards OK. No mailed credit card
entries. Re-entry: $80, no re-entry from Open Section to Open Section.
3-day schedule: Reg. ends Fri 11 am, rds Fri 12 & 7, Sat 11 & 6, Sun
10 & 4:30. 2-day schedule: Reg. ends Sat. 9 am, rds Sat. 10, 12:45, 3:15
& 6, Sun 10 & 4:30. 3-day & 2-day merge & compete for same prizes.
Byes: all; limit 2, Open must commit before rd2, others before rd 3. Bring
sets, boards, clocks if possible- none supplied. HR: $175-175-195-
210 (rates for 3 or 4 in room are for 2 beds), 1-800-764-4680, reserve
by 7/27or rate may increase, ask for Continental Chess Association
rate. Car rentals: Avis, 800-331-1600, use AWD #D657633 or reserve
car online at chesstour.com. Foreign player ratings: Usually 100 points
added to FIDE, 100 to FQE, 200/more to most other foreign, no points
added to CFC, PR or Jamaica. Some foreign ratings not accepted for U1900
or below. Highest of multiple ratings usually used. Players who fail to dis-
close foreign or FIDE ratings may be expelled. US player ratings:
August list used; FIDE ratings not used. Ent: Continental Chess, Box 249,
Salisbury Mills, NY 12577.Questions: 845-496-9658, www.chesstour.com.
You may request “lowest possible section” if August rating unknown. $15
service charge for refunds. Advance entries will be posted at
chesstour.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Regional
Alabama
Apr. 14, Pushing Pawns Scholastic
5SS, TC: G/30. Helena Intermediate School, 3500 Hwy 52, Helena, AL
35080. Open (K-12): EF: $20; Middle (K-8), Elementary (K-4): EF: $10,
if mailed by APR 7th. Trophy: Top 3 Individual, Medals 4th-6th. Late REG.:
APR 14th at 8AM. Rds.: 9-10-11-1-2. Checks payable to: Caesar Chess.
ENT: Caesar Chess LLC, 5184 Caldwell Mill Rd., Suite 204-202, Birming-
ham, AL 35244. Info: CaesarChess@yahoo.com/www.AlabamaChess.com.
May 4-6 or 5-6, 2012 Georgia Chess Championship (GA)
See Grand Prix.
Arizona
Apr. 21, Liulia Cardona's Tempe Open
4 round, USCF rated tournament. SECTIONS: USCF: 2000 & up/1600-
1999/1200-1599/U1200. ASCF: U1000; G/60 for the top 4 sections. G/30
for U1000; ROUNDTIMES: 4topsections: 9am/11:15am/1:30pm/3:30pm.
5:30pm Ceremony. U/1000: 9am/10:15am/12:00pm/1:15pm. 2:30pm Cer-
emony. PRIZES: $200 1st, $100 2nd 2000 & up/ Top 3 trophies in 1600-
1999, 1200-1599, and U1200/ Top 5 U1000 plus best U800 and U600.
ENTRY FEE: $20 by 4/18, $23 by 4/19, $26 by 4/20, $30 at site. $10 to
play up. TO REGISTER: chessemporium.com, call 602-482-4867. SITE:
1835 E. Elliot Rd., Tempe, AZ.
May 4-6 or 5-6, Western Amateur (CA-S)
See California, Southern.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 61
62 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
May 5 & 12, Metro Phoenix Chess Club G/60 #1 Grand Opening Event
Format: 4-SS (G/60, d/5), dual rated. One Open Section. Played over two
Saturdays, two rounds each Saturday. EF: $20. Registration:
9am–10am (onsite). Round Times: 10:15am, 12:30pm. Prizes: $450 prize
fund based on 30 full-paid entries, 1st, 2nd & Under cash prizes will be
awarded at the end of Round 4 on May 12th. One 1/2 point bye available.
USCF membership required and available on site. Note: The director
reserves the right to create a 2nd section if a large rating disparity exists.
Location: InnPlace Hotel Phoenix, 10220 N. Metro Parkway East,
Phoenix, AZ 85051 (2nd Floor Cottonwood Room). Skittles room available
for analysis of games. Hotel has a lounge, outside patio and full service
restaurant. Please bring your own sets for analysis of games. Club sets
cannot be removed from the tournament room. Phone: 602-850-1515.
Info: www.phoenixchess.org or phoenixchess@inbox.com.
May 26-28, 2012 U.S. Amateur West Championship
See Nationals.
California, Northern
Capital City C. C. Sundays Chess for Kids
Round Table Pizza, 3005 Freeport Blvd., Sacramento. Quads (3/RR). T/C:
G/30 w/5 Second Delay. RDS.: 12pm/Ongoing. PRIZES: 1st - Trophy or
Inscribed Chess Clock, 1st thru 4th - Medals or Pins. TIE-BREAK: G/7 w/3
Second Delay. EF: $20 (Includes $5 Food Gift Certificate). REG.: 11am at
Site Only. DIRECTOR: John C. Barnard 209-450-6133. JohnCharles
Barnard@ gmail.com, capitalcitychessclub.com.
Apr. 14, CalNorth Youth Chess Swiss Championships
Weibel Elementary School, 45135 S. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont, CA. Held
in memory of Hans Poschmann. Info & Entry Form at: www.calnorthy-
outhchess.org/WeibelChess/SpringTournaments2012. Open to all
scholastic players who are USCF members. Ten place trophies in five rat-
ing groups: unrated to 400, 401 to 800, 801 to 1000, 1001 to 1300,
above 1300. Game 30 d5 for up to 400, 401 to 800, 801 to 1000. Game
45 d5 for 1001 to 1300 and above 1300. The most current rating will be
used for placement. Ten place trophies in each section with trophies for
anyone tied on points with tenth place winner. Chess medals to all who
do not win a trophy. Info: Alan M. Kirshner, Ph.D., Alan@CalNorthY-
outhChess.org, (510) 659-0358.
A State Championship Event!
Apr. 20 or 21 or 22 or 21-22, CalChess State Scholastics Champi-
onship 2012
Note corrections: Santa Clara Convention Center, 5001 Great America
Pkwy. Park free. Hotel $109: Hyatt Regency, 5101 Great America Pkwy.,
Santa Clara. Main Event: Trophies to all KG & top 20 players (winning
record) in each section. Medals to others. K-3 u900 sections: Sat 9a. K
& 4-6 u750: Sun 9a. Blitz Fr 6-8:30p. Bughouse Sa 6-8:30p. EF by
4/10: 1-day $48, 2-day $60. Onsite+$40. Apr Supp & TD disc to place
players. Info/reg: CalChessScholastics.org. Quest: ask@BayAreaChess.
com. USCF+CalChess Mem reqd. NS, NC, W.
Apr. 21-22, 7th Annual Frank Doyle Open
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28-29, Hans Poschmann Memorial
4-SS, 30/90; SD/60 d/5. Club Sport, 46650 Landing Parkway, Fremont,
CA 94538. $$B 60 paid entries (not counting unrated entries). Three Sec-
tions: Open $300-210 U2200 $200-100; A/B $200-150 U1800 $145-100;
Reserve $200-150 U1400 $145-100 Unr: Trophy First. All, EF: post-
marked by 4/23 $60, $70 at site. Unrateds $20 in the Reserve section
or may play up to the Open section for the regular fee. USCF memb. req'd.
May play up for add'l $10 per section. Reg.: Sat 4/28 9:00-9:45am.
RDS.: Sat 10:00-3:30; Sun 10:00-3:30; One 1/2 pt bye available if
requested in advance (bye in rds 3 or 4 must be requested before rd 1).
2012 April Supplement, CCA minimums and Directors discretion will be
used to place players as accurately as possible. Please bring clocks and
equipment. INFO: Ken Zowal (510)-623-9935. Email: kenneth.zowal@sbc-
global.net or richardkoepcke@yahoo.com. Ent: Ken Zowal, P.O. Box 3211,
Fremont CA 94539. No Phone entries. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 4-6 or 5-6, Western Amateur (CA-S)
See California, Southern.
May 19, CalNorth Youth Chess Quads
Weibel Elementary School, 45135 S. Grimmer Blvd., Fremont, CA. Info
& Entry Form at: www.calnorthyouthchess.org/WeibelChess/SpringTour-
naments2012. Open to all scholastic players who are USCF members.
Trophies to winners of each Quad. Chess medals to all who do not win
a trophy. Info: Alan M. Kirshner, Ph.D., Alan@CalNorthYouthChess.org,
(510) 659-0358.
May 26-28 or 27-28, Best of the West Class Championship
See Grand Prix.
May 27, Azhar Memorial NorCal Grade Level Champ
Marriott, 2700 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara, CA. Hotel $89. Trophies:
Top 20 players & Top 10 teams in ea section. 8 sections: KG 1 2 3 4 5 6
7-12. Sched: Reg. 8:30-9a. K-3: 5xG/30 games 9:30 11 12:30 1:50
3:15. Gr 4-12: 4xG4/5 games 9:30 11:20 1:15 3:15. EF by 5/22: $39. Info:
BayAreaChess.com/grade12. NS, NC, W.
June 22-24 or 23-24, Summer Open
See Grand Prix.
California, Southern
Los Angeles CHESS CLUB
The premier chess club in Southern California! (310) 795-
5710 * www.LAChessClub.com. The premier chess club
in Southern California! Saturdays: 10AM-10 pm (Novice
Class & 3 Tournaments) Sundays: 12-6 & 1-5 pm
(Beginner class & 2 Tournaments) – Details on our web
site Tuesdays: 7:30-9:30 pm (Intermediate/Advance
Lecture) 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles, CA
90025 * (310) 795-5710 (4 blocks 405 West, Santa
Monica& Butler * 2nd Floor – above Javan Restaurant)
* Group Classes * Tournaments * Private (1:1) Lessons.
Beverly Hills Chess Club
Join the elite group of chess enthusiasts! Curriculum based instruction
from ages 3 and above, Privates, Lectures, Blitz, Simuls, Open & Scholas-
tic tournaments, Camps, Adult events, Member-only events and more...
Open T, TH, F, Sat, Sun (hours vary). 8950 W. Olympic Blvd., #210, Bev-
erly Hills, CA 90211. In the Beverly Hills Plaza (Corner of Lapeer Dr. &
Olympic) 310-274-7873, email us at info@bhchessclub.com, website
www.bhchessclub.com.
Apr. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, LACC - Every Sunday Chess 4 Jrs.
5 separate events – 2 Sections: 1000+ & U1000 (latest ratings used),
5SS, G/30. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA, 90025, 2nd fl. 4 blocks W 405.
EF: $25 ($20 LACC memb, $10 off siblings, Free new LACC memb). Reg.:
12-1 pm. Rds.: 1, 2, 3, 4 pm; Prizes: Trophies (Top 3) & Medals (rest);
eachplayer receives aprize! Parking: Free at BoA and streets. Free snacks
& free class (12-1). Info: (310) 795-5710 or Mick@LAChessClub.com.
Apr. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, LACC - Sunday G/61
3SS, G/61. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA, 90025 2nd fl. ($320 b/20),
$100/50/30; U1800-1200: $50/40/30/20. EF: $25 ($20 memb). Reg.: 11-
12 pm. Rds.: 12, 2, 4 pm. Parking: Free at BoA and streets ($3 basement).
Info: 310/795-5710.
Apr. 7&8, 14&15, 21&22, 28&29, LACC - Sat & Sun G/61
6SS, G/61. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA 90025, 2nd fl. EF: $45 ($35 LACC
memb). Reg.: 11-12 pm. Rds.: 12, 2, 4 pm each day. Prizes: 1/2 collec-
tions. Parking: Free at BoA and streets ($3 basement). Info: 310/795-
5710 or Mick@LAChessClub.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28, LACC - LA Masters G/30
3SS, G/30. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA, 90025, 2nd Fl. 4 blks W 405.
EF: $30 ($20 memb). Reg.: 5-6 pm. Rds.: 6, 7, 8 pm. Prizes: ($180 b/10,
75%); Parking: Free at BoA ($3 basement). Info: 310/795-5710.
Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28, LACC - Sat Nite Blitz G/5 (QC)
5DSS, (10 Games). 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA, 90025, 2nd fl. 4 blks
W 405. EF: $10. Q-rated. Reg.: 8-9 pm. Rds.: 9, 9:20, 9:40, 10, 10:20.
Prizes: 1/2 EF. Parking: Free on Butler ($3 basement).
Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28, LACC - Saturday G/61
3SS, G/61. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA, 90025, 2nd fl. ($320 b/20),
$100/50/30; U1800-1200: $50/40/30/20. EF: $25 ($20 memb). Reg.: 11-
12 pm. Rds.: 12, 2, 4 pm. Parking: basement ($3). Info: 310/795-5710.
Apr. 14&15, LACC - Sat & Sun G/90
4SS, G/90. 11514 Santa Monica Blvd., LA 90025, 2nd fl. EF: $45 ($35 LACC
memb). Reg.: 11-12 pm. Rds.: 12, 3 pm each day. Prizes: 1/2 collections.
Parking: Free on Butler ($3 basement). Info: 310/795-5710 or Mick@LA
ChessClub.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 22, LACC - 2012 Westwood Spring Open
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 27-29, 2012 National Junior High (K-9) Championship
See Nationals.
May 4-6 or 5-6, Western Amateur
5SS, 40/2, SD/1, d/5 (2-day option, rds 1-2 G/75, d/5). Sheraton Four
Points LAX, 9750 Airport Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90045. Special parking
$5/day. $$10,000 guaranteed. In 5 sections. Under 2300: $1000-500-
300-200, top Under 2100/Unr $400-200. FIDE. Under 2000: $1000-500-
300-200, top Under 1800 $400-200. Under 1700: $800-500-300-200, top
Under 1500 $400-200. Under 1400: $600-300-200-100, top Under 1200
$300-150. Under 1100: $400-200-100-50, trophies to top 3,1st Under 900,
Under 700, Under 500, Unrated. Unratedmay not win over $200 in U1100,
$300 U1400, or $500 U1700. Top 3 sections EF: 3-day $83, 2-day $82
mailed by 4/26, all $85 online atchesstour.com by 5/1, $90 phoned to 406-
896-2038 by 5/1 (entry only, no questions), $100 (no checks, credit cards
OK) at site. U1400 SectionEF: All $20 less than top 3 sections EF. U1100
Section EF: All $40 less than top 3 sections EF. All: re-entry $60. Unof-
ficial uschess.org ratings usually used if other unrated. Special 1 year
USCF dues with magazine if paid with entry. Online at chesstour.com, Adult
$30, Young Adult $20, Scholastic $15. Mailed, phoned or paid at site, Adult
$40, Young Adult $30, Scholastic $20. SCCF mem. ($18, jr. $10) required
for ratedSouthernCAresidents. 3-day schedule: Reg ends Fri 6 pm, rds.
Fri 7 pm,Sat 11 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. 2-day schedule: Reg ends Sat 10
am, rds. Sat 11, 2:30 & 6, Sun 10 & 4:15. All: Half point byes OK all, limit
2, must commit before rd 3. HR: $89-89, 1-800-529-4683, 310-649-7025;
reserve by 4/20 or rate may increase. Car rental: Avis, 800-331-1600,
AWDD657633, or reserve car online through chesstour.com. Ent: Con-
tinental Chess, Box 249, Salisbury Mills, NY 12577. $15 service charge
for refunds. Questions: www.chesstour.com, DirectorAtChess.US, 845-
496-9658. Advance entries posted atchesstour.com. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
May 26-28 or 27-28, 2012 Lina Grumette Memorial Day Classic
See Grand Prix.
May 27, MDC Action Swiss
5-SS, G/30. Hilton Ontario Airport, 700 N. Haven Ave., Ontario, CA 91764.
$$500 b/40, else proportional: $150-70-40, U2100/ Unr $80, U1800 $80,
Under 1500 $80. EF: $20 if received by 5/25, $25 at door. Reg.: 9:30-10
a.m. Rds.: 10:15-11:30-12:45-2:30-3:45. Ent: SCCF, PO Box 205, Monterey
Park, CA 91754. On-line entry: www.scchess.com.
May 27, MDC Scholastics
5-SS, G/30. Hilton Ontario Airport, 700 N. Haven Ave., Ontario, CA 91764
Open to gr. 12-below. In two sections: Open: Trophies to top 5, top 3
U1200, top 2 Unrated. Grade 6/below U1000: Trophies to top 5, top 3
U700, top 2 Unrated. Reg.: 8:30-9. Rds.: 9:30-11-12:15-1:45-3. EF: $16
if received by 5/25, $20 door. Info: randallhough@yahoo.com. On-line
ent: www.scchess.com. Ent: SCCF, PO Box 205, Monterey Park, CA
91754.
May 28, MDC Hexes
3-SS, G/90. Hilton Ontario Airport, 700 N. Haven Ave., Ontario, CA 91764
8-player sections by rating. EF: $21 if received by 5/25, $24 door. $$ 40-
20-10 each section. Reg.: 9:30-10:15 a.m. Rds.: 10:30-1:30-4:30. Ent:
SCCF, PO Box 205, Monterey Park, CA 91754. On-line entry: www.sc
chess.com.
July 19-22, 20-22 or 21-22, 17th annual Pacific Coast Open
See Grand Prix.
Colorado
A State Championship Event!
Mar. 31-Apr. 1, 2012 Colorado Class Tournament
4 SS, G/90, inc/30. Manitou Springs City Hall, 606 Manitou Ave., Mani-
tou Springs, CO 80829. Directions: Take I-25 to Exit 141, US 24 West.
Head 3 1/2 miles west towards the mountains and depart US24 at the
Manitou Avenue exit. Turn west onto Manitou Avenue then go 1 mile to
the Manitou Springs City Hall. 7 Sections: SM/M/X, A, B, C, D, E,
Under E/Unr. E and Under E/Unr. sections may be combined if there are
not enough participants in either section. Pre-registration EF: $40 if
received by Friday March 23, 2012; $30 for seniors (65 & over), juniors
(under 21), and unrated players (no USCF Rating on the USCF Ratings web-
site for March 2012 Supplement). No pre-registrations accepted without
full payment. On-site EF: $45 regular; $33 for seniors (65 & over), jun-
iors (under 21) and unrated players (no USCF Rating on the USCF Ratings
website for March 2012 Supplement). Prizes: Cash Prizes per Entries.
Unrated players may only win an Unrated category prize. *In addition,
WESTERN AMATEUR
May 4-6 or 5-6, Sheraton Four Points at LA Airport
$10,000 guaranteed prizes for Under 2300 or unrated!
5 round Swiss with 3-day &2-day schedule options. 3-day is 40/2,
SD/1, d/5. 2-day option, rounds 1-2 G/75, d/5, then merges with 3-day.
$89 room rates, $5 parking, free airport shuttle. In 5 sections:
Under 2300 Section: $1000-500-300-200, top U2100 $400-200.
Under 2000 Section: $1000-500-300-200, top U1800 $400-200.
Under 1700 Section: $800-500-300-200, top U1500 $400-200.
Under 1400 Section: $600-300-300-100, top U1300 $300-150.
Under 1100 Section: $400-200-100-50, trophy to first 3, top
Under 900, Under 700, Under 500, Unrated.
Unrated limit: $200 in U1100, $300 U1400, or $500 in U1700.
FULL DETAILS: see “Grand Prix” in this issue or chesstour.com.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 62
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 63
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
the Class champions in the A, B, C, D, and E classes will represent Col-
orado in the Rocky Mountains Team Chess Challenge. Reg.: Sat,
9am-10:30am. Rds.: Sat 11am-4pm, Sun 9am-2pm. Ent & Info: Jerry
Maier, 229 Hargrove Ct., Colorado Springs, CO 80919-2213; pmjer77@
aim.com; 719.660.5531; more info at www.colorado-chess.com/new
tourn.shtml. CO TOUR EVENT. USCF Membership required. CSCA Mem-
bership required ($15 reg; $10 Youth-under 21 or Senior-65+). OSA. Byes:
One non-retractable 1/2 point bye may be requested no later than the
start of the second round. Produced and Directed by the Colorado State
Chess Association. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A State Championship Event!
Apr. 21-22, 2012 Colorado Senior Championship
4 SS, G/90, inc/30. Masonic Lodge, 455 El Paso Ave., Manitou Springs,
CO 80829. Directions: Take I-25 to Exit 141, US 24 West. Head 3 1/2 miles
west towards the mountains and depart US24 at the Manitou Avenue exit.
Turn west onto Manitou Avenue then go 1 mile to Old Man's Trail (at the
park) and turn right. Continue to El Paso Blvd and turn right. Travel for
1/4 mile, site will be on your right; turn into the parking lot for the
Masonic Lodge (big white building). Open: Open to all players age 50 or
older by December 31, 2012. EF: $40 regular; $30 for seniors (65 & over)
and unrated players (no USCF Rating on the USCF Ratings website for
April 2012 Supplement). No Pre-registration discount. Prizes: Cash
prizes per entries. Reg.: Sat, 9:30-10:30am. Rds.: Sat 11am-4pm, Sun
9am-2pm. Ent & Info: Jerry Maier, 229 Hargrove Ct., Colorado Springs,
CO 80919-2213; pmjer77@aim.com; 719.660.5531; more info at www.col-
orado-chess.com/newtourn.shtml. NOT a Colorado Tour Event. BYES: One
non-retractable 1/2 point bye may be requested no later than the start
of the second round. Produced and Directed by the Colorado State Chess
Association.
May 5-6, 3rd Annual Salute To Bobby Fischer
4 Round Swiss System Tournament. Time Control: All rounds: 40/120
– G/60, d/5. Site: The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 State Highway 105,
Palmer Lake, CO 80133. Sections: Open (open to all), U1800, U1400. EF:
$55. Pre-Registration: $50. Must be received by May 3, 2012. Go to eagle
andking.webs.comfor entry form. USCFmembership required. See www.
uschess.org for rates. Prizes: Cash prizes per entries, paid at end of event.
Registration: Saturday 5/5, 8:30-9:30am. Rounds: 5/5 - 10:00am,
3:00pm; 5/6 – 9:00am, 3:00pm. Entries: Fred Spell, 16845 Buffalo Val-
ley Path, Monument, CO 80132. Phone: (719) 491-1040. Email: gentle
menschessclub@hotmail.com. Presented by the Gentlemen's Chess
Club. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Connecticut
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 23rd annual Vermont Resort Open (VT)
See Grand Prix.
May 18-20 or 19-20, 20th annual New York State Open (NY)
See Grand Prix.
June 8-10 or 9-10, 18th Annual Northeast Open
See Grand Prix.
July 27-29 or 28-29, 17th Annual Bradley Open
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 9-12, 10-12 or 11-12, 42nd annual Continental Open (MA)
See Grand Prix.
Delaware
Newark Chess Club
4-SS, G/75. USCF-rated games every Thursday 7-10 PM. 345 School
Bell Rd., Bear, DE 19701. For a full year of weekly games $22 for in-state
players, $15 out-of-state! www.newarkchessclub.blogspot.com, newark
chess@gmail.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 21, Cecil County Chess Club Quads (MD)
See Maryland.
June 9-10, 2012 Delaware Capital Open
Residence Inn Dover, 600 Jefferic Blvd., Dover, DE 19901. In 2 Sections,
Open: 5SS, G/90, $$b/25: 1st $200, 2nd $125, 3rd $75, U2000 $75, U1800
$75. Reserve: 5SS, G/90, Open to 1600 & under. $$b/15: 1st $140, 2nd
