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JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Produce for seniors
County offers program for
local elderly. PAGE 5
Annual
July 4
events
abound
By JULIE STIPE
The Princeton Sun
In Princeton, Independence
Day events are more than just
fireworks. From battle re-en-
actments to meeting George
Washington, there’s an event
for everyone.
At Morven Museum and
Garden’s annual July 4th Ju-
bilee, events on the museum’s
grounds are ongoing from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. The jubilee is
free and open to the public.
The museum is located at 55
Stockton Street in Princeton.
The event will include
demonstrations by inter-
preters in colonial garb, said
Morven program manager
Michelle Sheridan. Inter-
preters are members of the
“Past Masters,” a group dedi-
cated to researching and
demonstrating early Ameri-
can domestic activities such as
spinning, making soap, or tai-
loring.
Every year the Past Masters
demonstrate different activi-
ties, said Sheridan. This year
visitors will have the opportu-
nity to learn about and even
grind up various spices com-
monly used in early America.
please see THERE’S, page 2
By JULIE STIPE
The Princeton Sun
he Greater Princeton
Youth Orchestra’s sym-
phonic orchestra per-
formed June 17 at Avery
Fisher Hall in New York
City’s Lincoln Center.
The performance was a
triumph for a group that has had
something of a rocky year. In Septem-
ber the symphonic orchestra’s con-
ductor, Maestro Fernando Raucci,
suffered a stroke and returned to his
native country of Italy to recover.
“The kids loved him and they were
so devoted,” said Greater Princeton
Youth Orchestra (GPYO) recruitment
manager Lisa Nettleship.
The group was also supposed to go
to Italy this year to perform, Nettle-
T
Youth orchestra
performs at
Lincoln Center
Special to The Sun
The Greater Princeton Youth Orchestra’s Symphonic Orchestra performed at Lincoln
Center in New York City on June 17 under the baton of Kawika Kahalehoe.
BIG GIG
please see YOUTH, page 6
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There will also be a leaf printing
demonstration, Sheridan said, as
well as the ever-popular ice cream
making demonstration. Kids can
even sign the Declaration of Inde-
pendence.
“There are a lot of hands-on ac-
tivities for parents and children,”
Sheridan said.
A re-enactor will attend as
George Washington, and will read
letters both written and received
by the actual Washington, includ-
ing a letter to his mother and a
letter to his dentist, said Sheri-
dan. New this year is live music
by Princeton-based Riverside
Bluegrass Band, an acoustic five-
piece band that plays traditional
bluegrass and bluegrass-style
popular and country songs.
Refreshments will be provided
by Maglione’s Italian Ices.
The Morven Museum will be
open during the festivities. Ad-
mission is $6 for adults, and $5 for
seniors and students. The muse-
um is located in the Morven
house, formerly the mansion of
the New Jersey governor and
once home of Richard Stockton, a
signer of the Declaration of Inde-
pendence.
The Morven house’s connec-
tion with the Declaration of Inde-
pendence makes it the perfect
place for a Fourth of July celebra-
tion. “It is very fitting,” Sheridan
said.
You also can head over to the
Independence Day celebrations at
Princeton Battlefield State Park
at 500 Mercer Road (Princeton
Pike) in Princeton. The event is
free and will take place on July 4
from 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
The celebration is an annual
event begun more than 20 years
ago by Princeton Battlefield State
Park curator John Mills.
The event has changed some-
what over the years, Mills said,
and this year will include re-enac-
tors from Mott’s 6th Company,
2nd Continental Artillery dressed
in Revolutionary War period out-
fits, who will demonstrate how
drills were performed and how
period weapons were used.
“It will include demonstrations
of musket-fire of the time peri-
od,” Mills said.
Volunteers with the Thomas
Clarke House Museum, the his-
toric house on the battlefield,
built in 1772, will demonstrate
more domestic pursuits.
“There’s often some cooking or
baking going on,” Mills said.
Visitors will be able to hear a
talk on the Battle of Princeton,
and at 1 p.m., a reading of the
Declaration of Independence.
“A lot of people come just to
hear the Declaration of Independ-
ence read,” said Mills.
The Clarke House and its cur-
rent exhibit, “Arms of the Revolu-
tion,” will be open for tours.
Visitors are encouraged to
bring a picnic lunch and eat in
the park. Hiking trails are also
available throughout the park. “A
lot of people bring a picnic lunch
and spend most of the day at the
site,” Mills said.
