www.hopewellsun.

com
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Church groundbreaking
Hopewell Presbyterian celebrates
start of new chapter. PAGE 10
Board
approves
teachers’
contract
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
The Hopewell Valley Re-
gional Board of Education ap-
proved a new four-year teach-
ers’ contract last week.
The Hopewell Valley Educa-
tion Association, which repre-
sents the district’s teachers,
ratified the contract on May
31.
The agreement, which the
board approved with no oppo-
sition and one abstention,
comes after more than a year
of negotiations that included
sessions with a state-appoint-
ed mediator.
The agreement includes a
transition from the current
health-care plan to the less ex-
pensive School Employees’
Health Benefits Program, a
move expected to save the dis-
trict more than $200,000 in the
first year alone.
Teachers also agreed to
freeze coaching and extracur-
ricular adviser stipends for the
next three years. The teachers’
health-benefit contributions
will increase each year over
the life of the contract.
Starting this September, the
teachers will get raises of 2.4
percent, 2.2 percent and 2.2
percent over the next three
years, which will include their
annual increases based on ex-
Annual
race
draws
crowd
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
A couple of years ago, the
Pennington 5K wasn’t nearly
as successful as it is now. Be-
cause of the determined atti-
tudes of its valuable volun-
teers, the 36th Annual Pen-
nington 5K on May 19 drew
around 500 people, making it
one of Pennington’s most suc-
cessful 5Ks ever.
Unique to this year’s race
was the planning process,
which started earlier than
usual – in January – and was
aided by the Pennington 5K
Student Leadership Team,
which is a group of 10
Hopewell Valley Central High
School (CHS) students.
“I wanted to get ideas on
how to engage more students
and runners,” Race Director
Chris Fossel said. “Most peo-
ple have trouble finding volun-
teers, but because we do a lot
with the schools, we get a lot of
student volunteers. So, the
kids created the Pennington
5K Student Leadership Team,
which I call the ‘WOW Team.’
They helped with newspaper
articles, held a registration
Special to The Sun
Rachel Somonski, Callie Considine, Laura Haney, Francesca LoVerde, Sophie Bumham-Lemaire, and Sara
Ali stand by their booth at Pennington Day on May 19, where they got nearly 600 people to sign the New
Jersey Council on Developmental Disabilities’ ‘R-Word’ campaign.
The power of words
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Most people sometimes don’t
realize the power of their words,
especially when it comes to terms
that define people with disabili-
ties, which is why one student at
Hopewell Valley’s Central High
School (CHS) spearheaded a cam-
paign to raise awareness.
Laura Haney, a 15-year-old
freshman at Hopewell Valley
CHS, along with a group of her
friends and fellow freshmen – Cal-
lie Considine, Rachel Somonski,
Francesca LoVerde, Sara Ali and
Sophie Burnham-Lemaire – are
spreading awareness to help pre-
vent people from using disparag-
ing words that begin with the let-
ter “R” that can hurt people with
disabilities as a part of the New
Jersey Council on Developmental
Disabilities (NJCDD) campaign,
R-Word.
The overall goal of the R-Word
campaign is to raise awareness to
members of communities and
media around the state that the
two words mentioned above are
both hurtful to people with dis-
abilities and their families, and to
encourage the public to remove
these words from people’s every-
day vocabulary.
The drive behind Haney’s ef-
forts to spread knowledge and un-
derstanding about this cause is
her 19-year-old brother, Brian,
who has Down Syndrome.
“For a really long time, I’ve
been against people using that
please see STUDENTS’, page 11 please see HEALTH, page 2 please see RACE, page 9
2 THE HOPEWELL SUN — JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
Richard Eakins, Reverse Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS#523001
908-672-3320 cell • 888-519-7677 ext 5850
reakins@1stconstitution.com
86 East Broad Street • Hopewell, NJ 08525
(609) 466-2100 • www.1stconstitution.com
Branch Hours:
Mon-Thu 8:30am-5pm
Fri 8:30am-6pm
Sat 9am-1pm
New Lower-Cost FHA
Saver Reverse Mortgages
Now Available At
We know that seniors are cost conscious and now you can save thousands of
dollars with an FHA Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM) Saver
Reverse Mortgage.
Come in or call and get the facts.
• The HECM Saver virtually eliminates the initial mortgage insurance
premium—saving you thousands
• We now have a fixed rate HECM Saver that eliminates the origination fee!
Why pay more? Come in and check out the HECM Savers
and save twice with our lowest cost reverse mortgage!
perience.
Savings on health benefits and
the teachers’ increased health-
care contributions are forecast to
keep the budget within the state-
mandated 2 percent budget in-
crease cap.
The agreement covers the 2011-
12 negotiation period, as well as
the next three years through 2015.
For the 2011-12 school year,
each teacher will be frozen on
their current step, and get a pay-
ment of $1,500.
“Because we have been facing
difficult economic times, the
HVEA and Board of Education
have agreed to transfer the dis-
trict’s health-care coverage to the
School Employees’ Health Bene-
fits Plan, saving the district a sig-
nificant amount of money while
still providing minimal salary in-
creases,” HVEA President Heidi
Olson said. “We’ve also agreed for
additional time for faculty meet-
ings throughout the year. We are
happy to have the process com-
plete so we can continue to focus
on the children and their educa-
tion.”
“After lengthy negotiations and
mediation, the school board be-
lieves that we have achieved a
good outcome for our students,
while being prudent with taxpay-
er funds,” said Leigh Ann Peter-
son, vice president of the Board
of Education and chair of the Ne-
gotiations Committee. “The
change to state health-care bene-
fits and the increased teacher
contributions, offset the pay in-
creases resulting in a total cost
that is within the state-imposed
cap.”
Hopewell teachers have been
working under the terms of an
expired contract since June 30,
2011.
We’ll have more on the new
contract in the July 4 edition of
The Sun.
HEALTH
Continued from page 1
Health savings predicted
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
Stay healthy this summer
This summer, swimming pools
will be filled with people having
fun and staying cool. But did you
know germs can contaminate
swimming water even if it is
treated with chlorine?
This summer, learning about
recreational water illnesses
(RWIs), which are spread by
swimming in contaminated
water, such as swimming pools,
water parks, lakes and the ocean,
can protect you from illness.
RWIs are caused by germs like
Crypto, Guardia, E. coli 0157:H7
and Shigella and are spread by ac-
cidentally swallowing water that
is contaminated with fecal matter.
Remember, you share the water
with everyone in the pool.