$90, 3rd $50, U1400 $50, U1200 $50. ALL: EF: $35 before June 1st, $40
after. Memb. Req'd: DCA $10($5 under 18). OSA. Reg.: 8:45-9:45 AM.
Rds.: Sat 10, 2, 5:30 Sun 10, 2. Byes: limit one 1/2pt bye, must commit
by start of round 3. ENT: Kevin Pytel, 604 N. Walnut St., Newport, DE
19804-2624 KevinJPytel@aol.com. INFO: Kevin Pytel (KevinJPytel@aol.
com). HR: ask for the $119 Chess Rate 302-677-0777. Skittles Room and
restaurant on premises, many fine restaurants and points of inter-
est nearby. Lots of door prizes and give-aways! NS. W. Chess
Magnet School JGP.
District of Columbia
Apr. 14-15, Kingstowne Chess Festival - 10th Annual! (VA)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 21, Rated Beginners Open (RBO)
4-SS, G/30. U.S. Chess Center, 1501 M St. NW, Washington, DC 20005.
Open to players rated under 1200 or unrated. EF: $30 ($20 if by 4/14).
5 sections by age. Reg.: 12-12:45. Info: 202/857-4922. www.chess
ctr.org/rbo.php.
May 6, Metro Sunday Quads
3-RR, G/90. U.S. Chess Center, 1501 M St. NW. EF: $20. $$ $40 each quad.
Scholastic sections. EF: $10, Trophy prizes. Both: Reg.: 9:15-9:50. Rds.:
10-1-4. (202) 857-4922. www.chessctr.org./quads.php.
Florida
Boca Raton Chess Club
Friday nights, Game 90 Tournament, one game a week for 4 weeks.
www.bocachess.com, 561-479-0351. Chess Magnet School JGP.
South Florida Chess Club
Wednesday's 6:30-10:30pm. Rated G/90 Tournaments and skittles. Most
tournaments are 4+ rounds Call 561-573-3677 or 954-304-0928 or
email southfloridachessclub@gmail.com or visit www.SouthFloridaChess-
Club.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 14, April OCG Open
Orlando Chess and Games Center. 4SS, G/75. EF: $30. PF: $650 b/30
$250-$150-$100 best U-1600, U-1200, $75 each. Reg.: 9:15-9:45 am. RDS.:
10am-12:30pm-3pm-6pm, www.orlandochess.com. Info: call 407-248-0818
or email alex@orlandochess.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 21, April Scholastic Tournament
Orlando Chess and Games Center. 5SS, G/30. EF: $30. Trophies and
medals to all players, awards at 3:30 pm. Reg.: 9:15-9:55 am. RDS.: 10-
11-12-1:30-2:30, www.orlandochess.com. Info: call 407-248-0818 or
email alex@orlandochess.com.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 19th Space Coast Open
See Grand Prix.
May 4-6 or 5-6, 2012 Georgia Chess Championship (GA)
See Grand Prix.
May 5, May OCG Quick Open (QC)
Orlando Chess and Games Center. 6SS, G/29. EF: $30. PF: $650 b/30:
$250-$150-$100, U-1600, U-1200 $75 each. Reg.: 9:15-9:55 am. RDS.:
10-11-12:30-1:30-2:30-3:30, www.orlandochess.com. Info: call 407-248-
0818 or email alex@orlandochess.com.
May 19, Central FL Tornado
4SS, G/75. Casselberry CC, Wirz Park, 806 Mark David Blvd., Casselberry,
FL 32707. EF: $30, CFCC/CCC mbr $25, Masters free (EF deducted from
any prize). $$480 b/25, 160-80-60, U1800, U1600, U1400 $60 ea. Reg.:
9:30am. Rds.: 10, 1, 3:30, 6. Info: (407) 629-6946 or www.centralflchess.
org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 8-10 or 9-10, Sunshine Summer Open & Scholastic Chess Tour-
nament (formerly the After Memorial Open, now more sections)
See Grand Prix.
July 27-29 or 28-29, 20th Annual Southern Open
See Grand Prix.
Georgia
May 4-6 or 5-6, 2012 Georgia Chess Championship
See Grand Prix.
June 22-24 or 23-24, 2012 Castle Chess Grand Prix
See Grand Prix.
July 27-29 or 28-29, 20th Annual Southern Open (FL)
See Grand Prix.
Idaho
Apr. 21-22, 2012 Idaho Open Chess Championship
5SS, G/120 d5. 2 Sections: Open and Reserve (U1400). Site: ISU, Stu-
dent Un Bldg, Salmon River Suites, 1065 S. 8th St., Pocatello, ID. EF: USCF
mem req., $30 (U18 & 60+ $25), ISU students & Chess Club $10, by
04/18/12. $5 more (all) after. Reg & Ck in: 7:30-8:30 AM 04/21/12. Those
not paid & ck'd in by 8:30 AM may not be paired in 1st rnd. RNDS.:
9,2,7,9,2. 1/2 pt byes: Max 1, Rd 1-4 only. 0 pt bye avail rnd 5. Commit
by end of rd 2. Prizes: $$ b/30 non ISU; Open: $175-85-65; Reserve:
$75-50 -35. HR/ENT/INFO: ICA, % Jay Simonson, 391 Carol Ave., Idaho
Falls, ID 83401, 208-206-7667, rooknjay@yahoo.com, www.idahoches-
sassociation.org. NC, NS, W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Illinois
North Shore Chess Center
5500 W. Touhy Ave., Suite A, Skokie, IL 60077,
847.423.8626, www.nachess.org/nscc. Multiple monthly
chess events: Quick and Regular rated tournaments,
FIDE amateur tournaments, simuls and lectures by
masters. Private & Group lessons for all ages and
strengths available. Home of the Chicago Blaze US
Chess League team. Contact: Sevan A. Muradian Inter-
national Arbiter & International Organizer - sevan@na
chess.org.
Apr. 7, North Shore Chess Center (Skokie, IL)
G/30 +5/sec incr. - 5R-SS. See www.nachess.org/events for more info
and online registration.
Apr. 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, Aug. 4, Warriors Open & Reserve
G/60+5(sec.delay), 3R-SS. Lincoln-Way West HS, 21701 S. Gouger Rd.,
New Lenox, IL 60451. Reg.: 8:15-8:45 am. Rds.: 9, 11:30, & 2. 2 Sec-
tions: Open & Reserve (U1000). EF: $5. No concession on site (bring sack
lunch). USCF membership required. Contact: Coach Miller 815-463-
0104 or stevencraigmiller@comcast.net with questions.
Apr. 8, North Shore Chess Center (QC)
G/3 + 2/sec increment Blitz. See www.nachess.org/events for more info
and online registration.
Apr. 14-15, North Shore Chess Center 9th NA Amateur Open - 2nd
Annual Scott Silverman Memorial
4R-SS, G/90 + 30/sec inc. See www.nachess.org/events for more info
and online registration. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 15, 76th Knights Quest
4SS, G/25, d5. Hilton Hotel, 2855 N. Milwaukee Ave., Northbrook. Pre-
sented by Renaissance Knights Chess Foundation. USCF Rated Sections:
Open (K-12 & Adults), U1400 (K-12 & Adults), U1000 (K-8) & U600 (K-
8). Awards: Top 5 each section, medals all others, Team Awards: Top
2 teams in U600 & U1000. On-site Reg.: 12:00-12:30 pm. Rds.: 1 at 1:00
pm, rest ASAP. EF: $30 by 4/9, $35 after, $40 on-site. Registration/Info
at: www.rknights.org.
Apr. 20-22, 2012 All-Girls National Championships presented by the
Kasparov Chess Foundation in association with the Renaissance
Knights Chess Foundation & USCF
See Nationals.
Apr. 27, North Shore Chess Center Lantern Light Chess (QC)
G/15 + 5/sec incr. See www.nachess.org/events for more info and
online registration.
Apr. 28, North Shore Chess Center
G/60 + 5/sec incr. See www.nachess.org/events for more info and
online registration.
Apr. 29, North Shore Chess Center U1200 Scholastic
See www.nachess.org/events for more info and online registration.
May 5, JJC Chess Club 13th Annual Spring Tournament
3 round Quad, G/70. Joliet Jr. College, Bldg. J, Room 0006, 1215 Houbolt
Ave., Joliet, IL 60431 (exit 127 from I-80). EF: $25 by 05/01, $35 at site.
(Please Note: Due to the longer time control, no Scholastic players 12
or younger are allowed entry unless they are USCF rated 1,000 or higher,
no exceptions please). Cash Prize: $50 for 1st-$25 for 2nd per quad
(based on 4 per quad). Reg.: 9:00-9:50am. Rds.: 10:00-1:30-4:00. Info:
Checks payable to Dennis R. Doyle, c/o JJC Chess Club, 536 Springwood
Dr., Joliet, IL 60431, no phone or cr.card entries, cash only payment on
day of tournament. Email questions to: ddoyle@jjc.edu.
May 6, 77th Knights Quest
4SS, G/25, d5. Hilton Hotel, 2855 N. Milwaukee Ave., Northbrook. Pre-
sented by Renaissance Knights Chess Foundation. USCF Rated Sections:
Open (K-12 & Adults), U1400 (K-12 & Adults), U1000 (K-8) & U600 (K-
8). Awards: Top 5 each section, medals all others, Team Awards: Top
2 teams in U600 & U1000. On-site Reg.: 12:00-12:30 pm. Rds.: 1 at 1:00
pm, rest ASAP. EF: $30 by 4/31, $35 after, $40 on-site. Registration/Info
at: www.rknights.org.
May 19, Ninth Annual David Mote Memorial Open
4SS, G/75 (1st round G/60). First Congregational Church, 2100 Bates Ave.,
Springfield. Reg.: 9-9:45. Rds.: 10-12:30-3:15-6. Lunch break at noon.
EF: $17 by 5/16, $20 at site, $2 less to SCC members. Prizes: $$400 b/30.
140-80, 1600-1999 60, 1200-1599 50, Under 1200 40, Unrated 30.
Ent/Info: David Long, 401 S. Illinois St., Springfield 62704. 217-726-2584.
Information and directions available at our new web site www.spring-
fieldchessclub.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open
See Grand Prix.
May 27, Chicago Open Action Quads
3RR, G/25, d/5, dual rated. Westin North Shore Hotel (see Chicago
Open). EF: $20, at site only. $$ 50 1st each section. Reg. ends 1:45 pm,
rds. 2, 3, 4.
May 27, Chicago Open G/15 (QC)
4SS, G/15, d/3. Westin North Shore Hotel (see Chicago Open). Prizes $300
based on 20 entries, else in proportion: $100-50, U2100 $60, U1800 $50,
U1500/Unr $40. EF: $20, at site only. Reg. ends 9:45 pm, rds. 10, 11,
11:45, 12:30. One half pt bye available, must commit before rd 2. Quick
rated, but higher of regular or quick used for pairings & prizes.
May 28, Chicago Open Blitz & Game/7 (QC)
2 separate tournaments at Westin North Shore Hotel (see Chicago
Open). Blitz: G/5, no delay. Game/7: G/7, d/2. Each is a 4-SS, double
round (8 games) with prizes $300 based on 20 entries, else in propor-
tion: $100-50, U2100 $60, U1800 $50, U1500/Unr $40. EF: $20, at site
only. Blitz: reg. ends 12:45 pm, rds. 1, 1:30, 2, 2:30. Game/7: reg. ends
10:15 pm, rds. 10:30, 11:15, 12, 12:45. Both: One pair of 1/2 pt byes avail-
able, must commit before rd 2. Quick rated, but higher of regular or quick
used for pairings & prizes.
July 20-22 or 21-22, 5th annual Chicago Class
See Grand Prix.
Indiana
Every Second Saturday of the Month
4SS, G/61d5. Donatos Pizza, 825 W 10th St., Indianapolis. Reg.: 11-
11:30AM, Rd 1, 11:40AM. $$:b/20 1st $200; 2nd $100; Class (A, B,) (C,
D, E, Unr) $70 each. Prizes increased if + 20. EF: $27 - $5.00 BD month,
- $5.00 for any state association (except ISCA), OCCC Memb.req'd Memb.
includes magazine+. FIDE Titled Players Free. Ent: Donald Urquhart, 501
N. East St. # 802, Indianapolis, IN 46204. Info: at 317-634-6259 or e-
mail akakarpov@att.net. 3 entries in a class req'd for that class prize
to be awarded. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Orange Crush Chess Club Friday Night Blitz (QC)
Burger King, 410 E Morris St. (E Morris St and S East St). Show your OCCC
card for free upsize. Reg.: 6-6:25pm, starts at 6:30pm. Type: 3 RR Quad,
G/5d2, QC. EF: $8.00, $$4-Quad 1st $25.00. Ent: Donald Urquhart, 501
N. East St., #802, Indianapolis, IN 46204. Info: Don at 317-634-6259 or
email akakarpov@att.net.
Apr. 20-22 or 21-22, Indiana Memorial Open
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 21, Fort Wayne CC Spring Open
4SS, G/53. Allen Main Public Library, Conf. Room A, 900 Library Plaza. Free
parking on street. Reg.: 9-9:40. Rds.: 9:40am, 12noon, 2pm, 4pm. EF:
$30 pre-reg. check or cash only at site. Prizes: b/20, 1st $100, 2nd $50,
U1800 $50, U1600 $50, U1400 $50, U1200 $50, U1000/Unr $50, must have
3 per class. Ent: Dan Steininger, 6025 S. Hanna St., Apt 207, Fort. Wayne,
IN 46816. Info: (260) 755-3765.
A State Championship Event!
May 19, Indiana State Blitz Championship (QC)
Clarion Hotel & Conference Center, 2930 Waterfront Pkwy., West Dr., Indi-
anapolis, IN 46214. In 2 Sections, Championship: Rounds 4-6 Rd. DRR,
$$: $130-65-55-40-40-40. Finals: Top 4-6 from Prelims. Consolation:
Rounds TBA SS, G/5 d/0, $$: $40. u1900 - 20, u1700 - 20, u1500 - 20,
u1300 - 20. ALL: EF: $20 rcvd by 5/15, $25 at site. Memb. Req'd: ISCA.
OSA. Reg.: Ends: 5:30pm. Rds.: Round 1: Preliminaries 6pm (Finals &
Consolation 8pm). ENT: ISCA, C/o Gary Fox, P. O. 114, Logansport, IN
46947. 574-722-4965. INFO: info@indianachess.org. www.indianachess.
org. NS. NC. W.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 63
64 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
A State Championship Event!
May 19, Indiana State Quick Championship (QC)
Clarion Hotel & Conference Center, 2930 Waterfront Pkwy, West Dr.,
Indianapolis, IN 46214. In 3 Sections, Championship: 4SS, G/10 Inc/15,
$$: $140-70. u2300 - 65, u2100 - 60, u1900 - 55. Reserve u1700: 4SS,
G/10 Inc/15, Open to 1699 & under. $$: $120-60-55. u1500 - 50, 45, 40.
u1300: 4SS, G/10 Inc/15, $$: $100-50. u1100 - 45, 40. ALL: EF: $25 rcvd
by 4/15, $30 at site. Memb. Req'd: ISCA. OSA. 1st, 2nd medals for Champ,
Reserve & u1300. Reg.: Ends 10:30am. Rds.: 11, 1, 2, 3. ENT: ISCA, C/o
Gary Fox, P. O. 114, Logansport, IN 46947, 574-722-4965. INFO: info@indi-
anachess.org. www.indianachess.org. Enter Quick & Blitz for $5 off.
NS. NC. W.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
May 27, Chicago Open Action Quads (IL)
See Illinois.
May 27, Chicago Open G/15 (QC) (IL)
See Illinois.
May 28, Chicago Open Blitz & Game/7 (QC) (IL)
See Illinois.
July 20-22 or 21-22, 5th annual Chicago Class (IL)
See Grand Prix.
Iowa
Apr. 20-22 or 21-22, 6th Annual Okoboji Open, Reserve (U1600) &
Scholastics (K-12)
See Grand Prix.
A State Championship Event!
Apr. 28, 2012 Iowa Class Championships
4-SS, Divided into Classes: M-X-A, B, C, & D/under. Players may play
up one class. Some sections may be combined. All: G/75, T/D/5.
Clarion/Highlander Convention Center, NE Side Exit 246 of I-80, Iowa City,
IA 52245. Reg.: 8:15 to 9:00AM. Rds.: 9:30 AM-2:30-5:00 -7:30 PM. EF:
$20.00 if rcv'd by 04/26, $30.00 at site. Prize Info: Class prizes: 1st place
$45.00 + Trophy, 2nd place $30. U.S. Chess Federation (USCF) member-
ship required. On-Site Available. IASCA membership required, $15, $10
Jr. or Sr. On-Site Available. Send EF to: Mark Capron, 3123 Juniper Dr.,
Iowa City, IA 52245. Steve Young, PO Box 2833, Iowa City, IA 52244.
mcapron243@mchsi.com, PH# 319.321.5435. Additional Info: Annual
IASCA meeting scheduled at 1 PM. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
Kentucky
Apr. 20-22, 4th Annual WKU Open
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28, The Elizabethtown Tornado
4SS, G/45. Elizabethtown Community & Technical College, Room 303, Occu-
pational-Technical Building, Elizabethtown, KY. EF: $20 by Apr. 23, at
site $25. $$b/25; $150, 75 Class B, C, C, E & below/UNR $50 each if at
least 2 players in section. Reg.: 8:45-9:15 am, Rds.: First round 9:30 am,
others ASAP. Ent: Johnny Owens (TD), P.O. Box 226, Elizabethtown, KY
42702-0266. (270) 272-3061. Info: http://etownchess.blogspot.com.
June 9-10, 2012 Kentucky Open
See Grand Prix.
Louisiana
June 1-3, Susan Polgar Open for Boys & Girls (K-12; Team & Indi-
vidual)
6SS, G/45. Holiday Inn Downtown Superdome, 330 Loyola Ave., New
Orleans, LA 70112 (800-535-7830). SIDE EVENTS: Fri: Susan Polgar Chess
Camp, Chess Puzzle Competition, Bughouse Tournament (at Audubon
Insectarium); Sat: Blitz Tournament (at World War II Museum) & Susan
Polgar Simul; Sun: Breakfast/Q & A Session with GM Polgar (at Brennan's
Restaurant), Aquatic Simul with GM Andre Diamant. 8 Sects with each
sect. separately for Boys and Girls: Primary (K-2); Elementary (K-5);
Middle School (K-8); High School (K-12). PRIZES: Over $100,000 in
scholarships to Texas Tech University! Trophies guaranteed to top 10 ind.
and top 3 school teams in each sect. and top club team in separate boys
and girls overall. Every non-trophy winner receives a souvenir chess
medal. Special award to out-of-state team with most participants and to
team (or individual) who travels farthest to tourn. Team Info: School
teams may have as many players as they wish from the same school or
home school district and team players must register in the same section.
Club teams are allowed and a 1st place trophy will be awarded to top club
team overall (not based on sections) for boys and girls separately (no
co-ed teams). A player must declare whether he/she is on a school
team or a club team but may not be on both. Must have a minimum of 2
players to be considered a team; the top 3 player scores will count for
final team score. USCF-recommended computer tiebreaks will decide tro-
phy and medal placements for winners of all sections. RDS.: Sat:
8:30-10:30-12:30; Sun: 12-2-4. Awards ceremony at 6pm. EF: $40 by 4/30;
$50 by 5/15; $60 at site; Byes: One 1/2-pt. bye allowed for any Rd if
requested before Rd 2. Pre-registration required by 10pm June 1 in order
to play in first round of main event. Later on-site registrations accepted
until 9:30am on June 2 will receive 1/2-pt. bye for Rd 1. HR: $99 (with
2-night min. on June 1 & 2) for single, double, triple or quad (800-535-
7830), reserve by May 1 and mention Polgar Chess Tournament to assure
group rate, which will also be avail. 2 nights before and after event. ENT:
On-line registration and printable entry form at www.cajunchess.com, or
mail entry form to Cajun Chess, 7230 Chadbourne Dr., New Orleans, LA
70126. Info: More information on tournament events and optional tours
avail. at www.cajunchess.com (click on Tournaments and then on Upcom-
ing Tournaments & Chess Events). Phone Ent: 504-208-9596 or
504-905-2971. Major credit cards accepted (no checks at site).
Maryland
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open Action Quads (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open G/15 (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 8, Philadelphia Open Blitz & G/7 (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 14-15, Kingstowne Chess Festival - 10th Annual! (VA)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 20&May 4, Catonsville Friday Knight Quick #138 & #139 (QC)
5SS, G/12, d3. EF: $8, club members $5. Reg.: 7:30pm. Rds.: 8, 8:30, 9,
9:30, 10. $$b/24 1st=$50, 2nd=$25, U1850 $12. Website: http://
mysite.verizon.net/vze12d59q/. Bloomsbury Community Center, 106
Bloomsbury Ave., Catonsville, MD 21228. Info: Joe Summers 410-788-
1009, josephas2@verizon.net.
Apr. 21, Cecil County Chess Club Quads
All levels welcome! 3 Rd. Quads, Fairgreen Senior Community Apartments,
100 Greenway, Perryville, MD 21903. Game 90. EF: $20. $$GTD: $50. Reg.:
9-9:45 AM. Rds.: 10 AM, 1:30 PM, 5 PM. ENT: 302-740-3442, KevinJPy-
tel@aol.com. INFO: Free coffee and light refreshments! NS. W.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 2012 Maryland Open
See Grand Prix.
May 5, Catonsville Saturday Action Plus/RBO
4SS, G/45;d/5. EF: $20 by May 4, $25 at door. Under 18 $5 off. Rds.: 11-
1:15-3:15-5:15. Reg.: 10:15am. Bloomsbury Community Center, 106
Bloomsbury Ave., Catonsville, MD 21228. Two Sections: Open $$b/24:
$125-$75-$50 U1850 $45 U1550 $45. RBO U1200 $$b/12: $50-$30-$20
U1000 $15 b/4 U800 $15 b/4. Bye: 1-4, max 1. Info: josephas2@veri-
zon. net. Online Reg: http://mysite.verizon.net/vze12d59q. Ent: Joe
Summers, 1201 Daniels Ave., Balt., MD 21207. Include USCF ID, rating
and section. PH: 410-788-1009.
A State Championship Event!
May 12-13, 2012 Maryland Senior Championship
Bloomsbury Community Center, 106 Bloomsbury Ave., Catonsville, MD
21228. Format: 4SS, G/115; d5. Open to USCF members born before May
12, 1962. EF: $40 if Rec'd by 5/9, $50 at site. Free entries to GM's, $40
deducted from prizes. Top Maryland resident receives title of MD Sen-
ior Champion 2012, trophy, free entry, plus $250 expenses to US Senior
Open, July 9-14, 2012 at the Hilton Hobby Airport, Houston, TX 77061.
Reg.: 9-9:45 AM. Rds.: Sat. 10 AM, 3PM, Sunday 9:30 AM, 2:30PM. 1/2
point bye available if requested before rd. 2. Prizes: $$1000 Gtd: $300-
$175-$150, Top U2000 $130, U1700 $125, U1400 $120. Plaques to Top
Age 60-69 and Top Age 70 +. Standard USCF tiebreak's used for
titles/plaques. Make checks payable to: Maryland Chess Assoc. Mail
to: Joseph Summers, 1201 Daniels Ave., Baltimore, MD 21207. Please put
date of birth and USCF id number with entry. Info: Wilbert A. Brown 410-
327-9191, Joe Summers 410-788-1009.
WKU MasterMind Scholarships will be awarded
in the high school section:
1st place overall: Full tuition and fees
2nd place overall: $3,000 room and board
3rd place overall: $500 book scholarship
Registration:
On-site: Fri. 5-6 p.m., Sat. 8-9 a.m.
Online: www.hilltopperchess.net
Open prize fund:
$5,000 b/75 ($3,000 gtd)
Location:
Faculty House, WKU Campus
1906 College Heights Blvd.
Bowling Green, KY 42101
See website or Grand Prix ad for full details.
For More Information:
Samuel J. Hunt (918) 809-6278
hilltopperchess@live.com,
www.hilltopperchess.net
4th Annual
WKU OPEN
Chess Tournament
April 20-22, 2012
CHESS
CLUB - 20 il r p A
Chess
WKU
4th Annua
UB CL
CHESS