Of course, it isn’t the Fourth of
July without fireworks. On Mon-
day, July 2, a firework show
staged by the Spirit of Princeton
committee will be held at dusk,
around 9 p.m. The best place to
watch the show is Clarke Field
next to the Princeton University
stadium. The fields will be open
at 7 p.m. for those who wish to
bring a picnic. Blankets and
chairs are suggested, and alco-
holic beverages are not allowed.
There’s plenty to do locally
on or around July 4
THERE’S
Continued from page 1
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 – THE PRINCETON SUN 3
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I-Hsiung Ju’s artwork will be displayed
at the Princeton Art Gallery
The family of I-Hsiung Ju, the
award-winning professor of art
and artist-in-residence emeritus
at Washington and Lee Universi-
ty, has established an endowment
for traditional Chinese art stud-
ies in his honor with an initial
gift of $50,000.
There will be a memorial exhi-
bition of Ju's work at The Prince-
ton Art Gallery in Princeton from
July 1 through July 15.
Paintings at the exhibition will
be on sale with proceeds benefit-
ing the endowment.
Ju died in March. He had
taught and served as artist-in-res-
idence at W&L from 1969 until his
retirement in 1989.
An extremely popular profes-
sor, he was named Professor of
the Year by the Ring-tum Phi,
Washington and Lee’s student
newspaper in 1971 and won sever-
al other awards for his teaching.
A memorial service will be
held on July 7 at 2 p.m. at All
Saints Church in Princeton,
where Ju established his studio
after relocating from Lexington
in 2002.
The I-Hsiung Ju Endowment
for Traditional Chinese Art Stud-
ies will provide funds to continue
Ju’s legacy of nurturing and en-
couraging the study of tradition-
al Chinese art, art history, and
language and literature among
Washington and Lee students.
The dean of the College will
administer the endowment in co-
operation with the departments
of art and art history and East
Asian language and literature.
The ultimate goal of the en-
dowment will be to offer multiple
and varied opportunities for our
students to explore and study the
artistic expressions related to the
literati culture of the Chinese
past.
The preferred use of income
from the endowment will support
students who travel to China or
Taiwan to study traditional Chi-
nese art and culture, with special
attention given to learning the
practice or history of traditional
Chinese brush painting and cal-
ligraphy in either a University-
approved program or as an ap-
prentice to an artist.
The endowment will be flexible
enough to allow other uses on and
off campus related to Chinese
artistic expression.
For information about the en-
dowment fund, contact Nancy
McIntyre, director of develop-
ment for the college, at (540) 458-
8291. Or, send her an email to nm-
cintyre@wlu.edu.
Visit us online at www.theprincetonsun.com
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
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More than 500 children raced
to the finish line and celebrated
their completion of the fourth
annual Princeton Kids Marathon
on Sunday, June 10, organized by
Community Connection of
Princeton HealthCare to help
promote physical activity and
combat childhood obesity.
The race was the culmination
of a 10-week training program in
which kids in grades kinder-
garten through eighth walked,
ran or rolled 2.5 miles a week at
their own pace.
They then gathered at Prince-
ton University Stadium to com-
plete the last 1.2 miles of the
marathon together.
“It’s great to see the smiles on
the kids’ faces as they cross the
finish line,” said Community
Connection manager Pam Cipri-
ano. “Our goal is that this event
inspires children to remain ac-
tive and teaches them the impor-
tance of physical fitness and
healthy lifestyles.”
The children were joined by
former Giants players and Super
Bowl champions Stephen Baker
“The Touchdown Maker” and
Bart Oats, a five-time Pro-Bowler.
The players ran alongside the
kids and cheered them on during
the race.
Childhood obesity rates have
more than tripled in the past 30
years, according the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention,
and 70 percent of obese youth be-
tween the ages of 5 and 17 have at
least one risk factor for cardio-
vascular disease.
Moreover, children and adoles-
cents who are obese are likely to
be obese as adults and are there-
fore more at risk for adult health
problems such as heart disease,
type 2 diabetes, stroke, several
types of cancer, and osteoarthri-
tis, according to the CDC.
“Childhood obesity is an epi-
demic in the United States,” said
Alicia Brennan, M.D. “In order
for our children to live long and
healthy lives, we need to help
them establish healthy habits
early on and events like the
Princeton Kids Marathon are
great way to do that.”