Germs causing RWIs are killed
by chlorine, but chlorine doesn’t
work right away. It takes time to
kill germs. Plus, some germs like
Crypto are resistant to chlorine
and can live in pools for days.
That is why even the best main-
tained pools can spread illness.
Healthy swimming behaviors
are needed to protect you and
your family from RWIs and will
help stop germs from getting in
the pool in the first place.
Healthy swimming behaviors
are needed to protect all swim-
mers from RWIs and will help
stop germs from getting in the
pool in the first place. Here are six
healthy swimming tips:
1. Don’t swim when you have
diarrhea. This is especially im-
portant for kids in diapers. You
can spread the germs into the
water and make other people
sick.
2. Don’t swallow the pool water.
In fact, try your best to avoid even
having water get in your mouth.
3. Wash your hands with soap
and water after using the toilet or
after changing diapers.
4. Parents/caretakers of young
children: make sure to take them
on frequent bathroom breaks.
Waiting to hear “I have to go,”
may mean that it's too late.
5. Change diapers in a bath-
room and not at poolside. Germs
can spread to surfaces and objects
in and around the pool and
spread illness.
6. Everyone should
shower/wash their whole body
thoroughly (pay special attention
to babies’/children’s bottoms)
with soap and water before swim-
ming in a pool.
If you have questions on pool
water safety in Hopewell and Pen-
nington boroughs, call the Mont-
gomery Township Health Depart-
ment at (908) 359-8211.
Visit us online at
www.hopewellsun.com
4 THE HOPEWELL SUN — JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
Come Dance With Us!

Pennington Shopping Center • Route 31 South, Pennington
609-737-7338 · www.B4NCLwBRkSHLRCLR.CBH
register now
!
There's still time
to sign up!
Ballet
*
Tap
*
Jazz
Tapping Tots
*
Modern
Lyrical
*
Hip Hop
Pre-School
*
Adult
SLHHLR CL4SSLS
4NB wBRkSBBPS
24% OFF
Any Dry Cleaning Order of 6 pieces or more
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/15/12.
25% OFF
Household Items
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/15/12.
20% OFF
Repairs
With this coupon. Not valid with any other
offers or prior services. Exp. 7/15/12.
They’re back!
SUMMER SAVINGS!
CALL 609-737-3373
Or email us at service@craftpennington.com
Pennington Market Shopping Center · 25 Route 31 South, Pennington
Tailor On Premises • Suedes and Leathers • Wedding Gown Specialists (Cleaning and Preservations)
Fast and Friendly Service • Same-Day Dry Cleaning • Senior Citizen Discount: 15% Off Any Dry Cleaning
Shoe Repair
SmaII Rug CIeaning
Up to 6' x 9'
police report
The following items were taken
from reports on file with the
Hopewell Police Department:
On June 5 at 8:31 a.m., Officer
John Ferner responded to Moun-
tain Church Road for the report of
criminal mischief. Sometime
overnight, someone used a full
garbage can to damage a mailbox
at the end of a driveway. The dam-
age was estimated at $100.
On June 11 at 2:44 a.m., Sgt.
Michael Cseremsak stopped a car
along Route 29 after he says he ob-
served it weaving in and out of
lanes several times. He says the
driver, a 24-year-old man, had the
odor of alcohol on his breath.
After performing field-sobriety
tests, he was placed under arrest
by Officer Alexis Mirra and was
transported to police headquar-
ters for processing. He was
charged with drunken driving,
reckless driving, failure to keep
right and being an unlicensed
driver.
He was later released to an ac-
quaintance, and his case will be
heard in municipal court.
On June 10 at 11:11 a.m., Officer
Lincoln Karnoff responded to the
Pennington Circle for the report
of a motor-vehicle crash. Police
say a 2001 Jaguar, driven by a 56-
year-old woman, ran off of the
road while traveling north
through the circle. The car then
came back on to the road, ran
through a grass median, and then
struck the rear of a tractor trailer
that was traveling south through
the circle. She had the odor of al-
cohol on her breath and was
placed under arrest after per-
forming field-sobriety tests. She
was charged with DWI, reckless
driving and failure to maintain
lane and was later released to a
relative.
This case will be heard in mu-
nicipal court.
On June 13 at 10:19 p.m., Officer
Christopher Vaccarino stopped a
car along River Drive after ob-
serving it pull out of the state
park parking lot, which is closed
after dark. While speaking with
the driver, a 25-year-old woman,
Vaccarino says he smelled the
odor of burnt marijuana coming
from the car. A further investiga-
tion found the woman to be in
possession of eight partially con-
sumed marijuana cigarettes.
She was placed under arrest
and transported to police head-
quarters for processing where
she was charged with the posses-
sion of marijuana (under 50
please see POLICE, page 7
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
• Passenger Tires
• Performance Tires
• Truck & SUV Tires
Always the BEST PRICE!
No coupons needed!
• Commercial
• Lawn & Garden
• Heavy Equipment
• Tractor Tires
• Bob-Cats
• Vogue Tires & More!
1735 North Olden Extension

Ewing, NJ
609-895-8811 HOURS: Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm • Sat 8am-Noon
With us… your price doesn’t change! Price includes tire balance, valves, etc…
Wholesale Tires Open to The Public
WHERE HONESTY AND INTEGRITY COMES FIRST!
Tire mounting on premises.
All major and minor brands.
1666 Hamilton Ave.
Hamilton, NJ 08629
609-584-5252
www.priornami.com
It’s not too early for Back-To-School supplies!
15% OFF
CARRYING CASE
WITH PURCHASE OF ANY
LAPTOP OR TABLET
FREE
LAPTOP TUNE-UP
Tune-up Includes:
• Full Scan of Virus, Malware & Spyware
• Install all Microsoft updates & security patches
• Hard drive integrity scan
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0¼ FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
www.tricountyexteriors.com
ug to
10¼ OFF
Any roof or siding repair
With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services.
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
ug to
$2S0 OFF
Any complete roofing or siding job
With this coupon. Not valid with other offers or prior services.
FREE
Roof Accessories
with every roof!
Ask for detaiIs!
FREE
Gutter CIeaning
with every roof!
Lic.# 13VH06774500
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'll fix your drip in just one trip!"
Why hassle with store credit or gift cards?
TestTech pays top dollar CASH for your
iphone...even with cracked screens!
Test Tech iRepair will buy
your iPhone for CASH!
