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Ph.D.

Student Handbook 2009-2010

Flowchart of Ph.D. Process


Program Component Timeline
Preferred Deadlines: April 1 for Fall admit Admission Feb 1st for University Fellowship 1 year after admission Appt of Advisory Committee External Minor Transfer of Credit Within 1 year after completion of coursework Qualifying Exam At least 8 months before the degree is anticipated to be awarded After Passing Qualifying Exam, if not done sooner At least 6 months prior to defense After passing qualifying exam During coursework During coursework Notify Director that application was submitted Communicate with Director re: Committee composition

Student
Submit on-line application

RESPONSIBILITIES School
Set up Application file Ph.D. Committee reviews applications Send application packet to Graduate Office Director approves committee Complete Advisory Committee Form Director approves external minor proposal Submit Transfer of Credit form/revalidation request

Graduate Office
Approve and return packet to School Enter student data into registration system Verify and sign off on Advisory Committee form

Submit External minor proposal Meet with Ph.D. Program Director

Approves non-traditional minors Approve transfer of credits Authorize transfer on transcript Verify completion of coursework Sign off on Nomination to Candidacy form Verify faculty status and sign off on Nomination of Research Committee form

Submit written Qualifying Exam Present Oral Exam

Advisory Committee evaluates Qualifying Exam Submit Nomination to Candidacy form Submit Nomination of Research Committee form Dean and Director approve committee Research Committee approves proposal

Appt of Research Committee

In writing, suggest up to 5 committee members to Director

Dissertation Proposal

Submit Dissertation Proposal Register for diss credits each Fall & Spring* Pass Human Subjects Certification Prepare Defense Announcement (title pg & 150 word abstract) Set appt w/ Grad Office for Format Check Deposit bound dissertation w/ 350 word abstract to Grad Office

IRB Approval Final Defense & Format Check

After dissertation proposal is approved About 1 month before final defense

Dissertation Chair listed as PI Submit signed Defense Announcement to Graduate Office Research Committee approves final Dissertation Dissertation Chair oversees final revisions Conduct format check Receive final bound dissertation

After final written revisions are approved Within 7 yrs of passing Qual Exam By the 10th of the month to graduate that month

Deposit of Dissertation

Graduation

Submit pdf version to library for digital deposit Your graduation date is the last day of the month, in the month you deposit your final bound dissertation with the Graduate School by the 10th.

*Students must remain enrolled each Fall and Spring semester until the bound materials are submitted for deposit. If depositing dissertation during summer session, must be enrolled in one of the summer sessions.

Table of Contents
The Mission of the Indiana University School of Social Work ............................................................... 2 History and Development of the Ph.D. Program ..................................................................................... 2 Programs of Study ...................................................................................................................................... 4 The Pre-Doc Exploratory Option ........................................................................................................... 4 The Ph.D. Program................................................................................................................................. 4 External Minor Courses................................................................................................................ 6 Ph.D. Minor in Social Work................................................................................................................... 6 Ph.D. Course Descriptions ......................................................................................................................... 8 Ph.D. Program Committee......................................................................................................................... 9 IUSSW Graduate Faculty .......................................................................................................................... 9 Academic Policies...................................................................................................................................... 15 Academic Student Appointees ............................................................................................................. 15 Advising and Mentoring....................................................................................................................... 15 Annual Review of Student Progress..................................................................................................... 16 Appeals/ Student Review ..................................................................................................................... 17 Dissertation Proposal Guidelines ......................................................................................................... 19 Dissertation Final Defense Guidelines ................................................................................................. 21 Grading................................................................................................................................................. 21 Human Subjects Review 18 Independent Study................................................................................................................................ 22 Nondiscrimination, Social Work Policy on.......................................................................................... 22 Qualifying Exam Guidelines ................................................................................................................ 23 Student Misconduct.............................................................................................................................. 25 Students Rights and Responsibilities .................................................................................................. 28 Transfer Credit/ Revalidation of Courses............................................................................................. 29 Resources ................................................................................................................................................... 29 IUSSW Resources............................................................................................................................... 29 Computer Clusters ...................................................................................................................... 30 Faculty Offices ........................................................................................................................... 30 Financial Aid .............................................................................................................................. 30 Listserv ....................................................................................................................................... 30 Office of Research Services........................................................................................................ 30 PhD Student Lounge................................................................................................................... 30 Student Mailboxes ...................................................................................................................... 30 Website ....................................................................................................................................... 31 IUPUI Resources ................................................................................................................................ 31 Adaptive Educational Services, Office of................................................................................... 31 Bookstores .................................................................................................................................. 31 Campus and Community Life 28 Campus Housing......................................................................................................................... 31 Child Care Center ....................................................................................................................... 32 Counseling and Psychological Services ..................................................................................... 32 Food Service ............................................................................................................................... 32 Funding Resources ..................................................................................................................... 32 Graduate Student Organization (GSO)....................................................................................... 34

Identification Cards- Jag Tag...................................................................................................... 34 International Affairs, Office of ................................................................................................... 34 Learning Centers......................................................................................................................... 34 Libraries...................................................................................................................................... 35 Multicultural Center ................................................................................................................... 35 Parking and Transportation Services .......................................................................................... 36 Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) .................................................................................................. 36 Student Employee Health Service .............................................................................................. 36 Testing Center............................................................................................................................. 36 Tutoring Programs ...................................................................................................................... 37 University Information Technology Services (UITS) ................................................................ 37 University Writing Center .......................................................................................................... 37 Volunteerism .............................................................................................................................. 37 Online Resources ................................................................................................................................ 37 Student Opportunities .............................................................................................................................. 38 Hispanic/Latino Social Work/Human Service Provider....................................................................... 38 NASW .................................................................................................................................................. 38 NABSW................................................................................................................................................ 38 Employment Opportunities .................................................................................................................. 39 Career and Employment Services ........................................................................................................ 39 Job File in the Student Lounge............................................................................................................. 39 Appendices................................................................................................................................................. 40 1. Social Work Standards .................................................................................................................. 40 2. Sexual Harassment & Complaint Procedure............................................................................... 42 3. IUSSW Forms ................................................................................................................................. 46 Research Internship (S725)/ Special Topics (S790) Approval Form................................................ 47 Qualifying Exam Rating Form ................................................................................................... 48 Record of incomplete and contract for completion of course requirements form ...................... 49 4. Graduate School Forms ................................................................................................................. 50 Appointment of Advisory Committee ........................................................................................ 51 Nomination To Candidacy For The Ph.D. Degree ..................................................................... 52 Nomination of Research Committee for the Ph.D...................................................................... 53 Fitness-For-Duty Medical Certification ..................................................................................... 54 Ph.D. Requirements Checklist.................................................................................................... 55 5. Student Record Keeping ................................................................................................................ 56 Ph.D. Class Schedule Master...................................................................................................... 57 Sample Full-time Schedule of Courses....................................................................................... 58 Tentative Long Term Ph.D. Schedule ........................................................................................ 59 My Ph.D. Program Schedule ...................................................................................................... 60 Student Progress Sheet ............................................................................................................... 61 External Minors Taken by IUSSW PhD Students ...................................................................... 63 6. Syllabi .............................................................................................................................................. 64 S725: Social Work Research Internship .................................................................................... 65 S790: Special Topics in Social Work Practice, Theory and Research ...................................... 67

Introduction and Welcome


Welcome to Indiana University and the Indiana University School of Social Work Doctoral Program. The School of Social Work is housed in the Education/Social Work (ES) Building on the Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) campus. Created in 1969, IUPUI represents a unique merger of two major state universities, Indiana University and Purdue University. IUPUI draws upon the traditional strengths of each institution, bringing together in downtown Indianapolis the best of both universities. Indiana University provides educational programs in allied health, art, business, continuing studies, dentistry, education, journalism, law, liberal arts, medicine, nursing, optometry, physical education, public and environmental affairs, and social work, while Purdue University is responsible for academic programs in science, engineering, and technology. The budgetary and administrative management of IUPUI falls under the aegis of Indiana University. IUPUI is a vast and complex educational institution. Each year approximately 30,000 students enroll in courses. More than 185 degree programs are offered at IUPUI. There are more than 1,500 faculty members and approximately 6,000 staff. Educational resources include a state-of-the-art library, sophisticated computer technology centers available in convenient locations around the campus, nearby headquarters of major industries, and access to state government. As a major urban university, IUPUI is involved with a wide array of public and private organizations throughout the City of Indianapolis, the State of Indiana, and beyond. The Indiana University School of Social Work was founded in 1911 as the Department of Social Service within the Indiana University Medical School and is the oldest school of social service begun and continuously affiliated with a university. The School has awarded the MSW degree throughout its long history and the BSW degree was initially accredited in 1975. The Ph.D. Program was approved by the Indiana Commission on Higher Education and accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools in 1993 and 1994, respectively. The Ph.D. Program admitted its first cohort of five doctoral students in the fall of 1994 and graduated its first doctoral candidate in December 1998. This handbook provides an overview of the Ph.D. Program in Social Work and its relationship to the Indiana University Graduate School, including its history and mission, information regarding the Ph.D. Program; and services and opportunities available to Ph.D. students. Inquiries should be directed to Dr. Margaret E. Adamek, Director of the Ph.D. Program at: Indiana University School of Social Work Education/Social Work Building, ES4138H 902 West New York Street Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5156 Telephone: (317) 274-6730 madamek@iupui.edu

Dear Student: On behalf of the faculty and administration of the Indiana University Graduate School, I would like welcome you to the Ph.D. Program in Social Work. You are about to embark upon one of the most interesting and challenging journeys of your life. Although doctoral education will require an incredible investment of your time and energy, the rewards associated with the creation and dissemination of new knowledge are enormous. With planning and commitment, you will successfully complete this educational process with a Doctor of Philosophy degree in Social Work. This Ph.D. Student Handbook serves as a supplement to the Indiana University Graduate School Bulletin which can be accessed online at: http://www.indiana.edu/~bulletin/iu/grad/2008-2009/ As you become involved in the program, you will have an opportunity to select an academic advisory committee including two social work faculty members and a member of the faculty from the department or school in which you will complete your external minor. These individuals will serve as invaluable sources of information throughout the course of your studies together with other members of the School of Social Work faculty with whom you will have opportunities to explore your academic and research interests. We hope that this handbook will answer many of the questions that may arise as you pursue your degree. At any time, however, please feel free to contact me or the members of your academic advisory committee with any questions or concerns. We will be happy to assist you in whatever way we can. Sincerely,

Margaret E. Adamek, Ph.D. Professor Director, Ph.D. Program

Education/Social Work Building 4138 902 W. New York Street

Indianapolis, IN 46202-5156 (317)274-8605 fax (317)274-8630

Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

The Mission and Vision of the Indiana University School of Social Work
Mission Statement: The mission of the IUSSW is excellence in education, research and service to promote health, well-being, and social and economic justice in a diverse world. Vision Statement: An exemplary university and community-based collaboration advancing social and economic justice, empowerment, and human well-being in a changing global landscape. Underlying Values:
SOCIAL and ECONOMIC JUSTICE DIVERSITY EFFECTIVENESS EMPOWERMENT EXCELLENCE INTEGRITY

History and Development of the Ph.D. Program


The doctoral program in social work has the distinction of being the first Ph.D. program on the IUPUI campus outside the medical science area. Both the Indiana University Board of Trustees and the Indiana Commission on Higher Education approved the program in 1993. It was later reviewed and accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools in 1994 prior to the arrival of the first cohort of five doctoral students in the fall of that same year. It remains the only doctoral level program in social work in the State of Indiana. Prior to the onset of the Ph.D. Program, the school had, for the most part, viewed its charge as one of educating professional social workers with the knowledge and skills necessary to assume interpersonal practice, planning, and management positions, primarily within the State of Indiana. Within that context, the schools mission had focused more on the dissemination of existing knowledge than on the creation of new knowledge. In addition, the research that had been conducted by faculty was largely of an entrepreneurial nature, primarily reflecting the idiosyncratic interests of individual faculty members rather than that of the school as a larger entity. With the emergence of the Ph.D. Program, and the impetus provided by the schools developing research center, the mission has broadened considerably. As the school enters the new millennium, its mission now reflects a more unified corporate research agenda. That agenda not only embraces the individual interests of faculty, but also the schools larger vision of itself as an urban center of social work education -- responsible not only for disseminating but also contributing to the body of knowledge that informs its curriculum. As is true of most Ph.D. programs, the primary focus is one that emphasizes the primacy of research as the basis for the advancement of theory and the development and validation of knowledge for the improvement of professional practice. The overriding goal, therefore, is to prepare professional social workers for leadership roles in areas such as: social work research, education, social welfare policy development, high level administrative positions, and the development of knowledge for practice. The program is built around a flexible interdisciplinary model that includes an intentionally integrated series of didactic and experiential learning experiences. While grounded on the historical and experiential ideological values of the social work profession, the program is designed to take full advantage of the relevant human service professions and related academic disciplines available throughout the University. As such, students are able to tie their research interests to related areas such as, education, public and environmental affairs, sociology, psychology, business, philanthropy, law, etc. Given its strong multi-disciplinary thrust, the program utilizes a committee
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approach that is intended to draw upon the professional expertise of scholars throughout the University whose intellectual and research interests parallel those of the students enrolled in the program. The doctoral program is intended to support and sustain this larger vision through an organized curriculum designed to prepare future generations of social work scholars equipped to carry this tradition forward. Specifically, the Ph.D. Program consists of 90 credit hours (including up to 30 transfer credits) organized around five major curriculum components: Component I: An exploration and critical assessment of the current state of the knowledge, values and skills upon which the profession of social work is based. (27 credit hours) Component II: (External Minor): An intensive and focused specialization in which the student affiliates with one or more of the social or behavioral sciences/professions within the University that are directly related to the social work profession. (12-18 credit hours) Component III: A solid foundation in research and epistemology, including a mastery of quantitative and qualitative methods, measurement and statistics, and the related technologies. (27 credit hours) Component IV: A guided research internship that provides the opportunity for students to apply their developing knowledge and skills to the investigation of a viable practice sensitive research issue. Typically, this component is tied directly to a research assistantship and/or the students place of employment. (6 credit hours) Component V: A doctoral dissertation that demonstrates the students capacity for independent knowledgebuilding, including the ability to identify, organize, and empirically solve problems that are of both practical and theoretical significance to the profession of social work. (12 credit hours) Indiana University Graduate School, under whose aegis all Ph.D. programs fall, permits the transfer of up to 30 graduate credit hours from other universities to be counted toward the 90 credit hours required for the Ph.D. degree. With this provision, it is possible for students to complete the formal course work component of the program (excluding the dissertation) in approximately two to three academic years, if they are enrolled on a full-time basis. Similarly, part-time students can typically complete their course work in a three to four year period depending upon their level of involvement in the program. The length of time required to complete the qualifying process and the dissertation varies from student to student. In the fall of 1997, the Ph.D. Program Committee initiated a Pre-Doctoral Exploratory Option designed to enable qualified graduates of MSW programs to complete up to nine credit hours of doctoral coursework before having to formally apply to the Ph.D. Program. This Pre-Doc option serves a dual function. It provides prospective Ph.D. students with an opportunity to explore their interests in and potential for doctoral education while enabling faculty to evaluate and mentor them with respect to the rigors of pursuing an advanced research degree. The Ph.D. Program Committee also provides an External Minor in social work that enables students pursuing doctoral degrees in schools or departments other than social work to take Ph.D. courses available through the School of Social Work Ph.D. Program.

Programs of Study
The Pre-Doc Exploratory Option
The purpose of the Pre-Doc Exploratory Option is to permit qualified students to enroll in up to three of the schools regular Ph.D. foundation courses before having to make formal application to the program. This enables such students to complete up to 9 credit hours of doctoral course work before having to decide whether they intend to formally apply to the Ph.D. program. For students who subsequently apply, and are accepted, credits earned during the Pre-Doc phase will automatically apply toward the Ph.D. degree. Participation in the PreDoc Exploratory Option does not guarantee that students will subsequently be accepted into the Ph.D. program. The Ph.D. seminars comprising the Pre-Doc Option package include: S-710: Social Work Theories of Human and Social Behavior S-712: International Social Development in a Global Context S-718: Intermediate Statistics for Social Work S-720: The Philosophy of Science and Social Work S-721: Preparing to Publish: Seminar in Advanced Scholarship Skills S-724: Theory, Practice, and Assessment of Social Work Teaching S-726: Advanced Social Work Research: Qualitative Methods S-727: Advanced Social Work Research: Quantitative Methods S-728: Advanced Statistics for Social Work S-730: Pro-Seminar on Social Work Policy Analysis S-740: Social Work Practice: Theory and Research Students enrolled in the Pre-Doc Exploratory Option are encouraged to take the seminar S-721 Seminar in Advanced Scholarship Skills as a beginning course. Pre-Doc students may also take graduate courses related to the 15 research credit hours required as prerequisites for the Ph.D. Program (see section on Program Requirements for description of research prerequisites for the Ph.D. Program).

Application Requirements:
Approval for enrollment in the Pre-Doc Exploratory Option is based on the following criteria: An earned masters degree in social work or a related field from an accredited college or university. A graduate grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale. (preferred) A 500 word written statement that outlines applicants reasons for seeking enrollment in the Pre-Doc Option. A professional resume. At least one letter of reference. A scholarly writing sample Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores may also be submitted but are not required. Enrollment in any particular doctoral seminar requires the approval of the Ph.D. Program Director. All students approved to take courses in the Pre-Doc Exploratory Option are classified as Graduate Non-Degree enrolled in the School of Social Work. Graduate students who are in the process of completing the final semester of their M.S.W. degree are eligible to apply for the Pre-Doc Exploratory Option. It should be noted that all course requirements counted toward the Ph.D. degree must be completed within seven years prior to passing the Ph.D. qualification examination.

