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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013

University of Massachusetts Boston University College Instructional Design Graduate Program Instructor Information
Apostolos Koutropoulos, MBA, MSIT, MEd, MA, CTS Email: a.koutropoulos@umb.edu (Preferred) Phone (W): insert here Phone (M): insert here Office Hours: By Appointment Note: Throughout the semester, I will communicate with you via your UMB email account. Please review the following website for a job aid that will assist you in forwarding your UMB email account to your personal account if you prefer: http://howto.wikispaces.umb.edu/Forward+Student+UMB+Email+to+Personal+Account

Course Information
Course Title: Introduction to Project Management

Prerequisites: INSDSG 601 - or - permission of the instructor Prerequisite Skills: Course Description:

A basic understanding of course design and learner environments.

Project Management skills are a requirement for every freelance and senior level instructional designer. This course introduces learners to the concepts and techniques of Project Management that would be useful when leading, or directing, learning intervention projects.

Technical Requirements: Students ought to have access to the Internet, a web-browser capable of running the Blackboard Learning Management System, and Java. In addition, learners will be asked to use project management software, of their choice, to complete certain aspects of the course. Required Text(s): Shwalbe, K. (2009). Information Technology Project Management. Cengage Learning. [Amazon Book Link] Page 1

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Woodill, D. & Pasian, B. (2009). Plan to Learn: Case Studies in eLearning Project Management. CeLEA | ACEeL [Free Book Link]

Other Reading: Journal Articles as Assigned http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

Recommended Texts Publication Manual of APA. Sixth Edition. Dick, W., Carey, L, Carey, J.O. (2009) The Systematic Design of Instruction. Pearson.

Course Objectives:

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the PMBOK (project management body of knowledge) by explaining, comparing and contrasting key dimensions of the framework; 2. Evaluate alternative strategies to meet the Stakeholders' demands Discuss emerging trends, concepts, and key issues in Project Management; 3. Analyze a project plan, or a description of a completed project, for best practices and lessons learned; 4. Demonstrate elementary proficiency in a project management package, such as Microsoft Project, Omni Plan, or OpenProj; 5. Create a project proposal for an instructional design project that demonstrates mastery of PM concepts including (but not limited to): a. The ability to write accurate, measurable project requirements; b. Decision-making techniques for project work breakdown structures. Generation of appropriate project components such as activities, diagrams, computations ; c. Communication of project details to various levels of management; d. Discussion of the effect of project delays and constraints on project duration and cost.

Core Competencies: The objectives for this course focus on the following (IBSTPI) core competencies: 1. Professional Foundations a) Communicate effectively in visual, oral and written form. b) Update and Improve Ones Knowledge, Skills and Attitudes Pertaining to Instructional Design and Related Fields. c) Apply fundamental research skills to instructional design projects. d) Identify and Resolve Ethical and Legal Implications of Design in the Work place. 2. Planning & Analysis Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 2

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Conducts a needs assessment. Select and Use a Variety of Techniques for Determining Instructional Content. Identify and Describe Target Population Characteristics. Analyze the Characteristics of the Environment. Analyze the Characteristics of Existing and Emerging Technologies and their Use in an Instructional Environment. f) Reflect Upon the Elements of a Situation before Finalizing Design Solutions and Strategies. 3. Implementation & Management a) Plan and Manage Instructional Design Projects. b) Promote Collaboration, Partnerships and Relationships among the Participants in a Design Project. c) Apply Business Skills to Managing Instructional Design. d) Provide for the Effective Implementation of Instructional Products and Programs. Required Assignments: Participation This is a seminar course, implying active engagement in discussions and other class activities. Participation includes completing pre-class readings, online exercises, and participating substantively in online discussions. You should expect to participate in one or more online discussions focused on applying concepts derived from the weekly topic. The agenda for each class session will clearly identify required activities for a given week. Participating in weekly discussion on the class discussion board includes both responding to the posed discussion questions in a substantive way and commenting on the responses of other participants. Again, this participation is not graded, but is required to receive credit for being in class that week. Each week you will need to make one original post, and respond to at least two of your classmates postings. Team Contract Before you are allowed to work as a team on your semester project, you will be required to work on, and have a team contract approved before you begin your collaborative coursework. The team contract will ensure that every team member is on the same page, work responsibilities are delineated and mechanisms for remedies for issues that arise are in place. It is good practice, before any teamwork begins, to have the ground rules set, the lines of communication defined, and remedies or corrective mechanisms in place. Case Analyses Throughout the semester there will be various Case Analyses available. Each team is responsible for completing selecting one case to analyze. Each team will have 3 deliverables for the case that they work on: One case analysis report. This case analysis will be submitted to the instructor for grading. If you cite information you need to use proper APA style. One quick (10 minute) streaming presentation that serves as an executive summary of your report. This streaming video will be posted on Blackboard for your classmates to see. This presentation will serve as a way to get discussion Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 3 a) b) c) d) e)