Centrally located off Rt 73 & Greentree Road
At 4 East Stow Road • Marlton NJ, 08053
www.TestTech.com/iRepair/
Call (856) 552-0250 or iRepair@testtech.com for more information.
Farm experience comes to Hopewell
Blue Moon Acres brought a
real farm experience to the com-
munity with the opening of a new
farm market on Thursday, June
14. The certified-organic farm,
centered in Buckingham, Pa.,
with the new farm in Pennington,
serves the neighborhood locally
produced foods and goods, as well
as the opportunity to engage in
the farm experience themselves.
Owners Jim and Kathy Lyons
have provided organic food to
restaurants for 20 years and want-
ed to offer it to neighbors as well.
The reason for opening the farm
market “is to bring the communi-
ty to the farm and to give them a
farm experience… to see what
plants look like growing in a field,
to cut their own herbs and flow-
ers, to see the chicks whose eggs
they enjoy roaming the pasture,”
Kathy Lyons said.
The Lyons want to provide a di-
rect relationship between con-
sumers and the producers of
their food.
The Blue Moon Acres Farm
Market, located on Blue Moon’s
Pennington farm at 11 Willow
Creek Drive, features a “DIY” cut
flower and cut herb garden,
where visitors choose and cut
their own greens.
There is an experiential chil-
dren’s garden in the works, with
plans to include a vegetable plot,
music garden, fairy garden and a
craft garden.
Inside the geothermal heated
and cooled building is a selection
of Blue Moon-grown certified or-
ganic produce, microgreens, pas-
ture-raised eggs – as well as an
array of product from other local
vendors.
For purchase will be Grig-
gstown chicken and pies, Wow-
Cow Ice Cream, Solebury Or-
chard fruits, and soap and bath
products from Wash Tyme and
Peace Valley Lavender Farm.
The market is open Thursdays
and Fridays from 10 a.m. until 7
p.m., Saturdays from 10 a.m. until
6 p.m., and Sundays from noon
until 5 p.m. A grand-opening will
be held in July.
More information and updates
are posted on Blue Moon Acres
Facebook and Twitter pages.
Special to The Sun
The Blue Moon Acres farm officially opened on June 14 and is locat-
ed on Blue Moon’s Pennington farm at 11 Willow Creek Drive in Pen-
nington.
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN — JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes. If you are not on the mail-
ing list, six-month subscriptions are avail-
able for $39.99. PDFs of the publication are
online, free of charge. For information,
please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too. The
Hopewell Sun reserves the right to reprint
your letter in any medium – including elec-
tronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
OPERATIONS
DIGITAL MEDIA DIRECTOR Tim Ronaldson
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
VICE CHAIRMAN Alan Bauer
in our opinion
T
he good news: New Jersey ac-
counted for 25 percent of all
new jobs created in the United
States in the month of May: 17,500 new
jobs were created.
The bad news: the state’s unemploy-
ment rate rose from 9.1 to 9.2 percent.
And let’s be mindful: the 9.2 percent
figure really isn’t an accurate unem-
ployment percentage at all.
There are countless people whose
unemployment benefits have run out,
and whose cases no longer count in de-
partment of labor statistics.
And there are others who may have
lost a job, who were ineligible for un-
employment benefits, and, again,
whose cases are not factored into the
state unemployment rate.
And so as encouraging as it is to
hear our state created the most new
jobs in the country, the overall known
unemployment numbers are still ex-
tremely alarming.
Gov. Christie says the new jobs re-
port means consumers are becoming
“more confident.”
The overall figures paint a complete-
ly different picture.
We’re many years into this econom-
ic mess. And we’re still struggling as a
state, despite the so-called “comeback.”
While the governor’s 10 percent
across-the-board income-tax cut would
certainly help some, it certainly won’t
help the middle class all that much.
A person making an annual salary
of $35,000 would see a whopping $1 a
week increase in take-home pay.
This is hardly enough to spark con-
sumer confidence.
Much more still needs to be done – at
the federal and state levels – to inspire
confidence. Realistically, the unem-
ployment percentage needs to drop to
close to 8 percent before there’s any
reason for anyone to celebrate.
And even then, the numbers will
still be too high.
We look forward to the day we can
agree consumer confidence is back.
We’re just not sure that time is here
yet.
State’s uptick in unemployment
Number rises despite creation of 17,500 new jobs; more must be done
How confident are you?
Gov. Christie says he believes con-
sumers in New Jersey are gaining
confidence. Yet the unemployment
rate jumped in May. How confident in
the economy are you? We want to
know.
letters to the editor
Democratic nominee decides
to withdraw from candidacy
Congratulations and thanks to all the
residents of Hopewell Township who voted
in the recent primary election held on
June 5. Although perhaps a small piece of
the process, your participation in that elec-
tion is an important part of the whole dem-
ocratic process and the furtherance of our
ideals of democracy and citizen involve-
ment. I was just a small beneficiary of that
vote among a number of candidates for
various offices and became the nominee of
the Democratic Party for election to the
Hopewell Township Committee in the elec-
tion to be held in November.
Thank you for this vote of confidence.
After serious consideration, I have de-
cided to withdraw from that candidacy.
My reason is that I believe those matters
that were the subject of the recent referen-
dum held in the township will be a signifi-
cant part of the subject matter of the top-
ics considered by the township committee
over the forthcoming months. I believe
these matters can be better addressed by a
person who has been an active participant
in the referendum process and has the con-
siderable knowledge resulting from that
participation.
Therefore, I am withdrawing as a candi-
date.
My replacement as a nominee selected
by the township Democratic Committee is
Harvey Lester.
In addition to his other important life
experiences by way of education and pro-
fessional experience, Harvey, as the co-
chairman of the Citizens For Tax Choice,
will, in my judgment, bring valuable
knowledge and experience to the township
committee and by virtue of that, can better
serve the township in these matters than I
would be able to do.
This by no means will result in any di-
minishment of my interest in township
matters, and I look forward to having a con-
tinuing participation in township affairs.
William S. Clarke
Thomas R. Seabrook, of Hopewell
Township, was awarded a bachelor’s de-
gree in English and history, and graduated
with summa cum laude honors from The
College of William and Mary in Virginia.
He is a member of the Phi Eta Sigma
and Alpha Lamba Delta honors societies,
the National Society of Collegiate Schol-
ars, and the Golden Key International Hon-
our Society. Seabrook studied abroad in
Prague, Czech Republic, and in Bath, Eng-
land, where he interned at the American
Museum in Britain.
