Low Desert Planting & Harvest Calendar

Brought to you by the Urban Farm, Matt Suhr and Greg Peterson
For information on classes and events offered on gardening and sustainability visit our website at www.urbanfarm.org and add yourself to our email newsletter or email Greg@urbanfarm.org or to contact Matt Suhr - happydirt@earthlink.net Hardiness Temp
J J F F M M A A M M J J J A A E E A A P P A A U U U N N B B R R R R Y Y N N L 1 15 J A A S S O O N U U U E E C C O L G G P P T T V N D O E V C

K E Y XX X * t
D E C

= Main harvest = Potential extended harvest season = Ideal planting time = Good planting time = Can be planted (with protective measures) = Set out transplants

Crop
Artichoke-- Globe -- Jerusalem Arugula Asparagus Basil Bean--Blackeye --Fava --Garbanzo --Green snap --Lentil --Lima --Pinto --Soy --Yardlong Beet Bok Choy Broccoli--head --Raab --Romanesco Brussels Sprout Cabbage--Chinese --standard Carrot Cauliflower Celery Cilantro Collards Corn--flour --ornamental --popcorn --sweet Cucumber--Armenian --standard Dill Eggplant Endive Fennel--bulbing --herb

Comments Light frost helps first year harvest. Can be invasive. May be planted thickly. Don't harvest until 3rd year. Start indoors in winter. Performs well in full summer heat. Dislikes heat. Stays low to ground. Seed will rot if planted in cold soil. Harvest entire plant and thresh when dry. Does best with trellis. Harvest entire plant and thresh when dry. Use special varieties for edamame. Black-seeded types do best. Be sure to thin if you want big beets. Bolts quickly in Spring. Light frost improves flavor. Pick frequently to maintain production. Allow 15" spacing between plants. Only early hybrids do well."Oliver" is best. Heads form quickly. Be sure to thin. Red varieties take a little longer to head. Slow to sprout--mix in a few radish seeds. Fold leaves over exposed heads. Often stringy and bitter in desert conditions. Flowers attract beneficial insects. Light frost improves flavor. Allow to totally dry on stalk. Plant in blocks for good pollination. Harder kernals than flour corn. Supersweet var. need very warm soil to sprout. Withstands heat better than standard types. Harvest frequently for best quality. Very easy from seed. Does not transplant well. Best production in Fall. Pull leaves over center to blanch. Can be harvested at any size. Flowers attract beneficial insects.
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20 <0 15 <0 32 32 20 25 32 25 32 32 32 32 25 22 25 25 27 22 24 26 23 27 28 28 25 32 32 32 32 32 32 27 32 25 27 25

*t *t t t X X XX X X * t * t * t X X X X X X X XX XX X * * X XX XX XX XX XX XX * X XX XX X X * t t t t XX XX XX XX X t X t X t X t X X X X X X X X X X X X XX XX XX XX XX XX X X X * * XX XX XX X * X X * * XX XX X X * * * XX XX * X XX * * X X * * XX XX X X * * * X XX X * * X X X * XX XX * * X X * * XX XX * * X X * X X XX XX XX XX XX XX X X X * X XX XX X * * X XX XX XX X * * * *t *t * X XX XX XX X t X t X t X t X XX XX X t X t * t * t t X XX X * X XX XX XX X X X X * XX XX X t X t * t * t * XX XX X * t t t * X XX XX XX X t X t * t t * XX XX XX XX X t X t * t t X XX XX X * X XX XX X X X X X * XX XX X t X t * t * t * X X X *t t t X XX X * * X XX XX X X X X X X * * X XX XX X X X X X * XX XX X * * X X XX X * XX XX X * * X X XX X * XX XX X * * X X XX X * XX XX X * * X XX XX * * XX XX X X X X X X X X X * * * XX X X * * XX X X X X * * X XX X X X X XX XX XX X X t X t X t X X X X X X * * X * * X XX XX X X * X XX XX X * * * X XX XX X X X X X XX X * * X XX XX X X X X

© 2006 by Matt Suhr and The Urban Farm

Crop
Garlic Jicama Kale Lavender Leek Lettuce--head --leaf Melons Mint Mizuna Mustard Greens Okra Onion--bulb --multiplier --scallion Oregano Parsley Parsnip Pea--English --Snap --Snow Pepper Potato Pumpkin Radish Rutabaga Sage Spinach Squash--summer --winter Sunflower Sweet Potato Swiss chard Thyme Tomatillo Tomato Turnip Watermelon Hardiness Note Microclimates