As part of the marathon, chil-
dren received incentive prizes for
every 5 miles completed prior to
race day and were able to track
their progress and receive train-
ing tips online.
They were also encouraged to
complete 26 green deeds – from
planting a tree to using reusable
shopping bags – and to identify
sponsors who could help them
raise funds for the University
Medical Center of Princeton at
Plainsboro’s Outpatient Pediatric
Clinic.
Children from more than 75
schools across Central Jersey
participated.
In addition to the Princeton
Kids Marathon, Community Con-
nection also hosted its annual
10K race for adults, which attract-
ed more than 300 runners.
Kids Marathon draws 500-plus
NJ AIDS/STD Hotline
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PSA
Mercer County Executive
Brian M. Hughes announced re-
cently that senior citizens in Mer-
cer County will again have the op-
portunity to receive fresh-pro-
duce checks that will enable them
to purchase locally grown fresh
fruits and vegetables at partici-
pating farm stands.
Representatives from the Mer-
cer County Nutrition Office will
offer the checks on Friday, June
29 between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at
the Trinity Episcopal Cathedral,
801 West State St., Trenton.
Eligible senior citizens will re-
ceive checks to redeem $20 in
fresh produce at various vendor
sites throughout the county.
Vouchers will be distributed in
four $5 denominations and are
valid until Nov. 30.
There will be additional distri-
bution sites and dates throughout
Mercer County that will include
some of the senior housing com-
munities and other specially se-
lected locations. Call the nutri-
tion office at 989-6652 to
determine which site is best for
you.
“This is an important opportu-
nity for seniors in Mercer County,
especially as everyone is trying to
get the most for their money,”
said Hughes.
The farmers market program
was developed to provide low-in-
come seniors with checks they
can use to purchase fresh produce
grown by New Jersey farmers.
The Mercer County program is
the lead agency and coordinator
in Mercer County for the senior
farmers market nutrition pro-
gram, and has been for a number
of years.
Qualifications are as follows: a
single person’s income must not
exceed $20,147 per year or $1,679
monthly; a couple’s income must
not exceed $27,214 per year or
$2,268 monthly.
Identity and residency proof is
required, such as a driver’s li-
cense, utility/phone bill or birth
certificate. Income proof is also
required such as a current in-
come tax return, social security
statement or Medicare or Food
Stamp card.
The Mercer County Nutrition
Program reminds seniors of
these guidelines: you must be 60
years old to receive checks, you
must provide proof of income or
self-declare your gross income to
meet the income guidelines, you
may not pick up checks for any-
one other than yourself, unless
you are serving as a proxy. (Call
the nutrition office for details; see
number below), checks are to be
signed in front of the farmers. Do
not send signed checks to the
market with a friend.
The farmer has the right to re-
fuse to honor them. Checks may
be used only at certified farm
stands – not grocery stores.
Stands will display a yellow
poster indicating they accept
these checks.
Only one set of checks per per-
son will be awarded each year.
Couples can each receive their
own set of checks.
For additional information,
contact the Mercer County nutri-
tion program for the elderly, sen-
ior farmers market program, at
(609) 989-6652.
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 – THE PRINCETON SUN 5
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Send us your Princeton news
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an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@theprincetonsun.
com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
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PUBLISHER Steve Miller
GENERAL MANAGER & EDITOR Alan Bauer
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
NEWS
MANAGING EDITOR, NEWS Kevin Canessa Jr.
MANAGING EDITOR, PRODUCTION Mary L. Serkalow
PRINCETON EDITOR Julie Stipe
OPERATIONS
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in our opinion
T
he good news: New Jersey ac-
counted for 25 percent of all
new jobs created in the United
States in the month of May: 17,500 new
jobs were created.
The bad news: the state’s unemploy-
ment rate rose from 9.1 to 9.2 percent.
And let’s be mindful: the 9.2 percent
figure really isn’t an accurate unem-
ployment percentage at all.
There are countless people whose
unemployment benefits have run out,
and whose cases no longer count in de-
partment of labor statistics.
And there are others who may have
lost a job, who were ineligible for un-
employment benefits, and, again,
whose cases are not factored into the
state unemployment rate.
And so as encouraging as it is to
hear our state created the most new
jobs in the country, the overall known
unemployment numbers are still ex-
tremely alarming.