Bronson Stephens, of Hopewell, gradu-
ated from Albany Law School on May 11 in
Saratoga Springs, N.Y. Stephens earned a
J.D. from Albany Law School, the oldest in-
dependent law school in the nation.
Lauren Nowicki, of Hopewell, and
Michele Seabrook, of Hopewell, were
placed on the spring-semester dean’s list at
Gettysburg College.
on campus
Visit us online at www.hopewellsun.com
grams), driving an unregistered
vehicle and having a CDS in a
motor vehicle. She was later re-
leased and her case will be heard
in municipal court.
On June 12 at 9:53 a.m., Officer
Frank Tulko responded to the
Fire Dance Studio on Railroad
Place for the report of a theft.
Sometime between June 8 and
June 12, someone removed three
barrels of scrap metal from the
property. The loss was estimated
at $45.
On June 14 at 11:37 a.m., Officer
William Gaskill responded to the
Stony Brook Elementary School
for the report of criminal mis-
chief. Sometime between 4 p.m.
on June 7 and 9 a.m. on June 8,
someone damaged an outside alu-
minum staircase handrail on the
property. The damage was esti-
mated at $1,000.
On June 15 at 8:29 a.m., Officer
Vincent Amabile took a theft re-
port. Sometime between June 6
and June 15, someone entered an
unsecured shed on the property
of a Lambertville Hopewell Road
residence and removed a roto-
tiller and a weed whacker. The
loss was estimated at $800.
On June 16 at 8 p.m., Officer
Lincoln Karnoff responded to a
Bayberry Road address for a re-
port of an attempted burglary.
Sometime between 6 p.m. on June
15 and 3:30 p.m. on June 16, some-
one tried to force entry to a door
leading to an attached garage. A
door jamb was damaged, but
nothing was taken.
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi ro»b - reiiiicroi, iJ
rioie ·coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi»==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 ·R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
JERSEY SWEET CORN!!!
JERSEY
Tomatoes º Sguash
Lettuce º BIuebezz¡es
216 Pennington-Lawrenceville Road • Pennington, NJ
609-737-6502
www.littleacresfarmmarket.com
Hours
Mon-Sat 10am-6pm
Sun 10am-5pm
More Veggies, Fruits and Fresh Baked Pies
55+ COMMUNíTY, OPEN FLOOP PLAN,
2 BEOPOOMS, 2 BATHS, ALL NEW APPLíANCES
NEW: Pooí & Windows, Guttors,
Stainloss Stool Cnimnoy Cap
NEW: Marblo vanitios, Carpot, Kitonon Fauoot,
Elootrioal Hoators, Tnormostats
Finisnod Garago witn Storago Spaoo, Wood Burn-
ing Firoplaoo, Contral Air and Hoat. Soourity
Guardod Gato, Enolosod Soroon Baok Poron.
Cablo Poady. Prioo: As ís, Bost Oííor.
WELCOME TO A CHAPMíNG PANCH SíNGLE
HOUSE SALE íN SOUTHAMPTON, NJ 08088
Contaot: Ms C. Williams
For An Appointmont at
609-388-4814
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
7/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services or
any bulk products. Cannot be com-
bined with any other offers. Expires
7/31/12. Cash and carry only.
Not valid on landscaping services.
Cannot be combined with any other
offers. Expires 7/31/12.
Cash and carry only.
$S off
Any purchasc
of $S0 or morc
lANDSCAPf lNSTAllATlON & RfNOVATlON:
PATlOS - WAlkWAYS - RfTAlNlNG WAllS - ClfAN-UPS - MUlCHlNG
Bring in your
pots and pIantcrs
for pIanting!

All NURSfRY STOCk
Mix & Match - 3 GaIIon

PfRfNNlAlS
Mix & Match
(reg. $22.95-26.95)
$40 off
Any purchasc
of $200 or morc
20% Off
AII
Pottcd Trccs
10 WOOSAMONSA RD. - PfNNlNGTON
WWW.]ACkSNURSfRYANDlANDSCAPlNG.COM
Grccnhousc & farm
609-737-0224
4TH OF jULY 5AV¡NC5
10%-40% OFF
oooa/s º Vaoy·oy ías/c/s
¬-o/·ca/s º v/ao/c-s
REGISTER NOW
Summer July 8-August 13
Intersection Routes 518 & 601
Skillman
Call 908-285-5331
www.peridotartstudio.com
police report
POLICE
Continued from page 4
Pennington Dance will offer a
summer world dance camp from
July 16 to July 19 from 1:30 p.m. to
3 p.m. at the Pennington Dance
Presbyterian Church studio.
Campers will explore the dance,
music, language and culture of
East Africa, Leni-Lenape Native
America, India and France.
Campers ages 4 to 7 and stu-
dent interns ages 9 and older are
welcome to participate.
The cost is $150 for our trip
around the world.
The registration deadline is
Wednesday, July 11.
To register for summer camp
or the 2012-13 school year, visit
www.penningtondance.com or
call Nancy Warner at (609) 737-
7596.
Sign up now
for dance camp
WEDNESDAY JUNE 27
Movies for Adults: Come watch
“Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy” from
1:30 to 3:30 p.m. or from 6:30 to
8:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Stars Gary Oldman and Colin
Firth. Rated R.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
PJ Story Time: Ages 2 to 5. Siblings
welcome. 7 to 7:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Introduce
children to best age-appropriate
stories in children’s literature.
Action rhymes, songs and felt
board activities are part of the
program. Content of each story
time centers on a different
theme. Age-appropriate craft fol-
lows.
Bookworms Book Club: First to
third graders. 1 to 2 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Bring a
favorite book with the theme
“animals that come out at night”
to share with the group. Bring a
lunch to eat during the meeting.
Registration required.
Page Turners: Fourth to fifth
graders. 2 to 3 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. A different kind
of book club. Every week will read
aloud for the same book and then
work on an activity related to
what was read. Each week will get
further into the book. The book is
“From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs.
Basil E. Frankweiler” by E. L.
Konigsburg.
Fantasy/Sci-Fi Book Club: Ages 12
and older. 6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. The first book to
be discussed is “Ender’s Game”
by Orson Scott Card. The next
book will be voted on at the
meeting. Registration required.
THURSDAY JUNE 28
eLibraryNJ: eBooks @ Your
Library: 7 to 8:15 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Learn
how to download eBooks to your
computer, a compatible eReader
or a compatible mobile device.