The Ph.D. Program


The Ph.D. degree in social work awarded through the Indiana University Graduate School requires a minimum of 90 credit hours, including dissertation and research internship. Up to 30 graduate credit hours counted toward the minimum 90 credit hours required for the Ph.D. degree may be transferred from another accredited college or university. All prior graduate course work credited toward the Ph.D. degree must have a minimum grade of B, and must receive written approval of the Director of the Ph.D. Program. Specific program requirements include:

Description Professional Social Work Component External Minor Specialization Electives Social Work Research Component Research Internship Doctoral Dissertation Total Degree Requirements***

Credit Hours 27 12 6 27 6 12 90

***Includes up to 30 transfer credits, including 15 credit hours from the professional social work component and 15 credit hours from the social work research component. Students must complete a total of 15 credit hours in the area of research as prerequisites for the Ph.D. Program. Six of these 15 credit hours must have been completed within the last three years, including a graduate level foundation statistics course. Research prerequisites may be taken in conjunction with the Ph.D. Program, but must be completed before enrolling in either the S726 or S727 advanced research methods courses and/or the S725 Research Internship.

Admission Requirements
Admission to the Ph.D. Program in social work requires the successful completion of a Masters degree in social work (MSW) or a related field of study. A grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4-point scale is preferred. Applicants with two or more years of professional experience beyond the masters degree are given preferred admissions status. Admission to the Ph.D. Program is based on evaluations of: The applicants professional resume Professional experience beyond the MSW degree Undergraduate and graduate transcripts Three letters of reference An example of the applicants scholarly writing A 500 word statement of purpose Graduate Record Examination General Test scores which includes measures of verbal skills, knowledge of quantitative methods, and analytical reasoning ability. Application Deadlines Applications are accepted at any time, however, to be considered for a University Fellowship the deadline is February 1st. Application materials and further information may be obtained from the Program Director. Special Student Status: Applicants to the Ph.D. Program who do not have an earned Master of Social Work degree from a graduate school accredited by the Council on Social Work Education, or whose graduate degree is in a field other than social work, may be considered for admission to the Ph.D. Program upon successful completion of the additional requirements listed below and subsequent approval by the Ph.D. Program Committee. Individuals completing these additional requirements as prerequisites for possible admission into the PhD Program are classified as Special Students. All Special Students must satisfy the following requirements: Successful completion of up to fifteen (15) additional credit hours in the MSW Program at Indiana University which may include a required field practicum experience. The specific course requirements to be completed are individually determined by the Director of the Ph.D. Program following a review of the applicants graduate transcript and professional resume. Applicants to the Ph.D. Program must have completed at least fifteen (15) credit hours in the area of research at the graduate level. These credit hours are required of all applicants to the Ph.D. Program and must be taken in addition to any prerequisite courses specified from the MSW Program. The grade point average (GPA) for all courses completed at the graduate level must be at least 3.5 with no grade lower than B. A TOEFL score of at least 550 (paper-based) or 213 (computer-based) for applicants for which English is a second language. All MSW level course requirements must be completed within a two-year period.
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Special Students may be required to supplement their original application materials prior to being reviewed for possible admission to the Ph.D. Program. No individual classified as a Special Student shall be accepted into the Ph.D. Program until all additional requirements have been successfully completed and the Ph.D. Committee has subsequently approved the application. Successful completion of the additional requirements alone does not guarantee admission to the Ph.D. Program. External Minor Courses All students completing a Ph.D. degree in the School of Social Work are required to complete an External Minor consisting of at least twelve (12) credit hours in a school or department other than social work. The External Minor is intended to provide students with both an interdisciplinary perspective and a specialized focus for their research. It is intended to broaden and enrich the students locus of inquiry. External Minors are individually designed in consultation with the students academic advisor and in accordance with the policies and procedures established by the particular school as approved by the Indiana University Graduate School. Courses included as part of the External Minor must meet the following criteria: 1. The course must be graduate level and offered as part of an approved External Minor program offered at Indiana University. 2. The student's external minor academic advisor must approve all courses comprising the External minor and confirm the rationale for the courses selected. 3. Courses included as part of the External Minor cannot be similar to courses offered in the School of Social Work. 4. Courses that are part of the requirements of another degree can be used to meet the requirements of the External Minor. 5. Students must attain at least the minimum grades prescribed by the school or department offering the External Minor. 6. Students should submit a written external minor proposal signed by the external minor adviser to the Ph.D. Program Director.

Ph.D. Minor in Social Work Doctoral students wishing to pursue an external minor in social work should contact the Director of the Ph.D. Program who will discuss the requirements and secure an advisor from among the doctoral faculty in the School of Social Work. The minor in social work requires the completion of at least 12 credit hours. Minimal acceptable grades are determined by policies established by the students major department or school. The choice of courses comprising the minor must be made in consultation with the Ph.D. Program Director and have the approval of the students identified faculty advisor. The faculty advisor will serve as the representative of the School of Social Work in all examinations and other requirements of the students Ph.D. Program that pertain to the minor, including certification that the student has met the requirements of the minor. A written qualifying examination is not required by the School of Social Work, but will be administered at the request of the major department. Students must complete either S-730 or S-740 and at least one additional course from among the 700 level courses listed below. Remaining course requirements may be taken from among the schools 500 and 600 level courses with the approval of the Director of the MSW Program and the course instructor. S-710 S-712 S-720 S-726 S-727 S-724 S-730 S-740 S-790 Social Work Theories of Human and Social Behavior International Social Development in a Global Context Philosophy of Science and Social Work Advanced Social Work Research: Qualitative Methods Advanced Social Work Research: Quantitative Methods Theory, Practice, and Assessment of Social Work Teaching Pro-seminar on Social Work Policy Social Work Practice: Theory and Research Special Topics in Social Work Practice, Theory and Research
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500 and 600 Level Courses S501 Professional Social Work at the Masters Level: An Immersion (3 credits) This foundation course provides an overview of social work, including the definition, scope, history, ethics and values of the profession. This course will provide basic orientation to the available resources and expectations of graduate education within the framework of the adult learner model. Students will develop basic communication, self-assessment, and reflection skills necessary for success in the M.S.W. program. Students will have an opportunity to survey various fields of practice and will begin to identify personal learning goals for their M.S.W. education as well as develop a commitment to lifelong learning as a part of professional practice. S503 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I (3 credits) This course provides content on the reciprocal relationships between human behavior and social environments. It includes empirically based theories and knowledge that focus on the interactions between and within diverse populations of individuals, groups, families, organizations, communities, societal institutions, and global systems. Knowledge of biological, psychological, sociological, cultural, and spiritual development across the lifespan is included. Students learn to analyze critically micro and macro theories and explore ways in which theories can be used to structure professional activities. Concepts such as person-in-environment are used to examine the ways in which social systems promote or deter human well-being and social and economic justice. S513 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3 credits) (variable title) This course builds upon S503 and focuses on developing further knowledge of human behavior theories and their application to practice. Students will link course content to the concentration that the student has selected.

S663 Leveraging Organizations, Communities, and Political Systems (3 credits) This course focuses on the knowledge and skills essential for understanding, analyzing, and application in organizations, communities, and political arenas. Such knowledge and skills include, but are not limited to: organizational theories, structures, and processes; examination and application of rural, urban and virtual community models, themes and practices; and understanding and involvement in political, social action, and social change interventions and empowerment practices. S665 Designing Transformational Programs (3 credits) This course focuses on alternative, transformational models of strategic, community, and program planning. Featured development models center on collaboration, cultural competence, empowerment, and social justice. The course will address advanced grant writing, identification of funding and other resources, and philanthropic trends within a variety of social service delivery systems. It will move beyond a focus on the technology of program development, to examine planning as a vehicle for designing organizational, community, and social change. S682 Assessment in Mental Health and Addictions (3 credits) Recognizing the social, political, legal, and ethical implications of assessment, students enrolled in this course critically examine various conceptual frameworks and apply bio-psychosocial and strengths perspectives to understand its multidimensional aspects. Students learn to conduct sophisticated mental status and lethality risk interviews, engage in strengths and assets discovery, and apply the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association and other classification schemes in formulating assessment hypotheses. They gain an understanding of the application of several relevant assessment instruments and learn to evaluate their relevance for service to at-risk populations, including persons affected by mental health and addictions issues. Students learn to collaborate with a diverse range of consumers and other professionals in developing meaningful assessments upon which to plan goals, intervention strategies, and means for evaluation.
***It is the students responsibility to make sure that any courses taken in the School of Social Work are compatible with degree requirements as specified by the school in which the student is pursuing a degree.

Ph.D. Course Descriptions


S710 Social Work Theories of Human and Social Behavior (3 credits) This seminar focuses on the converging forces that have shaped the development, dissemination, and utilization of the human behavior knowledge base of social work. It specifically examines the social and behavioral science theory and research that provide the foundation for social work practice across a variety of system levels. International Social Development in a Global Context (3 credits) This course is an advanced seminar for students interested in developing an in-depth understanding of complex social problems in a global world. Students will have the opportunity to learn theories of development; critically analyze international agreements; and to explore and appropriately use social development models. Intermediate Statistics for Social Work (3 credits) Students will learn selected parametric and nonparametric statistics to examine research problems. Included in the learning process are hand computations of statistics, development of skills in using a comprehensive computer statistics package, and selection of statistical techniques based on levels of measurement and analyses of the assumptions of statistics. Philosophy of Science and Social Work (3 credits) This course examines the nature and sources of social work knowledge and considers a range of epistemological issues involved in the selection, development, evaluation and use of knowledge for social work. Preparing to Publish: Seminar in Advanced Scholarship Skills (3 credits) This course prepares doctoral students for academic scholarship. Topics include expectations and standards for scholarly discourse, critical and analytic thinking skills, logical argument, scholarly writing for publication, and development of a research agenda. Web-based peer and instructor review of successive drafts of writing assignments culminate in a synthesized review of literature. Theory, Practice and Assessment of Social Work Teaching (3 credits) This course prepares doctoral students to effectively and competently teach social work courses. Content includes teaching philosophies; curriculum and syllabus development; teaching methods; technology related to teaching; assessment, testing, evaluation of students; and research related to teaching. Students will learn accreditation standards for bachelors and masters social work education. Course goals will be accomplished using readings, written assignments, guest speakers, demonstrations of teaching, and class discussion. Advanced Social Work Research: Qualitative Methods (3 credits) This advanced research methods seminar is designed around an epistemological paradigm that combines both quantitative and qualitative methods of knowledge building. It explores the methodological similarities and differences between the logical positivist and grounded theory perspectives as they relate to practice focused research and requires students to develop and justify a viable research proposal. Advanced Social Work Research: Quantitative Methods (3 credits) P: S720 and Foundation Statistics Course. This advanced quantitative research methods course prepares students with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively engage in independent research, including: literature review, theory development, hypothesis testing, research design, data analysis and report writing. It includes related computer applications and use of online data sources. Advanced Statistics for Social Work (3 credits) Students in this course learn how to evaluate statistical assumptions and select, compute, and substantively interpret a variety of multivariate statistics using SPSS analysis of actual social work research data. Online resources WEB-based material and model applications of the statistics support students learning. Prerequisite: S718 or Foundation Statistics.

S712

S718

S720

S721

S724

S726

S727

S728

S725

Social Work Research Internship (6 credits) P: S720, S726 or S727, Foundation Statistics course, and at least one of the following: S710, S730, or S740. This supervised field internship provides practical experience in conducting research relevant to social work practice. Students participate in a new or ongoing, faculty supervised research project involving the design and implementation of a study, including the collection and analysis of data, and the development of appropriate research reports. May be registered for up to three times. Pro-Seminar on Social Work Policy Analysis (3 credits) This seminar focuses on the development and application of analytical tools necessary to critically examine and evaluate social policy theory and research germane to social work, including the values and ideologies that under grid social problem construction, social policy creation, and social program design. Specific attention is devoted to the application of these schemata for diverse populations. Social Work Practice: Theory and Research (3 credits) This seminar provides scholars with opportunities to develop and refine the knowledge, skill, and judgment necessary for competent analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of various aspects of social work practice. Students conduct a systematic review and evaluation of the practice effectiveness of social services to a distinct at-risk population affected by a contemporary social problem. Special Topics: Independent Study. (Var: 1-3 credits) P: Approval by appropriate instructor. This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in focused study of a substantive area of social work practice directly related to the students identified area of theoretical and research interest. It is completed with the approval and under the guidance of a member of the Ph.D faculty. Integrative Seminar I (1.5 credits) This course acquaints incoming doctoral students with campus resources for graduate students and with the expectations for doctoral education, including the policies, procedures, and academic standards of the Graduate School and of the School of Social Work. Students register for this seminar in their first semester. Integrative Seminar II (1.5 credits) This course is intended to support PhD students as they finish up doctoral coursework and prepare for their qualifying paper, dissertation, and subsequent professional careers. Students register for this seminar in their last semester of coursework. Dissertation Research (12 credits) Students must be continually registered for dissertation credits every Fall and Spring semester once they are admitted to candidacy up to a total of 12 credits of S800. Students do not need to register for dissertation credits in the summer unless they graduate in the summer. You are considered graduated when you deposit your final bound dissertation with the Graduate School. Special Topics in Social Work Advanced Research Students who have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. except the dissertation are eligible to enroll in G901 for a flat fee of $100 per semester for 6 credit hours, limited to a total of 6 semesters.

S730

S740

S790

S791

S792

S800

S805 G901

In addition to the required courses, all students must complete a minimum of 12 credit hours outside the School of Social Work related to their area of specialization. All students enroll for 6 elective credits that may be taken within or outside the School of Social Work with the approval of the students advisory committee.

Ph.D. Program Committee


All policies and procedures related to the Ph.D. Program are developed and reviewed periodically by the Ph.D. Program Committee. The committee meets regularly throughout the academic year and is responsible for the review and approval of all applicants to the Ph.D. program and Pre-Doc option. The committee is comprised of approximately eight to ten faculty members and up to two voting student representatives. The faculty chair of the
9

committee is elected by and from the members of the committee on a biannual basis. All meetings are open to faculty and pre-doc and doctoral students.

IUSSW Members of the Indiana University Graduate Faculty


All tenure track faculty members are automatically members of the Indiana University Graduate Faculty. In order to serve as the Chair of Qualifying Examination and Doctoral Dissertation Committees, faculty must go through an approval process to receive endorsement to chair. To identify members of the Graduate Faculty from other departments, students may consult the Graduate School website at http://www.graduate.indiana.edu/faculty-resources.php

Social Work faculty who are members of the Graduate Faculty are listed on pages 10-13. Retired faculty members can also serve on Dissertation Committee, though not as the Chair.

10

IUSSW Graduate Faculty Information and Fields of Interest


FACULTY MEMBER
*Adamek, Margaret Professor *Barton, Bill Professor Beathea, Joann Assistant Professor Bennett, Bob Associate Professor *Black, Carolyn Associate Professor Blackman, Lorraine Associate Professor Boys, Stephanie Assistant Professor Byers, Kathy Associate Professor Caucci, Frank Associate Professor

OFFICE NUMBERS
317-274-6730 IUPUI ES 4138H 317-274-6711 IUPUI ES 4118 574-520-4880 IUSB NS 420 317-274-6731 IUPUI ES 4153 317-278-1767 IUPUI ES 4123 317-274-6713 IUPUI ES 4121 317-274-0905 IUPUI ES 4157 812-855-4427 IUB 1127 Atwater 219-981-4286 IUN Dunes 3172 317-570-8048 IUPUI 812-941-2210 IUS AVC Acad.Affairs 219-981-5689 IUN Dunes 3183

E-MAIL ADDRESS
madamek@iupui.edu

FIELDS OF INTEREST
Mental health and aging, elder suicide, late-life depression in long term care

wbarton@iupui.edu

Juvenile justice, youth development, program evaluation, evaluation methods, policy implementation African American women, adolescent female issues, couples & families, intrapsychic humanism, group work, cultural diversity Mental health practice, adolescent sex offenders & their families, group work, children and adolescents Domestic violence, survivors of sexual assault, client-centered practice & research

cbeathea@iusb.edu

rbennett1@iupui.edu

cablack@iupui.edu

lblackma@iupui.edu

sboys@iupui.edu

Developing empirically-based, preventive practice models in family life education, reconnecting social work practice to its historical roots in prevention & public health. Promoting ethnic & gender sensitive practice with couples and families. Legal aspects of social work

kvbyers@indiana.edu

Welfare reform, social welfare policy analysis, teaching strategies in the policy sequence, community and organizational practice, qualitative research methods narrative therapy; object relations; LGBT identity, with particular emphasis on transgender identity shifts through the lifespan; HIV/AIDS, particularly psychosocial etiologies; trauma and resilience studies, with a focus on the "madres de los desaparecidos" teaching and learning, qualitative research, womens issues, and issues related to aging, and resiliency Public policy, socioeconomics, & comparative development strategy; aging, mental health, & community care; professional education, administration, & leadership; research methodology, measurement, & statistical analysis HIV prevention with sexual minorities, especially youth, residential treatment of children and youth, homeless and runaway adolescents, mental health.

fcaucci@iun.edu

Chang, Valerie Professor Emeritus *Chen, Sheying Professor Cotten, Christopher Assistant Professor

vchang@iupui.edu Chen30@ius.edu

cottenc@iun.edu

11

FACULTY MEMBER
*Cournoyer, Barry Professor Crouch, Mark Associate Professor *Daley, James Associate Professor *Davis, Chuck Professor Duggan, Lynn Associate Professor *Folaron, Gail Professor Gentle-Genitty, Carolyn Assistant Professor

OFFICE NUMBERS
317-274-6708 IUPUI ES 4119 260-481-6616 IPFW KT G28 317-278-0212 IUPUI ES 4115 317-278-1309 IUPUI UN 507 812-855-1560 IUB Poplars 635 317-274-6792 IUPUI ES 4122 317-274-3965 IUPUI ES 4145 812-855-4427 IUB 1127 Atwater 219-981-4272 IUN
Lindenwood Hall 231