Gov. Christie says the new jobs re-
port means consumers are becoming
“more confident.”
The overall figures paint a complete-
ly different picture.
We’re many years into this econom-
ic mess. And we’re still struggling as a
state, despite the so-called “comeback.”
While the governor’s 10 percent
across-the-board income-tax cut would
certainly help some, it certainly won’t
help the middle class all that much.
A person making an annual salary
of $35,000 would see a whopping $1 a
week increase in take-home pay.
This is hardly enough to spark con-
sumer confidence.
Much more still needs to be done – at
the federal and state levels – to inspire
confidence. Realistically, the unem-
ployment percentage needs to drop to
close to 8 percent before there’s any
reason for anyone to celebrate.
And even then, the numbers will
still be too high.
We look forward to the day we can
agree consumer confidence is back.
We’re just not sure that time is here
yet.
State’s uptick in unemployment
Number rises despite creation of 17,500 new jobs; more must be done
How confident are you?
Gov. Christie says he believes con-
sumers in New Jersey are gaining
confidence. Yet the unemployment
rate jumped in May. How confident in
the economy are you? We want to
know.
ship said, but the tour has been put on
hold. Between the canceled trip and Maes-
tro Raucci’s health problems, members of
the orchestra have had a lot of disappoint-
ment in the past few months, and Nettle-
ship and GPYO administrative director
Mini Krishnan felt for the kids.
“Mini said we have to do something for
them,” Nettleship said. “So when this (con-
cert) came up we jumped on it.”
That’s not to say the gig was easy to get.
To be considered for a slot in the world-fa-
mous hall, music groups must submit
recordings of past performances.
“It’s like an audition tape only it’s an or-
chestra,” Nettleship said.
The orchestra sent the arts center a link
to a recording of a performance online,
and on the basis of the performance was
chosen to play in a program that also in-
cluded the NYC Chamber Orchestra.
The acceptance was no easy feat, and
proof of the group’s ability and profession-
alism.
“We got accepted based on the perform-
ance of our ensemble,” Nettleship said.
“They don’t just accept anyone who comes
in.”
The orchestra performed the concert
under the capable baton of Kawika Kahale-
hoe. Kahalehoe is conductor of the Mont-
gomery High School orchestra and has
been involved with the Greater Princeton
Youth Orchestra for a number of years,
conducting its preparatory division wind
ensemble.
When the orchestra was left without a
maestro, Nettleship said, they turned to
Kahalehoe because of his experience in
conducting, and the choice turned out to be
a wise one.
As chaotic as things have been for the or-
chestra this past year, Nettleship said, the
switch in conductors went smoothly.
“Musically it was a fine transition,” Net-
tleship said. “Kahalehoe has a way with
the kids.”
In his new capacity as conductor and
music director for the symphonic orches-
tra, Kahalehoe chose to have the orchestra
perform Alexander Borodin’s Polovtsian
Dances and the fourth movement of Dvo-
rak’s Ninth Symphony at the concert.
Both are well known selections, which
are also not easy.
The symphonic orchestra was well qual-
ified to tackle them, however, being the
most advanced orchestra among those in
the GPYO group, which also includes the
concert orchestra, the wind symphony, the
middle school string ensemble and the
middle school wind ensemble.
“There’s not as much teaching with the
symphonic orchestra as with other
groups,” Kahalehoe said. Since students in
the orchestra are such advanced musi-
cians already, Kahalehoe said, rehearsals
tend to focus more on dynamics and ex-
pression than getting notes.
The orchestra draws kids from all over
Mercer County as well as Somerset County,
with a few coming from as far away as
Hunterdon and Middlesex Counties and
from Pennsylvania.
The orchestra has a good reputation in
the area, and, Nettleship said, offers a
chance to play with serious musicians in a
more rigorous atmosphere than might be
found in a school orchestra.
“The level of musicianship is higher,”
Nettleship said. Moreover, Nettleship said
she believes kids are challenged and in-
spired by playing alongside other talented
kids. “Playing with kids who are better
than you makes you want to be better,” she
said.
Youth orchestra performs at Avery Fisher Hall
YOUTH
Continued from page 1
please see LINCOLN, page 7
Princeton Summer Theater is
pleased to announce its 2012 fami-
ly show will be “Little Red’s Wild
Ride,” a new play by Shawn Fen-
nell.