ournament TTournament
OPEN
al
tion: a oc L
d) $5,000 b/75 ($3,000 gt
e fund: pen priz O
.net chess opper .hillt w w w nline: O
.m., Sat. 8-9 a.m. i. 5-6 p r F e: n-sit O
tion: a Registr
all: er v e o d plac 3r
$3,000 r all: er v e o 2nd plac
ull tuition and f F all: er v e o 1st plac
tion: in the high school sec
cholarships will be a ind S erM ast WKU M
ee
oom and
$500 book scholar

.net chess opper .hillt w w w
om, .c e chess@liv opper hillt
t (918) 809-6278 . Hun Samuel J
tion: orma nf e I or Mor F
ix ad f r and P e or Gr ebsit ee w S
Y 42101 een, K wling Gr o B
. d ts Blv ollege Heigh 1906 C
ampus WKU C , y House acult F
tion: a oc L
or full det

NATIONAL
OPEN
NATIONAL
OPEN
National Championships

NAT O AL I N
O EN P
JUNE 15–17 OR 16–17

JUNE 14 – 5:00 P.M.

U. S. GAME / 10 CHAMPIONSHIP U. S. GAME / 10 CHAMPIONSHIP

$80,000 GUARANTEED PRIZE FUND

6 Round Swiss in 8 Sections H 2 Sections FIDE Rated H 200 GP Points

L
a
s
V
e
g
a
s
L
a
s
V
e
g
a
s
a
s
L
V
e
g
a
s
L
a
s
V
e
g
a
s
www.VegasChessFestival.com

June 14th – 17th, 2012

NATIONAL OPEN H U.S. GAME/10
INTERNATIONAL YOUTH CHAMPIONSHIP
SIMULS H LECTURES H SCHOLASTICS
GRANDMASTER CHESS CAMP H AND MORE