E-MAIL ADDRESS
bcourno@iupui.edu

FIELDS OF INTEREST
Mental health, clinical social work, educational assessment, social work skills development

crouch@ipfw.edu

Community-based labor market organizing, minority-status unionism, collective bargaining as a mechanism to deal with family medical issues, and worker disability Families navigating high stress events (illness, prison, military), military social work, family assessment, families and cancer Effects of globalization and technological change on workers

jgdaley@iupui.edu

chdavis@iupui.edu

lduggan@indiana.edu

International comparisons of womens economic position, German unions and family policy, low wage work, S. hemisphere economic development Child welfare, foster care, emancipating youth, qualitative research methods

gfolaron@iupui.edu

cgentleg@iupui.edu

*Hostetter, Carol Associate Professor Iverson, M. Thandabantu Assistant Professor Khaja, Khadija Assistant Professor *Kim, Hea-Won Associate Professor *Lay, Kathy Associate Professor Luca Sugawara, Carmen Assistant Professor

chostett@indiana.edu

Student engagement middle thru college -- millennial and international millennial students, teaching excellence, chronic truancy in middle schools, social bonding and development, youth development, juvenile delinquency, juvenile re-entry, case management, mentoring, social work practice Child welfare, evaluation of online courses, the scholarship of teaching and learning, qualitative and quantitative research methods Diversity, human rights, class, gender and work

tiverson@iun.edu

317-278-8609 IUPUI ES 4155 317-278-0332 IUPUI ES 4111 317-278-8607 IUPUI ES 4107 317-274-6729 IUPUI ES 4151

kkhaja@iupui.edu

Social welfare needs of Muslim communities, global health care needs of culturally diverse women, international research, qualitative ethnographic research Mental health, psychosocial rehabilitation for persons with severe mental illness, stress and coping processes of families of persons with disabilities, including cross-cultural issues, family psychoeducation Substance abuse intervention and treatment with individuals and families, theory for practice and specific interest in feminist theory for practice, research and teaching Community reconstruction and parental involvement, civil society strengthening, and civil society evaluation 12

heakim@iupui.edu

kalay@iupui.edu

clucasug@iupui.edu

FACULTY MEMBER
*Lynch, Darlene Professor *Majewski, Ginny Professor *McGuire, Lisa Associate Professor Mello, William Assistant Professor Mishler, Paul Associate Professor *Needleman, Ruth Professor

OFFICE NUMBERS
219-980-7111 IUN 3400 Broadway 317-274-8464 IUPUI ES 4138G 317-274-6736 IUPUI ES 4152 765-455-9388 IU-Kokomo KE344 574-520-4469 IUSB Riverside Hall 128 219-980-6835 IUN Lindenwood Hall, Rm. 318 574-520-4464 IUSB NS 416 574-520-4227 IUSB Riverside Hall 125 317-278-8610 IUPUI ES 4156 317-274-8362 IUPUI ES 4138 317-278-0388 IUPUI ES 4109 317-274-6725 IUPUI ES 4138K 574-520-4881 IUSB NS 424

E-MAIL ADDRESS
darlynch@iun.edu

FIELDS OF INTEREST
Use of technology in direct practice, policy issues related to technology, GLBT youth development, social work practice with lesbians Service learning, strategic planning, rural social work, American Indian issues, hunger and food insecurity Child welfare, housing and homelessness, welfare reform, qualitative research methods

vmajewsk@iupui.edu

lmcguir@iupui.edu

wmello@iuk.edu

pmishler@iusb.edu

Issues in social policy and politics, American political development, US social history, social and labor movements in the US and Latin America (particularly Brazil), civil society organization. Labor history, history of social justice movements, labor education

rneedle@iun.edu

Leadership development; adult popular pedagogy; race, class & gender; African American history; working women; women in labor; globalization; labors globalization approaches; comparative labor movements: Latin America Substance abuse, child mental health

*Newcomb, Paul Associate Professor Nicholson, Michael, J.D. Associate Professor *Ouellette, Philip Associate Professor *Patchner, Michael Dean and Professor *Pike, Cathy Professor *Queiro-Tajalli, Irene Professor Ramsey, Marilynne Assistant Professor

pnewcomb@iusb.edu

mibnicho@iusb.edu

pouellet@iupui.edu

patchner@iupui.edu

Pension and retirement benefits and federal benefits law; the National Labor Relations Act and federal labor law; federal bankruptcy law and its impact on unions, workers and retirees; Catholic social doctrine regarding unions and workers Trauma survivors of natural disasters, eco-systemic family therapy & training, oppositional teens and families, instructional technology & computer assisted learning, family mediation & conflict resolution, group behavior & dynamics Aging and health care, social work education, program evaluation

ckpike@iupui.edu

Instrument development and psychometric testing, measurement of social work educational outcomes, values and ethics, rapid assessment instrument dev. to measure client progress Community practice, social movements, diversity, educational assessment, gerontology; international social work, Latino issues, online teaching Empowerment and assessment of student outcomes

itka100@iupui.edu

mjramsey@iusb.edu

13

FACULTY MEMBER
Roberts, Theresa Associate Professor *Sullivan, Pat Professor Thigpen, Jeffry Assistant Professor Thomas, Mark Assistant Professor Travis, Denise Assistant Professor Varga, Joseph Assistant Professor *Vernon, Bob Professor Walker, Marquita Assistant Professor *Westhuis, David Associate Professor Williamson Sullenberger, Sabrina Associate Professor

OFFICE NUMBERS
317-274-6726 IUPUI ES 4147 317-274-6728 IUPUI ES 4117 317-274-8453 IUPUI ES 4149 219-981-5688 IUN Dunes 3183 219-981-5618 IUNW Dunes 3180 812-855-9085 IUB Poplars 631 317-274-6717 IUPUI ES 4113 317-278-2066 IUPUI ES 4159 317-278-8611 IUPUI ES 4157 812-855-4427 IUB Atwater 1127

E-MAIL ADDRESS
troberts@iupui.edu

FIELDS OF INTEREST
African-centered social work paradigms, cultural competency and diversity, leadership and macro practice, qualitative research, health disparities, transformational planning Mental health, strengths perspective, case management public policy

wpsulliv@iupui.edu

jthigpen@iupui.edu

Childhood sexual behavior, sexual development, sexual health, and African-American sexuality Addictions, domestic violence, and aging (e.g., assisted living)

mdt@iun.edu

dtravis@iun.edu

HIV/AIDS research in communities of color, child welfare and ASFA, and mental health and addictions Labor geography, urban social movements, working class history, sociology of work and space Technology policy in social work, digital divide issues, agency technology development, virtual worlds, Social work education, curriculum design, accreditation Social stratification, dislocated workers, income inequity, and poverty as they pertain to workers and workers' education Substance abuse treatment and prevention, family issues, program evaluation, and rapid assessment instrument development and validation, military family research Scope and efficacy of faith-based social services, intervention research with an emphasis on anti-poverty initiatives, welfare reform, child welfare

jjvarga@iupui.edu

rvernon@iupui.edu

marqwalk@iupui.edu

dwesthui@iupui.edu

sabawill@iupui.edu

*Members of the Graduate Faculty with endorsement to chair dissertation committees

14

Academic Policies
The Indiana University Graduate School has established formal criteria and procedures for admission of students to the Ph.D. Program and PreDoc Option in the School of Social Work. The Director of the Ph.D. Program oversees the implementation of the admissions policies and procedures for the School of Social Work as determined by members of the University Graduate School faculty. These members set the general requirements for degrees, pass upon the specific requirements of programs, approve courses for graduate credit, and certify candidates for degrees. The Graduate Council, Dean, and administrative staff execute the previously mentioned functions. More specifically, University Graduate School faculty serve on advisory and research committees for doctoral students, direct doctoral dissertations, and elect members of the Graduate Council. All requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in social work are consistent with the policies established by the Indiana University Graduate School. Please refer to the most recent edition of the Indiana University Graduate School Bulletin for a more detailed explanation of admission requirements--http://www.indiana.edu/~bulletin/iu/grad/2008-2009/ Academic and Scholarly Guidelines Students admitted to the PreDoc or Ph.D. Program at Indiana University School of Social Work have already demonstrated in their undergraduate or other graduate studies their capacity for superior academic work. Most Ph.D. and PreDoc students are, therefore, very familiar and comfortable with high academic and scholarly standards. Obviously, students are expected to attend classes regularly and meet all expectations associated with research internships and other assistantship requirements. Regular attendance is viewed as the personal and professional responsibility of each student. Active participation in course activities is the expected norm. In participating, it is expected that students reflect interest in and respect for their colleagues in a manner that is congruent with the values, ethics, and skills of the profession. Students are expected to prepare written assignments in a scholarly and professional manner. Submissions should be typewritten in double-space format and carefully edited for spelling and grammar. All direct quotations, paraphrases, empirical research findings, and other restatements of the research, scholarship, or creative work of others must be appropriately annotated using the standard bibliographic citation methods set forth in the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The APA Manual serves as the guide for style and format of all papers submitted in the Ph.D. Program. Competent and effective social work practice requires well-developed and refined communication skills, including the use of the written word. Writing well helps social workers communicate information accurately and concisely. For this reason, formal writing assignments in social work courses will be evaluated on both the quality of presentation as well as the quality of the scholarly content.

Academic Student Appointees


Students appointed to assistantships are considered Student Academic Appointees. The Handbook for Student Academic Appointees can be accessed online at: http://www.indiana.edu/~vpfaa/download/SAA_Handbook_2008.pdf

Advising and Mentoring


An important aspect of doctoral education is the availability of a viable advising system. At Indiana University, all Ph.D. students select a Research Advisory Committee by the end of the first year of their doctoral studies. The committee is comprised of three members -- two from the School of Social Work, and one from the school or department in which the student completes his or her external minor. The Director of the Ph.D. Program serves as the students initial advisor until such time that the student is able to select his/her own advisory committee ideally by the end of the first semester of studies, but no later than the end of the first year.

15

The selection of the Research Advisory Committee should be completed with great care. The members should be faculty who are knowledgeable in the students area of research. One of the two social work members of the advisory committee should be identified as a Primary Advisor. This person should be selected on the basis of a shared common research interest and the likelihood of a positive personal relationship. The primary advisor plays an important role throughout the course of the students tenure in the program, including the approval of courses taken as well as the Annual Review of Student Progress. Incoming students may be matched with a Peer Mentor who will be available to provide guidance and support as requested.

Annual Review of Student Progress


Purpose The primary purpose of the Annual Review of Student Progress is to provide a forum for the annual review of student progress toward the attainment of educational goals. It is designed to focus on the students educational development as a scholar and researcher, and as such, focuses on topics that are directly related to that end. The Annual Review is intended to provide students with constructive feedback concerning their overall performance in the Ph.D. or PreDoc programs. As a process, it provides a unique opportunity for faculty to discuss issues that transcend individual courses and/or program requirements, including factors that may be inhibiting and/or facilitating the students progress. In essence, the process is intended to reflect the kind of collegial review that characterizes peer evaluation among scholars in the academic community. The review process is comprised of two components: 1) a meeting of program faculty at which the progress of each Ph.D. and PreDoc student is discussed and specific recommendations are proposed; and 2) a meeting of the student and his/her primary academic advisor at which the information and recommendations generated at the faculty review meeting are discussed with the student. Role of the Student: The student is expected to take an active role in the review process. This includes a written self-assessment that addresses, but is not necessarily limited to the following topics: The students critical assessment of self as an emerging scholar, particularly with respect to the development of the kinds of critical thinking skills necessary to engage in independent research and scholarship. The identification of the students personal program goals, as well as the overarching themes that give direction and meaning to those goals. The students perceptions of his/her progress toward the identified goals, including how those goals are being pursued programmatically (that is, in relation to specific educational and professional experiences). Identification of the students emerging substantive areas of research and scholarship as reflected in the contents of the students Academic/Professional Portfolio. A discussion of any obstacle that may be inhibiting the students progress toward her/his identified goals. The self-assessment should culminate in a statement that sets forth a specific educational plan for the following academic year. The plan should identify the specific courses and educational experiences that are to be pursued as well as any difficulties that may be anticipated in the realization of that plan. The student is responsible for providing his/her primary advisor copies of the annual Self-Assessment no later than May 1st of each academic year. Role of the Primary Advisor: It is the responsibility of the primary advisor to schedule a meeting with the student to discuss the findings and recommendations generated at the annual faculty review. The meeting should be scheduled at a time that is mutually convenient for both parties. The advisor shall prepare a written summary of the meeting with the student that includes any specific recommendations relevant to the students progress. Copies of the summary should be distributed to the student, the Director of the Ph.D. Program, the students file, and any other appropriate individuals
16

such as the students minor advisor.

Appeals/ Student Review


Policy Regarding Petition for Readmission Any student who fails to meet the requirements for continuance in the Ph.D. Program will automatically be Check Listed by the Indiana University Graduate School. Once a student has been check listed, he/she is automatically dropped from the program unless reinstated by the Dean. In order to be reinstated, the student must submit a written Petition for Readmission to the Director of the Ph.D. Program. The written petition shall address: 1. The students understanding of the reasons why check listing has occurred. 2. The students plan of action to address the issues that led to being check listed. 3. The reasons why the student believes that he/she should be granted an opportunity to continue in the Ph.D. Program on a probationary status. The petition must be initiated by the student within one week of having been notified by the Director of the Ph.D. Program that the student has been check listed. Upon receipt of the petition, the Director will conduct an initial review of the students situation and make specific recommendations regarding the students termination or continuance in the Ph.D. Program. The final decision will be that of the Dean. If the student is not satisfied with the recommendation of the Director, he/she may petition the Dean for a further review by an appointed Appeals Committee. The Appeals committee shall be composed and appointed according to the following procedures: Upon receipt of a Petition for Readmission, the Dean will appoint a committee of three full-time faculty members. The Chair will be assigned by the Dean. The student submitting the appeal may request the appointment of one of the three faculty members (and may also request the addition of a neutral student representative). The committee should act expeditiously. A. Appeal Process Within five days after the Appeals Committee has been constituted, the Chair will set a date for a hearing. After a hearing has been set, the Committee Chair shall give at least one week notification to the student, to the students advisor, and to the members of the Appeal Committee about the hearing time and place, as well as the issues which will be considered by the committee. The student will be notified via certified US Mail. All committee members and the students advisor must be present at the review hearing. B. Role of the Advisor At the hearing, the students primary advisor shall present brief background information about the student. The advisor will also secure evaluations from the other instructors in the previous semester regarding the students performance in her/his course. The advisor will present information obtained from these instructors and provide her/his assessment of the students overall performance. The advisor will also give the Appeal Committee any recommendations that might help resolve the students performance problems. C. Appeal Committee Hearing 1. The student may attend during the fact-finding part of the meeting. The student must leave prior to the committees deliberation. The student may also present information to the committee. Prior to the meeting, the student must inform the Committee Chair of intent to attend the meeting and/or speak to the committee. 2. The student may ask up to two persons who are knowledgeable about her/his performance to present information to the committee. Such persons must make brief statements and are permitted to be present in the committee meeting only to make their presentation to the committee. The Committee Chair must be informed at least 48 hours in advance about those persons who will appear on behalf of the student as well as the general nature of the information that each will present.
17

3. Other faculty members who can contribute information regarding the students performance may participate. Such faculty should be present in the committee meeting only to make her/his presentation. 4. Deliberation and Action. For this part of the meeting, only the committee members and the students advisor shall be present. The advisor will not participate in the voting. The committee shall complete the following tasks during its deliberation: a. Consideration of all the factors in the present and past performance of the student. b. Discussion of alternative plans to address the performance problem(s). c. Decision on plan to be completed by student to resolve the performance problem or decision to dismiss the student from the Ph.D. Program. The committees recommendation will be by majority vote. 5. The Appeal Committee shall prepare a written recommendation for submission to the dean which will include a statement describing the nature of the performance problem, a summary of the facts as they were presented to the committee, a description of the committees action, and the reasons supporting said action. D. Notification Within one week after the review hearing, the committees recommendation will be sent in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School. The dean may accept, reject or modify the recommendation of the committee. The dean sends her/his decision to the Associate Dean of the Indiana University Graduate School (Indianapolis Campus), the Ph.D. Program Director, the student, the students advisor, and members of the Appeal Committee. A copy of the deans decision and the committees recommendation will be sent to the student, with a copy going to the student file. E. Confidentiality All procedures related to performance review must be carried out in a manner that assures protection of the students right to privacy regarding information about her/his academic records, performance, or any of her/his personal affairs. The student has the right to review all written information that is presented to the committee. Members of the committee and other persons who appear at the hearing are expected to maintain confidentiality with regard to all aspects of the hearing. Actions of the committee are to remain confidential and are to be shared only with those persons involved with the student in an educational capacity.

18

Dissertation Proposal Guidelines


CONTENT
Title Page: Name of project, candidates name, date of defense, committee members Title, candidate name, abstract up to 350 words, dbl-spaced Recommended

Abstract: Table of Contents:

Introduction: The research problem or issue Identify the policy/practice issue. State how the topic/problem came about or was identified. The context of the problem The importance or significance of the problem How extensive is the problem? Why is this particular issue of interest? Why is research needed to address the issue? Literature review: A logically organized and integrated summary and critique of literature relevant to your topic. A statement or statements identifying gaps in the current knowledge base and/or which documents a need for the proposed study Your research question(s) and/or a statement of the study purpose Methods: The research design and the rationale for the design. What procedures will you follow in carrying out the study? Your description should be thorough enough so that your readers could replicate the study. Data collection procedures What are the major variables, concepts, or guiding questions? For quantitative studies: How will the variables be operationalized? How will you measure them?What tool or approach will you use for collecting data? Sample or Population Who (or what type of cases) will be studied? What are the criteria for inclusion and/or exclusion? What is the source of data? Reliability/Validity/ Protection vs. Researcher Bias What factors might affect the reliability and validity of your study? How do you plan to address or establish reliability and validity? What potential extraneous factors might influence your results? How do you plan to minimize their influence? Intervention If your project involves either monitoring or assessing the outcome of an intervention, describe the intervention in detail including how it was delivered and by whom. Human Subjects Review What are the human subjects review issues relevant to your study? References: In standard APA format

Appendices: Tables, graphs, letters of support, measurement instruments, etc.