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


about the case started, as well as a way to let your classmates know your findings and analysis. Facilitation of a weekly discussion. The team that analyzes the case for a given week is responsible for moderating, and driving, the discussion around the case. Your classmates will have read the case as well, so it is your responsibility to prepare questions and techniques to foster discussion around the case. Please see bibliography for resources on discussion board moderation. Even though only one team is writing an analysis, everyone in the class is expected to read and be able to contribute to the discussion of the case. Semester Project (part I) This part of your semester project will include the following parts: The basic scope of the project your will be managing An assessment of the feasibility of your project An initial listing of deliverables (as complete as possible) for your PM project An initial listing of project stakeholders An initial business case An initial SWOT analysis A project charter Once you complete the first part of your semester project, you will receive feedback, and you should use this feedback to feed into the improvement of your final deliverable (Semester Project part II) Semester Project (part II) This will be your final course deliverable. This will be a complete project management report, which will include, but is not limited to: An executive summary The business case A stakeholder analysis A project charter A description of scope and a WBS A complete SWOT analysis A plan for dealing with risks Financial estimations of cost & budgeting Project scheduling (Gantt chart) A critical path analysis A project quality checklist Final Presentation This final presentation will take place on the final day(s) of class (depending on how many people are presenting and time allotments). This final week is all about putting it all together. In this presentation you will be presenting, to the class, your semester project (both parts), including (but not limited to) the project at hand, the stakeholders, the WBS, the timeline for completion, costs associated with the project, and any issues that you Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 4

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


expect to arise. This deliverable is due to the instructor via Blackboard (see calendar for date). Your presentation can use any technology your team wishes to use, so long as it includes both visuals and audio voiceover. Your presentation needs to be in a streaming format so that your fellow learners do not need to download it in order to play it back. Your presentation should be no more than 20 minutes; and you can have your presentation be multiple parts (i.e. four parts, each being 5 minutes long) just remember, each part needs to flow neatly from one to the other. Course Rubric: Assignment/Deliverable 1. Participation 2. Team Contract 3. Case Analyses 4. Semester Project Part I Relevant Course Objective 1a, 1b, 1d 1a, 1d, 3b, 3c 1a, 1b, 1d, 3b, 3c, 3d 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d 1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, 2e, 2f, 3a, 3b, 3c, 3d Grade % 10% 10% 15% 25%

5. Semester Project Part II

30%

6. Final Presentation

10%

Course Policies: Attendance You are required to attend every course session for this class. If you participate at any point during the week online, you will be counted as having attended class that week. Participation Participation presupposes attendance. If you dont attend you cant participate in class. Participation includes completing all required reading and writing assignments prior to participating in discussions and thus thoughtfully participating in discussions, and taking responsibility for helping create a positive learning situation by arriving promptly, listening respectfully, and participating constructively. Group Work The semester project is going to be group based. Like most project management plans, you cant go at it alone. In order to facilitate the group process: o let me know in advance of your intentions to collaborate [first 2 weeks of the semester] in other words, whos in which group. You will be self-forming groups. o you create a team contract to show me that you have defined the parameters of your partnership, who does what, in what time frame, and what remedies you will have in place if conflicts arise. I can provide you with a template for a team contract. o you agree to evaluate (anonymously) the work of your group peers, and agree to receive anonymous evaluation from your group peers, upon completion of work. Your team grade will only be a team grade if everyone agrees that work was distributed equally. I will provide you with a rubric to grade your peers. Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Page 5

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Late Work Late work for full credit will be accepted only if its late due to demonstrable unforeseen circumstances such as a medical or family emergency. Late work is due within two weeks of due date, no later. Work turned in late, without extenuating circumstances will drop half a grade for every day its late. Collegiality It is expected that work will be turned in on time. Feedback is available from the instructor, provided that you give adequate time (at least a weeks notice) to the instructor for this feedback request. At times debate in class could get heated. If you disagree with someone, please do it in a respectful manner and if in the end you cant agree, then you agree to disagree. Disrespectful language is not an option. For additional information see Core Netiquette Rules: http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html Course Social Traditionally online courses have contained a course caf discussion forum where non-course social conversations could take place. Our program has an online community for current students and alumni at http://www.umassid.com. I encourage you to use this space for socializing with classmates, as well as other students and alumni. This is also a good space to ask for advice, ask fellow instructional designers to take surveys that you create, and a place to find and post news (and jobs) pertaining to instructional design, educational technology, teaching and learning.