This hands-on workshop includes
an overview and demonstration
of eLibraryNJ, a downloadable
eBooks site. Participants will
learn about tools needed to
locate and download eBooks. Par-
ticipants are encouraged to bring
their own laptop and/or eReader
to follow along using the library’s
wireless network. A limited num-
ber of library laptops may be
reserved at the time of sign up.
All participants must be experi-
enced and comfortable with a
computer, keyboard and mouse.
Registration required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 11 to 11:45 a.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Toddler Rock: Ages 18 months to 3.
10 to 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Singing, dancing
ad rhymes. Play with musical
instruments, puppets, parachutes
and more.
Super Scientists: First to third
grade. 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Each
week focuses on a different
experiment to explain the world.
This week is “Building Bridges
and Towers.” Registration
required.
Game Night: Third grade and older.
6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Play board games, listen to
music and enjoy some snacks.
Feel free to bring favorite board
games and friends!
Jr. Game Night: Kindergarten to
second grade. 7 to 8 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Board
games, group games and snacks.
Feel free to bring a favorite board
game or some friends!
Teen Game Night: Ages 12 and old-
er. 7 to 8 p.m. at Hopewell Branch
of the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Magic the Gathering, Set-
tlers of Catan, Pokemon, Chess,
Poker and more! Play board
games, listen to music and enjoy
some snacks. Feel free to bring
favorite games and some friends!
Hopewell Township Planning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the fourth
Thursday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit
hopewelltwp.org.
SUNDAY JULY 1
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY JULY 2
Book Group: 7 p.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. Discuss “The Sea
The Sea” by Iris Murdock.
Kids’ Open Craft: Ages 3 to 8. 4 to
5:30 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. Children can stop in to con-
struct the craft of the week. Staff
member will be present to help.
nineAbove Craft Time: Ages 9 and
older. 6 to 7 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Make a cool craft
project every week. Registration
required.
Getting Comfortable with Comput-
ers: 1 p.m. at the Hopewell Public
Library. Get comfortable with
computers, the Internet, the
World Wide Web and the digital
world. The library’s technologist
will answer questions, provide
demonstrations and guide partic-
ipants.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY JULY 3
Eyes of the Wild Animal Show: All
ages welcome; children younger
than 13 must have an adult pres-
ent. 1 to 2 p.m. at Hopewell
Branch of the Mercer County
Library System. Eyes of the Wild
Traveling Zoo will bring live ani-
mals that come out at night in
this “Nocturnal by Nature” pro-
gram.
Tuesday Night Knitters: 7:30 to 9
p.m. at Hopewell Public Library.
Welcomes knitters of all levels. A
cozy evening of stitching and
conversation.
Baby Time: Ages birth to 2. 11 to
11:30 a.m. at Hopewell Branch of
the Mercer County Library Sys-
tem. A great way to introduce
your child to library story times
and reading. Age-appropriate
books shared. Songs, nursery
rhymes, puppets and felt board
figures create a rich audio-visual
and social experience. Adult
supervision required.
Story Time: Ages 2 to 5; siblings
welcome. 2 to 2:45 p.m. at
Hopewell Branch of the Mercer
County Library System. Action
rhymes, songs and felt board
activities. Age-appropriate craft
follows story time. Parental
supervision required.
Anime Club: Ages 12 and older. 6 to
7 p.m. at Hopewell Branch of the
Mercer County Library System.
Join for discussions, snacks,
movies and other activities. This
week, discuss favorites and make
candy sushi. Registration
required.
Hopewell Township Agricultural
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. at the Township Build-
ing first Tuesday of the month.
Public is invited. For more infor-
mation contact: Lucia Huebner at
466-0277 or lucia@doorposter.
com; or John Hart at 737-2008 or
ihart89@aol.com.
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Hopewell meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Hopewell Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@hopewellsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.hopewellsun.com).
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 9
drive, and put posters up at CHS
for all the things they worked on.”
The “WOW Team” was created
by the Pennington 5K Race Com-
mittee last year, and has been able
to enhance certain aspects of the
race through vigorous publicity
and advertising. This year, their
efforts drew more than 40 differ-
ent volunteers from CHS to help
with different areas of the race.
Fossel also explained how the
students effectively helped organ-
ize entertainment for the event,
which is a significant part of the
race.
“What we do is provide enter-
tainment, and a lot of it is from
the Hopewell school district be-
cause another goal of the race is
to showcase some of the kids’ ac-
complishments to people that
may never have seen them,” Fos-
sel said. “Last year, we had a pep
band, and this year, we had a 50
student choir come and sing, as
well as a student band that played
before the race. We also had a jazz
ensemble made up of CHS stu-
dents and cheerleaders on the
course.”
Before the 5K was held, there
was a “Kids Fun Run,” which is a
smaller scale race for younger
children.
Since the kids’ race wasn’t
going so well a couple of years
back, the Race Committee came
up with the idea to have mascots
cheer them on during the race,
which has almost tripled the
number of child participants, ac-
cording to Fossel.
The five schools in Hopewell –
Hopewell Valley CHS, Hopewell
Elementary, Bear Tavern Elemen-
tary, Toll Gate Grammar, and
Stony Brook Elementary – loan
the Committee mascot uniforms,
which include a Bulldog, Bear,
Frog, Ghost and Alligator, and are
all worn by CHS students
to encourage the pint-sized run-
ners.
“Hopewell Valley CHS is a key
part to this and they help to pro-
vide things for the race,” Fossel
said.
The kids who ran also had
some extra inspiration this year
from Miriam Khan, a graduate of
Hopewell Valley CHS and The
College of New Jersey (TCNJ),
who is running for Italy in the
2012 Summer Olympics. She at-
tended the event and gave the
children some advice on how to
do things, some words of encour-
agement, and placed a medal
around each child’s neck when
they crossed the finish line.
After the “Kids Fun Run,” the
adult’s 5K was held, which
spanned the borough. It started
by the school district buildings,
progressed through the main
streets in Pennington where ven-
dors and attendees of Pennington
Day cheered runners on, and
wrapped up around the “Normal
Rockwell-like setting” of historic
Pennington, as Fossel described
it.
There were awards given to the
overall winner, first- and second-
places, male and female overall,
and nine different age categories
for males and females.
First-time runner and partici-
pant Angela Leaney explained
that the event really made an im-
pression on her 7-year-old son
Felix, who thoroughly enjoyed
the race and can’t wait to partici-
pate again next year.
“I asked my son, ‘What did I
say we were doing each time we
made a step?’” Leaney said. “And
his reply was, ‘We are helping
someone.’”