19

PROCESS Committee Appointment: 1. To initiate research for the dissertation, the student chooses a professor who will agree to direct the dissertation. The Chair must be endorsed to Chair dissertation committees. 2. Once a faculty member agrees to serve as the Chair, the candidate should consult with the Chair about the composition of the committee. The candidate might also consult with their advisor and/or with the Doctoral Program Chair. Candidates may informally approach faculty members to inquire about their availability and willingness to serve on their dissertation committees. Candidates should recognize that faculty members decision to accept an appointment will likely go beyond the faculty members interest in their topic as faculty must balance many competing demands on their time. The department shall then recommend to the dean for approval a research committee composed of the chosen director, two or more additional faculty members from Social Work, and a representative of each minor. All members of a research committee must be members of the Graduate Faculty. At least half must be full members of the Graduate Faculty.

3.

4.

Development and Approval of the Proposal: 1. The dissertation chair provides primary oversight of all phases of the dissertation proposal development and approval. 2. Candidates are responsible for seeking input from individual committee members as they develop their proposal. The chair is responsible for communicating with each committee member to determine at what point each judges that the proposal is sufficiently developed to be defensible. Each committee member should have an opportunity to provide input on the proposal prior to the oral defense. The candidate should submit the final proposal to each committee member at least two weeks before the proposal hearing date. The Chair is responsible for scheduling the proposal hearing. The chair will set a time and date in cooperation with the candidate and all committee members. The Chair will then inform the PhD Program Director as soon as the proposal hearing is scheduled. The Program Director and/or Administrative Assistant will facilitate scheduling a room for the proposal hearing, ordering equipment, and announcing the proposal hearing. The format of the proposal hearing will be determined by the Chair in consultation with the candidate and other committee members. Formats for the hearing may range from a conference call to a face-to-face meeting with or without a formal presentation. The Program Director will prepare the necessary paperwork and have it sent to the Graduate School upon successful defense of the proposal. A 1-to-2 page abstract of the dissertation proposal must be prepared by the candidate for submission to the Graduate School.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10. In the event that a committee member needs to be replaced, the Chair will consult with the candidate and with the PhD Program Director about appointing a replacement. Approved by the PhD Committee, 4/9/04
20

Dissertation Final Defense Guidelines


In concert with the University Policy on procedures for the dissertation defense, the IUSSW doctoral program supports a policy characterized by openness, respect, and academic integrity. Recognizing the value of parameters to facilitate such principles, the following guidelines are suggested: 1. Once the dissertation is completed, the Ph.D. candidate should submit an unbound copy to each committee member, allowing a sufficient amount of time for it to be read minimum of 3 to 4 weeks. Likewise, faculty members should review the dissertation in a timely manner. 2. The committee chair will communicate directly (either orally or in writing) with each committee member in deciding whether the dissertation is ready for defense. 3. Thirty days (30) prior to the scheduled defense, the candidate must submit a one-page announcement of the final hearing to the Graduate School. The announcement must contain an informative, 150 word (or more) summary of the dissertation including a brief statement of the principal results and conclusions. The announcement must be signed by the committee chair. 4. To allow for arrangements to be made for appropriate space for the defense, the Ph.D. candidate will inform his/her chair in advance regarding the number and nature of the guests expected to attend. Ideally, this should be done by the time the announcement identifying the date and location of the defense goes to the Graduate School. The candidate should also inform his/her chair about any equipment needs. 5. Notification of the final Oral Defense will be given to the members of the IUSSW community by the chair at least one week before the date of the defense. The announcement will include the title and author of the dissertation, the date and location of the defense and the names of the committee members. 6. For the most part, attendance at the defense is geared toward members of the academic community. It is requested that faculty members notify the chair if they plan to attend so that space can be arranged. According to University policy, graduate students may attend and would normally act as observers, not participants. 7. The oral defense should be scheduled at a day and time that is conducive to attendance by members of the academic Community. Normally, a one and a half two hour time block will be sufficient.

Grading
The grading scale for the IU Graduate School differs from the grading scale for undergraduates. A grade of C is failing by Graduate School standards, and to earn a degree from the Graduate School, students must have at least a 3.0 GPA. Most courses receive a letter grade. Instructors may elect to use a plus/minus system along with letter grades. Some courses (e.g., S725, S790, G901) are approved for pass/fail grades of S (Satisfactory) or F (Fail). Courses which span more than one semester such as the Research Internship (S725), Independent Study (S790), and dissertation credits (S800) are approved for deferred grades (R). An R grade will be replaced with an S or F once the course requirements are met. Grades of Incomplete Instructors at Indiana University School of Social Work follow closely the University policy regarding the assignment of grades of Incomplete (I). An Incomplete maybe assigned by an instructor when unexpected circumstances, such as an illness, injury, or a family emergency prevent a student from finishing all the work required for the course. The grade of Incomplete may be given only when more than half of the course work has already been completed and the quality of the students performance in the course is at a passing level. Whenever an Incomplete grade is assigned, the instructor should complete a "Record of Incomplete and Plan for Completion of Course Requirements" form (see Appendix) in order to ensure that a sound educational plan and time frame for completion of the course requirements has been established. Students in the School of Social Work are expected to complete outstanding course work expeditiously, since some courses serve as prerequisites for others. Any Incomplete grades that have not been removed from a students official university transcript within one calendar year of the time they were recorded are automatically converted to a grade of F.
21

Human Subjects Review


A very rigorous set of procedures has been established by Indiana University in order to comply with the Federal regulations dealing with the use of human subjects involved in research. All research projects involving human subjects, conducted by faculty and/or students whether or not supported by extramural funds, must be reviewed and approved by a properly constituted and authorized committee, the Institutional Review Board (IRB). Research and Sponsored Programs provide the administrative support services for the Indianapolis IRB. This office should be consulted for all procedures related to the involvement of humans in research. Research involving human subjects may not be initiated without first following the prescribed procedures. No human research is automatically exempt from these procedures. Appropriate forms can be obtained at: http://www.iupui.edu/~resgrad/spon/download2.htm All investigators at IUPUI, including doctoral students, must pass a certification test demonstrating basic knowledge of research with human subjects. Information about the Protection of Human Subjects in Research Certification and online test are available at: http://www.iupui.edu/%7Eresgrad/Human%20Subjects/human-menu.htm

Independent Study
In order to substitute an independent study for a social work elective course, a student must receive formal approval of the school prior to enrollment in the independent study. For this purpose, the student must complete the Independent Study Proposal Form and submit it to his/her faculty advisor for preliminary approval. The student may then request a member of the faculty of the School of Social Work to serve on a voluntary basis as instructor for the independent study. The primary basis for requesting a particular faculty member should be his/her interest or expertise n the topic of the student's proposed study. It should be noted that it is the responsibility of the student to obtain an agreement for instruction of his/her independent study. A signed and completed copy of the Independent Study Proposal Form must be submitted to the Office of the Program Director for final approval. An independent study course may be approved as a social work elective only if: (a) the general purpose of the independent study is to enable the student to engage in a self-directed study of a problem/issue related to the School's curriculum, (b) the topic and content of the independent study is not repetitive of content contained in any required courses or available electives in the MSW program, (c) the level and amount of work required is comparable to the number of graduate credits to be earned (i.e., as a general guideline three clock hours of work per week are generally needed for each credit earned), and (d) the student must have obtained an agreement from a member of the faculty for instruction of the independent study. The program director's approval must be obtained before registration for independent study will be permitted. Research projects requiring human subjects review must also have IRB approval prior to registration. To be completed by the student: Please respond to the following questions in a separate document and attach it to the Independent Study Form. 1. Describe the issue or problem you propose to study. 2. Specify the objectives to be accomplished or questions to be answered. 3. Describe the methodology that will be used to conduct the study. 4. Describe the expected end product of this independent effort.

Nondiscrimination, Social Work Policy on


Based on the tradition of the social work profession, and consistent with Indiana Universitys Equal Opportunity Policy, the Indiana University School of Social Work affirms and conducts all aspects of its teaching, scholarship, and service activities without discrimination on the basis of race, color, gender, socioeconomic status, marital status, national or ethnic origin, age, religion/creed, disability, political or sexual orientation. The School of Social Work has a strong commitment to diversity and nondiscrimination. Indeed, diversity is celebrated as a strength. This perspective is demonstrated by the composition of its faculty and student body,
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curriculum content, recruitment and retention activities, an active Diversity Committee, participation in University committees dealing with oppressed populations, numerous service activities including advocacy on behalf of the disadvantaged, selection of field practicum sites, and school policies related to promotion and tenure of its faculty.

Qualifying Exam Guidelines


I. INTRODUCTION The qualification experience is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to demonstrate that she/he has mastered the body of knowledge and skills necessary to engage in independent research and knowledge development. It occurs at the point in the students doctoral studies at which all required coursework has been successfully completed. Successful completion of the qualification process is a prerequisite for the submission of the Ph.D. Dissertation Prospectus and is a necessary condition for admission to Doctoral Candidacy. The qualification experience is essentially a juried process. It provides each student with an opportunity to profess to his/her colleagues in a scholarly format that demonstrates the students ability to apply, in an integrative fashion, knowledge from practice, policy, human behavior and research as well as the students external minor to problems or issues of significance to social work. It is intended to be educational in nature, and as such, attempts to establish a viable nexus between the students past educational and professional experiences and her/his future knowledge building ventures. The Indiana University Graduate Council determines the general policies governing the conduct of graduate study for all PhD programs. Among the requirements established by the Graduate Council is the successful completion of a Qualification Examination. According to University policy: The qualification examination shall cover the major subjects and may, at the discretion of the major department(s) or the interdepartmental committee, cover the minor subject as well. This examination, given at such time and in such manner, as the major department shall determine, shall be written, although additional oral examinations may be required. Normally, the qualification examination is taken after the student has completed all course work for the Ph.D. All such work offered in partial fulfillment of degree requirements must either have been completed within seven consecutive calendar years of passing of the qualification examination or be revalidated according to procedures outlined in the Graduate School Bulletin. Students who fail the qualification examination are normally allowed to retake it only once. The qualification examination must be passed at least eight months before the date the degree is awarded. ( Indiana University Graduate School Bulletin) In accordance with Graduate School policies, the Ph.D. in Social Work at Indiana University requires successful completion of a comprehensive/qualification process as a condition for formal acceptance of a student as a candidate for the doctoral degree. The following guidelines have been developed to help clarify the expectations and process for the qualifying exam. A. Purpose and Rationale: The comprehensive/qualification process for students enrolled in the Indiana University School of Social Work PhD Program is intended to serve both a summative as well as a foundational purpose. It is summative in the sense that it provides students with an opportunity to synthesize or pull together in a comprehensive manner the knowledge, values and skills that have been accrued as a result of their formal doctoral studies. Within this context, it is intended to be extensive and inclusive of content from both the social work and external minor areas of the students doctoral studies. It is foundational in the sense that it also provides the student with an opportunity to analyze in a very focused way the meaning and relevance of that body of knowledge, values, and skills in terms of an emerging research agenda. Within this more formative context, the qualifying process is intended to be intensive and specific with respect to the students knowledge building interests.
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The comprehensive/qualification process is tied directly to the contents of the students educational experience. It is intended to provide tangible documentation that the student has indeed attained the requisite knowledge and demonstrated the expected competencies as prescribed by the program. It is designed to address issues that are related to all aspects of the Ph.D. Program, including, but not limited to, requirements established by the School of Social Work; the external minor; and the students research internship. The student is required to prepare a written scholarly product of publishable quality that: (1) summarizes and synthesizes their doctoral educational experiences, and (2) lays the foundation for a developing research agenda related to an identified area of social work practice. B. Substantive Areas to be Addressed: Within the context of these two major organizing foci (i.e., summative and foundational), the written document is expected to demonstrate the students capacity to critically analyze, synthesize, apply, and evaluate the contents of her/his educational experience in relation to the following substantive areas: 1. A summary synthesis of the various components of the students educational experience in relation to a specific area or issue of central importance to social work. This component must make clear how the completion of an external minor has helped inform the students conception of the identified issues and the theoretical and empirical questions that need to be addressed. 2. A critical discussion of the underlying epistemological issues and their relationship to the development of theory and research related to the students specified area of social work interest. This should include an analysis of the prevailing paradigms that have shaped the debate in relation to the students specified area of social work interest. 3. An analysis of the identified area of social work interest in terms of its implications for the development of theory and research related to social work practice, policy and human behavior. This component must include content specifically related to issues of ethics, diversity and oppressed populations. 4. The articulation of a general research agenda that reflects the students emerging area of theoretical and research expertise. This component should circumscribe the parameters of the students research interests as well as demonstrate how the pursuit of those interests will contribute to the body of social work knowledge. The formulation of the research agenda must include a critical review of the relevant literature, a discussion of its importance and relevance to social work, and a conceptualization of the theoretical issues at stake. II. FORMAT The comprehensive/qualification process culminates in a written substantive paper of publishable quality (approximately 40-60 pages in length). The style and format for the presentation should follow the guidelines established in the most recent edition of The American Psychological Association Manual. Following the initial review of the paper, there is an oral component in which the faculty reviewers meet with the student to clarify and further develop ideas presented in the paper. Copies of written comprehensive/qualification materials that have been approved in the past are available for review by students in the Doctoral Lounge. III. PROCEDURES The following procedures shall govern the scheduling and implementation of the comprehensive/ qualification process: 1. Students must complete the written component of the comprehensive/ qualification process within one year following completion of the required courses. For example, if the required courses are completed at the end of the spring semester, the written paper must be submitted by the end of the spring semester the following year. The paper may be submitted any time during that period. Exceptions to this time frame should be requested in writing to the PhD Program Director. 2. Students submit their written comprehensive/qualification materials to a faculty review panel appointed by the Dean, in consultation with the Program Director and the students primary advisor. 3. The panel will consist of three members, two from among the graduate faculty in the School of Social Work and one from the faculty of the school or department in which the student completed her/his external minor. 4. Ideally, at least one of the panel members must have expertise in the students substantive area.
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5. The student may nominate up to five faculty members to serve as possible members of the review panel. 6. The panel is responsible for (a) evaluating the written materials; (b) conducting the oral component of the process; and (c) providing written feedback to the student. 7. Students are expected to prepare for the comprehensive/qualification document independently. However, they are encouraged to consult orally with their advisor as well as other faculty members about their general plan or outline for the qualifying exam. Faculty members should not provide a review of multiple drafts of the qualifying exam. 8. If a students written comprehensive/qualification materials are judged to be unsatisfactory, he/she may petition to resubmit the materials only once after additional preparation and within one year of the initial submission. IV. EVALUATION CRITERIA A. Criteria: Student performance is evaluated in relation to the substantive areas discussed above in Section III, and on the basis of the following criteria: 1. Accuracy with respect to the application of the concepts and principles selected for discussion. 2. Organization and integration of content as specified in guidelines. 3. Creativity, imagination and insight with respect to the presentation of ideas. 4. Documentation and use of relevant literature and other academic and professional resources. 5. Evidence of a constructively critical and objective approach to the subject matter: 6. Scholarliness as reflected in intellectual discipline, logical consistency and critical judgment. 7. Understanding of research concepts, methods and related issues. 8. Recognition of the implications for social work practice. 9. Recognition of the implications for the development and revision of theory. 10. Recognition of the implications for related research. 11. Recognition of the implicit values and assumptions operating in the approach to the subject matter. 12. Ability to analyze, synthesize and evaluate the practice, theory, and research issues identified. 13. Recognition of issues related to diversity, oppressed populations, and social and economic justice. 14. Recognition of appropriate ethical issues related to the identified research agenda, especially those involving human subjects. B. Grading: The written materials are reviewed and assessed independently by two (2) members of the social work graduate faculty and one (1) faculty member representing the students external minor area. A rating form providing evaluation criteria is attached. The written materials are graded in relation to fourteen (14) criteria with a maximum possible score of fifty-six (56) points. Each criterion is equally weighted. A minimum score of twenty-eight (28) by each panel member and an average score of thirty-six (36) is required for passing. Students who fail the comprehensive/qualification process may petition to repeat it only once. C. Notification and Feedback to Students: Students are officially notified of their performance in relation to the comprehensive/qualification process by the Chair of the Qualifying Review Committee. Faculty readers are expected to provide an overall written assessment of the students written materials as well as specific comments explaining the justification for any rating of a criterion that is judged to be Unsatisfactory. A copy of the rating form and the readers comments will be given to the student.

Student Misconduct
A. Academic Misconduct: Indiana University School of Social Work and/or the University may discipline a student for academic misconduct which is defined as any activity which tends to compromise the academic integrity of the institution and undermine the educational process. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, the following:

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1.

2. 3.

4.

5. 6.

Cheating a. A student must not use external assistance on any "in-class" or "take-home" examination, unless the instructor specifically has authorized such assistance. This prohibition includes, but is not limited to, the use of tutors, books, notes, and calculators. b. A student must not use another person as a substitute in the taking of an examination or quiz. c. A student must not steal examinations or other course materials. d. A student must not allow others to conduct research or to prepare any work for him or her without advance authorization from the instructor to whom the work is being submitted. Under this prohibition, a student must not make any unauthorized use of materials obtained from commercial term paper companies or from files of papers prepared by other persons. e. A student must not collaborate with other persons on a particular project and submit a copy of a written report that is represented explicitly or implicitly as the student's own individual work. f. A student must not use any unauthorized assistance in a laboratory, at a computer terminal, or on fieldwork. g. A student must not submit substantial portions of the same academic work for credit or honors more than once without permission of the instructor to whom the work is being submitted. h. A student must not alter a grade or score in any way. Fabrication: A student must not falsify or invent any information or data in an academic exercise including, but not limited to, records or reports, laboratory results, and citations to the sources of information. Plagiarism: A student must not adopt or reproduce ideas, words, or statements of another person without an appropriate acknowledgment. A student must give due credit to the originality of others and acknowledge an indebtedness whenever he or she does any of the following: a. Quotes another person's actual words, either oral or written. b. Paraphrases another person's words, either oral or written. c. Uses another person's idea, opinion, or theory. Borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative material, unless the information is common knowledge. Interference a. A student must not steal, change, destroy, or impede another student's work. Impeding another student's work includes, but is not limited to, the theft, defacement, or mutilation of resources so as to deprive others of the information they contain. b. A student must not give or offer a bribe, promise favors, or make threats with the intention of affecting a grade or the evaluation of academic performance. Violation of Course Rules: A student must not violate course rules as contained in a course syllabus or other information provided to the student. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty: A student must not intentionally or knowingly help or attempt to help another student to commit an act of academic misconduct.