Fennell was PST’s artistic di-
rector in 2009, and a company
member in 2008 and 2010.
“Little Red’s Wild Ride” is a
whimsical adaptation of the clas-
sic children’s story.
You’ve never seen Little Red
Riding Hood quite like this. The
play runs Thursdays to Satur-
days, on July 5 to 7, July 12 to 14,
July 26 to 28 and Aug. 2 to 4.
All performances are at 11 a.m.
Tickets are $9; they are free for
children under 3. To order tickets,
you can visit www.SmartTix.com;
call our (877) 238-5596; or contact
SmartTix, 312 West 36th St. Suite
200, New York, N.Y. 10018. You can
also call the Princeton Summer
Theater box office at 609.258.7062,
or email us at princetonsum-
mertheater@gmail.com.
We also offer Young Artists’
Workshops on Friday afternoons
for children ages 7 to12, which
will begin on Friday, July 6 and
run weekly from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.
There will be six workshops total;
parents can register their chil-
dren for $35 per workshop, or $145
for the full series.
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Also, Kahalehoe said, many
public schools don’t offer kids the
chance to play in a full orchestra,
since the winds and brass are
often in the school band.
“Most public schools have an
orchestra but it’s usually just
strings,” Kahalehoe said. “This
ensemble offers kids the opportu-
nity to play symphonic orchestra
music.”
It also offers the kids opportu-
nities to perform on stage. GPYO
ensembles perform in different
locations throughout the year,
Nettleship said. “We try to spread
out the concerts in different ven-
ues,” she said. These venues in-
clude Montgomery High School
and Richardson Auditorium on
the Princeton University Cam-
pus.
The chance to perform at Lin-
coln Center, however, was a won-
derful opportunity for the kids,
Nettleship said.
“It’s a really great musical ex-
perience as well as a trip to the
big city,” she said.
The benefits of playing at a
place like Lincoln Center are
valuable but intangible, Kahale-
hoe said.
They come from following in
the footsteps of hundreds of top
musicians and orchestras.
“It’s the experience of playing
at venue like Lincoln Center that
has such as rich history,” Kahale-
hoe said. “And they gain a greater
appreciation for that type of
music and that type of perform-
ance.”
Also, Kahalehoe pointed out,
the June 17 performance was an
authentic performance in the
sense that the concert was adver-
tised so the kids performed not,
as usual, for an audience consist-
ing mainly of their own parents,
siblings, and peers, but for all
sorts of people.
“That’s as authentic as it gets,”
Kahalehoe said.
The concert hall was full, Ka-
halehoe said, with probably be-
tween 1,000 and 1,500 people pres-
ent at the concert. “The house
was packed,” Kahalehoe said.
Since there was no time for a
dress rehearsal before the con-
cert, Kahalehoe said, the first
time the kids walked onto stage
was minutes before the concert
and in front of a full audience.
“It was a little high pressure
but I think they were very
poised,” Kahalehoe said. “They
had a great time. I think they real-
ly thought it was cool.”
Overall, Kahalehoe said, the
concert went very well. “It was
excellent,” he said. “It was a great
experience. I was incredibly
proud of the students.”
Lincoln Center hosts Princeton Youth Orchestra
LINCOLN
Continued from page 6
Princeton Summer Theater
putting on ‘Little Red’s Wild Ride’
Send us your
Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send
us a press release or photos?
Shoot an interesting video?
Drop us an email at
news@theprinceton.com. Fax
us at 856-427-0934. Call the
editor at 609-751-0245.
WEDNESDAY JUNE 27
Princeton Township Environmen-
tal Commission: 7:30 p.m. To
confirm meeting time and for
more information visit
www.princetontwp. org.
Ask the Mac Pros: 10 a.m. to noon
at Princeton Library Technology
Center. Have questions about
how to use your MacBook, iPad,
or iPod? Want to try out our new
iMacs, but don’t know where to
begin? Members of the Princeton
Macintosh Users Group will be
available at various times during
this ten-week series to offer tips,
tricks, and answers to all of your
Apple product questions. Drop
by!
Family Stories: Ages 2 to 6. 10 to
10:30 a.m. at Princeton Library
Story Room. Stories, songs, fin-
gerplays for little ones.