Grading
Grading: This course is designed to help everyone succeed and get the most out of research methodologies and research analysis. Weekly discussions (online and in-class) are ungraded -- simply complete them all and 20% of your grade is an "A." The following scale is used for final grading: Grade type for the course is a whole or partial letter grade. (Please see table below) Note: the lowest passing grade for a graduate student is a C. Grades lower than a C that are submitted by faculty will automatically be recorded as an F. Please see the Graduate Bulletin for more detailed information on the Universitys grading policy.

UMass Boston Graduate Grading Policy


Letter Grade A AB+ B B-

Percentage
93-100% 90-92% 87-89% 83-86% 80-82%

Quality Points
4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 Page 6

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


C+ C F INC INC/F W AU NA 77-79% 73-76% 0-72%
Given under very restricted terms and only when satisfactory work has been accomplished in majority of coursework. Contract of completion terms is required. Received for failure to comply with contracted completion terms. Received if withdrawal occurs before the withdrawal deadline. Audit (only permitted on space-available basis) Not Attending (student appeared on roster, but never attended class. Student is still responsible for tuition and fee charges unless withdrawal form is submitted before deadline. NA has no effect on cumulative GPA.)

2.3 2.0 0.0 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

72 and below is a failing grade (UMass Boston policy for graduate courses)Grades of "Incomplete" may be granted at the discretion of the instructor. An "Incomplete" will only be available to students who have completed at least 75% of the course work and have a substantiated problem at the end of the semester that prevents completion of the course work. Due dates for assignments will be posted on Blackboard. Students are expected to submitall assignments on time. Lateness is permitted without penalty only with written medical documentation or under grave extenuating circumstances that can be substantiated. Final decision rests with the instructor.

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Methods of Instruction
This course Project Management is a designed for an online environment. Taking a course online is a different type of experience from meeting face-to-face each week, and the activities of the class will reflect these differences. This course is divided into sessions, each of which will run for one week. Each new session begins on Monday at 6:00 AM EST. Any work due during a previous session must be submitted BEFORE that time. Sessions will be available one or two weeks in advance, so that you can be prepared for upcoming modules and get a head start if youd like. Keeping up with the work is one of the keys and challenges to being a successful graduate student; and this course does require more readings that the typical instructional design course. Typically, students should plan to spend on average approximately 9-12 hours each week completing the activities outside of class for each session (3 hours per credit). This means that youd spend 3 hours in Blackboard in-class per week, so you can expect to spend 12-15 hours per week doing readings, preparing work and presentations, and participating online in the fora. Weekly work may include the following activities: Listening to a brief module introductory lecture; Readings from the course textbooks; Additional research article readings; Visiting websites with Project Management Information; Experimenting with technologies that facilitate project management; Completing case analyses. These tasks may include Internet research, working with a case study, peer-reviewing another student's work and providing feedback, or working on a piece of your semester project. These assignments will not be graded, but you must complete them to receive credit forbeing in class that week. In addition to these weekly activities, each group of students will use complete a semester project consisting of a project management plan.

Accommodations
Section 504, 508 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 offer guidelines for curriculum modifications and adaptations for students with documented disabilities. If applicable, you may obtain adaptation recommendations from the UMass Boston Ross Center (508-287-7430. You need to present and discuss these recommendations with me within a reasonable period, prior to the end of the Drop/Add period. You are advised to retain a copy of this syllabus in your personal files for use when applying for future degrees, certification, licensure, or transfer of credit.