B. Personal Misconduct on University Property: The University may discipline a student for the following acts of personal misconduct that occur on University property: 1. Dishonest conduct including, but not limited to, false accusation of misconduct; forgery, alteration or misuse of any university document, record, or identification; and giving to a university official information known to be false. 2. Initiating or circulating a report or warning concerning an impending bombing, a fire, or other emergency or catastrophe, knowing that the report is false; making a false report concerning a fire or that a bomb or other explosive has been placed in any university building or elsewhere on university property; or transmitting such a report to an official or an official agency. 3. Release of access codes for university computer and duplicating systems and other university equipment to unauthorized persons; use of an access code for a purpose other than that stated on the request for service. 4. Lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct. 5. Disorderly conduct that interferes with administration, teaching, research, or other university or universityauthorized activity. 6. Actions that endanger the student, the university community, or the academic process.

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7. Failure to comply with the directions of authorized university officials in the performance of their duties, including failure to identify oneself when requested to do so; failure to comply with the terms of a disciplinary sanction. 8. Unauthorized entry, use, or occupancy of university facilities; refusal to vacate a university facility when directed to do so by an authorized official of the university. 9. Unauthorized taking or possession of university property or services, unauthorized taking or possession of the property or services of others. 10. Damage to or destruction of university property or of property on university premises belonging to others. 11. Unauthorized setting of fires on university property, unauthorized use of or interference with fire equipment. 12. Unauthorized possession, use, manufacture, distribution, or sale of illegal fireworks, incendiary devices, or other dangerous explosives. 13. Possession of firearms or other weapons on university property contrary to law; possession or display of any firearm on university property frequented by the public, except in the course of an authorized activity; possession of weapons in residence halls on university property in violation of residence hall rules; and intentional possession on university property of a dangerous article or substance as a potential weapon. 14. Acting with violence; aiding, encouraging, or participating in a riot. 15. Sexual harassment, as defined in the Student Code. 16. Racial harassment, as defined in the Student Code. 17. Hazing, defined as any conduct which subjects another person, whether physically, mentally, emotionally, or psychologically, to anything that may endanger, abuse, degrade, or intimidate the person as a condition of association with a group or organization, regardless of the persons consent or lack of consent. 18. Physical abuse of any person, including the following: a. The use of physical force or violence to restrict the freedom of action or movement of another person or to endanger the health or safety of another person. b. Physical behavior that involves an express or implied threat to interfere with an individuals personal safety, academic efforts, employment, or participation in university-sponsored extra-curricular activities and causes the person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is about to occur. c. Physical behavior that has the purpose or reasonably foreseeable effect of interfering with an individuals personal safety, academic efforts, employment or participation in university-sponsored extracurricular activities and causes the person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is about to occur. 19. Verbal abuse of another person, including the following: a. Verbal behavior that involves an express or implied threat to interfere with an individuals personal safety, academic efforts, employment, or participation in university sponsored extra-curricular activities and causes the person to have a reasonable apprehension that such harm is about to occur. b. Fighting words that are spoken face-to-face as a personal insult to the listener or listeners in personally abusive language inherently likely to provoke a violent reaction by the listener or listeners to the speaker. 20. Unauthorized possession or use of alcoholic beverages, as defined here. a. The possession or use of alcoholic beverages is forbidden in the following areas of the university unless otherwise prohibited by law: (1) Use or possession of alcoholic beverages on university property, or in the course of a university activity or student organization activity, contrary to law. (2) Use or possession of alcoholic beverages in any undergraduate residence supervised by the university, including fraternity and sorority houses. (3) Use or conspicuous possession of alcoholic beverages in or on any property of the university frequented by the public, except in areas specifically designated by the chief administrative officer of the campus. b. The possession or use of alcoholic beverages is not forbidden in the following areas of the university unless otherwise prohibited by law: (1) In designated graduate housing and residence hall buildings designated as restricted to students who are 21 years of age or older, including residence rooms and certain common areas approved for such purpose by the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students may enact rules to regulate such use or possession.
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21.

22.

23. 24.

(2) In designated undergraduate residences supervised by the university when temporary permission is granted by the Dean of Students for events at which persons 21 years of age or older may lawfully possess and use alcoholic beverages. (3) In designated family housing, including residence rooms, apartments and certain common areas approved for such purposes by the Dean of Students. The Dean of Students may enact rules to regulate such use or possession. (4) In Union Buildings, including guest rooms and certain other areas specifically approved for such purpose by the chief administrative officer of the campus. (5) In other areas, such as private offices and faculty lounges, not accessible to the public and specifically approved for such purpose by the chief administrative officer of the campus. Student organizations that serve or permit possession of alcoholic beverages at student organization functions, on or off campus, may be disciplined if violations of alcoholic beverage laws or of university regulations occur at such functions. Individual students who plan, sponsor, or direct such functions also may be subject to discipline. Unauthorized possession or use of illegal drugs, as defined here. a. The following actions are prohibited by Indiana University: (1) Use or possession of any drug, controlled substance; or of drug paraphernalia, on university property or in the course of a university activity or student organization activity, contrary to law. It is not a violation of university regulations for students to possess such drugs or controlled substances if they are possessed under the terms of a valid and legal prescription for such drugs or controlled substances. (2) Use of university facilities to manufacture, process, or distribute any drug or controlled substance contrary to law. (3) Sale, gift, or transfer of drugs, controlled substances, or drug paraphernalia to Indiana University students, whether or not such sale, gift, or transfer occurs on university property or in the course of a university activity or student organization activity. b. The term controlled substance is defined in Indiana law, and includes, but is not limited to, substances such as marijuana, cocaine, narcotics, certain stimulants and depressants, and hallucinogens. Violation of other published university regulations, policies, or rules. A violation of any Indiana or federal criminal law.

C. Personal Misconduct Not on University Property: The University may discipline a student for acts of personal misconduct that are not committed on university property if the acts occur during the course of university activities that are being conducted off the university campus or the acts relate to the security of the university community or the integrity of the educational process. Such acts include, but are not limited to, the following: 1. Altering academic transcript 2. Arson 3. Battery 4. Drug trafficking 5. Forgery 6. Fraud 7. Harassment of a student, as defined in this statement 8. Hazing 9. Rape 10. Sexual assault 11. Trafficking in term papers 12. Unauthorized use of a computer off the campus to obtain access to information on campus

Students Rights and Responsibilities


All Ph.D. and PreDoc students in the School of Social Work are viewed as competent adults who have a right to participate in decision-making activities about the educational program and school in which they have enrolled. Students regularly contribute to the continued development and growth of our programs. Indeed, the school values
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student input in several critical areas: faculty evaluation, school committee work, faculty hiring, and student field placements. All students enrolled at Indiana University have an opportunity each semester to evaluate their instructors. At the end of each course, students are given standardized faculty evaluation forms to complete. These evaluations are confidential with the results being computer generated. These evaluations are returned to the faculty to utilize in strengthening content, teaching, learning methods, and to facilitate more effective instruction. Students have the opportunity to meet both informally and formally with any candidates being considered for faculty positions. Additionally, a student representative is selected to be a member of any screening committee commissioned in the hiring of new faculty. Students are asked to provide written assessments of each candidate to be included as a part of the recommendation package prepared by the school for employment purposes. Ph.D. and Pre Doc students have the right to provide feedback about school policies and procedures as well as the behavior of faculty and staff members. In providing either positive or critical feedback, students are expected to follow professional social work norms, values, and ethics. For example, if a student believes that faculty or staff members behavior is discourteous or ineffective, she or he should usually communicate directly with the person or people in question. If the student has reason to believe that in communicating directly with the person she or he would be placed in some jeopardy, then the student should register the complaint with the Director of the Ph.D. Program, who will address the concern and respond. If a student believes a faculty or staff member has treated them unfairly, or that a policy or procedure is unjust or unwise, then the student may submit a formal written grievance petition to the Dean of the School of Social Work. Grievance petitions are reserved for those issues or incidences that warrant formal investigation and full exploration. Such petitions should be submitted in a professional manner, consistent with social work norms, values, and ethics. Student complaints regarding discrimination, sexual harassment (see Appendix 3 for the "IUPUI Sexual Harassment Policy and Complaint Procedure"), racial harassment, and harassment on the basis of sexual orientation have established complaint procedures available in the Indiana University Code of Student Ethics.

Transfer Credit/ Revalidation of Courses


The Indiana University Graduate School has established formal policies and procedures concerning the transfer of graduate credit from other colleges and universities (see Indiana University Graduate Bulletin). Students accepted into the Ph.D. Program in social work may transfer up to thirty (30) credit hours of graduate studies completed at another university. All courses credited toward the doctoral degree must have been earned at the graduate level with a minimum grade of B, and must receive written approval by the Director of the Ph.D. Program. Where course titles, credits, and descriptions appear to fulfill the research requirements at Indiana University School of Social Work and the earned grade was "B" or higher, the student may be granted up to 30 credits toward the 90 credits required for the awarding of the Ph.D. degree at the Indiana University School of Social Work.

Resources IUSSW Resources


The Indianapolis University School of Social Work is located on the fourth floor of the Education/Social Work Building (ES). Social Work classes are usually held in the ES Building. The fourth floor contains the faculty offices, administrative offices, meeting rooms, student and faculty mailboxes, student lounge, faculty/staff lounge, and the student computer lab. The reception area of the School of Social Work may be reached by the elevator located at Entry 4 of the Education/Social Work Building. Administrative offices of the Dean, Program Directors (Ph.D., MSW, BSW), and the Director of the Office of Research Services are located on the southern end of the Education/Social Work Building, ES 4138.
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Computer Clusters The School of Social Work added a student computer cluster in 1993. Computers for PhD student use are located in the Ph.D. Lounge in ES4162. Other computer clusters may be found on the second floor of the ES building as well as in various locations on the Indianapolis campus. Faculty Offices Faculty office numbers are listed in the reception area of the school. Faculty usually list their office and telephone numbers on the course syllabi. Financial Aid Social Work students needing assistance with financial aid may contact Jennifer Vines at javines@iupui.edu or by phone at 317-278-2862. Ms. Vines maintains office hours at the School in ES4114B on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:00-5:00 pm. Listserv The Ph.D. program maintains an unmoderated listserv for its students. (Unmoderated means unedited: the list's owner does not review or control postings to the listserv.) The list is available for use by all doctoral and predoctoral students. Faculty members have direct access to the doctoral student listserv contents with the exception of the list's owner. Faculty can post messages, but not receive replies. Messages can be posted to: sswphd@listserv.iupui.edu The purpose of this listserv is to facilitate communication and support among doctoral students and with our alumni. The following rules apply: 1. All correspondence must be school-related. The list may not be used for personal business or purposes. 2. While the list is expressly for doctoral-level students and graduates, people occasionally make mistakes when circulating email, so be aware that your postings may not be confidential. 3. Individual members hold copyright only for their own postings. The list owner holds copyright for all compiled postings to the listserv. 4. Users must abide by all university policies and regulations concerning listservs. For more information visit: http://listerv.iupui.edu/ and read the usage standards, guidelines, and netiquette information. 5. Complaints regarding unacceptable or inappropriate use of the listserv will be investigated by the lists owner and the Ph.D. Program Director, and may result in the members suspension or removal. To become a member, send an email request to the current list owner, Dr. Robert Vernon, at rvernon@iupui.edu. Be certain to identify yourself and also provide your preferred email address. (Some students like to use "iupui mail" while others prefer a personal email address from another source. Either type is fine, but please specify the exact email address you want to use.) Office of Research Services The Office of Research Services (ORS), was established in 2001 with the goal of facilitating research and scholarship of faculty and doctoral students. This vision of ORS is to foster a thriving, collaborative culture of research and scholarship within the school that contributes to the professional growth of faculty, staff, and students and provides knowledge useful for human service professionals, policymakers, and consumers. The Office of Research Services sponsors a brown bag series highlighting faculty research and addressing particular research issues. Ph.D. Students are encouraged to participate in activities sponsored by the ORS. The ORS website can be found under Research Services on the School website and contains a wealth of information about conducting research and about current research projects at the School. PhD Student Lounge The Ph.D. Student Lounge is located in ES 4162. The lounge contains Ph.D. student mailboxes and a small computer lab. Students may access the PhD Student Lounge using their JagTag. Student Mailboxes

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All predoc and doctoral students are assigned a mailbox located in the Ph.D. Student Lounge. These provide a means for the program director, faculty, staff, and others to communicate readily with students. Mailboxes should be checked frequently. Website The Doctoral Student Homepage can be found on the schools website (http://socialwork.iu.edu) under Current Students. The Doctoral Student Homepage provides useful information and links to many resources.

IUPUI Resources
Adaptive Educational Services, Office of www.diversity.iupui.edu/aes University College 137, 274-3241 The Office of Adaptive Educational Services provides the means for otherwise qualified students to overcome the consequences of their impairments rather than avoid the realities of them. Efforts are directed toward enabling students to realize and achieve their goals by augmenting their existing strengths and abilities. Students can arrange to have audio and video tapes from lectures reproduced for a nominal fee. Students can bring high quality 90-minute audio tapes of T120 video tapes to Cavanaugh Hall, Room 421, for this service. The Office of Adaptive Educational Services provides these services: < Specialized orientation to the campus < Registration assistance < Note takers, readers, and interpreters < Coordination of financial support and services through Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation < Approval for special area parking permits < Learning Resources Room for blind and visually impaired students Bookstore Barnes & Noble Bookstore www.bookstore.iupui.edu Campus Center 317/278-2665

Campus and Community Life http://life.iupui.edu/ccl/campus-programming/ Campus Center 370, 274-3931 Campus & Community Life coordinates student activities, events, and programs at IUPUI. The office coordinates the activities of more than 13 undergraduate student organizations, including fraternities and sororities, 16 student councils, the Student Activities Programming Board, and the IUPUI Student Assembly. A complete list of student organizations and information about other on-campus activities is available Campus Housing www.housing.iupui.edu
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The staff of the Department of Campus Housing maintains a current file of available housing located both on and off campus. 274-7200 Child Care Center www.childcare.iupui.edu 321 N. Limestone St., 274-3508 The IUPUI Center for Young Children is a licensed preschool that provides learning activities for children ages 2 through kindergarten. The center is available to school-aged children during vacations and summer time. The center is open from 6:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. year-round (except major holidays) and serves the children of students, staff, and faculty. Children are enrolled on a full or part-time basis. The center currently maintains a waiting list, and enrollment is limited. Counseling and Psychological Services http://life.iupui.edu/caps/ Union Building 418, 274-2548 Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) offers a variety of programs designed to assist students with intellectual, emotional, or social problems. The office is staffed by counseling psychologists and trained counselors prepared to help with personal problems through individual and group counseling and developmental workshops. Appointments are free and can be scheduled by calling CAPS. Food Service Besides the vending machines located throughout campus, food service is available in the Campus Center, the Law School Lounge, University Hospital, Riley Hospital, and the Food Court in the University Hotel and Conference Center across the street from Cavanaugh Hall. Funding Resources Associate Faculty Positions are available to either full or part-time students who are interested in and qualified to teach BSW or MSW level courses. A 3 credit hour course pays $2,000. Students interested in teaching should contact the appropriate Program Director (i.e., BSW or MSW). Applicants will be asked to provide a resume and a statement indicating the course or courses they are interested in teaching. Educational Enhancement Grants (EEG) and Educational Opportunity Fellowships (EOF) are available through the Graduate Student Organization. EEG - Up to $5,000 is allocated each semester to support graduate students who meet the following criteria: 1) enrolled in at least 3 credit hours, and 2) seek funding for research expenses related to thesis or dissertation; travel associated with presenting a paper or poster session at a professional conference; and/or participating in training resulting in certification from a professional organization. Maximum awards are $500. Individual students may have one award funded per academic year. There are 2 deadlines per year--1 in fall and 1 in spring. EOF The EOF is based on the premise that some promising students, although in financial need, do not fare well in conventional competition for graduate/professional fellowships. They may have been required to work excessively while attending school or have emerged from social and economic groups that are underrepresented in graduate/professional schools. The amount of the award is dependent upon the amount of money available and the number of completed applications. Previous awards ranged from $1,500-$2,000 per academic year. Applications for the EEG and EOF are available at: http://www.iupui.edu/~gradstu/studentResources/. Faculty Field Liaisons are hired by the school to provide a critical link to the social agencies in which we place our BSW and MSW students. All faculty are expected to serve in this important role. Field liaison positions may be available to interested doctoral students. The type of settings field liaisons are expected to visit are in part determined by the individuals area of practice specialization. All such appointments are made in consultation with the BSW and MSW Directors. Field liaisons are reimbursed per student or as part of a Teaching Assistantship.
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GradGrants Center - Indiana University The GradGrants Center is a free service available to all IU graduate students and provides free database searches, workshops, and grant writing assistance to help obtain money for research or graduate study. The GGC provides centralized information to assist in your search for grants, scholarships, internships, fellowships, prizes, research opportunities, independent project funding, and work-cooperative programs to further research and graduate study. The GradGrants Center is located in the Main Library, Room 1052E on the Bloomington campus. Telephone: 812855-5281. Email: gradgrnt@indiana.edu. http://www.indiana.edu/~gradgrnt/ Graduate Assistantships are used to support full-time doctoral students as research or teaching assistants. Funds are distributed to students on a competitive basis in the form of stipends. In exchange for working with a faculty member on a research or teaching related project 12-15 hours per week, graduate assistants receive a stipend of $14,000, tuition remission, and graduate student health insurance. Research assistantships are designed to provide student with opportunities to engage in research-related learning activities while providing them with an additional source of income to help offset some of the expenses associated with doctoral education. Accordingly, efforts will be made to maximize the goodness-of-fit between student and faculty research interests. Faculty members submit written proposals outlining the nature of the research project(s) and the role the student would be expected to play. Preference will be given to projects that are directly related to the schools overall research agenda and that provide students with research internship opportunities. The assignment of graduate assistants will be the responsibility of the Director of the Ph.D. Program in consultation with the Director of the Office of Research Services. IASWRS Compendium of Doctoral Funding A comprehensive list of doctoral, dissertation and post-doc funding opportunities is posted on the IASWR website. This is a rich resource for doctoral students and post-docs seeking research funding. www.iaswresearch.org (Click on Technical Resources) International Enhancement Grants up to $2000 are available on a competitive basis for graduate students seeking support to pursue relevant academic or training opportunities that will enhance their degree programs at IU. The International Enhancement Grant is funded jointly by the Office of International Programs and the Office of Research and University Graduate School and supports directed off-campus international activities in areas that do not duplicate opportunities or coursework available through their home campus. Applicants should contact Rose Vondrasek from the Office of International Programs before applying for this grant to determine their eligibility. Information and the application can be found on the web at http://www.indiana.edu/~ovpia/ovpia/ Questions should be directed to Ms. Vondrasek at Franklin Hall 315, Bloomington, IN 47405 or by e-mail at rvondras@indiana.edu. NIMH Minority Fellowships are available on a competitive basis to minority social work students with an interest in mental health issues. NIMH provides funding in the form of stipends of $19,968 each plus an additional $3,000 for tuition. The school provides student health insurance. Application materials are available at www.cswe.org (Click on Programs and Services) Riley Adolescent Medicine Fellowship is a cooperative agreement with The Riley Hospital Adolescent Unit that provides an annual Research Assistantship of $8,800 plus tuition and student health insurance. This assistantship is available to any full-time student who is interested in social/psychological research related to adolescents and their families. A social work faculty member serves as the schools representative at the weekly interdisciplinary research seminar. Travel Fellowships of up to $800 are available on a competitive basis through the Indiana University Graduate School. These grants are intended to help offset expenses associated with travel to professional meetings for the purpose of presenting a scholarly paper. In order to qualify for a travel grant, the student must be registered full time and be listed as the first or sole author of the paper to be presented. Applications are available at www.iupui.edu/~gradstu.