The Buzz: 11 a.m. to noon at Prince-
ton Library. Join the staff every
Wednesday for an informal chat
about buzz-worthy books, films,
music, technology and more.
Share what you’ve been reading,
watching and listening to, and the
library will keep you in-the-know
about new and recommended
titles each week.
Lapsit Stories: Ages newborn to 15
months. 11 a.m. at Princeton
Library Story Room. Stories,
songs, fingerplays and move-
ment.
Playgroup for Babies: Ages new-
born to 15 months. 11:30 a.m. to 1
p.m. at Princeton Library Story
Room, third floor. Socialize and
interact. Library provides play-
mats and simple toys. Caregiver
must attend.
“Hunters of the Night” Talk: 3 to 4
p.m. at Princeton Library Com-
munity Room. Live owls and rap-
tors will be featured in this pro-
gram that teaches children about
the creatures’ natural habitats,
how they have adapted to our
changing environment and more.
Camp NaNoWriMo: 5 to 8 p.m. at
Princeton Library Quiet Room,
first floor. Campers, come join
Counselor Beth to weave tales in
15-minute timed writings each
Wednesday evening in June.
Show up when you can and dive
right in. We'll come up for air for
five minutes between each ses-
sion, so you'll have a chance to
meet and cheer one another on.
Keep a word count as you go
along. The camper with the high-
est total word count wins a free
drink at Small World Coffee.
Camp NaNoWriMo is where
campers write 50,000 words in
30 days. The program will also
run Saturday mornings from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Salsa Slam: 7 to 9 p.m. at Princeton
Library Community Room and
Hinds Plaza. Celebrate all things
salsa at the first ever Princeton
Salsa Slam! Presented in partner-
ship with the Princeton Farmers’
Market, this family event includes
salsa samples from local eateries
and stores. Taste the variety of
salsas and then vote for your
favorite along with a judging pan-
el of local foodies. Salsa music
and dancing will happen out on
Hinds Plaza with Salsa dancing
and demonstrations by Henri
Velandia's Hot Salsa Hot. Help us
turn up the heat this summer and
come discover who will be
crowned as the Salsa Champ of
Princeton.
THURSDAY JUNE 28
Princeton Farmer’s Market: 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at Hinds Plaza. Seasonal
produce, flowers, crafts and a
variety of edibles from local farm-
ers and artisans are for sale at
this weekly five-hour event,
which features live music at 12:30
p.m.
Family Stories: Ages 2 to 6. 10 to
10:30 a.m. at Princeton Library
Story Room. Stories, songs, fin-
gerplays for little ones.
Introduction to iLife: 7 to 8:30 p.m.
at Princeton Library Technology
Center. Mac specialist Caitlin
Trought will provide an overview
of the iLife Suite, which includes
iPhoto, iMovie and GarageBand.
SATURDAY JUNE 30
Camp NaNoWriMo: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
at Princeton Library Quiet Room,
first floor. Campers, come join
Counselor Beth to weave tales in
15-minute timed writings each
Wednesday evening in June.
Show up when you can and dive
right in. We'll come up for air for
five minutes between each ses-
sion, so you'll have a chance to
meet and cheer one another on.
Keep a word count as you go
along. The camper with the high-
est total word count wins a free
drink at Small World Coffee.
Camp NaNoWriMo is where
campers write 50,000 words in
30 days. The program will also
run Wednesday evenings from 5
to 8 p.m.
Saturday Stories: Ages 2 to 8 with
an adult. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at
Princeton Library Story Room.
Stories, songs and movement.
“The Phantom Tollbooth” Film: 2
to 3:30 p.m. at Princeton Library
Community Room.
SUNDAY JULY 1
Sunday Stories: Ages 2 to 8 with an
adult. 3:30 to 4 p.m. at Princeton
Library Story Room. Stories,
songs and movement.
MONDAY JULY 2
Fireworks: Best viewing is from the
Princeton University sports fields
immediately next to the Universi-
ty Stadium. Fields open at 7 p.m.
for picnicking. Fireworks at dusk,
usually around 9 p.m. No alco-
holic beverages permitted.
Family Stories: Ages 2 to 6. 10 to
10:30 a.m. at Princeton Library
Story Room. Stories, songs, fin-
gerplays for little ones.