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Code of Student Conduct
Students are required to adhere to the Code of Student Conduct, including requirements for the Academic Honesty Policy, delineated in the University of Massachusetts Boston Graduate Studies Bulletin and relevant program student handbook(s). http://media.umassp.edu/massedu/policy/3-08%20UMB%20Code%20of%20Conduct.pdf You are encouraged to visit and review the UMass website on Correct Citation and Avoiding Plagiarism: http://umb.libguides.com/GradStudiesCitations

Other Pertinent and Important Information


Writing Style: Everything in this course (except discussion posts) should be written following the Style Guide of the American Psychological Association (APA). This format is the academic standard among social scientists in the United States. As such, you should be able to write in this format as a graduate student in Education, and especially if you plan to pursue additional post-graduate studies. Your professional writing in the instructional design profession may not follow APA style,but part of your graduate education in the Instructional Design program is to learn how to communicate to a variety of audiences both formal and informal. Learning how to write following these guidelines will help you demonstrate excellent written communication skills to your own future stakeholders. In addition to the APA Style Manual (required readings) you can find many excellent resources to help you learn APA Style; A good bootcamp overview for APA is provided by Purdues Online Writing Lab: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/

Assignment Submissions:

All assignment submissions will be through using Google Docs. Google Docs doesnt have as many features as Microsoft Word, but it was what you need to complete your assignments. The reason we are using Google Docs is because as a program it provides a better platform for collaboration and for providing comments and feedback. This syllabus is subject to change throughout the semester due to emergent student needs, important new learning opportunities, guest speakers, inclement weather, or other unforeseen situations. In the event a change must be made, I will notify you as soon as practically possible, and provide an updated syllabus on our course website.

Changes to Syllabus:

Course Schedule

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Week 1: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Introductions & Welcome! Blackboard A survey of Project Management, and its place in the ISD process.

Schwalbe Chapter 1: Introduction to project management Schwalbe Chapter 2: Project Management and the IT Context Participation in the Introductory Thread Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Create an account on http://www.umassid.com if you dont already have one, connect with classmates, and write a blog post on a topic of your choosing.

Week 2: Starting Monday 00/00/2013


Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Project Integration Management Blackboard Functional understanding of project initiation Understanding of all of the parts of a project and their interrelations. Schwalbe Chapter 4: Project Integration Management Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the Week 2 exploratory discussion: Wins and Fails of project initiation. None this week

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 3: Starting Monday 00/00/2013


Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Project Scope Management Blackboard Understanding of what makes for good scope management Applying knowledge to create a scope statement Using software to assist in scope management Schwalbe Chapter 5: Project Scope Management Woodill & Pasian Chapter 4: Flexmasters: a unique elearning initiative Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the discussion of this weeks case Team Alpha Presentation & Discussion Facilitation Page 10

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Week 4: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Project Time & Cost Management Blackboard Understanding the basics of project time management and defining activities based on project schedules Use a Gantt chart to plan and track a PM schedule Developing tools and techniques for controlling and managing project schedules Understanding of basic cost management principles Understanding the basics processes for cost budgeting Schwalbe Chapter 6: Project Time Management Schwalbe Chapter 7: Project Cost Management Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the Week 4 exploratory discussion: Watch out, is that scope creep is see coming? Discussion on scope creep, its effects on Time and Cost, ways to combat, and personal experiences with scope creep. None this week

Reading Assignment Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 5: Starting Monday 00/00/2013


Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Project Quality Management Blackboard Understanding the importance of project quality management for ID products Describe quality management with relation to scope management Describe how leadership, cost of quality, organization culture, and maturity models relate to improving quality Schwalbe Chapter 8: Project Quality Management Woodill & Pasian Chapter 5: Creating the instructor toolbelt: managing faculty development at a technical community college Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the discussion of this weeks case Team Beta Presentation & Discussion Facilitation

Reading Assignment Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Week 6: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Project HR Management Blackboard Explain the importance of good HRM to PM projects Summarize key concepts of managing people Discuss HRM planning as it relates to PM Schwalbe Chapter 9: Project Human Resource Management Woodill & Pasian Chapter 24: When Worlds Collide: Project Management and the Collegial Culture Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the discussion of this weeks case Team Gamma Presentation & Discussion Facilitation Semester Project Part I due

Week 7: Starting Monday 00/00/2013


Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Project Communication Management Blackboard Explain the elements of project communication Describe the various ways of communicating project information List methods for improving communication Schwalbe Chapter 10: Project Communication Management Woodill & Pasian Chapter 11: Communications challenge: migrating "f2f" to elearning Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the discussion of this weeks case Team Delta Case Presentation & Discussion Facilitation