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Tuition Waivers are available to full-time PhD students appointed to an Assistantship or Fellowship. Assistantship recipients must be available to work with a faculty member as a teaching or research assistant for 12 hours (without health insurance) or 15 hours (with health insurance) per week. University Fellowships are available to individuals who apply to the Ph.D. Program by the February 1st priority deadline. Applicants are nominated by the Ph.D. Program Committee and are ultimately selected by the IUPUI Fellowship Committee in a campus-wide competition based on academic excellence. Preference is given to first year full-time students. University fellowships are considered to be the most highly prestigious awards granted on this campus. They provide a stipend of $22,000 plus tuition, student health insurance, and an $800 discretionary travel fund. Graduate Student Organization (GSO) www.iupui.edu/~gradstu The Graduate Student Organization (GSO) provides the graduate and the professional students of IUPUI with an official and representative student government. It gives graduate and professional students a voice in matters pertaining to the affairs of the University and therefore enhances their involvement on the campus. In this capacity, the GSO works to improve the quality of graduate and professional student life and to provide a means for them to become involved in campus planning to determine future University directions. The members of the Graduate Student Organization are elected or appointed from each academic school with a graduate or professional degree program and from the continuing non-degree students registered in the Graduate School. The GSO sponsors the Educational Enhancement Grant to support graduate and professional students in research, training, and participation in professional conferences.

Identification Cards- Jag Tag http://www.jagtag.iupui.edu/ The following services at IUPUI require an identification card: < Language Lab/Tape Library < Education and Curriculum Library < Use of physical education facilities < Tax exemption in cafeterias An identification card may also be needed for these services: < International travel < General proof of student status Students may apply for a permanent User ID that will allow use of electronic mail as long as the student is enrolled at IUPUI. Request forms are available in all Learning Centers and in the Student Guide; they are to be returned to the Integrated Technologies in the Engineering/Technology Building, Room 1021. You may obtain a photo ID card for $10.00 during fall or spring registration through the Office of the Registrar. You must obtain your ID card in the semester in which you paid for it or seek a refund of the fee. Usually, one card will last throughout your time at IUPUI. The card is validated each semester with a free sticker, which can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar at the beginning of the semester. Photo IDs are not produced for the summer sessions. International Affairs, Office of 902 W. New York Street, 2nd Fl. 274-7000 www.international.iupui.edu The office is located in the south wing of the ES Building, Rm 2126, and provides these services to IUPUI students: < Admission processing for all foreign applicants and permanent resident applicants with fewer than two years of study in a U.S. high school
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< < < < <

Student ID cards for international travel Non-immigrant documentation for foreign students Advising on opportunities and scholarships for study and internship programs Advising on non-immigrant regulations, employment authorization, university procedures, housing, and adjustment to life in Indiana Orientation activities and programs

Learning Centers Centers are located throughout the campus, containing both DOS/Windows and Macintosh computers. Students have access to mainframe computers, as well as microcomputer applications such as word processing, database, and spreadsheet. Consultants are available in the centers for help in using the systems and resolving problems. Quick Docs (free handouts on technology basics) are available in each center. Learning centers are open throughout the week, with hours varying depending upon location. Beside the door of each facility the hours are posted as to when they are open. The TIPS (technology training) program provides a hands-on workshop atmosphere where students can learn the basics of technology use. Students may enroll in TIPS classes in the Learning Center consulting office in the Engineering/Technology Building, Rm 1021. Production services, including video/audio production, photography/photo lab processing, and graphic material preparation are available to students by contacting the office for Campus and Community Life at 274-3931.

Libraries While all libraries are open to all students, social work students tend to use the resources available at the University Library. An inter-library loan service connects the IUPUI libraries with the university libraries at Bloomington and West Lafayette as well as other libraries throughout the country. The staff at the University Library can help you locate books at other libraries. The IUPUI library system is composed of the following libraries: University Library 755 W. Michigan Street Indianapolis, IN 46202-5153 317-274-8278 www.ulib.iupui.edu School of Medicine Library 975 Walnut Street Indianapolis, IN 46202-5121 317-274-7182 www.medlib.iupui.edu Lending policies and procedures vary slightly among the different libraries. Please consult the library staff from each library for detailed information. Multicultural Center http://www.iupui.edu/~divrsity/planning/mcc.html University Library 006, 274-4239 The Multi Cultural Student Affairs Office plans, conducts, and evaluate multi cultural educational and training programs with people of racial and otherwise diverse backgrounds on the campus. The office teaches about the history, culture, and issues of various people of color throughout the community.
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School of Law Library 530 W. New York Street Indianapolis, IN 46202-5194 317-274-4028 www.indy.indiana.edu/library/librar.htm

Parking and Transportation Services www.parking.iupui.edu South Garage, 1004 W. Vermont St. 274-4232 There are four areas of parking available at IUPUI. A and B lots are restricted to faculty and staff; E lots are designated for students. Garages, attended lots, and meter spaces are for visitors. Permit fees are assessed if you designate that you want a parking permit when you register. You will then receive your parking permit by mail. Vehicles parked in any lot for which an incorrect permit is displayed will be ticketed and, in cases of continued illegal parking, will be towed at the owner's expense. If you do not pay parking fines, you will not be allowed to register. The campus shuttle runs continuously between parking lots to the center of campus. The intercampus shuttle connects the Michigan Street campus with the Herron School of Art. Schedules for the intercampus shuttle are available at the Visitors Information Booth, Parking Services, and other building lobbies. The Office of Parking Services provides jump-start and escort services. The jump-start service is available when your car will not start while parked on the main campus. The escort service is provided from the time it gets dark until midnight. Students will be escorted safely to their vehicles on campus or to their on-campus housing unit. In addition, the IUPUI Police Department offers a lockout service to help students who lock their keys in their cars. If you have a physical disability, you may be eligible for a special parking permit. Short-term permits are available for temporary disabilities. If you have a long-term disability, you are required to get state certification before receiving an extended permit. Contact the parking services office for more information. If you are interested in using the garage parking, contact parking services for information on how to obtain a garage card for the semester.

Preparing Future Faculty (PFF) www.opd.iupui.edu A number of graduate programs have established Preparing Future Faculty programs which are designed to introduce graduate students to the full range of professional responsibilities in research, teaching, and service they will encounter in academia. These programs typically include more advanced courses in pedagogy, the opportunity to work closely with teaching mentors and to construct teaching portfolios, workshops on specialized topics, and expanded teaching possibilities, often in cooperation with other campuses of Indiana University or other institutions. Free seminars covering a variety of topics are available to graduate students who are interested in pursuing careers in academia. Information on PFF is available through the Office for Professional Development, 274-8880.

Student Employee Health Service Coleman Hall 101, 274-8214 All IUPUI students may be seen in the office of Student Employee Health Service on a fee-for-service basis. All labs, x-rays or referrals are the responsibility of the student. Call (317) 274-8214 to make an appointment with a physician. The clinic is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Applications for health insurance are available at the clinic as well. Testing Center http://www.assessment.iupui.edu/testing/ Union Building G003, 274-2620 The IUPUI Testing Center has responsibility for the administration of tests and psychometric instruments used for the counseling and development of students. Tests administered by the center include English, math, reading; and foreign language placement tests; CLEP; SAT; interest inventories; leaning style indicators; and diagnostic academic skills tests. You may schedule tests by calling the IUPUI Testing Center between 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.; Monday through Friday.
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Tutoring Programs All IUPUI students may take advantage of tutoring in math through the Department of Mathematical Sciences or tutoring in writing through the University Writing Center. These services are free. Certain other departments may also provide tutoring. Contact the department that teaches the course you are having difficulty with to determine if tutoring is available. Paid tutors may also be available. University Information Technology Services (UITS) http://uits.iupui.edu/ Informatics and Communications Building 274-4357 Integrated Technologies develops and supports the IUPUI campus technological environment, offering a single point of contact for all centralized computing, telephone, and media services. The Student Guide to Integrated Technologies provides information important to students about the services available on the campus through Integrated Technologies. The Guide is available in all public-learning centers. University Writing Center http://www.iupui.edu/~uwc/ Cavanaugh Hall 427 and University Library 2125 274-2049 tutorial appointments 274-3000 hotline You are invited to bring any writing project to the center when you need help finding a topic; focusing, organizing, writing, revising; and overcoming writer's block. The following services are available to you: < One-half hour tutorial sessions are available on an appointment basis. < Immediate drop-in help is available if instructors are not occupied with appointments. < Reference library < Handouts < Workshops < Writing center hotline will answer your questions concerning grammar, sentence structure, punctuation, formats, or any aspect of the writing process. Volunteerism Student Volunteer Service Coordinator Campus Center 370, 274-3931 The Indiana Campus Compact (ICC), an association of 13 campuses in the state of Indiana, has established an office on the IUPUI campus through a grant from the Commission on National and Community Service. The Student Volunteer Services Coordinator (SVSC) is the student liaison for the ICC. The SVSC works to establish volunteerism among students in the community. A student organization can apply for mini-grants through the SVSC, located in the Student Activities Center.

Online Resources
IUPUI Graduate Office IU Grad Grants Center Graduate Student Organization Handbook for Student Academic Appointees International Affairs Registrars Office Homepage OneStart http://www.iupui.edu/~resgrad/grad/grad_menu.htm http://www.indiana.edu/~gradgrnt/index.html http://www.iupui.edu/~gradstu http://www.indiana.edu/~deanfac/saahbk.htm http://www.iupui.edu/~oia http://registrar.iupui.edu
General info, registration info, academic calendars, enrollment reports, etc.)

https://onestart.iu.edu/my-prd/Portal.do
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GRE IU Graduate Faculty Information Theses and Dissertations, Guide

http://www.gre.org http://www.graduate.indiana.edu/faculty-resources.php http://www.iupui.edu/~gradoff/docs/theses_dissertation.pdf

Student Opportunities
Students are encouraged to be involved with both School sponsored organizations and outside, related professional organizations. Some of the organizations are: Hispanic/Latino Social Work/Human Service Provider The Hispanic/Latino Social Work/ Human Service Provider Network was established in 1995 under the auspices of the Indiana University School of Social Work. Membership is open to any Hispanic/Latino student and those employed in a social work capacity working with Hispanic/Latino groups. This is an evolving group whose policies are developed as it provides support to its members. For further information, please contact Dr. Irene Queiro-Tajalli at (317) 274-6725. NASW The National Association of Social Workers (NASW) has over 200,000 members worldwide. As a member, students receive all of the benefits and privileges of a regular member at a reduced cost. Members receive the Social Work Journal, the monthly newsletter, the Indiana state newsletter, group rate health and disability insurance coverage, discounts on all NASW specialty journals, and other valuable information. The address for the national headquarters of the NASW is: National Association of Social Workers 750 First Street, N.E., Suite 700 Washington, DC 20002-4241 Telephone: 800-638-8799 The address for the Indiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers is: Indiana Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers 1100 West 42nd Street, Suite 316 Indianapolis, IN 46208 Telephone: 317-923-9878 NABSW The National Association of Black Social Workers (NABSW) was established in May of 1968 in San Francisco, California, to promote the welfare, survival, and liberation of the black community. Membership is open to any African-American employed in a social work capacity, or others not employed but working in a voluntary capacity in a social work setting or program that accepts and adheres to the constitution and by-laws of the association. The purpose of the organization is: to provide a structure and forum though which black social workers, any workers in related fields of social service, and interested citizens may exchange ideas, offer their services, and develop or refine skills in the interest of the black community and the community-at-large. to work in cooperation with, or to support, develop, or sponsor community welfare projects and programs which will serve the interest of the black community and the community-at-large. to strengthen human services in all service systems in all aspects pertaining to the black community, and to ensure that services are available to black individuals, families, groups, and the community. For information regarding the Indianapolis chapter of the NABSW, contact: National Association of Black Social Workers Indianapolis Chapter, Inc. P.O. Box 88847 Indianapolis, IN 46208-0847
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Employment Opportunities To help students prepare for their job search the following services are available: Career and Employment Services Available to any IUPUI student, Career and Employment Services can help the student define realistic career goals and choose a field of study based on interest and job market trends. The office staff also operates an extensive job placement program to help students find part time jobs, paid internships, or summer employment. To make an appointment with a career counselor, call 274-2554. For information about part-time employment, call 274-4577. Job File in the Student Lounge The Field Department and Student Services regularly receive notification of job openings in the field of Social Work. These are posted and placed in the appropriate job file in the Student Lounge on the Indianapolis campus. Students are encouraged to check these regularly.

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Appendices Appendix 1 Social Work Standards


I. STANDARDS FOR THE CLASSIFICATION OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

Social Work Values1


# # # # # # # # # # II. Commitment to the primary importance of the individual in society. Respect for the confidentiality of relationships with clients. Commitment to social change to meet socially recognized needs. Willingness to keep personal feelings and needs separate from professional relationships. Willingness to transmit knowledge and skills to others. Respect and appreciation for individual and group differences. Commitment to developing clients' ability to help themselves. Willingness to persist in efforts on behalf of clients despite frustration. Commitment to social justice and the economic, physical, and mental well-being of all in society. Commitment to a high standard of personal and professional conduct.

MAJOR PRINCIPLES OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS CODE OF ETHICS In the United States, the Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers (1994) serves as the primary guide to which social workers must adhere. Because this association is so dominant, its code of ethics tends to be used in adjudication processes and court proceedings even for those social workers who are not members of the National Association of Social Workers. The NASW Code reflects the relationship between values and ethics. The preamble (NASW, 1994, p. v.) states: "This code is based on fundamental values of the social work profession that include the worth, dignity, and uniqueness of all persons as well as their rights and opportunities. It is also based on the nature of social work, which fosters conditions that promote these values." In order to practice ethically, therefore, students in the Ph.D. program at Indiana University School of Social Work must be thoroughly familiar with the social work code of ethics. A copy should be readily accessible in order that students may refer to it in considering the value and ethical implications of their academic and professional behavior.

1NASW Standards for the Classification of Social Work Practice, p. 18. Copyright 1981, National Association of Social Workers, Inc.

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National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics Summary of Major Principles2 I. A. B. C. D. E. II. F. G. H. I. III. J. K. IV. L. V. M. N. O. VI. P. The Social Worker's Conduct and Comportment as a Social Worker Propriety -- The social worker should maintain high standards of personal conduct in the capacity or identity as social worker. Competence and Professional Development -- The social worker should strive to become and remain proficient in professional practice and the performance of professional functions. Service -- The social worker should regard as primary the service obligation of the social work profession. Integrity -- The social worker should act in accordance with the highest standards of professional integrity and impartiality. Scholarship and Research -- The social worker engaged in study and research should be guided by the conventions of scholarly inquiry. The Social Worker's Ethical Responsibility to Clients Primacy of Clients' Interests -- The social worker's primary responsibility is to clients. Rights and Prerogatives of Clients -- The social worker should make every effort to foster maximum self-determination on the part of clients. Confidentiality and Privacy -- The social worker should respect the privacy of clients and hold in confidence all information obtained in the course of professional service. Fees -- When setting fees, the social worker should ensure that they are fair, reasonable, considerate, and commensurate with the service performed and with due regard for the clients' ability to pay. The Social Worker's Ethical Responsibility to Colleagues Respect, Fairness, and Courtesy -- The social worker should treat colleagues with respect courtesy, fairness, and good faith. Dealing with Colleagues' Clients -- The social worker has the responsibility to relate to the clients of colleagues with full professional consideration. The Social Worker's Ethical Responsibility to Employers and Employing Organizations Commitments to Employing Organization -- The social worker should adhere to commitments made to the employing organization. The Social Worker's Ethical Responsibility to the Social Work Profession Maintaining the Integrity of the Profession -- The social worker should uphold and advance the values, ethics, knowledge, and mission of the profession. Community Service -- The social worker should assist the profession in making social services available to the general public. Development of Knowledge -- The social worker should take responsibility for identifying, developing, and fully utilizing knowledge for professional practice. The Social Worker's Ethical Responsibility to Society Promoting the General Welfare -- The social worker should promote the general welfare of society.