Because the race has essential-
ly transformed over the last sev-
eral years, it’s been coined the
“Race to Remember,” according
to Fossel.
“We call it the ‘Race to Remem-
ber’ because we incorporate a lot
of different things from other
races and some things that our
runners have never seen before,”
he said. “So, the idea there is to
remember it and tell other people
about it.”
This year, the proceeds from
the race benefited the Hopewell
Valley Municipal Alliance as well
as the Hopewell Valley YMCA.
The proceeds were split and doled
out to each organization for dif-
ferent purposes. The Hopewell
Valley YMCA’s portion will go to-
wards its Strong Kids campaign,
which provides scholarships for
families in need in the Hopewell
area.
The Hopewell Valley Munici-
pal Alliance will be using the
money to fulfill the mission of the
organization, which is “a commu-
nity united in the development of
caring, confident and responsible
use,” according to Chair of the
Hopewell Valley Municipal Al-
liance and four-year member of
the Pennington 5K Race Commit-
tee Heidi Kahme.
“The primary goal of the
Hopewell Valley Municipal Al-
liance is to provide opportunities
for positive youth,” she said. “The
proceeds of the race will add
more positive youth development
opportunities and more drug and
alcohol education and preven-
tion. It will support programs in
the community to make sure our
kids are making good decisions
and are being educated about
drug and alcohol issues.”
Kahme also explained how the
Hopewell Valley Municipal Al-
liance partnered up with the
Hopewell Valley YMCA, which
has been involved for four years,
for the event this year.
“Hopewell Valley Municipal
Alliance was invited by the
Hopewell YMCA to join efforts be-
cause we shared a very similar
mission,” she said. “We were ap-
proached by the Board President
to make this race bigger and bet-
ter, so the Alliance was invited to
join.”
“I think the most important
part of the race is pulling the
community together for an
event,” Kahme said. “Ultimately,
we’re coming together as a com-
munity to help our youth in our
community because that’s where
it all goes.”
20 Nassau Street | Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245 | sales@elauwit.com
www.elauwit.com
Hopewell
Lawrence
Montgomery
Princeton
Robbinsville
West Windsor
RACE
Continued from page 1
Race proceeds benefited Municipal Alliance, YMCA
On June 12 at 6:20 a.m.,
Hopewell Township police re-
ceived notification of a fire-alarm
activation at the Hopewell Valley
Vineyards building at 46 Yard
Road.
When officers and firefighters
arrived, they found a smoke con-
dition within the large, banquet
hall type structure. Firefighters
quickly located the source of the
smoke – a fire in a wall in the
kitchen area – and immediately
opened up the wall and extin-
guished the fire.
Fire damage was limited to the
kitchen area. The entire struc-
ture suffered some smoke dam-
age and the roof was breached by
firefighters to ventilate the build-
ing.
The investigation into the
cause of the fire is ongoing; how-
ever, preliminary indications are
that it may have been electrical in
nature.
Responding to the call were the
Pennington Fire Company, under
command of Chief James De-
Forte, and Hopewell Fire Compa-
ny, Union Fire Company,
Lawrenceville Fire Company,
Lawrence Road Fire Company,
the West Trenton Fire Company,
and the Yardley Makefield Fire
Company.
Also responding were
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices and the Pennington First Aid
Squad.
The investigation is being con-
ducted by Detective Dan McKe-
own from Hopewell Township po-
lice, specialist Josh Wilson from
Hopewell Valley Emergency Serv-
ices and Fire Marshall George
Lenhardt.
Officers, firefighters respond
to structure fire on June 12
Please recycle!
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN — JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
Hopewell Presbyterian
Church, which sits at the V-
shaped intersection of Broad and
Louellen streets in Hopewell Bor-
ough, occupies a prominent piece
of real estate.
On Sunday, June 10, the congre-
gation worshipped with the
theme, “Past, Present, and Future
in God’s Hands.”
Pastor Mike Capron then led
everyone outside for a historic
groundbreaking ceremony on the
lawn, celebrating the beginning
of a new chapter in the church’s
vibrant life.
As folks cheered and applaud-
ed, shovels were wielded first by
long-time members Tom Fille-
brown and Joyce Homan; next by
Michael Mills, chairman of the
church’s architectural planning
team, and Martha Camp, chair-
woman of the communications
and coordination team; and then
by Sunday School students Tier-
nan Blankstein and Christopher
Rice.
Making Connections! is the
culmination of many years of
self-study, conceptual design and
fundraising. When completed, the
project will include a new central
main entrance on the Broad
Street side leading to a welcome
center, an elevator to all floor lev-
els, energy efficient systems, ad-
ditional restrooms, and improved
site drainage.
Local architect Ronnie Bregen-
zer has designed the plan to bet-
ter connect the sections of the
sprawling building.
But it’s certainly not about the
building, as any HPC member
can tell you. It’s about the real ob-
jective of the renovation – becom-
ing more hospitable, more wel-
coming, and handicapped accessi-
ble.
It’s about removing the barri-
ers that get in the way of the
church’s real ministry – connect-
ing people with God.
The word “outreach” is the key
to understanding this outward-
looking congregation. For exam-
ple, each month, the church sends
a team of volunteers to the Tren-
ton Area Soup Kitchen, and food
is also collected to go to the Home-
Front food pantry.
Last year, a group of talented
church and community seam-
stresses spent a Saturday morn-
ing in Fellowship Hall creating
more than one hundred cotton
dresses to send to needy children
in Haiti.
The proceeds from the annual
HPC rummage sale are ear-
marked for mission. This year’s
sale in early May raised more
than $11,000 for humanitarian
causes both in the United States
and abroad.
This summer, HPC will send a
large group of eager adult and
teenage volunteers on the ninth
annual summer mission trip to a
community in need, where they
will apply their considerable
skills to carpentry, painting and
other construction projects.
Working through Habitat for
Humanity and similar aid organi-
zations, the group has travelled to
upstate New York, Virginia, West
Virginia and other areas. This
year’s trip takes them to Camden.
As Making Connections! con-
struction begins, Hopewell Pres-
byterian Church is also planning
new opportunities to help those
in need in our community, our
country and beyond.
During construction, Sunday
worship services will continue to
be held at 10:30 a.m., and the
many outside groups that use the
church facilities, including Boy
and Girl Scout troops and others,
can continue to meet there. For
more information about
Hopewell Presbyterian Church
and its missions and programs,
please call (609) 466-0758 or go to
www.hopewellpres.org.