IVIERA
HOTEL - CASINO - LAS VEGAS

Special Guest
Former World Champion
GM ANATOLY KARPOV



CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r5_chess life 3/11/2012 10:52 AM Page 64
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 65
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
June 2-3, 3rd Annual Catonsville-Fells Point Open
5SS, G/85, d/5. EF: $30 before May 30, $35 until June 1, $40 at door.
Bloomsbury Community Center, 106 Bloomsbury Ave., Catonsville, MD
21228. 3 Sections: Open: $$600b/24 $250-$120-$80, Top X, A $75.
Amateur/U1900: $$550b/24 $200-$120-$80; Top U1700, U1550, $75.
Reserve/U1400: $$450b/20 $175-$90-$65, Top U1200, U1000 $60 b/4.
Reg.: 9:45-10:50am Rds.: Sat 11:00-3:00-7:00 Sun 10:00-2:00. Bye: 1-
5, max 2. Must commit before Rd 3. Upset: Top upset in each round in
all sections: =book prize. Info: josephas2@verizon.net, Online Reg:
http://mysite.verizon.net/vze12d59q. Ent: Joe Summers, 1201 Daniels
Ave., Balt., MD 21207. Include USCF ID and section: Open, U1900 or
U1400. PH: 410-788-1009. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 9-10, 2012 Delaware Capital Open (DE)
See Delaware.
June 29-July 3 (New date), 9th annual Philadelphia International
(PA)
See Grand Prix.
June 30, World Open U2300 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 1-2, World Open U2200 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 40th Annual World Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 3-4, World Open U2100 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 4, World Open 7-Minute Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 7, World Open 10-Minute Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 8, World Open Blitz Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 28-Aug. 1, 2012 Washington International
See Grand Prix.
Massachusetts
Apr. 15, 22nd Massachusetts G/60 Championship
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 23rd annual Vermont Resort Open (VT)
See Grand Prix.
May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, June 6, 13, Wachusett CC “B” Division Cham-
pionship
7SS, G/110, d/5. McKay Campus School, Room C159, Fitchburg State Uni-
versity, 67 Rindge Rd., Fitchburg, MA 01420. EF: $20 annual club dues;
free to Wachusett CC members. Reg.: 7-7:10 p.m. Rds.: 7:15 p.m. Byes:
1-6, limit three. Prizes: chess books. Info: George Mirijanian, 176 Oak
Hill Rd., Fitchburg, MA 01420, miriling@aol.com, 978-345-5011. Web-
site: www.wachusettchess.org. Online ratings as of May 2 will be used.
W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 18-20 or 19-20, 20th annual New York State Open (NY)
See Grand Prix.
May 26-28 or 27-28, 81st Massachusetts Open
See Grand Prix.
June 8-10 or 9-10, 18th Annual Northeast Open (CT)
See Grand Prix.
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 40th Annual World Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 27-29 or 28-29, 17th Annual Bradley Open (CT)
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 9-12, 10-12 or 11-12, 42nd annual Continental Open
See Grand Prix.
Michigan
Apr. 28, Chess for Charity VI
5SS, G/25d5. The River, 255 S. Squirrel Rd., Auburn Hill, MI 48327. $10.
Rated and unrated sections. Bughouse and Chess960 if sufficient inter-
est. See: http://gamesinmichigan.com/chessforcharity for complete
details.
May 11-13, 12-13 or 13, 9th Great Lakes Chess Open
5SS, U1000 4SS. McCamly Plaza Hotel, 50 Capital Ave., SW, Battle Creek,
MI 49017. EF: (Add $10 after May 5, $15 at site) Open: 3 day $53; 2 day
$52, IM/GMs free!(EF deducted from winnings). U1700: 3 day $43; 2 day
$42. U1000: $20. USCF and a State membership required(can be pur-
chased on site). Reg: 3 day: Fri. 5-6:30. 2 day and 1 day: Sat. 9-11. TC:
3 day: Rds 1-3 G/2; Rds 4-5 40/2 SD/30. 2 day: Rds 1-2, G/60; Rd 3 G/2;
Rds 4-5 40/2 SD/30. 1 day (U1000): G/45. Rds.: 3 day: Fri. 7, Sat. 12-
4:30, Sun. 10-3:30. 2 day: Sat. 11:30-2-4:30; Sun. 10-3:30. 1 day:
11:45-2-3:45-5:30. Prizes: Open:(b/36) $1500-700, Top X-A-U1800/Unr
$250. U1700: (b/36) $400-250, Top C-D-U1200/Unr $125. U1000:
(b/22)$125-$75, Top 700-899, U700/Unr $50 (Unrated eligible for top/Unr
prizes only). Special Events: Blitz tournament: 7 Saturday. EF: 10 (
85% payout). IM/Gm Lecture-$10. Hotel: McCamly Plaza Hotel, Chess rate
$91/night, must reserve by Apr. 9th. Parking $8 a day. Info and Entries:
Stan Beckwith, 269-964-2927, 84 Bond Ave., Battle Creek, MI 49037-1907.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 3-5 or 4-5, Cleveland Open (OH)
See Grand Prix.
Minnesota
Apr. 13-15, 2012 National High School (K-12) Championship
See Nationals.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
Missouri
Apr. 14-15, Saint Louis Open
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28-29, Joplin Benefit Tournament
See Grand Prix.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
May 26, Show Me Classic
4SS, G/70. Chess Club & Scholastic Center of Saint Louis, 4657 Maryland
Ave., Saint Louis, MO 63108. Free entries for GMs and IMs. EF: $25, $20
for annual members of the club if registered by 5/25. MCA membership
req'd from $5. OSA. PF: $750 UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED!! 1st
Place-$145, 2nd Place-$105. $100 for 1st in each class: A, B, C, D,
U1200/UNR. Winner qualifies for 2013 Club Championship. Reg.: 9-
9:45. Rds.: 10, 12:30, 3:30, 6:15. One 1/2 point bye if declared before
round 1. MCA Membership required from $5. OSA. Ent: 4657 Maryland
Ave., Saint Louis, MO 63108, or online at saintlouischessclub.org. Info:
314-361-CHESS, info@saintlouischessclub.org. Chess Magnet School
JGP.
June 30, 2012 Kansas City Open
4SS, G/75/5td. Noland Rd Baptist Church, 4505 S. Noland Rd., Independ-
ence, MO 64055. Reg.: 8-8:45. Rds.: 9, 12, 3, 6. USCF & MCA required,
OSA. EF: $20 by 6/23, $30 onsite. Sections: Open & Reserve (U1600)
b/40: 1st $150, 2nd $100, 3rd $50 each section. Entries to: CJ Armenta,
12734 Richmond, Grandview, MO 64030. Cash only onsite. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
Montana
A Heritage Event!
Apr. 28-29, 77th Montana Open
Open, 5SS, G/120. Site: Holiday Inn, Downtown at the Park, Missoula,
MT 59802. HR: $96 mention chess, 800-399-0408 ext 515 or email:
reservations@himisssoula.com. EF: $30 by 4/27, $35 at site, jrs 1/2, free
entry to 1st time USCF. Reg.: 9-9:40am, phone/email entries must be pres-
ent by 9:40am Sat to be paired. Rds.: 10-2:30-7, 9-3 (or ASAP after annual
meeting). $$b/25, $200, $120, $80, 2 Biggest Upsets, $40-$35 both
players non-prov). Trophies to: Top age 65+, top age 18/under, Top in
classes A-E/below. Info and entries: Dan McCourt, 608 West Central,
Missoula, MT 59801, (406)-721-0254, mccourtdj@msn.com. Checks to
MCA. Memb. req'd, $12, OSA. Byes: rd 5 by close of 1st day. W, NC.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
Nevada
Apr. 6-8, 12th Annual Reno-Larry Evans Memorial (formerly Far West
Open)
See Grand Prix.
May 4-6 or 5-6, Western Amateur (CA-S)
See California, Southern.
June 14, 2012 U.S. Game/10 Championship (QC)
See Nationals.
June 15, National Open Scholastic Trophy Tournament
5-SS, Game/30. Riviera Hotel and Casino, 2901 Las Vegas Boulevard
South, Las Vegas 89109. Open to players 18 and under. In 3 sections:
U1800, U1200, and U800. Unrateds in the U1200 section and all players
in the U800 section must be age 11 or under. Trophies to top 5 in each
section, top 2 in each odd 200 point rating group and unrated. EF: $33
by 5/28, $39 by 6/13, $45 on site. REG.: 9-9:30 a.m. RDS.: 10-11:30-1-
2:30-4. Blitz 6:30 p.m. ($15 by 5/28 $20 on site) HR: $59 single or double
($89 Friday and Saturday nights). 1-800-634-6753 or (702) 734-5110. ENT:
National Open, PO Box 90925, Henderson, NV 89009-0925, on line
www.VegasChessFestival.com or fax at (702) 933-9112. NS. NC. W.
June 15-17 or 16-17, 2012 National Open
See Nationals.
June 16-17, International Youth Championship
5SS, Game/60. Riviera Hotel and Casino, 2901 Las Vegas Boulevard
South, Las Vegas 89109. In 4 Sections by age: 14 and Under, 14 and
Under Reserve (rated below 1100), 9 and Under, 9 and Under Reserve
(rated below 900). Trophies to top 10 in each section plus class trophies
and team trophies. 1st Place in each section wins a Computer loaded
with Chess Software, 2nd-4th win chess prizes valued at 250-150-100.
Unrated players may not win 1st in Reserve sections. EF: $59 by 5/27,
$69 by 6/13, $80 on site. 1/2 point bye in any round (limit 2) if requested
in advance. REG.: 8-9 a.m. RDS.: 10-1-4, 10-1. Blitz 6/15 at 6:30 p.m. ($15
by 5/28 $20 on site) HR: $59 single or double ($89 Friday and Saturday
nights). 1-800-634-6753 or (702) 734-5110. ENT: National Open, PO Box
90925, Henderson, NV 89009-0925, on line www.VegasChessFestival.com
or fax at (702) 933-9112. NS. NC. W.
July 19-22, 20-22 or 21-22, 17th annual Pacific Coast Open (CA-S)
See Grand Prix.
New Hampshire
Apr. 21, New Hampshire Quick Chess Championship (QC)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 23rd annual Vermont Resort Open (VT)
See Grand Prix.
New Jersey
Fair Lawn Saturday Quads
Schedule through June 30, 2012. 3RR, G/60 for quads with rating above
1000; G/30 for quads with rating below 1000 or unrated ICA. 9 - 10 SAD-
DLE RIVER RD., FAIR LAWN, NJ 07410. EF: $25 Prizes: $50 to 1st place
in each quad. Reg.: 1-1:15 PM. Rds.: 1:15 PM-3:30-5:40 (rating above
1000). Rds.: 1:10 PM-2:20-3:30 (rating below 1000 or unrated). Info: Diana
201-797-0330, diana@icanj.net; www.icanj.net. EVERY SATURDAY. ALL:
ICA provides breakfast & lunch.
Apr. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Sunday Advance Lesson & Open Blitz (G/5/RR)
(QC)
Advance Lesson (Above 1600 USCF Rating): 6:15pm-7:15pm, $15. Blitz
start: 7:30pm. EF: $20/$15. Prizes: 80% of EF 1st, 2nd, & Class Prizes:
based on the # of participants. GMs - Free entry ($15 deducted from
prizes). Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ. (732) 499-
0118. www.chessmatesnj.com.
Apr. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Sunday Camp and Quad G/30
Sunday Chess Camp: 10am-6pm. Fees: $80/$90. Snacks and lunch
included. Quad: G/30: Starts at 3pm. EF: $15/$10, camp participants are
free. Prize per Quad: 1st Place: Trophy or $35. Chess Mates Corporation,
1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ. (760)583-8429/(732)499-0118. www.chess
matesnj.com.
Apr. 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Chess Lessons & Monday Quad G/30
Chess Lessons: 5pm-6:30pm, Under 1600 USCF. Fees: Monthly: $95
(Monday and Wednesday) and Daily: $15. Quad: 3RR, Rds.: 7pm, 8:15pm,
9:30pm. EF: $20/$15. Prizes: $60 to first in each section. GMs - Free entry.
($15 deducted from prizes). Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St.,
Rahway, NJ. (760)583-8429/(732)499-0118. www.chessmatesnj.com.
Apr. 3, 10, 17, 24, Girls Chess Lessons & Tuesday G/15 (U2000) (QC)
Chess Lessons: 5pm-6:30pm, Under 1600 USCF. Fees: Monthly/daily:
$50/$15. G/15: 4SS, Rds.: 7pm, 7:40pm, 8:20pm, & 9pm. EF: $20/$15.
Prizes: 80% of EF 1st, 2nd, & Class Prizes: based on the # of partici-
pants. Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ. (760)-583-
8429, (732)-499-0118. www.chessmatesnj.com.
Apr. 4-8, 5-8, 6-8 or 7-8, 6th annual Philadelphia Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 4, 11, 18, 25, Chess Lessons & Wednesday G/90 (4SS, Monthly)
Lessons: 5pm-6:30pm, Under 1600 USCF. Fees: Monthly: $95 (Monday
andWednesday)/Daily: $15. Monthly 4SS, Rd starts at 7pm. EF: $30/$25.
Prizes: 70% of EF. Prizes: 1st, 2nd & Class Prizes (based on the # of par-
ticipants). 1 bye available, commit at least two days before the next round.
No re-entry. GMs free entry ($20 deducted from prizes). Chess Mates Cor-
poration, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ 07065. (732)499-0118/(760)583-
8429. www.chessmatesnj.com. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open Action Quads (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open G/15 (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 7, 14, 21, 28, Saturday Camp and Quad G/45
Saturday Chess Camp: 9am-1pm. Fees: $55/$60. Snacks and lunch
included. Quad: G/45. EF: $20/$15. Prizes: $60 to first in each section.
Rds.: 1:30pm, 3:15pm, 5pm. GMs - Free entry. ($15 deducted from
prizes). Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ 07065.
(732)499-0118/(760)583-8429, www.chessmatesnj.com.
Apr. 8, Philadelphia Open Blitz & G/7 (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 14, Princeton Day School
650 The Great Road. Plaques to top 3 school teams and top 6 in each sec-
tion. Medals to all players. Four sections for OVER 1000 begin at 10:15
and must preregister: OVER 1600 (K-12), NEAR MASTERS (K-12 over
1400) and FUTURE MASTERS (Players K-12 over 1200) G/55/d5, 3
rds. CLOSED (K-12 1000-1200) G/40/d5 4 rds. ALL OTHER SECTIONS.
G/25/d5 4 rds. Beginning at 12:00 noon. (round times will be acceler-
ated if possible): OPEN (Players K-12 U-1000), RESERVE (K-12 U-800),
NOVICE II (K-8 U-600), NOVICE I (unrated K-6), K-1 (unrated) NO SCORE
K-1 (unrated). PARENTS OF PLAYERS rated G/25/d5 3 rounds. Pre-reg-
istration online, pay at the door $35. Parents play free. On-site 11-12 noon
$45. Info and register online: www.pds.org/chess. Inquires to Bonnie
Waitzkin Chessteach@gmail.com.
Apr. 15, Westfield Quads
3 RR, G/40 T/D 5s, G/45. Westfield Y, 220 Clark St., Westfield, NJ 07090.
Prizes: $50 to first in each section. EF: $20, $15 Members. Reg.: 1:30-
2:15 p.m. Rds.: 2:30-4:20-6:10 p.m. Info: Todd Lunna 732-526-7163,
lunnaco@aol.com, www.westfieldchessclub.com.
Apr. 18, S. Jersey/Philly Wednesday Quicks G/10 (QC)
G/10. Wednesdays 7-9:30 p.m. Located at CoffeeWorks at the Voorhees
Town Center, 8109 Town Center Blvd., Voorhees, NJ 08043. Instruction,
analysis and Reg.: 6:30-7:00. EF: $10. $$ 1st, 2nd, and 3rd and best
FOREIGN RATING?
NOT UNRATED!
If you have no USCF rating, but do have
a rating or category from any other coun-
try, no matter how many years ago, you are
not unrated.
If you have a FIDE rating, you are also not
unrated.
Tell the Director of any event you enter
about your foreign rating or category or
your FIDE rating, so that you can be paired
appropriately.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r5_chess life 3/11/2012 10:52 AM Page 65
66 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
less than 1600. More information: call 703-989-6867, email dgorman@
darsmemail.com.
Apr. 21, Hamilton Chess Quads
3RR, 40/80 15/30 15/30. Full K. Ray Dwier Recreation Center, Bldg. 392,
Groveville, NJ 08620. Quads open to all. EF: $10. Prizes: $25 per Quad.
Reg.: 9-10:30/am. Rds.: 10:30/am-1:30/pm-4:30/pm. NJ State Chess
Federation, no dues magazine Subscription per year, OSA. NS, NC, W.
Apr. 21, Monmouth and Ocean County K-8 Scholastic Champi-
onship
4SS, G/30. Holy Family Elementary School, 1141 East County Line Rd.,
Lakewood, NJ 08701. 2 Sections: Championship: Trophies to top 10, Top
5 teams (3 players). Future Masters: Trophies to top 10, Top 5 teams (3
players). ALL: Entry fee $20 if received by 4/14, $30 at site. Reg. Sat.
8-9am. Rds.: 10:00 am and ASAP. ENT: Hal Sprechman, P.O. Box 1151,
Jackson, NJ 08527. Please make checks payable to Hal Sprechman or
pay online at www.characterkings.org until 4/19. Entries must include
name, grade, school, USCF ID#, mailing address, phone number and entry
fee.
Apr. 21, NW Jersey Class “A” Quads (also K-8 U1200)
U2000 sections: Courtyard Marriott, 15 Howard Blvd., Mt. Arlington.
Take exit #30 off I-80. 3RR, G/90. Rds.: 10-1-4. U1200 K-8 U1200 sec-
tions: May be 3RR or 3SS, G/45. All: Trophy or $40. Starts 10am then ASAP.
EF: $20 cash by 10am. Prizes: $40 or trophy, (All kids win trophies or
awards. Info: Ken 908-619-8621 or email Ken, acn@goes.com. NS, NC,
W.
Apr. 21, 28, Fair Lawn Saturday Quads
3RR, G/60 for quads with rating above 1000; G/30 for quads with rat-
ing below 1000 or unrated. Site: 9-10 SADDLE RIVER RD., FAIR LAWN,
NJ 07410. EF: $25. Prizes: $50 to 1st place in each quad. Reg.: 1-1:15
PM. Rds.: 1:15 PM-3:30- 5:40 (rating above 1000). Rds.: 1:10 PM-2:20-
3:30 (rating below 1000 or unrated). Info: Diana 201-797-0330,
diana@icanj.net; www.icanj.net. EVERY SATURDAY. ALL: ICA provides
breakfast & lunch.
Apr. 22, Westfield Swiss #72 (QC)
5 SS, G/15 (QC). Westfield Y, 220 Clark St., Westfield, NJ 07090. $425
Guaranteed $125, $60, under 2100, under 1850, under 1600, under 1350
$60 each. EF: $35, $25. Reg.: 2-2:30 p.m. Rds.: 2:45-3:25-4:05-4:45-5:30
p.m. Info: Todd Lunna 732-526-7163, lunnaco@aol.com, www.west-
fieldchessclub.com.
Apr. 25, S. Jersey/Philly Wednesday Quicks G/10 (QC)
G/10. Wednesdays 7-9:30 p.m. Located at CoffeeWorks at the Voorhees
Town Center, 8109 Town Center Blvd., Voorhees, NJ 08043. Instruction,
analysis and Reg.: 6:30-7:00. EF: $10. $$ 1st, 2nd, and 3rd and best less
than 1600. More information: call 703-989-6867, email dgorman@
darsmemail.com.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 2012 Maryland Open (MD)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28, Central Jersey Chess Tournament
4SS, G/30. All Saints' Church, 16 All Saints' Rd., Princeton, NJ 08540. Park-
ing, playground, wi-fi & lounge. 3 rated sections (all K-8, G/30): Open
(above 900), Reserve (600-900), Experienced (below 600). 3 unrated sec-
tions: K-1, Novice (2nd-8th grade), Parents/Adults. Trophies to 1st, 2nd,
3rd per section, 1st school/club team per section, $20 & Free EF to 1st
in Parents/Adults. EF: $30 online at njchess.com by 4/26, $40 after or
on-site. Check-in/Reg ends 1pm, first round starts 1:30. Late arrivals may
not be paired in first round. Late arrivals may not be paired in first
round. Late arrivals may not be paired in first round. Separate awards
ceremonies 4-5:30pm. Snacks & drinks sold on-site. Questions: newjer-
seychess@gmail.com.
Apr. 29, Westfield Quads
3 RR, G/40 T/D 5s, G/45. Westfield Y, 220 Clark St., Westfield, NJ 07090.
Prizes: $50 to first in each section. EF: $20, $15 Members. Reg.: 1:30-
2:15 p.m. Rds.: 2:30-4:20-6:10 p.m. Info: Todd Lunna 732-526-7163,
lunnaco@aol.com, www.westfieldchessclub.com.
May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Girls Chess Lessons & Tuesday G/15 (U2000)
(QC)
Chess Lessons: 5pm-6:30pm, Under 1600 USCF. Fees: Monthly/daily:
$50/$15. 4SS, Rds.: 7pm, 7:40pm, 8:20pm, & 9pm. EF: $20/$15. Prizes:
80% of EF 1st, 2nd, & Class Prizes: based on the # of participants. Chess
Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ. (760)583-8429/(732)499-