2 National Association of Social Work. (1994). The code of ethics of the National Association of Social Workers. Washington, DC: NASW Press. Copyright 8 National Association of Social Workers, Inc.

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Appendix 2- Sexual Harassment & Complaint Procedure


Sexual harassment is against the law. It is prohibited in the University community by Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Executive Order 11246, Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, and Indiana Civil Rights Law. Moreover, Guidelines on Sexual Harassment, published by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 1980, and case law developing in the courts continue to define and refine what constitutes sexual harassment; what responsibilities attached to perpetrators, employers, and supervisors; and what remedies are available to victims. IUPUI Policy applies to: University faculty, staff, and students. Policy: Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) does not tolerate sexual harassment of students, employees, or guests of the University and responds to every complaint, providing proper remediation when harassment is determined. This policy serves to support the University's commitments to the principles of equal educational and employment opportunities for all persons and to positive action toward the elimination of discrimination in all aspects of university life. Provisions: All members of the University, including employees, students, and guests have the right to raise the issue of harassment and are protected by faculty and staff personnel policies, student codes, and the University's Equal Opportunity Policy. Sexual harassment can be a grievous action having serious and far-reaching effects on the careers and lives of individuals. False accusations can have similar impact. Thus, the charge of sexual harassment is not to be taken lightly by a charging party, a respondent, or any other member of the University community. Sexual harassment is a specific form of sex discrimination. This form of discrimination usually occurs when the power inherent in a faculty member or supervisor's relationship to his or her students or subordinates is unfairly exploited. While sexual harassment most often takes place in a situation of power differential between persons involved, this policy also recognizes that sexual harassment may occur between persons of the same university status, i.e., student-student, faculty-faculty, or staff-staff. The university's mission is promoted professionalism in faculty-student and supervisor-employee relationships. Professionalism is fostered by an atmosphere of mutual trust and respect that is diminished when those in positions of authority abuse or appear to abuse their power. Consenting amorous or sexual relationships between faculty members and students for whom they have professional responsibility (either instructional or non-instructional) are viewed as violations of the university's "Code of Academic Ethics." While not expressly forbidden, such relationships between supervisors and employees are deemed very unwise and can lead to charges of sexual harassment. The Affirmative Action Office (AAO) is vested with the responsibility to ensure university compliance with the policy. In the performance of that responsibility, the AAO serves the university in the following manner. The AAO provides information, education, and training on university policies and procedures regarding sexual harassment; serves as a resource to those who may be affected by sexual harassment, investigates and resolves all complaints of sexual harassment, and undertakes action necessary to eliminate offensive behavior. Justice requires that the rights and concerns of both the complainant and respondent be fully assured. The AAO makes every effort to protect these rights, and to assure that no action is undertaken that threatens or compromises them. Prevention is the best tool for the elimination of sexual harassment. In this regard, each dean, director, department chairperson, and/or administrative officer is responsible in his/her area of jurisdiction for the implementation, dissemination, and explanation of this policy. It is the obligation of each faculty, staff, or student member of the university to adhere to this policy. Definition: In accordance with the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines, the "IUPUI Sexual Harassment Policy" defines sexual harassment as follows:
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Unwelcome sexual advances or requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature that constitutes sexual harassment when: 1. Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or education, or 2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for employment or academic decisions affecting such individual, or 3. Such conduct has the effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or learning environment. Examples: Many types of conduct, stemming from unwanted sexual attention, may constitute sexual harassment. Following are some illustrations of the range of behaviors characteristic of sexual harassment. Unwanted propositions for sexual favors, particularly when accompanied by threats of retaliation or promises of special consideration Physical assault Unwanted propositions or invitations for dates Sexually explicit statements, questions, jokes, anecdotes, pictures or graffiti Direct or implied threats that submission to sexual advances will be a condition of employment, work status, promotion, grades, or letter of recommendation Offensive gender-based personal remarks, including verbal, written, graphic, computer generated or e-mail communications Unnecessary touching, patting, hugging, or brushing against a person's body Patterns of conduct causing the person to whom it is directed to feel humiliated, demeaned or uncomfortable, including remarks of a sexual nature about a person's clothing or body, remarks about sexual activity, or speculations about previous sexual experience. Complaint Procedures: Within a reasonable time, faculty, staff, or students who feel that they have been sexually harassed should notify one of the following: their supervisor, an academic or student services dean, or an official and/or the affirmative action officer. Complaints received by administrators or supervisors should be forwarded to the Affirmative Action Office for investigation and resolution. The affirmative action officer can be contacted in the Administration Building (AO127) 355 N. Lansing St., Indianapolis, IN VOICE (317)274-2306 or TDD (317) 278-2200. Within fourteen days of receipt of a formal written complaint, the Affirmative Action Officer shall proceed with conducting an investigation of the complaint for the purpose of affecting a resolution. Because of the sensitive and discriminatory nature of the charges of sexual harassment, complaint procedures will include the following principles and guidelines: 1. A direct personal interview will be held with the complainant or victim for the purposes of completing a "Formal Complaint Form," and to gather specific information detailing the nature of the allegations. 2. Efforts will be made to restrict information regarding complaints to the complainant, the accused party, and those persons directly involved in the resolution of the matter. 3. All records, memoranda, correspondence, and other information/materials related to complaint investigations conducted by the IUPUI Affirmative Action Office shall be retained for a period of no less than three years. 4. Complaint investigations will be conducted as promptly as possible, and results will be reported in writing to the complainant and those persons party to the resolution of the matter. 5. If a complaint is found to be valid, action will be taken through appropriate channels of the University to rectify the situation and to reasonably ensure that such incidents do not occur in the future. University complaint channels for appeal will be open to either the complainant or the accused party.

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6. University policy prohibits retaliation against an individual because of the filing of a complaint, or cooperating with a complaint investigation. Such incidents will be considered seriously and action will be taken expeditiously to prevent such conduct. Legal Basis For Implementing A Sexual Harassment Policy: 1. Title VII of the 1964 Civil rights Act, as amended, prohibits sex discrimination in all employment matters, i.e., hiring, promotions, training, etc. 2. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, prohibits sex discrimination in education programs and/or activities receiving Federal financial assistance. 3. Executive Order 11246 specifies, in part, that government contractors and subcontractors "will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin" and that said contractor "will take affirmative action" to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated without regard to these factors. Definitions: Sexism is an attitude. An attitude of a person of one sex that he or she is superior to a person of the other sex. Sex discrimination is a behavior. With respect to employment activity, sex discrimination occurs when employment decisions are based solely on the gender of an applicant or employee or when an employee is treated differently than other employees of the opposite gender. Sexual harassment is a behavior. It is defined as unwelcome behavior of a sexual nature. Sex-based harassment is a behavior. It is defined as any conduct that is denigrating, ridiculing or abusive in nature and directed only toward individuals of the opposite gender. Categories of Sexual Harassment (EEOC Guidelines): Quid pro quo harassment - when an individual's term or condition of employment is explicitly or implicitly based on submission to unwelcome sexual conduct. Environmental harassment - unwelcome sexual conduct that unreasonably interferes with an individual's job performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment. Intent vs. Impact: To determine if your behavior could be unwelcome to another person, remember that the recipient of the behavior, not the person doing the behavior, decides what is unwelcome. Therefore, it is the impact of the behavior, not the intent of the person who did the behavior that determines whether sexual harassment has occurred. Self Assessment Questions (Is my behavior welcomed?) 1. Would I want any of my behaviors to be the subject of an article in my organization's newsletter or an item appearing on the evening news? 2. Is there equal power between myself and the person with whom I am interacting? 3. Would I behave the same way if the person with whom I have a relationship were standing next to me? 4 .Is there equal initiation and participation between myself and the person with whom I am interacting? Examples of Sexual Harassment - Evaluating Your Environment 1. Is the language or jargon used in your work area derogatory or offensive to women?-men? 2. Are sexually suggestive visuals such as posters, calendars, cartoons, etc. displayed in your work area? 4. Are sexually oriented comments shared among the employees in your work area? 5. Are sexually suggestive or obscene letters, notes, cards, photographs, magazines, etc. circulated among employees in your work area? 5 .Do some employees in your work area unnecessarily touch or hug other employees? 6 .Is undue attention or subtle pressure for sexual favors directed at any employee or group of employees in your work area? 6. Do some employees in your work area experience unwanted and deliberate physical advances such as pinching, hugging fondling, or kissing?
44

7. Do employees ask unwanted personal questions about one another's social or sexual experiences or tell lies and spread rumors about another individual's personal sex life in your work area? 8. Do some employees in your work area make kissing, howling, whistling, and/or smacking sounds or make sexual gestures with their hands or through body movements? 9. Do some employees stand too close or brush up against other employees or touch and rub themselves sexually when in the presence of other employees? 10. Do some employees in your work area make sexual comments about the clothing, anatomy and/or looks of others? 11. Do some employees in your work area refer to adult females as girls, dolls, babes, honey, toots, etc.?
(from IUPUI Affirmative Action Office)

How to Stop Unwanted Sexual Attention 1. State and repeat your objections to the offending behavior. It is not necessary to explain or justify why you want the person to stop. 2. Talk to your supervisor. 3. Write a letter to the sexual harasser and include the following: a. a description of the unwelcome behavior b. the time the behavior occurred c. the fact that you want it to stop d. a warning that if the behavior does not stop, you will take further action e. your signature and date. f. Make a copy of the letter and give it to the harasser in front of a witness. 4. Contact the Affirmative Action Office. Responding to Sexual Harassment TELL SOMEONE! It is better to talk to someone about an uncomfortable situation than to keep it a secret. Talk to a trusted friend, to a counselor, an advisor or the Affirmative Action Officer. HANDLING IT YOURSELF! 1. Keep a written account of what is happening, including dates and details of your own behavior and efforts to stop the harassment. 2. Write a letter to the offending person telling that person to stop. In the letter, include a description of the behavior and how you feel as a result of it, and ask the harasser to stop. Keep a copy of the letter. 3. Talk directly to the offending person and ask that person to stop. Bring someone else along for support. IF YOU WITNESS SEXUAL HARASSMENT! Think about how you can respond to the situation to ensure a good learning environment for yourself and everyone else. Let the harasser know how witnessing harassment makes you feel. COUNSELING/ADVICE! If you feel uncomfortable about a situation or are unsure about how to interpret or handle a situation that you are experiencing, there are places you can go or call on campus. The information you provide people in these offices will be kept confidential unless you give them your permission to speak to someone else about your situation. IUPUI Counseling Center (Non-Academic) Union Building, Room 330 620 Union Drive 317-274-2548 IUPUI Affirmative Action Office Administration Building, AO 127 355 N. Lansing St. 317-274-2306

45

Appendix 3 IUSSW Forms

IUSSW FORMS

46

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK Research Internship (S725)/ Special Topics (S790) Approval Form
Student's Name: Date of Request:

Student's Phone #:

Students E-mail:
) )

Approval requested for: Research internship ( ) Special Topics Course: ( No of Crs: ( ) Semester/Year: ( ) Course #: ( ) Section #(
TO BE COMPLETED BY PROPOSED INSTRUCTOR:
1.

Has the Schools policies regarding the Research Internship/Special Topics courses been discussed with the student? YES ( ) NO( ) Does the subject to be explored in this Research Internship/Special Topics course involve human subjects? YES ( ) NO ( ) a. If yes, is IRB approval required? Yes ( ) No ( ) b. b.If IRB approval is required, please attach a copy of the forms sent to IRB. (Registration will not be approved without formal IRB approval) Attach a statement describing how the students performance is to be evaluated. (Please find attached)

2.

3.

Instructors Signature: Academic Advisors Recommendation (check):

Date:
Approved (

) Disapproved ( )

Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Advisors Signature: _____________________________ Date:


/ /

Program Directors Recommendation (check): Approved ( ) Disapproved ( ) Comments: __________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Program Directors Signature: ____________________________ Date:
/ /

This form must be submitted to the Program Director at least six (6) weeks prior to the beginning of the semester during which the Research internship or Special Topics course is being taken.

Copies: Student, Instructor, Academic Advisor, Program Director, Students File


47

Qualifying Exam Rating Form


Student Reviewer Instructions: Please circle the number corresponding to your judgment regarding the extent to which the characteristic(s) described in each criterion is evident in the students written materials and oral presentation. Any criterion rated as marginal or as unsatisfactory, must be accompanied by a written justification for your judgment. The reader should also attach a general written assessment of the students overall performance. 4 3 2 Excellent Good Satisfactory Accuracy with respect to the application of the concepts and principles selected for discussion: Organization and integration of content as specified in guidelines: Creativity, imagination and insight with respect to the presentation of ideas: Documentation and use of relevant literature and other academic and professional resources: Evidence of a constructively critical and objective approach to the subject matter: Scholarliness as reflected in intellectual discipline, logical consistency and critical judgment: Understanding of research concepts, methods and related issues: Recognition of the implications for social work practice. Recognition of the implications for the development and revision of theory. Recognition of the implications for related research. Recognition of the implicit values and assumptions operating in the approach to the subject matter: Ability to analyze, synthesize and evaluate the practice, theory, and research issues identified: Recognition of issues related to diversity, oppressed populations, and social and economic justice. Recognition of appropriate ethical issues related to the identified research agenda, especially those involving human subjects. 1 Marginal 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 0 Unsatisfactory 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

TOTAL SCORE QUALIFY STUDENT Reviewer (Please Print Name) Reviewer Signature FOR AGAINST Date

48

INDIANA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK PH.D. PROGRAM RECORD OF INCOMPLETE AND CONTRACT FOR COMPLETION OF COURSE REQUIREMENTS FORM

Student Name: __________________________________

Student ID#: ________________________

Instructors Name: ____________________________________________________________________ Advisors Name: ______________________________________________________________________ Course Title: __________________________________________________________________________ Course Number: __________ Credit Hours: ____________ Section Number: _________________________ Semester & Year of Enrollment: ____________

Brief Statement of the reason for assigning the Incomplete Grade: _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

Educational contract for completion of course requirements and removal of the Incomplete Grade: _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ Due date for completion of outstanding course work: __________________________________ Expected grade if contract if not fulfilled: ___________________________________________ __________________________________________________ Signature of Instructor __________________________________________________ Signature of Student __________________________________________________ Reviewed by Program Director ___________________ Date ___________________ Date ___________________ Date

*****Return to Ph.D. Recorder***** Copy: Advisor, Instructor, Program Director, Recorder, Student, Students file
49

Appendix 4 Graduate School Forms

GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS

The following forms are samples only. You must get official copies directly from the graduate school.

50

INDIANA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL APPOINTMENT OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE


(Please Type)
Date Name of Student Social Security Number/ ID Number Date of Admission to Graduate School Major Minor Department

Advisory Committee: Name


1st inside member

Discipline

Signature

2nd inside member

1st outside member

Signature/Departmental Chairperson or Graduate Advisor

Date

Approval/Dean University Graduate School

Date

Note: The students major department shall assign every Ph.D. student admitted to a degree program to an advisory committee no later than one year after admission to the Ph.D. program. The names of the faculty on the advisory committee shall be forwarded, also no later than one year after admission, to the Graduate School for approval
51

Research and the University Graduate School NOMINATION TO CANDIDACY FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE*
Name of Student Current Mailing Address Department I.D. No.

Date of Enrollment/Univ. Graduate School DATE/CANDIDACY EXPIRES

Date Qualifying Exam (mo/da/yr) Total Graduate Credits Earned (including transferred credits)

REQUIREMENT COMPLETION DATES Major Minor Minor Language proficiency (If student is using research skill, please list courses.) Date Date Date

Date Date

This certifies that the above named student has passed the Qualifying Examination and is hereby nominated to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree.

Advisory Committee Signatures Outside Minor


Outside Minor Examination Passed

OR
Outside Minor Examination Waived

Chair or Graduate Advisor/Major Dept. Information Verified/Ph.D. Recorder University Graduate School Approved/Dean University Graduate School

Date Date Date

*Do not submit this form to the University Graduate School until the transfer of all credits from other institutions has been approved.

52

Research and the University Graduate School NOMINATION OF RESEARCH COMMITTEE FOR THE PH.D.*
I.D. No.
(Last) (First)

Name of Student Department Date of Qualifying Examination Date of Enrollment in University Graduate School Purposed Dissertation Title

Dissertation Prospectus: Please attach a one-to-two page summary of the proposed research. If the research involves human subjects, animals, biohazards, biosafety, or radiation, please also attach an approval from appropriate committee.

NOTE: Your signature below indicates that you have read the attached prospectus and agree to serve, if appointed, on a committee to supervise this research. NAME
(please type)

SIGNATURE

DEPARTMENT

EMAIL ADDRESS

(Chair)

(Minor)

ALL COMMITTEE MEMBERS MUST BE MEMBERS OF THE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL FACULTY AND AT LEAST HALF MUST BE FULL MEMBERS INCLUDING THE CHAIR. I certify that I have examined the attached prospectus and that this committee is appropriate to supervise research in this area. Signature/Departmental Chairperson

Date

Approval/Dean University Graduate School

Date

*To be used only by students who have passed the qualifying examinations and who have previously been admitted to candidacy.

53

IUPUI Graduate Office Graduate Student Fitness-For-Duty Medical Certification Return to School/Work from Leave of Absence ______
The purpose of this form is to certify that the student is fit to return to school/work if a serious health condition required that medical leave be granted.

This section to be completed by the student:

Name of Student: Department:

Student ID# Days Absent:

This section to be completed by the health care provider: Yes No

Is student able to return to class and to perform the essential functions of students position in their Graduate program? If NO, when will the student be able to perform the essential functions?