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Week 8: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Project Risk & Procurement Management Blackboard Understand risk, and its importance to good PM Describe the risk identification process, tools and techniques to identify risk Explain analytic processes for quantifying risk Describe the work involved in planning purchases and acquisitions Understanding RFPs and the process of selection post RFP. Schwalbe Chapter 11: Project Risk Management Schwalbe Chapter 12: Project Procurement Management Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the Week 8 exploratory discussion: With eyes wide open - A discussion on risk, knowing what might come, and how to deal with it! None this week

Reading Assignment Class Activities

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 9: Starting Monday 00/00/2013


Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Agile Project Management Blackboard Describe the historical background and benefits of Agile PM (APM) Know when, and how to, apply Agile PM Be able to use and adapt the iterative project management life cycle model. Wysocki Chapter 11: Agile Project Management Woodill & Pasian Chapter 21: Moving targets: factors affecting decisions to shift university courses and services online Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion Participation in the discussion of this weeks case Team Epsilon Case Presentation & Discussion Facilitation

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Week 10: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Extreme Project Management Blackboard Know when, and how, to apply Extreme Project Management (xPM) Describe the benefits of xPM Use, and adapt, the Extreme PMLC model Wysocki Chapter 12: Extreme Project Management Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion. Participation in the Week 10 exploratory discussion: Traditional, Agile, Extreme A discussion on PM methodologies. None this week

Assignment(s): Due Date:

Week 11: Starting Monday 00/00/2013


Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities When things go wrong! Blackboard Be able to recognize a project in distress Understanding why projects go awry Conduct a Root Cause Analysis for a distressed project Wysocki Chapter 16: Prevention and Intervention Strategies for Distressed Projects Participation in the Chapter Questions, Comments & AHA! Moments discussion Participation in the Week 11 exploratory discussion: When the mud hits the fan: experiences with distressed (and distressing) projects, and your solutions to them. None this week

Assignment(s): Due Date:

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Week 12: Starting Monday 00/00/2013
Core Topic(s): Location(s): Learning Objectives: Reading Assignment Class Activities Assignment(s): Due Date: Final Head-Scratchers, Wrap-up & Presentations Blackboard Course wrap-up & demystification of the still mystifying.

None Participation in the Wrap-up Head-scratchers discussion board. Final Presentations due Final Project Reports due

Resources
Organizations Association for Project Management - http://www.apm.org.uk/ Project Management Center - http://www.infogoal.com/pmc/ Project Management Institute (PMP Certification) - http://www.pmi.org/ Project Management Reference - http://www.projectmanagement.com/ Journals PM Word Today - http://www.pmworldtoday.net/ Project Management Journal (available via Healey Library) International Journal of Project Management (available via Healey Library) Harvard Business Review (available via Healey Library) Project Management Software OpenProj - http://sourceforge.net/projects/openproj/ Microsoft Project (comes with your textbook) - http://www.microsoft.com/project/ OmniPlan - http://www.omnigroup.com/products/omniplan/ ConceptDraw Project - http://www.conceptdraw.com/products/strength-project Online Project management tool review - http://online-project-managementreview.toptenreviews.com Bibliographies Michael Greers PM Bibliography - http://www.michaelgreer.com/Greer-bibliography.htm David H. Gleasons PM bibliography - http://www.info-ethics.com/docs/Bibliography-ProjectManagement.pdf MAAW PM Bibliography - http://maaw.info/ProjectManagementArticles.htm

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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INSDSG-697 Project Management Spring Syllabus 2013


Bibliography
Darnall, R. & Preston, J. M. (2010) Project Management from Simple to Complex. Flatworld Knowledge. http://catalog.flatworldknowledge.com/catalog/editions/25 Project Management Institute (2008). A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge. PMI Ryerson University (n.d.) Discussion Board Moderation. Retrieved from: http://de.ryerson.ca/portals/de/assets/resources/Moderation.pdf LaTrobe University (n.d.) Designing Effective Online Discussion Forums. Retrieved from: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/teaching/assets/downloads/EffectiveOnlineDiscussion.pdf Reed, M. (2007) How to effectively moderate forums. CommunitySpark.com. Retrieved from: http://www.communityspark.com/how-to-effectively-moderate-forums/ Wiley, D. (n.d.). Project Management for Instructional Designers. Get it for free at: http://idpm.us/ Wysocki, R. K. (2011). Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme. Wiley.

Updated: June, 26 2012 This Project Management Course Syllabus by Apostolos Koutropoulos is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

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