Hopewell Presbyterian Church holds groundbreaking
Special to The Sun
The groundbreaking was held on June 10 for the Making Connections! project at Hopewell Presbyterian
Church. Back row: Tom Fillebrown, longtime member; Phil Ludeke, owner’s representative during con-
struction; Charlie Ashton, Minister of Music and Sanctuary Redesign chair; Martha Camp, Communica-
tions & Coordination chair; Ronnie Bregenzer, architect; Pastor Mike Capron; Michael Mills, Architectural
Planning co-chair; Andy Ward, construction manager, Princeton Construction Group; Sandy Sherrard, Fi-
nance Team co-chair; Scott Megaffin, Finance Team co-chair; Joyce Homan, longtime member and histo-
rian emeritus; Front row: Sunday school students Tiernan Blankstein and Christopher Rice.
word, and I just decided to do
something about it,” she said.
“Most people understand that
there are people with disabilities,
but I honestly don’t think people
put two and two together. What
we’re trying to do is raise aware-
ness that it actually does hurt real
people when you say it because I
don’t think people really under-
stand that.”
Haney originally began think-
ing about this cause two years
ago. When she was in seventh
grade, she rallied the other girls
to make t-shirts with Brian’s pic-
ture on them that said, “If you
wouldn’t say it to him, don’t say it
at all.”
LoVerde explained how putting
Brian’s picture on the t-shirt real-
ly helped the cause, although it
was nerve-wracking to wear them
to school at first.
“The first time we wore the t-
shirt with Brian on it, I was kind
of shy about it because I didn’t
know how people we’re going to
react,” she said. “But then once
people started reacting positively,
we were more proud to wear the
shirt.”
“It’s also good because we all
had each other’s backs,” Somons-
ki said.
Haney’s mother, Cynthia, who
is an administrative assistant for
the Middle School at Stuart Day
Country School in Princeton,
helped her start the cause and
constantly offers her and the girls
loads of encouragement and sup-
port.
“The negative connotation this
word implies hits particularly
close to home for Laura and her
friends,” she said. “Her brother,
who is non-verbal, cannot speak
up for himself, and Laura has
made it her mission to speak up
for him and others like him.”
After the girls made the t-shirts
in seventh grade, they all chose
one day out of each month to
wear them, which gained consid-
erable recognition – both positive
and negative – from other stu-
dents and teachers.
Although some students
sought to ridicule their cause be-
cause of immaturity or misun-
derstanding, they didn’t stop
what they were doing and were
persistent with their cause,
which has brought them to the
successful place that they’re at
today.
The girls set up a booth at this
year’s Pennington Day on May 19,
the first time they’ve raised
“mass awareness,” to encourage
people to sign the R-Word cam-
paign pledge, which they ob-
tained from the NJCDD.
“It was a pledge to not use the
word and to inform people who
use it not to use it,” Somonski
said. “Once we ran out of the
cards, we had people sign the
poster.”
Somonski, along with the other
girls, all said they were surprised
that they ran out of 300 cards
they received from the NJCDD.
“Personally, when I went, I was-
n’t sure how people were going to
react,” LoVerde said. “I certainly
didn’t expect that much of a reac-
tion, and I didn’t think we’d run
out of that many cards.”
After they ran out of cards,
they had almost the same number
of people who signed the pledge
cards sign the banner that the
Special Olympics supplied for
them, which read, “I Pledge to
Show Respect: Spread the Word to
End the Word.” “Spread the Word
to End the Word” is the Special
Olympics’ national campaign to
raise awareness and stop the use
of the “R” word, much alike the
NJCDD. Aside from signing the
pledge, the girls also distributed
buttons, pamphlets, bumper
stickers, and bracelets. They ex-
plained how people even came up
to them asking where they could
purchase the t-shirts they were
wearing, but since the girls didn’t
expect nearly as much of a re-
sponse as they received, they did-
n’t order any to sell or distribute.
Considine recommended that
they have the t-shirts available at
next year’s Pennington Day,
which all of the girls agreed with
and are planning to do.
Brian doesn’t really under-
stand the girls’ cause, but he was
happily present at their booth for
part of the day, helping to put a
face to the cause.
“Before Pennington Day, it was-
n’t really that big of a thing. Pen-
nington Day was what really
opened it up to the public and
helped spread the word about it,”
LoVerde said.
All of the girls agreed that it
was nice to see how much of a dif-
ference they made at Pennington
Day, as they saw clusters of peo-
ple wearing the buttons they gave
out, and since people were so re-
ceptive and supportive of their
cause.
Moving forward, they’re hop-
ing to start a club at Hopewell Val-
ley CHS next year when they’re
sophomores.
“At Pennington Day, some stu-
dents asked us if it was a club and
said they would join it when it be-
comes a club,” LoVerde said.
“We also want to hang the ban-
ner somewhere to show how
many people are a part of it al-
ready,” Haney said.
And because all of the girls
have been such adamant support-
ers of this cause, it’s as if their
ears are more alert to the deroga-
tory terms they’re trying to dis-
courage people from saying.
“We kind of have a thing now
that when you’re having a conver-
sation with someone else and you
overhear another conversation
with someone saying it, you’re
like, ‘Whoa,’” Somonski said.
“It kind of stands out when you
hear it,” Haney said. “But, when
certain people start to learn
about it, I think that they start to
understand and realize they’re
hurting someone’s feelings, and
stop saying it,” Haney said.
Currently, the girls are working
on new designs for their t-shirts
since their seventh-grade ones
are too small, and also ones to sell
to people who want to join the
cause. They are also searching for
a local cause so they have an or-
ganization their future club’s
events and proceeds can support.
“We wanted to donate money to
families who need to send their
kids to special kids, but can’t af-
ford it,” Haney said. “Where my
brother goes to school is really, re-
ally expensive, but the school dis-
trict pays for it. But, it doesn’t al-
ways work out that way.”
For now, all that the girls can
do is try their best to talk to peo-
ple, supply alternative words to
substitute for the R-word, and ed-
ucate them on how it affects peo-
ple who are linked to people with
disabilities, like Haney.
“We’re going to try and get this
bigger and bigger until more peo-
ple know about it, especially in
the school,” Haney said.
“It’s a big problem here,” Con-
sidine said.
To sign the R-Word pledge or
find out more about the cam-
paign, visit www.njcdd.org/pro-
jects/2012-04-23-13-46-37/r-word.