Hardiness Temp

J J F F M M A A M M J J J A A E E A A P P A A U U U N N B B R R R R Y Y N N L 1 15

J A A S S O O N U U U E E C C O L G G P P T T V

N D O E V C

D E C

Comments

1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15 1 15

10 32 22 0 15 28 28 32 <0 25 27 32 15 15 15 <0 20 25 26 26 26 32 32 32 25 26 <0 22 32 32 32 32 26 <0 32 32 25 32

X XX XX t X X X X XX X X XX XX t t t X X * X X * t t t t t X X X t t t X XX X * X XX XX X XX XX X XX XX XX XX X * t t

* X XX XX X X X X X X * X t t * * X * * XX XX XX X X X X X X X * t t t *

* * X * *

X XX XX XX X X X X X X X * t t X * t *

* * * t

* * * X t * XX XX X X

X X X X X X X X X * * XX XX XX X X X X X XX X * * *

* * *

XtXt t XX XX X X * * XX XX XX XX * XX XX XX X X XX XX X X * t t t X XX XX X * t XtXt t t X XX XX X X t X t X t X XX XX X t t t t XX XX XX X * XX XX XX X

* X

X X X X X X XX XX * X X X X XX X * X X X X X X XX XX * t t t t t t * * * X X X X X X XX * X X X * * * X X X X X X *

* Harvest when tops die back. Does well with trellis. XX XX XX XX X X X Pick outer leaves for continual harvest. X XX X * Needs sandy soil. XX XX XX X X X X Pile dirt over stalks to blanch. * X XX XX X X X Allow 8-12" per plant for big heads. * XX XX XX XX X X Won't sprout in hot soil. Rich soil, lots of H2O, lots of room. t t t t t t Can be invasive. Doesn't come true from seed. X XX XX XX XX X X Good as baby greens or full-size. X XX XX XX X X X Light frost improves flavor. Pick frequently to maintain production. X XX XX X X t * t t Harvest when tops die back. Use short-day type. t t t t t t t Don't produce seed. Divide to propagate. * XX XX X X X X Use long-day type. t t t t t t t Keep flowers trimmed for best leaf production. * XX XX XX X X X Very slow to germinate. Otherwise easy. * XX XX X X X X Dig root before flower stalks form. X XX XX XX XX X X Does best with trellis. Blooms are frost-tender. X XX XX XX XX X X Does best with trellis. Blooms are frost-tender. X XX XX XX XX X X Does best with trellis. Blooms are frost-tender. * X Start indoors in winter. Best harvest in Fall. Harvest when in full bloom. Red potatoes do best. Plant June 15 for Halloween. * X XX XX XX XX XX Do best when day-length is short. X XX XX X X * Harvest before flower stalks form. X XtXtXt Many varieties with different requirements. * X XX XX XX XX XX Bolts quickly in Spring. Pick frequently to maintain production. The longer they are left on the vine, the sweeter. Quite drought-tolerant Cure tubers in warm place before storage. X XX XX XX X X X Pick outer leaves for continual harvest. X t X t X t t t t t Prefers sandy soil. Easy. * X Do best with 30-50% shade cloth. X XX XX XX XX XX XX Best flavor in cool weather. Rich soil, lots of H2O, lots of room.

X XX XX XX X *

Hardiness temperature, in degrees Fahrenheit, is the point at which damage occurs in exposed plants. Extent of damage depends on length of exposure, as well as micro-environmental factors. Covering plants with frost cloth can give anywhere from 2 to 10 degrees of extra protection. Coverings are most effective when suspended close to, but not in contact with, the plant. The exact season of growing depends greatly on your particular microclimate. A microclimate is any area of your yard that is warmer or cooler than the rest of the yard such as planting next to a block wall that retains heat into the night. Many frost sensitive plants can be grown through the winter in milder Valley locations, though with slower growth rates. Likewise, with appropriate shading many heat-sensitive crops can be grown into the summer months in outlying areas with cooler nights, though quality and vigor will be reduced.
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© 2006 by Matt Suhr and The Urban Farm

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