Field Station: Dinosaur: Ages 5 and
older. 3 to 4 p.m. at Princeton
Library Community Room. Repre-
sentatives from Field Station:
Dinosaur, an outdoor scientific
dinosaur attraction in Secaucus,
present a program designed to
get people excited about
dinosaurs in New Jersey. The pro-
gram begins with a costumed
character, “The Dinosaur Trouba-
dour” reading Syd Hoff’s “Danny
and the Dinosaur.”
Ask the Mac Pros: 4 to 6 p.m. at
Princeton Library Technology
Center. Have questions about
how to use your MacBook, iPad,
or iPod? Want to try out our new
iMacs, but don’t know where to
begin? Members of the Princeton
Macintosh Users Group will be
available at various times during
this ten-week series to offer tips,
tricks, and answers to all of your
Apple product questions. Drop
by!
“The City Dark” Film: 7 to 9 p.m. at
Princeton Library Community
Room. Stargazing on the Plaza
with the Princeton Amateur
Astronomy Association follows
the screening.
TUESDAY JULY 3
Princeton Eats: Denis Granorolo: 10
to 11 a.m. at Princeton Library
Community Room. The baker
from the Terra Momo group of
restaurants will give a lesson
inspired by items found in the
Princeton Farmers’ Market. Reg-
istration required at princetonli-
brary.org.
Family Stories: Ages 2 to 6. 10 to
10:30 a.m. at Princeton Library
Story Room. Stories, songs, fin-
gerplays for little ones.
Lapsit Stories: Ages newborn to 15
months. 11 a.m. at Princeton
Library Story Room. Stories,
songs, fingerplays and move-
ment.
Opera Lovers Discussion Group: 7
to 9 p.m. at Princeton Library
Quiet Room. Opera aficionados
discuss “Backstage at the Opera:
From Concept to Opening Night.”
CALENDAR PAGE 8 JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your Princeton meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or
Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior
to the date of the event. Send information by mail to: Calendar,
The Princeton Sun, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J.
08542. Or by email: news@princetonsun.com. Or you can submit a
calendar listing through our website (www.princetonsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
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Robbinsville
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In May 2011, Princeton Dance
for Parkinson offered the first
New Jersey dance classes for peo-
ple with Parkinson’s, and now al-
most a year later, DanceVision
and The Parkinson Alliance are
thrilled to announce its four-week
summer series of classes. The
classes empower those afflicted
with Parkinson’s disease, their
partners, their caregivers, and
friends to enjoy movement, music
and dance.
The new summer four-week se-
ries will take place on Thursdays
beginning July 5 to July 26 at 5 to
6:15 p.m. at Princeton Dance and
Theater Studio, Forrestal Village,
Princeton. Classes for walk-ins
are $10 per person. If a caregiver
or spouse or partner participates
it is only an additional $5.
No dance experience is neces-
sary; all levels and can start any-
time in the series.
For more information, please
contact mariesnyder@dancevi-
sionnj.org or call (609) 520 1020.
DanceVision is located at PDT
Studio Forrestal Village 116 Rock-
ingham Row, Princeton.
Princeton Dance for Parkin-
son’s classes are based on the
Dance for PD program started at
the Mark Morris Dance Center in
Brooklyn in 2001 and it has since
been replicated in more than 40
other communities around the
world. Classes are appropriate for
anyone with Parkinson’s, no mat-
ter how advanced. No prior dance
experience is necessary.
Parkinson’s Disease is a move-
ment disorder that results when
the cells in the brain that produce
the chemical dopamine are dam-
aged and can no longer produce
sufficient levels of the chemical.
Parkinson’s usually progresses
slowly in most people. Although
symptoms vary from person to
person, Parkinson’s symptoms
often include a resting tremor,
rigidity, slow movement and im-
pairments in balance and coordi-
nation.
Approximately 50 to 60,000 new
cases of Parkinson’s are diag-
nosed in the United States each
year.
Dance classes offered for
those with Parkinson’s
Caregivers, spouses also invited
Visit us online at www.theprincetonsun.com
classified
T HE P R I N C E T O N S U N
JUNE 27-JULY 3, 2012 PAGE 10
BOX A DS
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$2.50 1796 to 1834 Up To $5,500 $18,000
$2.50 1840 to 1929 Up To $1,000 $5,500
$3.00 1854 to 1889 Up To $3,000 $10,500
$5.00 1795 to 1833 Up To $10,000 $50,500
$5.00 1834 to 1838 Up To $1,000 $10,500
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