0118. www.chessmatesnj.com.
May 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, Chess Lessons & Wednesday G/90 (4SS,
Monthly)
Lessons: 5pm-6:30pm, Under 1600 USCF. Fees: Monthly: $95 (Monday
and Wednesday)/Daily: $15. Monthly 4SS, Rd starts at 7pm. EF: $30/$25
Prizes: 70% of EF. Prizes: 1st, 2nd & Class Prizes (based on the # of
participants). 1 bye available, commit at least two days before the next
round. No re-entry. GMs free entry ($20 deducted from prizes). Chess
Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ 07065. (732)499-
0118/(760)583-8429. www.chessmatesnj.com. Chess Magnet School
JGP.
May 5, 12, 19, 26, Fair Lawn Saturday Quads
3RR, G/60 for quads with rating above 1000; G/30 for quads with rat-
ing below 1000 or unrated. Site: 9-10 SADDLE RIVER RD., FAIR LAWN,
NJ 07410. EF: $25. Prizes: $50 to 1st place in each quad. Reg.: 1-1:15
PM. Rds.: 1:15 PM-3:30- 5:40 (rating above 1000). Rds.: 1:10 PM-2:20-
3:30 (rating below 1000 or unrated). Info: Diana 201-797-0330,
diana@icanj.net; www.icanj.net. EVERY SATURDAY. ALL: ICA provides
breakfast & lunch.
May 5, 12, 19, 26, Saturday Camp and Quad G/45
Saturday Chess Camp: 9am-1pm. Fees: $55/ $60. Snacks and lunch
included. Quad: G/45. EF: $20/$15. Prizes: $60 to first in each section.
Rds.: 1:30pm, 3:15pm, 5pm. GMs - Free entry. ($15 deducted from
prizes). Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ 07065.
(732)499-0118/(760)583-8429, www.chessmatesnj.com.
May 6, Westfield Quads
3 RR, G/40 T/D 5s, G/45. Westfield Y, 220 Clark St., Westfield, NJ 07090.
Prizes: $50 to first in each section. EF: $20, $15 Members. Reg.: 1:30-
2:15 p.m. Rds.: 2:30-4:20-6:10 p.m. Info: Todd Lunna 732-526-7163,
lunnaco@aol.com, www.westfieldchessclub.com.
May 6, 13, 20, 27, Sunday Advance Lesson & Open Blitz (G/5/RR)
(QC)
Advance Lesson (Above 1600 USCF Rating): 6:15pm-7:15pm, $15. Blitz
start: 7:30pm. EF: $20/$15. Prizes: 80% of EF 1st, 2nd, & Class Prizes:
based on the # of participants. GMs - Free entry ($15 deducted from
prizes). Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ. (732) 499-
0118. www.chessmatesnj.com.
May 6, 13, 20, 27, Sunday Camp and Quad G/30
Sunday Chess Camp: 10am-6pm. Fees: $80/$90. Snacks and lunch
included. Quad: G/30: Starts at 3pm. EF: $15/ $10, camp participants
are free. Prize per Quad: 1st Place: Trophy or $35. Chess Mates Cor-
poration, 1531 Irving St., Rahway, NJ. (760)583-8429/(732)499-0118.
www.chessmatesnj.com.
May 7-21, Mayflower Quads
3-RR or Swiss. 30/90, SD/30, d/5. Hackettstown Community Ctr., 293 Main
St. (Rte. 46), Hackettstown, NJ 07840. EF: $12. Prizes: $35 top in quad,
or b/16 entries $75/40/25, U1800 $25, if Swiss. Reg.: 7 pm, May 7. Rds.:
7:30 pm, each Monday.
May 7, 14, 21, 28, Chess Lessons & Monday Quad G/30
Chess Lessons: 5pm-6:30pm, Under 1600 USCF. Fees: Monthly: $95
(Monday and Wednesday) and Daily: $15. Quad: 3RR, Rds.: 7pm, 8:15pm,
9:30pm. EF: $20/$15. Prizes: $60 to first in each section. GMs - Free entry.
($15 deducted from prizes). Chess Mates Corporation, 1531 Irving St.,
Rahway, NJ. (760)583-8429/(732)499-0118. www.chessmatesnj.com.
May 12 not May 5, North Jersey Quads (Limited to Class A and
below.)
NOTE DATE CHANGE: Courtyard Marriott, 15 Howard Blvd., Mt. Arling-
ton: Off exit #30 of Rt #80. Adult Quads: 3RR, G/90, EF: $16 early at
EntryFeesRus.com or $20 cash at site by 10 am. $$G: $40 or trophy. Rds
10-1-4. Kids Quads: for K-8 players, 3RR, G/45, EF: $15 early
EntryFeesRus.com or $20 cash at site by 10am. $$G: $40 or Trophy, all
kids get awards. 1st round 10am then ASAP with lunch break. Info: call
Ken at 908-619-8621 or email, njchess64@yahoo.com. Past Quad Quit-
ters may not play. NS, NC, W.
May 18-20 or 19-20, 20th annual New York State Open (NY)
See Grand Prix.
May 19, Princeton Day School
650 The Great Road. Plaques to top 3 school teams and top 6 in each sec-
tion. Medals to all players. Four sections for OVER 1000 begin at 10:15
and must preregister: OVER 1600 (K-12), NEAR MASTERS (K-12 over
1400) and FUTURE MASTERS (Players K-12 over 1200) G/55/d5, 3
rds. CLOSED (K-12 1000-1200) G/40/d5 4 rds. ALL OTHER SECTIONS.
G/25/d5 4 rds. Beginning at 12:00 noon. (round times will be acceler-
ated if possible): OPEN (Players K-12 U-1000), RESERVE (K-12 U-800),
NOVICE II (K-8 U-600), NOVICE I (unrated K-6), K-1 (unrated) NO SCORE
K-1 (unrated). PARENTS OF PLAYERS rated G/25/d5 3 rounds. Pre-reg-
istration online, pay at the door $35. Parents play free. On-site 11-12 noon
$45. Info and register online: www.pds.org/chess. Inquires to Bonnie
Waitzkin Chessteach@gmail.com.
May 19-20, New Jersey Junior Championship
OPEN: (K-12) 4SS, G/90 +30sec incr. ICA, 9-10 Saddle River Rd., Fair
Lawn, NJ 07410 Phone: 201 797-0330. Trophies to top 10. Top High
School player from NJ awarded entry to Denker Tournament of HS Cham-
pions. Top K-8 from NJ awarded entry to Dewain Barber Tournament of
K-8 State Champions. Open section is FIDE rated. Reg.: Sat. 8-9:30am.
Rds.: 10-3: Sat, 10-3 Sun. Game 15 playoff if ties. RESERVE: (K-12 &
U1400) 4SS, G/60. Trophies to top 10, U1300, U1200, U1000, Unr. ALL:
Entry fee $35 if received by 5/12, $50 at site. Reg.: Sun. 8-9:30am. Rds.:
10-1-3-5:30 Sun. ENT: NJSCF, P.O. Box 1511, Jackson, NJ 08527. Make
checks payable to NJSCF or online at www.characterkings.org. Info:
Hal Sprechman, 732-259-3881, hsprechman@characterkings.org. FIDE.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 20, Westfield Quads
3 RR, G/40 T/D 5s, G/45. Westfield Y, 220 Clark St., Westfield, NJ 07090.
Prizes: $50 to first in each section. EF: $20, $15 Members. Reg.: 1:30-
2:15 p.m. Rds.: 2:30-4:20-6:10 p.m. Info: Todd Lunna 732-526-7163,
lunnaco@aol.com, www.westfieldchessclub.com.
May 26, U.S. Amateur K-8 East U1200
5-SS, G/30. Crowne Plaza Hotel, 110 Davidson Ave., Somerset, NJ, Tele-
phone 732-560-0500. In 3 Sections (U1200, U900, & U600). Trophies to
Top 10, Others win chess medallions. Unrated may not win first. Reg-
istration: Saturday May 26, 11am-12pm. Rounds: 12:30pm, then ASAP
with lunch break after round #2. EF: $29 if mailed by May 25 or paid online
via EntryFeesRus.com, EF: $40 cash at site. One 1/2 point bye allowed
if requested with EF. April Rating supplement used. Ent: Ken Thomas, 115
W. Moore St., Hackettstown, NJ 07840. Checks to NJSCF. Indicate grade
level. Info: 908-619-8621 or acn@goes.com. NS. NC. W.
May 26-28 or 27-28, 68th Annual U.S. Amateur East Championship
See Nationals.
June 3, Dr. David Ostfeld Memorial ICA Summer 2012 Open Cham-
pionship
See Grand Prix.
June 3, Dr. David Ostfeld Memorial ICA Summer 2012 Scholastic
Championship in 5 sections
4SS, EVERYONE PLAYS 4 GAMES, ALL PLAYERS WITH 2.5 PTS OR MORE
WILL RECEIVE A TROPHY! USCF Memb Req'd. For Sections 3, 4 AND 5.
Info: 201 287 0250 or 201 833 1741 www.icanj.net Email: Diana@icanj.
net ADV EF (pmk by May 30th) $25 At Site $30 Reg. ends 1/2 hr before
1st rd Late entrants will receive a 1/2 pt bye for rd 1 BERGEN ACADEMY,
200 HACKENSACK AVE., HACKENSACK, NJ 07601. In 5 Sections, Section
1 Junior Novice (not USCF rated): Open to unr players K thru 2nd grade.
Rds.: First Round 10:15 AM then ASAP. Section 2 Novice: Open to unr
players K thru 4th grade. Rds.: First Round 10:00 AM then ASAP. Sec-
tion 3 G/45 Reserve: Open to players rated below 800 and unr players
K thru 12th grade. Rds.: 9:45 AM, 11:30, 1:15, 3:00 PM. Section 4
G/45: Open to players rated below 1200 and unr players K thru 12th grade.
Rds.: 9:45 AM, 11:30, 1:15, 3:00 PM. Section 5 G/60: Open to players
rated below 1700 and unr players K thru 12th grade. Rds.: 9:45 AM, 12:00,
2:15, 4:30 PM. ENT: Make EF and/or USCF Memb chks payable to: Inter-
national Chess Academy. Mail To: Diana Tulman, 28 Canterbury Ln., New
Milford, NJ 07646.
June 3, Westfield Quads
3 RR, G/40 T/D 5s, G/45. Westfield Y, 220 Clark St., Westfield, NJ 07090.
Prizes: $50 to first in each section. EF: $20, $15 Members. Reg.: 1:30-
2:15 p.m. Rds.: 2:30-4:20-6:10 p.m. Info: Todd Lunna 732-526-7163,
lunnaco@aol.com, www.westfieldchessclub.com.
June 8-10 or 9-10, 18th Annual Northeast Open (CT)
See Grand Prix.
June 9-10, 2012 Delaware Capital Open (DE)
See Delaware.
June 29-July 3 (New date), 9th annual Philadelphia International
(PA)
See Grand Prix.
June 30, World Open U2300 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 1-2, World Open U2200 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
20
th
annual NEW YORK STATE OPEN
May 18-20 or 19-20, Tiki Resort, Lake George
$3000 prize fund, includes Senior Section
5 rounds, $65 or $75 room rates, beautiful area. In 4 sections:
Open Section: Prizes $400-200-150, top Under 2010 $230-120,
top Under 1810/Unr $220-110.
Senior Section: Open to under 1910 or unrated born before
5/21/62. $300-150-80, top Under 1710 $120-60.
Under 1610 Section: $300-150-80, top Under 1410 $120-60.
Unrated may not win over $150.
Under 1310 Section: $100-50, trophies to first 3, top Under 1000,
Under 800, Unrated. Advance entry fee only $27 to $29!
Unrated prize limit: $150 in U1250, $400 U1650.
FULL DETAILS: see “Grand Prix” in this issue or chesstour.com.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 66
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 67
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 40th Annual World Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 3-4, World Open U2100 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 4, World Open 7-Minute Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 5-8, World Open Daily 2pm Blitz (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 7, World Open 10-Minute Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 8, World Open Blitz Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 28-Aug. 1, 2012 Washington International (MD)
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 17-19 or 18-19, 11th annual Manhattan Open (NY)
See Grand Prix.
New Mexico
Apr. 21, 18th Annual Pir Maleki Memorial
United World College, Montezuma, NM. 7 Sections. Professor: 1700 or
above. 3SS, G/90. Instructor: 1500-1850 or UR. 3SS, G/90. Tutor (JGP):
1150-1650 or UR. 4SS, G/60. Sophomore (JGP): U1300 or UR. 4SS, G/60.
Scholastic: U/age 19 and U1100 or UR. 4SS, G40. Youth U17: U850 or
UR. 4SS, G/40. Youth U14: U600 or UR. 4SS, G/40. All sections Round
1, 10 am and 5 sec time delay. Late entries by phone or e-mail by 4/20.
Complete details at www.nmsco.org or TD Andy Nowak at 505-310-0095
or anowak@cybermesa.com. Chess Magnet School JGP for Tutor and
Sophomore sections.
New York
Apr. 4-8, 5-8, 6-8 or 7-8, 6th annual Philadelphia Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open Action Quads (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open G/15 (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 8, Philadelphia Open Blitz & G/7 (QC) (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Apr. 16-May 21, FIDE Mondays!!
6-SS, G/120d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. Open
to all players rated 1600 or above. EF: $50, $30 members. $$500 b/24:
$175-125-100, U2000 $100; 2 byes OK, commit before Round 4. Reg.:
6:15-6:45, Rds.: 7PM each Monday; FIDE rated. www.marshallchessclub.
org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 17, Marshall Masters!
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 19, 4 Rated Games Tonight!
4-SS, G/25 + td/5 or G/30 + td/0. Chess Center at Marshall Club, 23
W. 10th St., bet 5-6 Ave., NYC: 212-477-3716. May be limited to 1st 36
entries. EF $35, Club membs $25, GMs $20 from prize. $$ (480 b/32 paid):
150-100-50, Top U2200/unr $95, U2000 $85. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if
U2000), commit by 8:15. Re-entry $15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min. before
game. Rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. Phone entry often impossible! $5
extra if entering under 10 min. before game.
Apr. 19-May 17, Marshall Thursday Members-Only Swiss!
5-SS, G/115d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. Open
to MCC members only. EF: $30. ($450 b/20): $240-120, U2000 $90.
Reg.: 6:15-6:45. Rds.: 7PM each Thursday. Limit 2 byes, request by rd.
3. www.marshallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 21, Marshall Saturday U1600!
4-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. ($300
b/20): $160-80, U1300 $60. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 12:15-12:45.
Rds.: 1-2:45-4:30-6:15PM. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar
shallchessclub.org.
Apr. 21, Syracuse University April Open
4SS. Rds.: 1&2 G/60, Rds.: 3&4 G/90. (Syracuse University, Hall of
Languages, Room 101). EF: $30. Prizes: (b/20) $200, 125, Class 100. Reg.:
8:30-9:15. Rds.: 9:30, 12:00, 2:15, 5:30. Contact: Joe Ball 315-436-9008.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 21-22 or 22, Marshall CC April U2300!
4SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716.
EF: $45, Members $25. ($540 b/36): $240-120, U2000/unr $95, U1700
$85. Reg.: ends 12:15PM. Rds.: 2 schedules: 2 day, Rds. 12:30-5:30
PMeach day; 1 day, (Rds. 1-2 G/25d5) 10-11:15AM-12:30-5:30 PM Sun;
both merge rd.3. Limit 2 byes, request at entry. NO RE-ENTRY. www.mar
shallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 22, 38th Binghamton Monthly Tournament
4SS, G/65 d/5. Prizes: $500 b/26. Open-$150-$100-$50; Reserve-
$100-$75-$25 (U1700). Trophies: 1-3 both sections. Advance Entry:
Open-$35 Reserve-$25 (U1700) $5 more on site-cash only on site.
Schedule: Registration on site 8:45–9:15 AM. Rounds: 9:30-12Noon-
2:30-4:45. Free USCF 90-day membership (call for details) Mail Entry:
checks payable to: “Cordisco's Corner Store”, 308 Chenango St., Bing-
hamton, NY 13901 (607) 772-8782, cordiscos@stny.rr.com. Chess
Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 26, 4 Rated Games Tonight!
4-SS, G/25 + td/5 or G/30 + td/0. Chess Center at Marshall Club, 23
W. 10th St., bet 5-6 Ave., NYC: 212-477-3716. May be limited to 1st 36
entries. EF $35, Club membs $25, GMs $20 from prize. $$ (480 b/32 paid):
150-100-50, Top U2200/unr $95, U2000 $85. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if
U2000), commit by 8:15. Re-entry $15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min.
before game. Rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. Phone entry often impossi-
ble! $5 extra if entering under 10 min. before game.
Apr. 26-May 24, 2nd Long Island CC Early Spring Open
5SS, G/90 (d/5). United Methodist Church, 470 East Meadow Ave., East
Meadow, NY 11554. Open to all. $(b/20): $150-100. Top U-2000, U-
1500/unr. $95 ea. Best upset $10. Random pairings used (within ea.
scoregrp.) EF: $35. Non-LICC members +$10. Reg.: 6:40-7:10 PM, no
adv. ent., Rds.: 7:15 PM SHARP ea. Thursday. 2 byes 1-5. Info: www.lichess
club.com. NS. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 27, Marshall Friday Quads!
3-RR, G/40d5. Open to all levels; Quads formed by rating. Marshall CC,
23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. EF: $25, members $20. $50 for each
winner. Reg.: 5:15-5:45; Rds.: 6-7:30-9PM. www.marshallchessclub.org.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 23rd annual Vermont Resort Open (VT)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28, Marshall Saturday U1800!
4-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. ($300
b/20): $160-80, U1500 $60. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 12:15-12:45.
Rds.: 1-2:45-4:30-6:15PM. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar-
shallchessclub.org.
Apr. 28-29 or 29, Marshall April Grand Prix!
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 30-May 21, 26th Nassau Amateur Team
4-SS, 40/80. 1st Presbyterian Church, 1st & Main Sts., Mineola. Open to
teams of 3 (+ optional alternate). Ave rating must be U1800. May rat-
ings used. Teams play in rating order. EF: $54/team by 4/28, $75 at site,
$10 more per non-memb. $$ (504 b/12 teams) 252, U1600, 1400/UR each
126. Team byes 1-4 (Last rd bye must be req before rd 3 and is irrevo-
cable). Teams seeking players call 631 218-4440 or captnhal@optonline.
net. Players looking for teams $18 by 4/28, $25 at site, $10 more for non-
memb. Reg ends 7:15 PM. Rds.: 7:15 each Mon. Ent: Harold Stenzel, 80
Amy Dr., Sayville, NY 11782. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 30-May 28, Marshall Monday U1600!
5-SS, G/85d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. EF: $50,
members $30. ($675/30): $360-180, U1300 $135. Reg.: 6:15-6:45pm.
Rds.: 7 pm each Monday. Limit 2 byes, request by Rd 3. www.marshall
chessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 3, 4 Rated Games Tonight!
4-SS, G/25 + td/5 or G/30 + td/0. Chess Center at Marshall Club, 23
W. 10th St., bet 5-6 Ave., NYC: 212-477-3716. May be limited to 1st 36
entries. EF $35, Club membs $25, GMs $20 from prize. $$ (480 b/32 paid):
150-100-50, Top U2200/unr $95, U2000 $85. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if
U2000), commit by 8:15. Re-entry $15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min. before
game. Rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. Phone entry often impossible! $5
extra if entering under 10 min. before game.
May 5, Marshall Saturday G/60!
4-SS, G/55d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. ($360/24):
$160-80, U2000 $65, U1700 $55. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 11:15-11:45
am. Rds.: 12-2:30-4:45-7. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar
shallchessclub.org.
May 6, Marshall Open & U1500 Sunday Game/45!
5-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. Two sec-
tions-you play only those in your section: A. Open ($360/24): $160-80,
U2100 $65, U1800 $55. B. U1500 ($240/16): $120-65, U1200 $55. EF:
$40, members $20. Reg.: 11:15-11:45 pm. Rds.: 12-1:45-4:00-5:45.
One bye available, request at entry. www.marshallchessclub.org.
May 10, 10 Grand Prix Points Tonight!
See Grand Prix.
May 11, Marshall Friday Quads!
3-RR, G/40d5. Open to all levels; Quads formed by rating. Marshall CC,
23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. EF: $25, members $20. $50 for each
winner. Reg.: 5:15-5:45; Rds.: 6-7:30-9PM. www.marshallchessclub.org.
May 12, Marshall Saturday U1400!
4-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. ($300
b/20): $160-80, U1100 $60. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 12:15-12:45.
Rds.: 1-2:45-4:30-6:15PM. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar-