Comments or limitations suggested:

Health Care Provider Information:

Name:

Signature:

Medical Specialty or Type of Practice:

Date:

54

INDIANA UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL Ph.D. REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST The Appointment of Advisory Committee form must be submitted to the Indiana University Graduate School for approval no later than 1 year after admission to the Ph.D. program. At least two members of the advisory committee must be members of the graduate faculty. Student must complete 90 credit hours of an advanced course of study. Qualifying examination must be passed at least 8 months before the date the degree is awarded. A Ph.D. student has 7 years to complete the degree after passing the qualifying exams (9 years for combined degree students). All required language courses must be passed. Following the passing of the exam and the completion of coursework and language requirements, the advisory committee must submit a Nomination to Candidacy form to the Indiana University Graduate School. Upon approval of the dean, the student will be admitted to candidacy. After passing the qualifying exam, Ph.D. students must be enrolled in each semester (excluding summer sessions). After passing 90 credit hours, students may enroll in G901 Dissertation Research (6 credit hours) for a flat fee of $100 per semester. Enrollment in G901 is limited to 6 semesters. The Recommendation of a Research Committee form must be submitted to the dean for approval 6 months prior to the defense. Thirty days prior to the defense, the student must submit to the Indiana University Graduate School a one-page defense announcement. After passing the defense, students should make an appointment with the Indiana University Graduate School secretary (274-4023) for a dissertation format check. Students and departments should make sure all I and R grades have been removed and that a final transcript verifying the students undergraduate degree has been submitted to the Indiana University Graduate School. Students should verify that the Office of the Registrar has the correct spelling of their name and the correct diploma-mailing address. They should also make sure that they are not listed on University checklist. Ph.D. candidates need to make an appointment to turn in their bound copies of the dissertation to the Indiana University Graduate School before the 10th of the month of anticipated graduation. They must bring the following:

Two (2) bound copies: 1 original on 100% cotton (acceptance page can be copy on 100% cotton), 1 copy regular paper, Oversewn. One (1) unbound original: on 100% cotton, original acceptance page (100% cotton), fee receipt (obtained from Bursars Office),-microfilm ($60.00), copyright ($45.00), signed microfilm contact, signed survey form Two (2) loose abstracts (100% cotton), >350 words, 1 signed, 1 unsigned (indicate chair of committee), extra title page (100% cotton)

55

Appendix 5 Student Record Keeping

SCHEDULES STUDENT PROGESS SHEET EXTERNAL MINORS

56

Indiana University School of Social Work Indianapolis Campus

Ph.D. Class Schedule Master


S710 Social Work Theories of Human & Social Behavior (Spring odd years) 9:00-11:40 A W International Social Development in a Global Context (Spring each year) 6:00- 8:40 P W Intermediate Statistics for Social Workers (3cr) (Fall every year) 1:30- 4:10 P T Philosophy of Science and Social Work (3cr) (Fall every year) 9:00 11:40 A T Preparing to Publish: Seminar in Advanced Scholarship Skills (3cr) (Fall every year) 9:00 11:40 A W Theory, Practice and Assessment of Social Work Teaching (3 cr.) (Spring even years) 9:00 11:40 A W Advanced Social Work Research: Qualitative Methods (Fall even & Spring odd years) 1:30 4:10 P W*** Advanced Social Work Research: Quantitative Methods (Fall odd & Spring even years) 1:30 4:10 P W***

S712

S718

S720

S721

S724

S726

S727

***S726/S727 take place on alternating Wednesdays throughout the fall/spring semesters S728 Advanced Statistics for Social Work (Spring every year) 1:30 4:10 P T Social Work Policy Analysis (Fall even years) 9:00 11:40 A T Social Work Practice: Theory and Research (Spring even years) 1:30- 4:10 P T Integrative Seminar I (Fall every year) 10:30 12 P Integrative Seminar II (Spring every year) 10:30 12 P

S730

S740

S791

S792

S725 S790 S800 G901

OFFERED EVERY TERM Social Work Research Internship (3 cr) Deferred Grade Option Independent Study (1-3 cr) Deferred Grade Option Dissertation Research (1-12 cr) Deferred Grade Option Dissertation Research (6 cr) Deferred Grade Option (6 semester limit)

57

SAMPLE FULL-TIME SCHEDULE OF COURSES


First Year
Fall: S720 S718 S721 S726 S791 Spring: S710 S728 S740 S726 Philosophy of Science & Social Work Intermediate Statistics for Social Work Scholarly Writing Advanced SW Research: Qualitative (pt 1) Integrative Seminar I 3 3 3 1.5 22.5 3 3 3 1.5 1.5

SW Theories of Human & Social Behavior Advanced Statistics for Social Work Social Work Practice: Theory & Research Advanced SW Research: Qualitative (pt 2) Total

Second Year
Summer: Course # Ext M Ext M Fall: S727 S730 Ext M S725 Spring: S725 S727 Ext M S724 S792 Advanced SW Research: Quantitative (pt 1) Proseminar in Social Policy Analysis External Minor course #3 Research Internship I 3 1.5 3 3 1.5 1.5 3 3 3 Title External Minor Course #1 External Minor Course #2 Credits 3 3

Research Internship II Advanced SW Research: Quantitative (pt 2) External Minor course #4 Teaching (elective #1) Integrative Seminar II

Total

28.5

Third Year
Preparation for Qualifying Exam Qualifying Exam Dissertation Total

S800

6 6

Fourth Year
Fall: Course # S800 Spring: S800 Dissertation Total 3 6 Title Dissertation Credits 3

58

Tentative Long Term Ph.D. Schedule


Summer 2009 2009/2010 Fall 2009 S718 Intermed Stats S720 Phil of Science S721 Scholarly Writing S727 Quan Methods (part 1) S791-Integ Sem I 2010/2011 Fall 2010 S718 S720 S721 S726 (part 1) S730 S791- Integ Sem I 2011/2012 Fall 2011 S718 S720 S721 S727 (part 1) S720 S791-Integ Sem I 2012/2013 Fall 2012 S718 S720 S721 S726 (part 1) S730 S791- Integ Sem I Spring 2010 S728 Advanced Stats S724 Teaching S740 Practice Theory S727 (part 2) S792-Integ Sem II

Summer 2010 Service Learning courses: China, Croatia

Spring 2011 S728 S710 S712 S726 (part 2) S792-Integ Sem II

Summer 2011

Spring 2012 S728 S724 S712 S727 (part 2) S740 S792- Integ Sem II

Summer 2012

Spring 2013 S728 S710 S712 S726 (part 2) S792- Integ Sem II

The following courses are offered every semester, including summer terms: S725 Research Internship S790 Independent Study S800 Dissertation Research G901 Advanced Research

59

My Ph.D. Program Schedule


Name: Summer 1 Yr ______ Summer 2 Yr ______ Date: Fall Yr ______ Spring Yr _____

Summer 1 Yr ______

Summer 2 Yr ______

Fall Yr ______

Spring Yr ______

Summer 1 Yr ______

Summer 2 Yr ______

Fall Yr ______

Spring Yr ______

Course Choices:
Foundation Research 1. Masters transfer course 2. Masters transfer course 3. 718: Intermed Stats for SWK 4. 721: Preparing to Publish 5. Any Grad level Research or Stats 15 credits Social Work Doctoral 710: SWK Theories of Human & Social Behavior 720: Philosophy of Science & SWK 730: Social Work Policy Analysis 740: SWK Practice: Theory & Research 790: Integrative Seminar 15 credits Advanced Research & Stats 728: Advanced Stats for SWK 726: Advanced SWK Res: Qualitative 727: Advanced SWK Res: Quantitative 725: Research Internship 725: Research Internship 15 credits Electives & External Minor 724: SWK Teaching (Elective #1) S712: Social Develpmt (Elective #2) External Minor Course #1 External Minor Course #2 External Minor Course #3 External Minor Course #4

60

Student Progress Sheet


Student Name Date of Entry Date completed first Ph.D. Course Student ID# Primary Advisor External Advisor Minor ____________________

S730 S740 S791 & S792

Pro-Seminar on SW Policy Analysis SW Practice: Theory & Research Integrative Seminar

Total Credit Hours for this section 24


61

Required Social Work Courses Course Course Title # SW Theories of Human & Social Behavior S710 Philosophy of Science and Social Work S720 Adv Research Methods: Qualitative S726 Advanced Research Methods: Quantitative S727 Advanced Statistics (or approved course) S728

Sem/Year Credit Grade Completed Hours

Total Credit Hours for this section 15

Foundation Non-Research Credit Hours Completed (validated transfer credits) Course Sem/Year Credit Course Title Grade # Completed Hours

Total Credit Hours for the section 15

Foundation Research Courses Completed (grade of B or higher) Course Sem/Year Credit Course Title Grade # Completed Hours Foundation Statistics (taken within last 3 years)

Research Internship Faculty Mentor __________________________ Course # S725 S725 Total this section 6 External Minor ___________________________________ Course # Course Title Sem/Year Credit Grade Completed Hours Total Credit Hours for this section 12 Total Credit hours to complete Ph.D. studies Graduation Date: _____________________________________
62

Course Title SW Research Internship SW Research Internship

Sem/Year Completed

Grade

Credit Hours

Course Title

Qualification Exam Completion Date: _________________________ Reviewers Dissertation Date Prospectus Approved Title Committee Chair Committee Members External Minor Representative Date of Dissertation Defense

Total this section 6 90

Electives Course #

Sem/Year Credit Grade Completed Hours

Total Credit Hours for this section 12

External Minors Taken by IUSSW PhD Students


Aging/Gerontology Anthropology & Health Applied Statistics Continuing Education Education Victoria Hanson, Greta Yoder Slater Glenna Barnes, Richard Rapp Jieru Bai (Education & Statistics), Valerie Decker, Lisa Lewis, Corey Pfahler Kathy Compton, Rob Richardson Marva Augustine, James Brown, Monique Busch, Jackie Green, Janell Horton, Zulkipli Lessy, Phil Suman, David Wilkerson Jennifer Wright Beth Muehlhausen, Donna Pittman, Ankita Deka, Barb Burdge Shweta Chandra Carol Decker, Delthea Hill, Beth Morris, Daniel Navarro, Celia Williamson, Kim Campbell Jaylene Schaefer, Sung-Ju Kim, Lalit Khandare (+ SPEA) Ed Pickett, Virgil Gregory Ronnie Taylor, Phil Thomas, Michael Twyman, Betty Walton, Carolyn Gentle-Genitty, Amy Murphy-Nugen Kathy George Jon Peters Marty Pentz, Sherry Sanders Ray Woodcock

Epidemiology (Public Health) Gender Studies Health Policy Nursing Philanthropic Studies Psychology Public & Environmental Affairs Public Health Religious Studies Sociology Therapeutic Recreation

63

Appendix 6 Syllabi

S725 Syllabus S790 Syllabus

64

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

S725: Social Work Research Internship


(Variable Credits: 3, 6, or 9) Course Description This Research Internship is designed to provide doctoral students with a supervised research experience in which students work collaboratively on a current faculty research project or on an approved agency-based project under faculty supervision. The internship is designed to involve students in the major phases of a research process prior to and in preparation for the dissertation. These phases include: conceptualization of a research question(s); assessment and synthesis of the relevant literature; articulation of appropriate quantitative/qualitative methods; operationalization of theoretical concepts, empirical questions, and research procedures; collection, processing and analysis of data; interpretation of findings and the articulation of implications in terms of original research questions; and research report writing. An overarching goal of the Research Internship includes strengthening students ability to synthesize the various phases and components of social research as a foundation for subsequent independent research. This synthesis is advanced and demonstrated by the student by means of a scholarly product of publishable quality that is presented the Annual Spring Ph. D. Research Symposium. Course Objectives As a result of having completed the Research Internship, the student will have: Developed a research proposal, Participated in the planning and implementation of a research project, Engaged in the various tasks associated with the completion of a research project, Developed the capacity to plan and carry out an independent research project, Prepared a written research report of publishable quality. The specific objectives for any given Research Internship are determined in part by the research project itself, and in part by the individualized nature of the students research interests, knowledge, and skills. For example, based on self and faculty assessments of a students research competencies, interests, and learning goals; and on available opportunities for supervised research experience, a written internship Acontract or Aproposal is submitted for review and approval by the proposed faculty instructor. The contract/proposal specifies the research plan to be pursued by the student, including the specific knowledge and skills to be attained as well as how they will be attained and evaluated. The proposal, which indicates how the internship will contribute to the students capacity to perform independent research, must be mutually acceptable to the student, the faculty advisor, and the Research Internship instructor. The internship proposal must address the following set of criteria: The research competencies to be acquired/strengthened by the student. The specific research problem to be examined. The general methodological procedures to be employed. The specific research tasks/ activities to be engaged in by the student over the course of the two semester experience. 5. The research training to be provided by the member of the faculty who will serve as the research instructor (mentor) for the project, including the number of hours per week of direct supervision to be provided. 6. The nature of the anticipated scholarly product to be developed. Course Requirements and Evaluation Ordinarily, the students involvement in the Research Internship will culminate in a scholarly product of publishable quality, co-authored by the student and the faculty research instructor (mentor). At minimum, the student is expected to submit a formal written summary (the format of which must be approved by the instructor) which
65

1. 2. 3. 4.

integrates the substantive, methodological, and/or statistical components of the research project. The research instructor evaluates the students performance based upon the completion of the tasks specified in the original contract/proposal, including the attainment of the targeted knowledge and skills, and the overall quality of the final written report. This written product must be evaluated as satisfactory by the research instructor before the internship is successfully completed. Upon completion, the written report is included as part of the students Research Portfolio. All research practica are graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Structure/Format of the Internship Internship placement decisions are based on the mutual interests of doctoral students and available faculty instructors (mentors). Final placement decisions are reached through a process of negotiation involving the student, the students academic advisor, and the proposed research instructor (mentor). Research opportunities may be identified by either students or faculty. While most Research Internship placements are in social work, outside placements (particularly those associated with the students External Minor) are acceptable if quality supervision is available and all course requirements can be met. The Research Internship is an individualized research experience that is normally completed over a period of two academic semesters/terms. Pre- or co-requisites include the following core courses: At least one foundation statistics course. S720 Philosophy of Sciences and Social Work S726 Advanced Social Work Research: Qualitative Methods (3 cr) S727 Advanced Social Work Research: Quantitative Methods (3 cr) At least one of the following core social work theory courses: S710 SW Theories of Human & Social Behavior S730 Pro-Seminar on Social Work Policy Analysis S740 Social Work Practice: Theory and Research Typically, students are eligible to enroll in the Research Internship upon completion of the first year of their doctoral studies. The Research Internship requires that students complete a minimum of six (6) credit hours of approved research. With approval, students may register for up to nine (9) credits in three (3) credit units.

66

INDIANA UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK

S790: Special Topics: Independent Study


Course Description: This Special Topics course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to engage in independent study of a wide range of topics not otherwise addressed in the core Ph.D. curriculum. It is intended to complement the required courses by enabling students to focus their research interests by means of an in-depth exploration of a substantive area of practice, theory, and research directly related to a particular area of social work practice. The independent study completed in conjunction with a Special Topics course is carried out with the approval and under the direction of a faculty member with identified expertise in the subject area selected for study. The focus of any given Special Topics course will vary depending upon the students specific research interests. For example, the independent study might take the form of a meta-analysis of the relevant literature related to a students proposed dissertation topic; an in-depth exploration of different research methodologies; or an interdisciplinary review of research related to a particular topic. The study may deal with fields of practice (e.g., mental health, corrections, child welfare), public policy issues (e.g., models for the reform of the welfare system or health care), diverse populations (e.g., womens issues, vulnerable populations such as minorities, children, older adults, gays and lesbians); specific social problems (e.g., substance abuse, AIDS, domestic violence, discrimination), or the efficacy of different methodological approaches to practice (e.g., individual, family, group). Course Objective: As a result of having completed the requirements for a Special Topics course, a student will: Conduct a systematic, in-depth review of the literature related to the identified topic area, Deepen their knowledge of a particular topic directly related to the research topic, Prepare a written report summarizing the results of their independent study. The specific objectives for any given Special Topics course will be determined by and prepared individually by the student in conjunction with an identified faculty member who agrees to serve as the students mentor. It is the responsibility of the student to complete the Special Topics Proposal Form and secure the requisite approvals. In submitting a proposal, the student must attach a detailed written statement that addresses each of the following points: 1. 2. 3. 4. The parameters of the issue/problem proposed for study. The specific objectives to be pursued by means of the independent study. A description of the approach or methods to be used to conduct the study. A suggested outline for the expected end product of the independent study.

The student may request any member of the faculty of the School of Social Work to serve on a voluntary basis as instructor for a Special Topics course. Qualified faculty from others schools or departments may also serve as an instructor with the approval of the students academic advisor and the PhD Program Director. The primary criteria for selection of an appropriate faculty member to serve as an instructor for a Special Topics course is based on the individuals interest and qualifications as an established expert in the area proposed for study. A copy of the Special Topics proposal form, together with the written proposal, must be reviewed and approved by both the students academic advisor and the Director of the PhD Program prior to registration. A Special Topics course may be approved as a doctoral program elective only if it meets the following conditions: 1. The proposal clearly articulates how the suggested independent inquiry will enable the student to engage in a self-directed course of study related to a specified problem/issue of practical, theoretical, and/or research importance to the field of social work. 2. The topic and content of the independent study is not repetitive of content contained in any of the required or elective courses otherwise available to doctoral students.
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3. Since the Special Topics course may be taken for variable credits, it is essential that the level and amount of scholarly work required be comparable to the number of graduate credits to be earned. A general guide for the determination of credits is that of approximately three clock hours for each credit hour awarded for the course. 4. The student must obtain prior agreement from a member of the faculty to serve as the course instructor before a Special Topics course can be approved by the academic advisor and the Director of the PhD program. Course Evaluation Student performance in a Special Topics course is evaluated and graded by the faculty member who agrees to serve as the course instructor. The criteria to be employed in the evaluation process shall be discussed with the student at the time the proposal is agreed to by the instructor. The instructors expectations for the course, as well as the criteria to be used in evaluating the students performance, should be included in the students proposal before it is forwarded to the academic advisor and the PhD Program Director for final approval. All Special Topics courses must minimally include an acceptable written report that summarizes the nature and scope of the inquiry, the method of investigation employed, the findings and conclusions drawn, and the relevance of the findings to the students broader research agenda. A copy of the students written report, and any other materials produced in conjunction with the independent study, should be submitted to the PhD Program Director for the students file.

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