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
Bttgt//eIæuw.It/stuyvesæmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures offers custom tailored
packages and accommodations for serious and casual hunters alike. All of our packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all meals and accommodations at
our newly remodeled lodge - Stuyvesant Manor; the former estate of Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier -
which is also licensed as a bed and breakfast.
Whether you're looking for a short getaway, a corporate retreat, a camping weekend or even a seminar
with guest speakers and instructors, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures is a perfect spot.
Foz InIoznatIon, to nake a zesezvatIon oz to zeach
ouz tzIp-pIannIng concIezge, caII
(888} 690-0041
FALL AND 8PRINO
Turkey, WhitetaiI Deer
(archery, rifIe, muzzIeIoader),
Pheaaant (fieId and tower),
Coyote, Rabbit and WaterfowI
FBOm WHITBTAIL DBBB AND WILD T0BHBY TO
PHBASANTS, WATBBFOWL AND mOBB.
Memorial bricks may be pur-
chased for $60 each with an in-
scription.
Each brick will be placed on
the “Walk of Heroes” that will
surround the 9-11 Memorial.
Brick applications are available
at all firehouses and the Hopewell
Township Municipal Building.
The application is also avail-
able at the Memorial web site
www.hv911memorial.org.
If you have any questions,
please contact Mike Chipowsky
at (609) 737-8869 or by emailing
mchipowsky@comcast.net.
Memorial bricks for sale
Students’ R-Word pledge can be signed online
STUDENTS’
Continued from page 1
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email
at news@hopewellsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
NJ AIDS/STD Hotline
(800) 624-2377
PSA
20 Nassau Street
Princeton, NJ 08542
609.751.0245
elauwit.com
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 PAGE 14
BOX A DS
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 10 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE ADS
List a text-only ad for your yard sale,
job posting or merchandise.
Only
$
20per week
B US I NE S S
S E RV I C E S
Only
$
80per month Only
$
25per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
Robbinsville Sun • West Windsor Sun
EIectricaI Services
Editing & Writing
Roofing CIeaning
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
$1,000 OFF
UP TO
Any new
complete roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
10% OFF
UP TO
Any
roofing
or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
ROOF AND
GUTTER
INSPECTION
Must present coupon at time of estimate.
Not valid with other offers or prior services.
Offer expires 7/31/12.
FREE
GUT TERS
With any new roof
and siding job
Virtual Home
Remodeler
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
POOLS
New º Rebuild º Service
Open º Close º Liners
Paint º Removals
Patios º Decks
Call: 908-359-3000
Concrete Masonry
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
Warring the Written Word?
Professional Proofreading,
Editing and Writing
Quality Service at Affordable Rates
www.editwriteonline.com
609-654-8702
FREE ESTIMATES 856-381-0249
NJ License #13VH06184500
CSI Group International
Absolutely all concrete problems solved • Repair and Restoration
“Cracks are our specialty.” Residential and Commercial Services
Decorative Concrete New Concrete Seal Coating
Power Washing Mudjacking Stain Removal
Concrete Leveling
Concrete Repair
m&m mOVINO
AND HA0LINO
CleanOuts·Houses
Garages·Yards
Local& LongDistance

Services
609-481-8030
• Home Clean Outs
• Basements
• Estate Buy Outs
• Attics
• Pre-Settlement Real Estate
Clean Outs
www.tricountyexteriors.com
609-882-S800
BOOF LBAHINO?
WE CAN REPAIR IT!
"We'llfixyourdripinjustonetrip!"
Lic.#13VH06774500
WE OFFER:
·NewShingleRoofs·SeamlessGutters· Skylights
·Siding·SlateRoofRepairs·RubberRoofs
·Windows&Doors·Capping·Soffits
Licensed · Insured · ResidentiaI & CommerciaI
FBBB BSTImATBSI
NO mONBY DOWN
0¼ FINANCINO
ASH FOB DBTAILS.
TBI-CO0NTY BNTBBIOBS
Home Improvement
Junk RemovaI &
Estate CIean Outs
All types of demolition
Insured
FREE ESTIMATES
609-532-5665
*all trash disposed by lic. hauler
WE HAUL
IT ALL!
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,Ìndividualized
Ìnstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
ACT, All Standardized Tests
H.S. Eng. Lit. and Writing;
Math to Pre-Calc., History
Elem. Phonics, Reading,
Math; Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Tutoring
Place your
classified today!
856-427-0933
R&V Hall Construction, Inc.
MASONRY CONTRACTORS
Residential & Commercial
We do masonry repair on
brick, block and concrete!
609-883-0630
www.RVHall.com • info@RVHall2.com
BIG BOYS INC
Nasoo - 8estorat|oo
8r|ck - Po|ot|og
Steps - Fo0odat|oo - 0h|moey
609-672-4145
Free £st|mates
CLASSIFIED JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
Wow!!! Views to die for!!! Now is
your chance to buy a gorgeous
2nd floor corner property located
in the deep south end of Ocean
City! This 3 bedroom 2 bath 2nd
floor corner is in fantastic condi-
tion. Amenities feature granite
tops, bamboo flooring, s/s appli-
ances and much more! Come see
why Ocean City has the best
sunrises in NJ! This property is
located right across the street from
the beach with no homes in front!
The unit is being sold furnished
with a fantastic rental history.
This won't last! $1,049,000
5902 Central Avenue
If you’re reading your competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money… you or them?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933 x 512
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Let
The
Sun
Shine
For You!
Call
(856)
427-0933
for
Advertising
info.
Wanted To Buy
UP TO $1100 CASH
For Cars or Trucks w|th bad
Eng|nes or Transm|ss|ons
$500 CASH For
Any Comp|ete Junk Car or Truck
W|th or W|thout T|t|e

ReaI Estate For SaIe
SPRING VALLEY ESTATES
Quick occupancy, New
Construction in Mt. Laurel by
D.R. Horton. Only 2 ready now
in a beautiful, wooded commu-
nity. Great schools. 1 ready for
September and all have plenty
of upgrades including Gourmet
Kitchens, Side Entry Garages
and Large Wooded Lots.
Priced from the mid $600’s.
Call (856) 912-1975 for your
Personal Tour!
If your home comfort system is on the blink, help is on the way.
When your home comfort system isn’t working, it seems help can't get there fast enough.
But the good news is, your local independent American Standard Heating & Air
Conditioning dealer is close by, with the training and expertise to
fix nearly any make or model. And if it doesn’t make sense to fix
your system one more time, you’ll get an honest opinion, and real
solutions from our reliable, efficient line of products. If you're
uncomfortable, we’re on the way.
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900