shallchessclub.org.
May 12, Utica Four Seasons - Spring
4SS, Rds. 1-2 G/60; Rds. 3-4 G/90. Mohawk Valley Community College,
Exit 31, I-90, bear left, South on E. Genesee, (2.6 miles), left on Memo-
rial Highway (2.3 miles, left Sherman, right into MVCC, Payne Building
3rd Floor). EF: $30. Prizes b/20: $200, 125, 75, Class 100. Reg.: 8:30-
9:15. Rds.: 9:30-12:00-2:15-5:30. Ent: Joe Ball, 310 Helfer Ln., Minoa,
NY 13116. 315-436-9008. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 12-13, Marshall May U2100!
4SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716.
EF: $45, Members $25. ($540 b/36): $240-120, U1850 $95, U1600 $85.
Reg.: ends 12:15PM. Rds.: 2 schedules: 2 day, Rds. 12:30-5:30 PM each
day; 1day, (Rds. 1-2G/35) 9:40-11:05AM-12:30-5:30 PMSun; both merge
rd.3. Limit 2 byes, request at entry. NO RE-ENTRY. www.marshallchess
club.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 15, Marshall Masters!
See Grand Prix.
May 16-June 13, Marshall Wednesday U1400!
5-SS, G/85d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. EF: $50,
members $30. ($450/20): $240-120, U1100 $90. Reg.: 6:15-6:45pm. Rds.:
7 pm each Wednesday. Limit 2 byes, request by Rd 3. www.marshallchess
club.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 16-June 13, Marshall Wednesday U2000!
5-SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-
3716. EF: $50, members $30. ($450/20): $240-120, U1700 $90. Reg.: 6:15-
6:45pm. Rds.: 7 pm each Wednesday. Limit 2 byes, request by Rd 3. www.
marshallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 17, Get Ready For Next Thursday!!
4-SS, G/25 + td/5 or G/30 + td/0. Chess Center at Marshall Club, 23
W. 10th St., bet 5-6 Ave., NYC: 212-477-3716. May be limited to 1st 36
entries. EF $35, Club membs $25, GMs $20 from prize. $$ (480 b/32 paid):
150-100-50, Top U2200/unr $95, U2000 $85. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if
U2000), commit by 8:15. Re-entry $15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min.
before game. Rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. Phone entry often impossi-
ble! $5 extra if entering under 10 min. before game.
May 18-20 or 19-20, 20th annual New York State Open
See Grand Prix.
May 19, Marshall Saturday U1800!
4-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. ($300
b/20): $160-80, U1500 $60. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 12:15-12:45.
Rds.: 1-2:45-4:30-6:15PM. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar-
shallchessclub.org.
May 19-20 or 20, Marshall May Grand Prix!
See Grand Prix.
May 20, 39th Binghamton Monthly Tournament
4SS, G/65 d/5. Prizes: $500 b/26. Open-$150-$100-$50; Reserve-
$100-$75-$25 (U1700). Trophies: 1-3 both sections. Advance Entry:
Open-$35 Reserve-$25 (U1700) $5 more on site-cash only on site.
Schedule: Registration on site 8:45–9:15 AM. Rounds: 9:30-12Noon-
2:30-4:45. Free USCF 90-day membership (call for details) Mail Entry:
checks payable to: "Cordisco's Corner Store", 308 Chenango St., Bingham-
ton, NY 13901 (607) 772-8782, cordiscos@stny.rr.com. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
May 24, The LAST “4 Rated Games Tonight!” At The Marshall
Chess Club-What A Long, Strange Trip It's Been!
4-SS, G/25 + td/5 or G/30 + td/0. Chess Center of New York leaves
18
th
annual NORTHEAST OPEN
June 8-10 or 9-10, Sheraton Hotel, Stamford CT
$8,000 GUARANTEED PRIZE FUND
5 rounds, $94 roomrates, free parking, downtown location, trains
from NYC run frequently. In 4 sections:
Open Section: Prizes $1000-500-300-200, top U2250 $600-300.
FIDE rated, 50 GPP
Under 2050 Section: $800-400-300-200, top U1850 $500-250.
Under 1650 Section: $700-400-250-150, top U1450 $400-200.
Under 1250 Section: $300-150-100, trophy to top U1000, U800,
U600, Unrated.
Unrated prize limit: $150 in U1250, $400 U1650.
FULL DETAILS: see “Grand Prix” in this issue or chesstour.com.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 67
68 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
the Marshall Chess Club, 23 W. 10th St, bet 5-6 Ave., NYC: 212-477-3716.
EF $35, Club membs $25, GMs $20 from prize, free to specified Greater
NY Scholastic Prizewinners! $$(480 b/32 paid): 150-100-50, Top
U2200/unr $95, U2000 $85. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if U2000), commit by 8:15.
Re-entry $15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min. before game. Rds. 7-8:15-
9:30-10:45 pm.
May 24-June 21, Marshall Thursday Members-Only Swiss!
5-SS, G/115d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. Open
to MCC members only. EF: $30. ($450 b/20): $200-100, U2100 $90,
U1800 $60. Reg.: 6:15-6:45. Rds.: 7PM each Thursday. Limit 2 byes,
request by rd. 3. www.marshallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 25, Point Me To The New Yorker!
3-SS, G/25 + d5 or G/30 + d/0. Chess Center at New Yorker Hotel, 481
Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station, NYC. EF: $20. 3-0 wins
$40, 2.5 wins $20, 2 wins $10. Reg. ends 7:15 pm. Rds. 7:30-8:30-9:30.
May 25, New Yorker Rated Beginners Tournament! (RBO)
4-SS, G/25 + d5 or G/30 + d/0. Chess Center at the New Yorker Hotel,
481 Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station, NYC, for Under 1200
or those not rated in any country. EF: $30, free to players who join or re-
join USCF with magazine, free to players also entering New Yorker
Open, 5/25-28 (3-Day or 2-Day schedule), specified Greater NY prizewin-
ners free! $$220 b/20 paid: $120-60-40. 2 byes OK, commit by 8:15. Reg.
ends 6:30 pm. Rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. No advance entries.
May 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, The 2nd Annual New Yorker Open!
See Grand Prix.
May 26, Marshall Saturday G/60!
4-SS, G/55d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. ($360/24):
$160-80, U2000 $65, U1700 $55. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 11:15-11:45
am. Rds.: 12-2:30-4:45-7. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar-
shallchessclub.org.
May 27, 2nd Annual New Yorker Open Blitz Championship (QC)!
See Grand Prix.
May 27, Marshall Open & U1500 Sunday Game/45!
5-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. Two sec-
tions-you play only those in your section: A. Open ($360/24): $160-80,
U2100 $65, U1800 $55. B. U1500 ($240/16): $120-65, U1200 $55. EF:
$40, members $20. Reg.: 11:15-11:45 pm. Rds.: 12-1:45-4:00-5:45.
One bye available, request at entry. www.marshallchessclub.org.
May 28, Memorial Day Madness!
6-SS, G/25d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. EF: $45,
members $25. ($480/24): $200-100, U2000 $70, U1700 $60, U1400
$50. Reg.: 10:15-10:45. Rds.: 11-12:15-1:30-3:00-4:15-5:30. Two byes
available, request at entry. www.marshallchessclub.org.
May 31, The New Yorker Masters!!
See Grand Prix.
June 2, Marshall Saturday U1600!
4-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. ($300
b/20): $160-80, U1300 $60. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 12:15-12:45.
Rds.: 1-2:45-4:30-6:15PM. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar-
shallchessclub.org.
June 2-3, 6th Annual Buffalo International Chess Championships
2012
See Grand Prix.
June 2-3 or 3, Marshall June U2300!
4SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716.
EF: $45, Members $25. ($540 b/36): $240-120, U2000/unr $95, U1700
$85. Reg.: ends 12:15PM. Rds.: 2 schedules: 2 day, Rds 12:30-5:30 PM
each day; 1 day, (Rds 1-2 G/25d5) 10-11:15AM-12:30-5:30 PM Sun; both
merge rd.3. Limit 2 byes, request at entry. NO RE-ENTRY. www.marshall
chessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 4-July 9, FIDE Mondays!!
6-SS, G/120d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. Open
to all players rated 1600 or above. EF: $50, $30 members. $$500 b/24:
$175-125-100, U2000 $100; 2 byes OK, commit before Round 4. Reg.:
6:15-6:45, Rds.: 7PM each Monday; FIDE rated. www.marshallchessclub.
org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
June 7, 4 Rated Games Tonight At The New York Hotel- USCF's
Longest-Running Action Tournament!
4-SS, G/25+d/5 or G/30 +d/0. Chess Center at the New Yorker Hotel!,
481 Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station, NYC: 845-569-9969.
EF $30, GMs $25 from prize, free to specified Greater NY Scholastic Prize
winners! Good Customer Loyalty Discounts: $5 less to those who played
in at least 4 “4 Rated Games Tonight!”Thursday Night Actions since Jan.
2011, $10 less to those who played in at least 10 4RGTs since 1987—
Thank You So Much For Your Support Of This Tournament These
Past 25 Years! $$ (480 b/32 paid): 150-100-50, Top U2200/unr $95,
U2000 $85. NEW!! $150 GUARANTEED In Mixed Doubles Bonus
Prizes! Best male/female 2-player team combined score: $100-50
(teammates’ average rating must be Under 2200; teammate pairings
avoided but possible, teams must declare by 8:15). Choice of 2 sched-
ules! 7:00 Schedule, rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. 7:30 schedule, rd. 1
(G/15 + td/3) at 7:30 pm, score carries over into round 2 of 7:00 sched-
ule at 8:15 pm. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if U2000), commit by 8:15. Re-entry
$15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min. before game.
June 8, Marshall Friday Quads!
3-RR, G/40d5. Open to all levels; Quads formed by rating. Marshall CC,
23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. EF: $25, members $20. Prize: $50 for
each winner. Reg.: 5:15-5:45; Rds.: 6-7:30-9PM. www.marshallchessclub.
org.
June 8-10 or 9-10, 18th Annual Northeast Open (CT)
See Grand Prix.
June 9, Marshall Saturday U1400!
4-SS, G/40d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716. ($300
b/20): $160-80, U1100 $60. EF: $40, members $20. Reg.: 12:15-12:45.
Rds.: 1-2:45-4:30-6:15PM. One bye available, request at entry. www.mar
shallchessclub.org.
June 9-10 or 10, Marshall June U2100!
4SS, 30/85d5, SD/1d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212 477-3716.
EF: $45, Members $25. ($540 b/36): $240-120, U1850 $95, U1600 $85.
Reg: ends 12:15PM. Rds.: 2 schedules: 2 day, Rds. 12:30-5:30 PM each
day; 1 day, (Rds 1-2 G/35) 9:40-11:05AM-12:30-5:30 PM Sun; both merge
rd.3. Limit 2 byes, request at entry. NO RE-ENTRY. www.marshallchess
club.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 11-July 9, Marshall Monday U1600!
5-SS, G/85d5. Marshall CC, 23 W. 10th St., NYC. 212-477-3716. EF: $50,
members $30. ($675/30): $250-150-100, U1400 $100, U1200 $75. Reg.:
6:15-6:45pm. Rds.: 7 pm each Monday. Limit 2 byes, request by Rd 3. www.
marshallchessclub.org. Chess Magnet School JGP.
A Heritage Event!
June 14, 4 Rated Games Tonight At The New Yorker Hotel- USCF's
Longest-Running Action Tournament
4-SS, G/25 + d/5 or G/30 + d/0. Chess Center at the New Yorker Hotel!,
481 Eighth Ave at 34th St, across from Penn Station, NYC: 845-569-9969.
EF $30, GMs $25 from prize, free to specified Greater NY Scholastic Prize
winners! Good Customer Loyalty Discounts: $5 less to those who played
in at least 4 “4 Rated Games Tonight!”Thursday Night Actions since Jan.
2011, $10 less to those who played in at least 10 4RGTs since 1987—
Thank You So Much For Your Support Of This Tournament These
Past 25 Years! $$ (480 b/32 paid): 150-100-50, Top U2200/unr $95,
U2000 $85. NEW!! $150 GUARANTEED In Mixed Doubles Bonus
Prizes! Best male/female 2-player team combined score: $100-50
(teammates’ average rating must be Under 2200; teammate pairings
avoided but possible, teams must declare by 8:15). Choice of 2 sched-
ules! 7:00 Schedule, rds. 7-8:15-9:30-10:45 pm. 7:30 schedule, rd. 1
(G/15 + td/3) at 7:30 pm, score carries over into round 2 of 7:00
schedule at 8:15 pm. Limit 2 byes (1 bye if U2000), commit by 8:15. Re-
entry $15, counts half. Reg. ends 10 min. before game.
June29-July 3(Newdate), 9thannual Philadelphia International (PA)
See Grand Prix.
June 30, World Open U2300 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 1-2, World Open U2200 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 40th Annual World Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 3-4, World Open U2100 Warmup (PA)
See Pennsylvania.
Adult Dues Options! >>
Free 8-Line Tournament Life Announcements (TLAs)!
ACTIVITY MEANS MEMBERS
RUN AN ADDITIONAL TOURNAMENT THIS SUM-
MER! Each affiliate is entitled to one TLA per month
of up to 8 lines and up to 2 issues of Chess Life, for
any tournament between July and September 2012,
if no TLA for such an event appeared in 2011, and the
TLA is e-mailed by the appropriate deadline. The 8 free
lines cannot be applied to longer TLAs.
SPECIAL CATEGORIES QUALIFY FOR FREE TLAS!
Each affiliate is entitled to one TLA per month of up to 8
lines for events in the following categories, if submitted
by e-mail. The free lines cannot be applied to longer TLAs:
SENIOR. For age 50 or above, or a higher minimum
age.
UNRATEDS FREE. Any tournament that offers free
entry to unrated players. If your prizes are based on
entries, say “paid entries.”
USCF BOOSTER TOURNAMENT. A tournament that
offers at least two USCF membership renewal prizes, or
a quad that offers at least one per section.
CHESS CLUB SPECIAL. A tournament playing only on
one or more weekday evenings.
RBO. Open to Under 1200/Unr or Under 1000/Unr.
Tournament name must include “Rated Beginners
Open” or “RBO.”
BLITZ. Time control of Game/5. TLAs such as “USCF-rated
Blitz every Friday 7 pm” are accepted.
COLLEGIATE. A tournament limited to college students.
JUNIOR. For age 20/below (age 20 must be eligible).
NON-SCHOLASTIC WITH SCHOLASTIC. A tour-
nament for all ages held concurrent (same location)
with a scholastic tournament that in its previous
year drew at least 50 players. We encourage organ-
izers of scholastics to hold open or collegiate events
on the side.
SPECIAL RATES FOR CLUB ADS. Up to 5 lines $180
per year, $100 for 6 months for unchanged club ads in the
TLA section. Announce meeting dates & times, activities,
contact info, etc.
USCF DISCUSSION GROUPS. See www.uschess.
org/forums for four groups: Tournament Organization,
Chess Club Organization, Tournament Direction, USCF
Issues.
N E W F R E E T L A C A T E G O R I E S A D D E D !
Ages 21-24 dues lower
than Adult dues!
The membership category once called “Youth” has been
renamed “Young Adult,” and eligibility has changed from
under 21 to under 25. Annual dues for this category are
only $33 with paper Chess Life or $26 with the online
version!
One-year membership
withChess Life:
Only $46 for Premium Membership, which includes a
copy of Chess Life every month. Regular Memberships
are available for $40 and give online-only access to
Chess Life and a mailed Tournament Life Newsletter
(bi-monthly). (Note to affiliates: If you collect a $46 mem-
bership, you may submit it online to USCF for $43.)
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 68
uschess.org Chess Life — April 2012 69
See previous issue for TLAs appearing April 1-14
July 4, World Open 7-Minute Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 7, World Open 10-Minute Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 8, World Open Blitz Championship (QC) (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 28-Aug. 1, 2012 Washington International (MD)
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 9-12, 10-12 or 11-12, 42nd annual Continental Open (MA)
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 17-19 or 18-19, 11th annual Manhattan Open
See Grand Prix.
North Carolina
May 4-6 or 5-6, 2012 Georgia Chess Championship (GA)
See Grand Prix.
Ohio
Apr. 20-21 & 27- 28, Dayton Chess Club 54th Championship
6SS, G/150, td5. USCF rated Open Tournament. Reg.: ends Apr 20,
7:45 p.m. EF: $15 adv/$25 after Apr 13. Rds.: Apr 20/21: 8pm, 10:30am,
5pm. Apr 27/28: 8pm, 10:30am, 5pm. Must be DCC mbr for 1+ month.
Trophies: 1st/2nd, u2000: 1st/2nd, u1600: 1st/2nd, u1200: 1st/2nd. Reg-
ister at: DCC or at www.DaytonChessClub.com or mail to Dayton Chess
Club, 18 W 5th St., Dayton, OH 45402. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 21, Progress with Chess Monthly Open
4SS, G/30. Fairhill Center, 12200 Fairhill Rd., Cleveland, OH 44120. EF:
$20. Reg.: 9-9:45. Rds.: 10, 11:30, 1, 2:30. $350 Guaranteed Open (1st
$100, 2nd $50 U-2000 $50). Reserve U-1500: (1st $70, 2nd $40 U-1000
$40). Entries: Progress with Chess, 12200 Fairhill Rd., Cleveland, OH
44120. Info: www.progresswithchess.org. Contact: Mike Joelson 216-
321-7000.
Apr. 28, Parma Open
4SS, G/45. German Central Organization, 7863 York Rd. (1/4 mi. N of
Sprague), Parma, OH. Sections: Open, U2000, U1600. Reg.: 8-9AM.
Rds.: 9:30-11:15-1:30-3:15. Prizes (b/50): Open 1st $160, 2nd $80;
U2000 1st $120, 2nd $60; U1600 1st $120, 2nd $60; U1200 1st $60. Ent:
$20. Info & entries: William Wright, 19121 Wheelers Lane, Strongsville,
OH 44149. Phone: (440) 572-9565. E-mail: grubber@adelphia.net. Web
www.parmachessclub.org/.
May 4, DCC #16 Quick 2012 (QC)
4SS, G/24, td5. Dayton Chess Club, 18 W. 5th St., Dayton, OH. Rds.:
7:30/8:30/9:30/10:30. One bye. Prizes based on entries. EF: $10 ($8 DCC
mbrs). Info: DCC.18W5@sbcglobal.net or 937-461-6283.
May 4-6 or 5-6, 48th Cincinnati Open
See Grand Prix.
May 5, House of Chess Open
4SS, G/45. House of Chess, Great Northern Mall, North Olmsted, OH (W
of JC Penny). Sections: Open, U1600. Reg.: 11-11:25 AM. Rds.: 11:30-
1:15-3:30-5:15. Prizes (b/25): Open 1st $200, 2nd $100; U1900 1st $100;
Reserve(U1600): 1st $100. Ent: $25, Club members $20. Info & entries:
House of Chess, Great Northern Mall, North Olmsted, OH 44070. Phone:
(440) 979-1133. E-mail: info@houseofchess.com. Web: www.thehouse
ofchess.com/.
May 11, DCC #17 Quick 2012 (QC)
4SS, G/24, td5. Dayton Chess Club, 18 W. 5th St., Dayton, OH. Rds.:
7:30/8:30/9:30/10:30. One bye. Prizes based on entries. EF: $10 ($8 DCC
mbrs). Info: DCC.18W5@sbcglobal.net or 937-461-6283.
May 12, Pawn Storm VII
5SS, G/45, td/5. Dayton Chess Club. 18 W. 5th St., Dayton, OH. Rds.: 11-
1-3-5-7. Two byes – only 1 if in rd 5. Prizes (b/25 paid): Open: $200-101,
U1900: $100, U1600: $99. EF: $25 until 5 May then $35. EF refunded 2200
or higher players who complete their schedule. Info: DCC.18W5@sbc-
global.net or 937-461-6283.
May 12, Toledo May Swiss
Open, 4SS, Rnd. 1 G/75, Rnds. 2-4 G/90. The University of Toledo Health
Science Campus, Mulford Library Basement Café, 3000 Arlington Ave.,
Toledo, OH 43614. Can split into 2 sections if enough players. EF: $20 by
5/10, $25 at site. Reg.: 9-10 a.m., Rds.: 10, 1, 4, & 7. Prizes: $360 b/20,
$100-50, 1st Class A ,B,C,D/Under $40, 1st U1600 $50. Ent: James
Jagodzinski, 7031 Willowyck Rd., Maumee, OH 43537. 419-367-9450.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
June 1-3 or 2-3, 54th Gem City Open
See Grand Prix.
June 9, Toledo June Swiss
Open, 4SS, Rnd 1 G/75, Rnds 2-4 G/90. The University of Toledo Health
Science Campus, Mulford Library Basement Café, 3000 Arlington Ave.,
Toledo, OH 43614. Can split into 2 sections if enough players. EF: $20 by
6/7, $25 at site. Reg.: 9-10 a.m., Rds.: 10, 1, 4, & 7. Prizes: $360 b/20,
$100-50, 1st Class A ,B,C,D/Under $40, 1st U1600 $50. Ent: James
Jagodzinski, 7031 Willowyck Rd., Maumee, OH 43537. 419-367-9450.
Chess Magnet School JGP.
June 22-24 or 23-24, 2012 Columbus Open
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 3-5 or 4-5, Cleveland Open
See Grand Prix.
Oklahoma
May 26-28, 31st NAO FIDE Open
See Grand Prix.
Oregon
July 19-22, 20-22 or 21-22, 17th annual Pacific Coast Open (CA-S)
See Grand Prix.
Pennsylvania
Every Saturday - Lehigh Valley Super Quads
(NO QUADS ON LVCA GRAND PRIX DATES LISTED IN CHESS LIFE or July
7 for WO), G/40 Quads, 3-RR. Reg.: 1-1:45, Rds.: 2 pm, then asap, Site:
Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 514 3rd Ave., Bethlehem, PA 18018. EF: $10,
$30 for 3-0 score, else $25 for 1st., Ph: 484-866-3045, Info: bdavis@
lehighvalleychess.org, www.lehighvalleychess.org/.
Apr. 4-8, 5-8, 6-8 or 7-8, 6th annual Philadelphia Open
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open Action Quads
3RR, G/25, d/5, dual rated. Loews Philadelphia Hotel (see Philadelphia
Open). EF: $20, at site only. $$ 50 1st each section. Reg. ends 1:45 pm,
rds. 2, 3, 4.
Apr. 7, Philadelphia Open G/15 (QC)
4SS, G/15, d/3. Lowes Philadelphia Hotel (see Philadelphia Open). Prizes
$300 based on 20 entries, else in proportion: $100-50, U2100 $60,
U1800 $50, U1500/Unr $40. EF: $20, at site only. Reg. ends 10:15 pm,
rds. 10:30, 10:45, 11:30, 12:15. One half pt bye available, must commit
before rd. 2. Quick rated, but higher of regular or quick used for pairings
& prizes.
Apr. 8, Philadelphia Open Blitz & G/7 (QC)
2 separate tournaments at Loews Philadelphia Hotel (see Philadelphia
Open). Blitz: G/5, no delay. G/7: G/7, d/2. Each is a 4-SS, double round
(8 games) with prizes $300 based on 20 entries, else in proportion:
$100-50, U2100 $60, U1800 $50, U1500/Unr $40. EF: $20, at site only.
Blitz: reg. ends 12:45 pm, rds. 1, 1:30, 2, 2:30. Game/7: reg. ends 10:15
pm, rds. 10:30, 11:15, 12, 12:45. Both: One pair of 1/2 pt byes available,
must commit before rd 2. Quick rated, but higher of regular or quick used
for pairings & prizes.
Apr. 15, PCL April Quick Quads (QC)
3RR, G/15d3. Wm. Pitt Union, Univ. of Pittsburgh, 5th Ave. & Bigelow, Pitts-
burgh, PA 15213. EF: $10, $7 Jrs. $20 to 1st/quad. Reg.: 11-11:15am. Rds.:
11:30am-Noon-12:30pm. Info: martinak_tom_m@hotmail.com, 412-
908-0286. W.
Apr. 21, NW Jersey Class “A” Quads (also K-8 U1200) (NJ)
See New Jersey.
Apr. 21-22, 2012 PA State Amateur Champ.
Comfort Inn, 58 SR 93, West Hazleton, PA 18202, 1/2 mile from Exit 145
off I81. 2 sections: Champ (Sat & Sun): Open to U2200. 5SS. G/90. Rds:
10-1:30-5, 9:30-1. EF: $20 rec'd by 4/18, $30 later. Trophies: 1-3, U1800,
U1600, U1400, U1200/Unrated, School Team (top 4 scores). Top 2 receive
entry into 2012 PA Champ. Title to top PA resident. Scholastic (Sat only):
unrated or U1400 in grades K-12. 4SS. G/40. Rds: 10-11:30-1-2:30. EF:
$15 rec'd by 4/18, $20 later. Trophies: 1-2, U1000, U800/Unrated, School
Team (top 4 scores). All: Reg.: 9-9:45am, PSCF $5, OSA. HR: 570-455-
9300, 1-877-424-6423, $68.95. Ent/Info: GHACC, c/o Michael Jemo,
128 Forest Hills Acres, Hazle Twp., PA 18201, jem023@ptd.net 570-
455-9261. W. Chess Magnet School JGP.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 2012 Maryland Open (MD)
See Grand Prix.
A Heritage Event!
Apr. 28-29, 52nd Golden Triangle Open
4SS, G/120, d/5. Pittsburgh Chess Club, 5604 Solway St., Suite 209, Pitts-
burgh, PA 15217. EF: $30 postmarked by 4/23, $40 later, $5 discount to
PCC members. 2 Sections: Open, Reserve (under 1800). Prizes: $$615
b/30. Open: 120-90, U2000 $80. Reserve: 100-70, U1600 $60, U1400 $50,
U1200/Unr $45. Reg.: 9AM-9:45AM on 4/28. Rounds: 10AM-3PM both
days. One 1/2 point bye permitted if requested before the start of Round
2. Info: 412-421-1881, www.pittsburghcc.org. Ent: Pittsburgh Chess Club,
Attn: Mike Holsinger, 5604 Solway St., Suite 209, Pittsburgh, PA 15217.
Checks payable to Pittsburgh Chess Club. Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 4, 1st Friday of the Month LVCA $$ 100% GTD (QC)
4SS, G/25;d3. St Timothy's Lutheran Church, 140 So. Ott St., Allentown,
PA 18104. EF: $15, $10-21 & under/College Student Id, $$200 100% Gtd.,
$70-$35, Top U20 $35, top U16/unrated $30, Top Junior/College $30. One
1/2 pt byes if reg.'d after 6:45 pm. REG.: Ends 6:45pm, Cash on site only.
RDS.: 7 pm, then ASAP. Ent/Info: By May 2, Check payable: Bruce Davis,
1208 Linden St., Fl. 1, Bethlehem, PA 18018, 484-866-3045 or bdavis@
lehighvalleychess.org, www.lehighvalleychess.org.
May 5, W. Chester 1st Sat. Quads
Our 23rd year! 3RR, 40/75, sd/30, td/5sec. United Methodist Church,
129 S. High St., West Chester, PA. EF: $20; $40, $50 for 3-0. Reg.: 9am;
Rds.: 9:30, 1, 4:30. Info: WCCC1975@gmail.com.
May 12 not May 5, North Jersey Quads (Limited to Class A and
below.) (NJ)
NOTE DATE CHANGE: See New Jersey.
May 12, MasterMinds CC Swiss/Quads
Blair Christian Academy, 220 W. Upsal St., Philadelphia, PA. Quads:
40/75 SD/30 TD/5. EF: $20 cash, Perfect score winner $50 else $40. Rd.
1 10AM then asap. Scholastic SS, EF $5 rec'd by Thursday before, $15
at the door. 3 sections Rd. 1 10AM then asap: K-12 3SS, G/55 TD/5 1st,
2nd, 3rd, top under 1200, top unrated; K-8 4SS, G/35 TD/5.1st, 2nd, 3rd,
top under 800, top unrated; K-6 4SS, G/35 TD/5.1st, 2nd, 3rd, top under
600, top under 400, top unrated. 1st & 2nd school & club trophies. All
Reg. ends 9:30am. Ent: MasterMinds CC, 36 E. Hortter St., Philadelphia,
PA 19119. Checks made payable to: MasterMinds CC. Info: Bradley
Crable, 215-844-3881, info@mastermindschess.org, or www.mastermind
schess.org.
May 26, 6th Annual May LVCA Scholastic K-12 Championship
5-SS, G/30. EF: $30, $35 CASH ONLY after 5/23/12 AT SITE. Trophy's to
1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, Top U1400, U1200, U1000,U800, UNR, FREE ENTRY TO
UNRATEDS, if paying 1 year USCF Dues, Drawings for $100 in Door
Prizes. Rds.: 1:10 pm then ASAP. Reg.: Ends 1 pm. Site: Holy Trinity Church,
514 3rd Ave., Bethlehem, PA 18102. Ent: Bruce Davis, 1208 Linden St, Beth-
lehem, PA 18018, Ph. 484-866-3045, Email: bdavis@lehighvalleychess.org.
Info: www.lehighvalleychess.org/.
June 9-10, 2012 Delaware Capital Open (DE)
See Delaware.
June 29-July 3 (New date), 9th annual Philadelphia International
See Grand Prix.
June 30, World Open U2300 Warmup
5SS, G/30, d/5. Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel (see World
Open). Open to under 2300 or unrated. Prizes $500 based on 30 entries,
else in proportion: $150-70-40, U2050 $90, U1800 $80, U1550/Unr $70.
EF: $20, at site only, no checks. Reg. ends 9:30 am 6/30, rds. 10, 12, 1:30,
3, 4:30. One half point bye allowed if U1800/Unr, otherwise two byes
allowed, must commit before rd 2.
July 1-2, World Open U2200 Warmup
5SS, G/90, d/5. Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel (see World
Open). Open to under 2200 or unrated. Prizes $500 based on 20 entries,
else in proportion: $150-70-40, U1950 $90, U1700 $80, U1450/Unr $70:
EF: $30, at site only, no checks. Reg. ends 10 am 7/1, rds. Sun 10, 2, 6,
Mon. 10, 2. One half point bye allowed if U1700/Unr, otherwise two byes
allowed; must commit before rd 2. Chess Magnet School JGP.
July 3-4, World Open U2100 Warmup
5SS, G/90, d/5. Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel (see World
Open). Open to under 2100 or unrated. Prizes $500 based on 20 entries,
else in proportion: $150-70-40, U1850 $90, U1600/Unr $80, U1350 $70.
EF: $30, at site only, no checks. Reg. ends 10 am 7/3, rds. Tue 10, 2, 6,
Wed 10, 2. One half point bye allowed if U1600/Unr, otherwise two byes
allowed, must commit before rd 2. Chess Magnet School JGP.
July 4, World Open 7-Minute Championship (QC)
See Grand Prix.
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 40th Annual World Open
See Grand Prix.
July 5-8, World Open Daily 2pm Blitz (QC)
4 separate tournaments at Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel (see
World Open). Each is a 4-SS, double round (8 games), G/5. Prizes $300
based on 20 entries, else in proportion: $100-50, U2100 $60, U1800 $50,
U1500/Unr $40. EF: $20, at site only, no checks. Reg. ends 1:45 pm, rds.
2, 2:45, 3:15, 3:45. One pair of 1/2 pt byes available, must commit before
rd 2. Quick rated (will not affect regular ratings), but higher of regular
or quick used for pairings & prizes.
July 7, World Open 10-Minute Championship (QC)
See Grand Prix.
July 8, World Open Blitz Championship (QC)
See Grand Prix.
July 28-Aug. 1, 2012 Washington International (MD)
See Grand Prix.
Aug. 3-5 or 4-5, Cleveland Open (OH)
See Grand Prix.
Rhode Island
Cranston Chess Club Monthly
Every Tuesday. 4SS, 40/70, SD/30. Garden City Center, Cranston. EF:
$5/game (club mbrs: $3/game). Reg.: 6:30-6:50pm; RDS.: 1st 4 Tuesdays
of the month, 7pm sharp! 5th Tuesday extra rated games and events. One
bye rd 1-3; if notified in advance. Prizes based on entries. Info: www.
cranstonchess.org, 401-575-1520. Chess Magnet School JGP.
South Carolina
May 4-6 or 5-6, 2012 Georgia Chess Championship (GA)
See Grand Prix.
Tennessee
A State Championship Event!
Apr. 14, Tennessee All-Girls Scholastic State Championship
5SS, G/40. 3rd Floor, Keathley University Center, MTSU 1301 E. Main St.,
Murfreesboro, TN 37132. Two Sections: Championship Section open to
all TN girls ages 18 & under. EF: $20 pstmkd by 4/10/12, $25 later.
Competition Section open to all TN girls ages 12 & under. EF: $15.00 if
pstmkd by 4/10/12, $20.00 later, USCF and TCA membership req'd., Tro-
phies 1st–6th place, medals 7th–10th place, plus prizes to 1st–3rd place
in each section. Rds. both sections: 9:00, 10:30, 12:00, 1:30 3:00,
Playoff if needed: G/10, G/5, Coin toss, Winner of Championship Section
will be crowned TN All-Girls State Champion and receive Grand Prize of
partial scholarship to college of choice. Special events: Exhibits &
Seminars for players and Parents from WiSTEM, GRITS, NGCP, MTSU, Free
games analysis by NM. Inq.: clarksvillechessclub@charter.net. Ent:
Clarksville Chess Club, c/o Roy Manners, 1215 Cumberland Heights Rd.,
Clarksville, TN 37040. Online: www.tnchess.org.
Apr. 21, 2012 Cumberland County Spring Open
Cumberland Co. Community Complex, 1398 Livingston Rd., Crossville, TN
38555. $420 guaranteed prize fund. In 2 Sections: Open: 4SS, G/60, $$:
$75. 30-X,A,B,C,D/Below. Amateur: 4SS, G/60, Open to U1200 & under.
$$: $75. 30-F, G,H/Below,UNR UNR eligible for unrated prize only. ALL:
EF: $15 if mailed by 4/16, $20 at site. Memb. Req'd: TCA $10 TN resi-
dents only. ENT: Harry D. Sabine, P.O. Box 381, Crossville, TN 38557. INFO:
www.cumberlandcountychess.com or Susan at 931-261-4024. NS. W.
Apr. 21, Bluff City Open
See Grand Prix.
May 4-6 or 5-6, 2012 Georgia Chess Championship (GA)
See Grand Prix.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r5_chess life 3/15/2012 8:25 AM Page 69
70 Chess Life — April 2012 uschess.org
Tournament Life
Chess Life accepts classified advertising in these categories:
Activities, For Rent, For Sale, Games, Instruction, Miscellaneous,
Services, Tournaments, Wanted. Only typed or e-mailed copy is
accepted. Absolutely no telephone orders. Rates (per word, per
insertion): 1-2 insertions $1.50, 3-6 insertions $1.25, 7 + inser-
tions $1.00. Affiliates pay $1.00 per word regardless of insertion
frequency. No other discounts available. Advertisements with
less than 15 words will cost a minimum of $15 per issue. Post
office boxes count as two words, telephone numbers as one,
ZIP code is free. Full payment must accompany all advertising.
All advertising published in Chess Life is subject to the applica-
ble rate card, available from the Advertising Department. Chess
Life reserves the right not to accept an advertiser’s order. Only
publication of an advertisement constitutes final acceptance.
For a copy of these complete set of regulations & a schedule of
deadlines, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Chess Life
Classifieds, PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557.
For Sale
* WORLD’S FINEST CHESS SETS *
*The House of Staunton, produces unquestionably the finest Staunton
Chess sets. *Pay-Pal and all Major Credit Cards accepted. The
House of Staunton, Inc.; 1021 Production Court; Suite 100; Madison, AL
35758.
*Website: www.houseofstaunton.com; phone: (256) 858-8070; email:
sales@houseofstaunton.com
Chess Life and Chess Life and Review magazines.
Have all issues from 1969 to 2000. Will sell packages of 12 (any year).
Also various issues dating to 1961. Will sell individually. Call Ken at 906-
428-1150 for information. E-mail mcbay77@gmail.com.
Instruction
TOP-QUALITY BARGAIN CHESS LESSONS BY PHONE
With more than 40 years of experience teaching chess, the Mid-Atlantic
Chess Instruction Center is the best in the business. We specialize in adult
students. We offer 32 different courses as well as individual game
analysis. Center Director: Life Master Russell Potter. Tel.: (540) 344-4446.
If we are out when you call, please leave your name & tel. #. Our Web-
page is at: chessinstructor.org. NEW FOR 2012: Two additional courses
+ FREE powerful analysis engines + FREE screen-sharing!
LEARN CHESS BY MAIL:
Any Strength: Inquire about individual programs. Alex Dunne, 324 West
Lockhart Street, Sayre, PA 18840. adunne@stny.rr.com.
YOU’LL SEE REAL PROGRESS by Studying with 3-
Time U.S. Champ GM Lev Alburt!
Private lessons (incl. by mail and phone) from $80/hr. Autographed
seven-volume, self-study Comprehensive Chess Course-only $134 post-
paid! P.O. Box 534, Gracie Station, NY, NY 10028. (212) 794-8706.
Internet and Telephone Chess Lessons for all ages with N.M.
Peter Aravena Sloan www.TeachesChess.com 347-451-1154.
Miscellaneous
Chess Gazette Monthly FREE. Reviews, stories, sales. PDF
download. Send email address and name: bob@thinkerspressinc.com
Wanted
* CHESS-PLAYER SCHOLARS *
in top 10% of high school class with USCF > 2000 and SAT (math + crit-
ical reading) > 1400 for possible college scholarships to UMBC. Prof. Alan
Sherman, Dept. of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, Univ. of
Maryland, Baltimore County, 21250. 410-455-2666, sherman@umbc.edu
Classifieds
ChessMate® Pocket & Travel Sets
Perfect chess gifts for the chess lover in your life:
The finest magnetic chess sets available.
Handmade in the USA
30-DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE!
WWW.CHESSMATE.COM Phone: 425.697.4513
May 11-13, 2012 National Elementary (K-6) Championship
See Nationals.
May 18-20 or 19-20, 2012 Tennessee Senior Open
5SS, G/120. Fair Park Senior Center, 1433 Livingston Rd., Crossville, TN
38555. EF: $25 if mailed by 5/11/2012 $35 at site. 3-Day: Reg. Fri
2:00-3:30 PM. Rds.: 4, 10-4, 9-2. 2 Day: Reg Sat 8:00-9:30. Rds: 10-1-
4, 9-2 (2 Day R 1 & 2 at G/60). Memb. Req'd: TCA $10, TN residents only.
$$GTD: $150-100. 50-B/C, D/E, B1000,Unr, Age 60-69, Age-70 & Older.
Plaques to top 3, B1400, Age 70+ (plaques to TN residents only). Medals
to all participants. ENT: Harry D Sabine, PO Box 381, Crossville, TN
38557 or register on line at www.tnchess.org. HR: $60 + tax 931-484-
1551 or 1-866-707-8408, Crossville Best Western Leisure Inn, 4035
Highway 127 N, Crossville, TN 38571. NS.
May 18-20, Pawn Power Open 9
5SS, G/120. $750 prizes based on 40 entries. Greater Memphis Chess
Center, 5796 Shelby Oaks Dr., Suite 11, Memphis, TN 38134. Accelerated
pairings. Prizes: 1st $300, $200, $100. Top U1600 and U1400: $100
each. EF: $40 ($35 for MCC and GMCC members). Rounds: 3-day option:
Fri 7pm, Sat 2pm & 7pm, Sun 9am & 2pm. 2-day option: Sat 9am, 2pm
& 7pm; Sun 9am & 2pm. On-site registration: Fri: 5:30-6:30pm or Sat:
7:30-8:30am. Saturday side event: U1200 Scholastic, 5SS, G/45. 1st
round at 9am, next rounds ASAP. Trophies for top 3 finishers. EF: $15.
Entries: Memphis Chess Club Inc., PO Box 17864, Memphis, TN 38187-
0864. Chess Magnet School JGP for Main Event.
May 26, Rutherford County Open
See Grand Prix.
June 9-10, 2012 U.S. Amateur South Championship
See Nationals.
Texas
Apr. 14-15, 2012 DCC Fide Open III
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 21, Many Springs Open 44
North Richland Hills Public Library, 9015 Grand Ave., North Richland
Hills, TX 76180. 4 Round SS, G/45. EF: $15, 80% of entry fee's returned
as prizes. Registration On-site: 8:45-8:55. First Round 9:00 AM. Addi-
tional information Tom Crane at either 817-296-4287, tcrane5000@yahoo.
com or www.tarrantcountychessclub.org/.
Apr. 21, Temple Chess Club Spring Swiss 2012
See Grand Prix.
May 12, Mother's Day Tournament (QC)
Harlingen Public Library, (TX). 12:30. Rated, 4-rounds, G/20. EF: $15, mul-
tiple sections. Contact: Josie Balboa, 956-216-5814.
May 25-28 or 26-28, Texas State and Amateur Championships
See Grand Prix.
July 9-14, 2012 U.S. Senior Open
See Nationals.
July 13-15, 2012 U.S. Junior Open
See Nationals.
Vermont
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 23rd annual Vermont Resort Open
See Grand Prix.
May 12, White River Open
See Grand Prix.
May 18-20 or 19-20, 20th annual New York State Open (NY)
See Grand Prix.
Virginia
Arlington Chess Club's Friday Action Tournament
3SS, G/30. Once a month we run a Friday night event - dates are on the
club website: www.arlingtonchessclub.com. Prizes b/entries: 80%
returned as prizes. Reg.: 7:00-8:15pm. Rd. 1: 8:20. EF: $15 ($10 for ACC
Members), no advance entries, cash only. Arlington Forest United
Methodist Church, 4701 Arlington Blvd., Arlington, VA 22202. Contact for
info only: chrisney2@gmail.com. W, NS.
Arlington Chess Club's Friday Ladder
30/90, SD/1. Most monthly game points: $50; most total points Jan. to
Dec.: $100. Must join club to play. Yearly dues: $50 adults, $40 seniors/
U18. Cash or check. Reg.: weekly sign-up from 7:00-8:00pm, games
start by 8:10, no advance entries. Arlington Forest United Methodist
Church, 4701 Arlington Blvd., Arlington, VA 22203. Contact for info only:
chrisney2@gmail.com. W, NS. Chess Magnet School JGP (if 4
rounds/games played in that one month).
Apr. 14, Sleepy Hollow Scholastic Open Chess Tournament (QC)
4SS, G/25. 3333 Sleepy Hollow Rd., Falls Church, VA 22044. Rounds: 11-
3pm. Contact: Olympia Chess Academy, Mary C. Fair, 703-755-0973,
info@olympiachess.org.
Apr. 14, 1st Annual Silver Knights K-8 Chess League, Meet 1
Rounds: 1-3, G/30. 12:30 PM-3:30 PM. Hunter's Woods Elementary
School, 2401 Colts Neck Rd., Reston, VA 20191. EF: $180 per team, cov-
ers this and events on 4/28 and 5/19. Team rosters of 4 - 6 players in
grades K-8 that attend the same school, plus a team captain (coach or
parent) responsible for organizing the team. Free Game analysis by NM
Jeremy Kane. For details on eligibility and match regulations see:
www.silverknightschess.com/league.
Apr. 14-15, Kingstowne Chess Festival - 10th Annual!
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 21, Third Saturday Swiss
4SS, G/61. Open & U1200 sections. Ashburn Chess Center, 44927 George
Washington Blvd., #120, Ashburn, VA 20147. Prizes: 50% back to top
3 per section. EF: $18 Preregistered. $20 at site. Members discounted.
Reg.: 9-9:30AM. Rd.1 10AM. Halfpt Bye: 1-3. Preregistration and
more info at: www.loudounchess.org/reg/accregister.htm. Chess Mag-
net School JGP.
Apr. 27-29 or 28-29, 2012 Maryland Open (MD)
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28, 1st Annual Silver Knights K-8 Chess League, Meet 2 (Play-
off May 19th in Reston)
Rounds 4-6, G/30. 12:30 PM-3:30 PM. Key Middle School, 6402 Franco-
nia Rd., Springfield, VA 22150. EF: $180 per team, covers this and events
on 4/14 and 5/19. Team rosters of 4 - 6 players in grades K-8 that attend
the same school, plus a team captain (coach or parent) responsible for
organizing the team. Free Game analysis by NM Jeremy Kane. May 19
Playoff: Rounds: 12:30-3:30pm. Hunters Woods Elementary School,
2401 Colts Neck Rd., Reston, VA 20191. For details on eligibility and match
regulations see: www.silverknightschess.com/league.
Apr. 28, 2012 Walter Muir Memorial
See Grand Prix.
Apr. 28, Sterling Chess April Open and RBO
See Grand Prix.
May 26, 2012 Richmond Spring Open!
4SS, G/65. Atlee High School, 9414 Atlee Station Rd., Mechanicsville VA,
23116. Reg.: 9:00-9:30. Rds.: 9:45-12:15-3:00-5:30. 2 Sections: OPEN:
EF: $32 pd by 5/23, $36 at site, $140-83, Top X/A/B $64 ea.; PREMIER
(under1700) EF: $29 pd by 5/23, $33 at site, $128-72, Top C/D/E-unr $57
ea. Prizes GUARANTEED, increased if more than 50 players total. NS,
nocredit cards. A VCF Cup event. Mail entries to: Andrew Rea, 6102 Lundy
Pl., Burke VA 22015. Info: www.vachess.org or andrerea2@yahoo.com.
One 1/2 pt bye available at reg. or at site before Rd2. Chess Magnet
School JGP.
June 9-10, 2012 Delaware Capital Open (DE)
See Delaware.
July 4-8, 5-8, 6-8, 2-8, 1-3 or 4-5, 40th Annual World Open (PA)
See Grand Prix.
July 28-Aug. 1, 2012 Washington International (MD)
See Grand Prix.
Washington
Aug. 4-12, 7-12 or 9-12, 113th annual U.S. Open
See Nationals.
West Virginia
Apr. 14-15, Kingstowne Chess Festival - 10th Annual! (VA)
See Grand Prix.
Wisconsin
Apr. 21, Hales Corners Challenge XV
See Grand Prix.
May 19-20, Arpad Elo Open
Wyndham Milwaukee Airport Hotel, 4747 S. Howell Ave., Milwaukee, WI
53207. In 2 Sections, Open: 5SS, 45/2; SD/1; TD/5, EF: $37 (Jr $35) if
received by 5/15; $3 more later or at site. $$b/30: $325-175. X 125; A
110; U1800: 75. Top Female $100. Reserve: 5SS, 45/2; SD/1; TD/5, Open
to Under 1700. EF: $25 (Jr $23) if received by 5/15; $3 more later or at
site. $$b/30: $110-80. Trophies to 1st, 2nd, 1st D, 1st E, 1st U1000, Top
Female. ALL: Reg.: 8:30-9:30 am 5/19/12. Rds.: 10-2:30-7:30; 10-3:30.
ENT: Dennis Kosterman, 28 Singleton Ct., Madison, WI 53711 608-770-
3133. INFO: dennisk@tds.net. HR: $82 414-481-8000 (mention Chess).
www.wischess.org. WCA Tour Event! Chess Magnet School JGP.
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28 or 27-28, 21st annual Chicago Open (IL)
See Grand Prix.
May 27, Chicago Open Action Quads (IL)
See Illinois.
May 27, Chicago Open G/15 (QC) (IL)
See Illinois.
May 28, Chicago Open Blitz & Game/7 (QC) (IL)
See Illinois.
July 20-22 or 21-22, 5th annual Chicago Class (IL)
See Grand Prix.
Clubs Committee
The USCF is appointing a Clubs Commit-
tee with Bob Rasmussen, President of the
Fresno Chess Club, as chair. Anyone
interested in discussing how to build a
chess club or joining the committee is
welcome to call Bob at 559-708-8100.
ATTENTION AFFILIATES
The United States Chess Federation has
partnered with R.V. Nuccio & Associates
Insurance Brokers, Inc. to provide USCF
affiliates with affordable annual liability
and short term event insurance. The lia-
bility coverage is available for approxi-
mately $265 per year for a $1,000,000
limit of insurance. Also available is con-
tents property and bonding insurance.
For more information, please go to www.
rvnuccio.com/chess-federation.html.For
event insurance, please go to www.rvnuc
cio.com.
CL_04-2012_TLA_JP_r4_chess life 3/7/2012 4:46 PM Page 70
uschess.org
CHESS TO ENJOY
(page 15)
Problem I.
1. ... Qxa2+! and 2. Kxa2 Ra4+ 3. Kb1 Ra1 mate, or
2. Kc1 Bf4.
Problem II.
1. d5! threatens the queen, 2. Bxb6, and king, 2.
Rxf7 mate.
Problem III.
1. f3! so that 1. ... Nf6 2. Bd2 wins the queen. After
1. ... Nc5! White avoided 2. dxc5 dxc5 3. Q-moves
Bxa1 and prompted resignation with 2. Rb1!
Problem IV.
1. ... Qc8! threatens to mate with ... Qg4+-g2 but
also to win a piece with 2. ... Bxd2 3. Qxc8 Bxc8.
And won the game after 2. f3 Rxd2! in view of 3.
Bxd2 Bd4+ and 4. ... Qxc2.
Problem V.
1. Bd6! Ke8 (else 2. Qa8+) 2. Qc6! and 3. Rb8+
wins, e.g. 2. ... Qd5 3. Rb8+ Bd8 4. Rxd8+! Kxd8 5.
Qc7+ Ke8 6. Qc8 mate.
Problem VI.
1. Be2!! stops 1. ... Qxc2+ and threatens 2. Rxh4+
Bxh4 3. Qg7 mate. Black resigned after 1. ... Rg2 2.
Rxh4+ in view of 2. ... Bxh4 3. Qh5+ and 4. Rxg2+.
No better is 1. ... Rf1+ 2. Rxf1 Qxe2 3. Rg1.
SOLITAIRE CHESS
ABCs of Chess (page 17)
Problem I.
Pin: Black wins a pawn with 1. ... Nxf4, since 2.
Rxf4 is met by 2. ... Be5.
Problem II.
Fork: Black steals a pawn with 1. ... Ng4.
Problem III.
Discovery: Black gains a piece with 1. ... f3+ 2.
Kh1 fxg2+.
Problem IV.
Mating net: Black mates with 1. ... Nf3+ 2. Kh1
Qh2 mate.
Problem V.
Mating net: Black mates with 1. ... Qf2+ 2. Kh1
Qxg2 mate.
Problem VI.
Mating net: The game comes to an end by 1. ...
Rf1+ 2. Kg2 (or 2. Kh2) 2. ... Qf2 mate (or 2. ... Qg1
mate).
ENDGAME LAB
Benko’s Bafflers (page 47)
Problem I.
1. Ba5 Rxb7
No better is 1. ... Rxg8 2. Bc7 Kf3.
2. Nf6 Ke2 3. d4 Ra7 4. Bd8
Thematic try: 4. Bb6? Ra6 half-pin 5. Nd5 Kf3 6. Kg6
Ke4 7. Nf6+ Kd3 8. Bc5 Kc4 9. Kf5 Ra5 pin 10. Nd7
Kd5 unpin 11. Nf6+ Kc4 12. Nd7 Kd5 unpin 13.
Nf6+ positional draw.
4. ... Ke3 5. d5 Ra6 pin 6. Be7 Kf4 7. d6 half-pin 7.
... Ke5 8. d7
Thematic try: 8. Ne8? Rb6 (Rc6) pin 9. Kg6 Ke6
unpin (but not 9. ... Rb7? unpin 10. Kf7 Rd7 pin 11.
Kf8 Ke6 12. Nc7+ Ke5 13. Nb5 Ke6 14. Ke8 and
White wins).
8. ... Ke6 unpin 9. d8=Q wins.
“An excellent thematic study. The thematic tries are
really good because of the pinning/unpinning
moves”
Problem II.
1. h7 Bb2 2. Nc5+ dxc5
2. ... Kc6 3. Rxb2 Rg1+ 4. Kf7 Rf1+ 5. Kg6 Rf6+ 6.
Kxf6 a1=Q 7. Nd3 draws.
3. Rxb2 Rg1+ 4. Kh8 Rg2
4. ... a1=Q Stalemate, or 4. ... a1=R 5. Rd2+ draws.
5. Rb1 Rg8+
5. ... axb1=Q Stalemate, or 5. ... Rh2 6. Ra1 draws.
6. hxg8=Q axb1=Q 7. Qg4+ Kd8 8. Qg8+ Kd7 9.
Qg4+ Kd6 10. Qg6+ Qxg6 Stalemate.
“Another interesting example of consecutive
synthesis.
Highly suspect. MG proposes: 1. Nf8+ Kc6 2. h7 Bb2
3. Rc2+ Kd5 4. Rxb2 Rg1+ 5. Ng6 Rxg6+ 6. Kh8
a1=R 7. Rb5+ and White has a rabid rook.
Chess Life — April 2012 71
Solutions
CHESS LIFE USPS# 102-840 (ISSN 0197-260X). Volume 67 No. 4.
PRINTED IN THE USA. Chess Life, formerly Chess Life & Review, is pub-
lished monthly by the United States Chess Federation, 137 Obrien Dr.,
Crossville, TN 38557-3967. Chess Life & Review and Chess Life remain
the property of USCF. Annual subscription (without membership): $50.
Periodical postage paid at Crossville, TN 38557-3967 and additional mail-
ing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chess Life (USCF),
PO Box 3967, Crossville, Tennessee 38557-3967. Entire contents
©2012 by the United States Chess Federation. All rights reserved. No
part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system,
or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical,
photocopying, or otherwise without the prior written permission of USCF.
Note: Unsolicited materials are submitted at the sender's risk and Chess
Life accepts no responsibility for them. Materials will not be returned unless
accompanied by appropriate postage and packaging. Address all sub-
missions to Chess Life, PO Box 3967, Crossville, TN 38557-3967. The
opinions expressed are strictly those of the contributors and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the United States Chess Federation.
Send all address changes to: U.S. Chess, Membership Services, PO Box
3967, Crossville, Tennessee 38557-3967. Include your USCF I.D.
number and a recent mailing label if possible. This information may be
e-mailed to addresschange@ uschess.org. Please give us eight weeks
advance notice.
PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO. 41473530 RETURN UNDE-
LIVERABLE CANADIAN ADDRESSES TO EXPRESS MESSENGER
I NTERNATI ONAL P.O. BOX 25058 LONDON BRC, ONTARI O,
CANADA N6C 6A8
Wijk-ie Quickie Solutions (page
24):
Gelfand-Nakamura: 35. Rd6 should hold but not 35.
Rc2?? Red4, White resigned.
Radjabov-Karjakin: 60. b6! Rxa4 61. b7! Rb4 62.
Rc4+!!, Black resigned and after 62. ... Bxc4 63.
Nc2+ the b-pawn queens.
Gelfand-Kamsky: Gelfand has been hanging on to a lost
position for many moves and now Kamsky has a last
chance to finish off the world title challenger: 34. ...
Re4 and draw agreed on move 44 allowing the great
escape. After 34. ... Qc7+ 35. Kf2 Qh2!! the white king
can never reach safety and a Black rook and a black
rook will soon reach the f-file with decisive affect.
Ivanchuk-Giri: 51. Rxb7 Kxb7 52. f4!! gxf4 53. h4 a5
54. e6 Kc7 55. h5 a4 56. e7 Kd7 57. h6, Black
resigned.
Gashimov-Navara: Here White sought to attack with 25.
g4 not realizing that he could have finished the game
immediately with 25. Rxc7!! Qxc7 26. Qg5. Instead the
game was drawn at move 40.
Radjabov-Navara: Navara, in desperate trouble, set up
a trick with 29. ... Nc7 30. Rxc7 d5. However his hopes
were dashed when Radjabov found a way to hang on to
his extra piece through 31. Rd1 Re8 32. Bb5, Black
resigned..
Aronian-Navara: 57. ... g5 58. fxg5 hxg5+! 59. Kh5
Qe4 60. Kxg5 Ne6+, Black resjgned.
Karjakin-Gelfand: The 2012 world title challenger had a
hard time in Wijk aan Zee but here he turns an appar-
ently difficult queen ending into something much
easier: 42. ... g2 43. Qxg6+ Kxg6 44. Kxg2 b4, White
resigned.
Sachdev-Schut: Black has placed her king in the cor-
rect corner, but Sachdev makes one last try before
agreeing to a draw: 53. Rh7+ Kg8 54. Rg7+ Kh8 55.
Rh7+ Kg8 56. Rc7 Be6?? Any unlucky choice—any
other square on the a2-g8 diagonal (except f7) would
suffuce for a draw. 57. Kg6 Kh8 58. Rh7+ Kg8 Re7!,
Black resigned.
Tikkanen-Grover: The best combination of Wijk aan Zee
2012: 21. Nxe4 Qxg2 22. Rhg1 Qh2 23. Nxf6+ Ke7
24. Rd7+ Kxf6 25. Rf1+ Kg5 26. Rf5+ Kg6 27. Rdxf7!
Ng7 28. g5+! Kh7 29. g6+ Kxg6 30. R7f6+, Black
resigned.
Ernest-Batista: The best trap from Wijk aan Zee 2012:
17. ... Ra6!! 18. c5? Qxa2+!! 19. Rxa2 bxa2 20. Qe4
f6 21. Bxe5 fxe5 22. Qxe5+ Re6! 23. Qxg7 Rf8 24.
Bf3 Ref6, White resigned.
Harikrishna-Vocaturo: The game would be drifting
towards a draw had Black defended with 25. ... Rc7 but
instead Vocaturo allows a simple but effective trick: 25.
... Rec8? 26. Bxc6 Rxc6 27. Qxc6!, Black resigned.
Now you can donate online
through a secure website at
www.uschesstrust.org
DONATE
TO U.S. TRUST ONLINE!
Simply click on
Donate
and then on the
Make a Donation
button!
PROFESSIONAL PLAYERS
HEALTH AND BENEFITS FUND
Many Grand Prix tournament organizers will
contribute $1 per player to the Professional
Health & Benefits Fund. All Grand Prix
tournaments which participate in this pro-
gram are entitled to be promoted to the
next higher Grand Prix category—for exam-
ple, a six-point tournament would become
a 10-point tournament. Points in the top
category are promoted 50%.
CL_04-2012_solutions_JP_r6_chess life 3/14/2012 11:53 AM Page 71
21st annual
CHICAGO OPEN
May 24-28, 25-28, 26-28, 27-28 or 25-26
Open 9 rounds, others 7 rounds, Memorial Day weekend.
At the luxurious WESTIN NORTH SHORE HOTEL
Free lectures & analysis of your games by GM John Fedorowicz!
$100,000 PRIZE FUND UNCONDITIONALLY GUARANTEED!
Open Section: 9 rounds, 40/90, SD/30, Inc/30, 5/24-28.
U1300 to U2300 Sections: 7 rounds, choice of 5/25-28,
5/26-28 or 5/27-28. 40/2, SD/1, d/5 except first 2 rounds of
3 day are G/75, d/5, first 4 rounds of 2 day are G/40, d/5
U1100 Section (NOTECHANGE): 7 rounds, G/90, d/5,
5/26-28 or 5/27-28, rds 1-4 G/40, d/5, merges with 3-day.
U900 Section: 7 rounds, G/40, d/5, 5/27-28.
At Westin Chicago North Shore Hotel, 601 N
Milwaukee Ave, Wheeling IL 60090. Free parking.
Open Section: $10000-5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-
500-400-300, clear/tiebreak bonus $200, top FIDE U2500/
Unr $2000-1000. FIDE, GM/IM norms possible, 300 GPP.
EF $100 more for US players never rated 2200/over by FIDE.
Under 2300 Section: $5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-
500-400-300-300. FIDE rated.
Under 2100 Section: $5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-
500-400-300-300. Unrated limit $2500.
Under 1900 Section: $5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-
500-400-300-300. Unrated limit $2000.
Under 1700 Section: $5000-2500-1200-900-700-600-
500-400-300-300. Unrated limit $1500.
Under 1500 Section: $4000-2000-1000-800-600-500-
400-400-300-300. Unrated limit $1000.
Under 1300 Section: $4000-2000-1000-800-600-500-
400-400-300-300. Unrated limit $700.
Under 1100 Section: $1500-700-400-300-200-200-100-
100. Unrated limit $400.
Under 900 Section: $500-300-200, trophies to first 5, top
U700, U500, U300, Unrated. Unrated limit $200.
Ratings: May official USCF ratings used for U2300 &
below, FIDE for Open. Unofficial web ratings usually used
if otherwise unrated. For foreign ratings see chesstour. com.
Prize limits: 1) Players with under 26 lifetime games
rated through 5/12 official USCF list may not win over $800
in U1100, $1500 U1300 or $2500 U1500. 2) If official rating
5/11-4/12 or unofficial post-event rating posted 5/24/11-
5/24/12 more than 30 pts over section max, prize limit $1500.
Top 7 sections entry fee: 5-day $225, 4-day $224, 3-day
$223, 2-day $222 mailed by 5/16, all $227 online at
chesstour.comby 5/21, $250 online until 2 hrs before rd 1 or
at site. No checks at site, credit cards OK. Phoned entry
(406-896-2038) $230 by 5/21.
Special entry fee: GMs, IMs, WGMs, foreign FMs free
in Open; $200 deducted from prize. $100 less to seniors 65
or over in U1300/above. Online or mailed EF $5 less to ICA
members; join at il-chess.org. Re-entry (except Open) $100.
Under 1100 entry fee: $85 mailed by 5/16, $87 online at
chesstour.com by 5/21, $100 at site.
Under 900 entry fee: $35 mailed by 5/16, $37 online at
chesstour.com by 5/21, $50 at site.
USCF mem. required. Special dues, see chesstour.com.
.
5-day schedule (Open): Late entry to Thu 6 pm, rds Thu
7 pm, Fri 12 & 7, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 11 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30.
4-day schedule (U1300-U2300): Late entry to Fri 6 pm,
rds. Fri 7 pm, Sat 11 & 6, Sun 11 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30.
3-day schedule (U1300-U2300): Late entry to Sat 10
am, rds. Sat 11, 2:30 & 6, Sun 11 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30.
2-day schedule (U1300-U2300): Late entryto Sun9 am;
rds. Sun 10, 12, 2, 3:45 & 6, Mon 10 & 4:30.
3-day U1100 schedule: Late entry to Sat 1 pm, rds.Sat 2
pm & 6 pm, Sun 10, 12 & 6, Mon 10 & 2.
2-day U1100 schedule: Late entry to Sun 9 am, rds Sun
10, 12, 2, 3:45 & 6, Mon 10 & 2.
U900 schedule: Late entry to Sun 9 am, rds Sun 10, 12,
2 & 3:45, Mon 10, 12, 2.
Half point byes OK all rounds, limit 4 (2 in last 4 rds).
Open must commit before round 2, others before rd 4.
Hotel rates: $103 for 1-4/room, 800-937-8461, 847-777-
6500. Reserve by 5/11; rate may increase or hotel sell out.
Car rental: Avis (800-331-1600), use AWD#D657633.
All: Bringsets, boards, clocks- none supplied. $15 charge
for refunds. Advance entries posted at chesstour.com.
Questions: chesstour.com, Director@Chess.US, 845-496-
9658. JGP. See TLAs under Illinois for side events.
CL_04-2012_pg72_JP_r1_chess life 3/11/2012 11:55 AM Page 80
Limited-Time
Promotional Discount!
Save $50
Chess King Pro with Houdini 2 Pro $149 $99
Chess King with Houdini 2 $99 $49

You will improve at chess with the Chess King program
We Guarantee it!
The best in chess education:
6 interactive CD-Roms
to help you improve at chess.
Covers all the chess education needed to become
an accomplished player, in all important areas of
chess study: Openings, Tactics, Strategy, Endgames.
Theory and Practice are presented in an easy-to-
follow and beautiful interface, that will help you or
your kids or students improve at chess fast.
All software programs allow for multiple users
(siblings, friends, or students), and individual ELO
ratings are calculated for each user individually.
Easy for parents and coaches to follow the progress
of their child and students, and also easy to set up
practice sessions, with exercises varying in number
and/or diculty.
Our Price: $24.95
Complete Chess Training
Complete Chess Training
Available from www.USCFSales.com and www.chess-king.com






















































































































































































































































































































































































04-2012_IBC_chess life 3/14/2012 9:42 AM Page 1
03-2012_BackCover_chess life 3/11/2012 12:03 PM Page 1

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful