DELPHOS

The
50¢ daily www.delphosherald.com BY MARK SHERMAN The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court today upheld the individual insurance requirement at the heart of President Barack Obama’s historic health care overhaul. The decision means the huge overhaul, still only partly in effect, will proceed and pick up momentum over the next several years, affecting the way that countless Americans receive and pay for their personal medical care. The ruling also hands Obama a campaign-season victory in rejecting arguments that Congress went too far in requiring most Americans to have health insurance or pay a penalty. Breaking with the court’s other conservative justices, Chief Justice John Roberts announced the judgment that allows the law to go forward with its aim of covering more than 30 million uninsured Americans. The justices rejected two of the administration’s three arguments in support of the insurance requirement. But the court said the mandate can be construed as a tax. “Because the Constitution permits such a tax, it is not our role to forbid it, or to pass upon its wisdom or fairness,” Roberts said. The court found problems

Towns try to loosen reins on food producers, p7

ACME roundup, p6

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

High court upholds key part of Obama health law
with the law’s expansion of Medicaid, but even there said the expansion could proceed as long as the federal government does not threaten to withhold states’ entire Medicaid allotment if they don’t take part in the law’s extension. The court’s four liberal justices, Stephen Breyer, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor, joined Roberts in the outcome. Justices Samuel Alito, Anthony Kennedy, Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas dissented. “The act before us here exceeds federal power both in mandating the purchase of health insurance and in deny-

Thursday, June 28, 2012

HERALD
Delphos, Ohio

Colleges move toward absolute bans on smoking
BY JULIE CARR SMYTH The Associated Press COLUMBUS — As a political science major at Ohio State University, Ida Seitter says, she lit up many a cigarette to help her through the stress of exam season. Right or wrong, they were her security blanket as she toiled through college. Seitter, now 26, was old enough by then to make her own decisions, she says. She opposes efforts by policymakers in Ohio, New York, California and other states to impose bans on tobacco use not just in buildings at public colleges, but also anywhere on the campus — even in the open air. “Just back away from me a little bit. I won’t blow it in your face and I’ll try not to

Officials urge residents to use caution during extreme heat Hearing set for Information submitted heat exhaustion when the body

ing non-consenting states all Medicaid funding,” the dissenters said in a joint statement. Republican campaign strategists said presidential candidate Mitt Romney will use the court’s ruling to continue campaigning against “Obamacare” and attacking the president’s signature health care program as a tax increase. “Obama might have his law, but the GOP has a cause,” said veteran campaign adviser Terry Holt. “This promises to galvanize Republican support around a repeal of what could well be called the largest tax increase in American history.”

be rude,” Seitter says. “At the same time, I think it’s a little discriminatory for a practice that is considered legal.” Bans on use, advertising and sales of tobacco in all its forms are being enacted or considered at perhaps half of campuses nationwide, sometimes over the objections of student smokers, staff and faculty. The movement is driven by mounting evidence of the health risks of secondhand smoke, the reduced costs of smoke-free dorms and a drive to minimize enticements to smoke at a critical age for forming lifelong habits. California’s state system will begin to bar tobacco use in 2013. A ban on use and advertising at the City University of New York system goes See SMOKING, page 3

Upfront

township budget
Notice is hereby given a public hearing will be held on the budget prepared by the Trustees and Fiscal Officer of Marion Township of Allen County for the next succeeding fiscal year ending Dec. 31, 2013, at 7 p.m. July 9 at the township house. Copies of the proposed budget are available for public inspection at the Marion Township Office, 5405 Kiggins Road.

Team sets annual golf scramble
The 2012 “Relay for Life” Golf Scramble is set for July 21 at the Delphos Country Club. Four-person teams can play in the open scramble for $200. Cash prizes, 50-50 raffle, contest holes and proximity prizes will be offered. To participate, contact Dave and Cindy Burgei at 419-453-3706 or dburgei@bright.net.

COLUMBUS — With heat and humidity on the rise, the Ohio Department of Health and Ohio Emergency Management Agency urge residents to use extra care to avoid heat-related illness over the next several days. Even short periods of high temperatures can cause serious health problems. During hot weather health emergencies, keep informed by listening to local weather and news channels or contact local health departments for health and safety updates. Doing too much on a hot day, spending too much time in the sun or staying too long in an overheated place can cause heat-related illnesses “When temperatures are extremely hot and there is high humidity, the body has to work extra hard to try to maintain a normal temperature,” said ODH Director Ted Wymyslo, M.D. “We start to see heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke and

is overwhelmed. It’s important to pay attention to warnings; in 2010 there were nine related deaths in Ohio. According to FEMA, most heat disorders occur because a person has been over-exposed to heat or has over-exercised for his/her age and physical condition. People most at risk for heat injuries are infants and young children; people age 65 and older; overweight people; people who over-exert during work or exercise; and people who are ill or on certain medications. “Summer is the ideal season for increased outdoor activity and fun in the sun,” said Nancy Dragani, Ohio EMA executive director. “But summer is also the time where people have increased injuries and accidents. If you have neighbors who are elderly or have special medical needs, check on them to ensure they’re cool enough and have enough water to drink.” See CAUTION, page 3

Volunteers from the Wildcat football team along with Stadium Club members and park workers mulched trees, flower beds and other landscaping at Stadium Park Saturday. Isaac Illig, left, Austin Jettinghoff and Zavier Buzard take a short break while awaiting the next load of mulch.

Wildcat gridders help mulch at park

Photo submitted

Landeck sets Bible school

Heat wave: More than 1,000 records fall in US in a week
The Associated Press center. Still, it’s impressive, given that records usually aren’t broken until the scorching months of July and August. “Any time you’re breaking all-time records in midto late-June, that’s a healthy heat wave,” Arndt said. And if forecasts hold, more records could fall in the coming days in the central and western parts of the country and extend to the East Coast through the weekend. Though it’s been a week that could fry a person’s soul — and their soles and hands, really anything exposed to the relentless sun — no matter where you are, the objective is the same: stay cool. High stakes, high temps All bets are off at the famed thoroughbred racetrack Churchill Downs during the heat wave — at least they will be today. The Louisville, Ky., venue canceled its racing card as meteorologists predicted temperatures would touch at least 100 degrees. Track spokesman Darren Rogers said he thinks it’s the first time the home of the Kentucky Derby has canceled racing due to extreme heat. Longtime horse trainer Dale Romans has seen the toll that sweltering temperatures can take on the animals. “I’ve seen horses have heat strokes, and it’s not a pretty sight,” the veteran Kentucky trainer said Wednesday. Romans said he thinks most of the horses and humans could handle the heat, but it’s not worth the risk, especially when the dirt track soaks up the sun’s heat. “These are professional athletes,” he said. “They’re exerting all their energy, and everybody knows how tough it is to get that hot. Some of the horses just can’t cool down fast enough afterward.” __ Nighttime firefighting Wildfires pack intense heat, but soaring temperatures and whipping winds are piling on the men and women battling the blazes raging across the Rocky Mountains. U.S. Forest Service firefighter Owen Johnson had to work overnight and avoided the piping-hot daytime temperatures in the region, which toppled records in Colorado, Wyoming and Montana. On Tuesday, Colorado Springs reached 101 degrees, and Miles City in eastern Montana soared to 111 degrees, the highest ever recorded in that area. A call came in after Johnson’s regular shift Monday in the Helena National Forest in Montana. A wildfire was racing through the Scratchgravel Hills, threatening at least 200 homes. But firefighters had to wait to pose a direct attack until midnight, when the temperatures cooled and the wind died down. On Tuesday morning,

If you’re feeling hot this week, it’s not a mirage. From Landeck St. John the Montana to Louisiana, hunBaptist Catholic Church dreds of heat records have will hold Vocational Bible been slashed as harrowing School from 6:30-8:30 p.m. temperatures leave cornfields Aug. 6-9 for all children parched and city sidewalks between the ages of 3 (and sizzling. potty trained) and those On Tuesday, 251 new entering 5th grade on the daily high temperature upcoming school year. records were set, boosting to The free program requires 1,015 the number of records registering by July 13. set in the past seven days. Call Shelly Kroeger at The consequences range 419-692-2409 or Crysti from comical — a baconRode at 419-303-6061. fried driveway in Oklahoma — to catastrophic, as wildIndex fires consuming parts of the Obituaries 2 Rocky Mountains are fueled State/Local 3 by oppressive heat and gusty Politics 4 winds. The record-breaking numCommunity 5 Sports 6 bers might seem big, but Farm 7 they’re hard to put into conClassifieds 8 text — the National Climatic TV 9 Data Center has only been tracking the daily numbers broken for a little more than a year, said Derek Arndt, head of climate monitoring at the

Johnson figured he had worked more than 24 hours, and probably wouldn’t quit until the sun went down. His sweaty hands gripping a banana and a cup of coffee, he gave a tired shrug when asked to compare this fire to others in his 13-year career. “Every fire’s different,” he said. “They all pose their own risks and challenges. ___ Praying for rain On the treeless, windswept Kansas prairie, the searing mix of sun and triple-digit heat is a recipe for agricultural disaster. Some residents have taken to praying for rain and cooler temperatures in this sparsely populated western part of the state. Menlo farmer Brian Baalman can testify to that. “Everybody is just sick of it. They just wish we would get a good rain,” he said. “It has become a point to pray for it at church on Sunday, See HEAT, page 3

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Your Weekend Weather outlook
Very hot. Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 90s. Lows in the lower 70s.

FRIDAY

Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 90s. Lows in the lower 70s.

SATURDAY

Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 90s. Lows in the lower 70s.

SUNDAY

944 E. Fifth St.

EXTENDED FORECAST

Mostly clear Monday. Highs in the mid 90s. Lows in the lower 70s.

2 – The Herald

Thursday, June 28, 2012

www.delphosherald.com

Strong explosion rocks Syria’s capital
The Associated Press DAMASCUS, Syria — A strong explosion rocked the Syrian capital today near a busy market and the country’s highest court, wounding at least three people and sending clouds of black smoke into the sky. The blast came as tensions threatened to spread across the region. Neighboring Turkey deployed anti-aircraft guns and other weapons alongside its border with Syria, nearly a week after Syrian forces shot a Turkish military plane out of the sky, Turkish state TV said today. Major world powers will meet Saturday in Geneva for talks on Syria, but few observers expect a major breakthrough. Syria has the protection or Russia, a vetowielding member of the U.N. Security Council, and has so far been impervious to international pressure. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said today that Moscow will not endorse a call for Assad to give up power. “We are not supporting and will not support any external meddling,” he said. “External players must not dictate ... to Syrians, but, first of all, must commit to influencing all the sides in Syria to stop the violence.” It was not clear who was behind today’s blast in Damascus. Much of the violence that has gripped Syria since the uprising began has been sanctioned by the government to crush dissent. But rebel fighters are launching increasingly deadly attacks on regime targets, and several massive suicide attacks this year suggest al-Qaida or other extremists are joining the fray. An Associated Press reporter at the scene of the blast said some cars were charred and many had their windshields blown out. “I did not see any wounded people, but cars and nearby shops were damaged,” said Fawaz Mishhim, a witness who was in a nearby market when he heard the explosion. Syria’s state-run TV said the explosion was in the parking lot of the Palace of Justice, a compound that houses several courts. The blast happened at 1 p.m. near the capital’s famous

For The Record

The following individuals appeared before Judge Charles Steele Wednesday in Van Wert County Common Pleas Court: After a one and a half day jury trial, Kasey Schisler, 23, of Van Wert was found guilty of complicity to trafficking in heroin, a felony of the fourth degree. He was also found to have committed this offense in the vicinity of a school. This involved helping another individual sell heroin in the area of Washington School in Van Wert. He was found not guilty of a second count for trafficking in heroin. He was ordered held on bond until his sentencing set for Aug. 8. In other unrelated cases: Sam Whisman, 20, Van Wert, changed his plea to guilty to trafficking drugs, a felony of the fifth degree.

VAN WERT COUNTY COURT NEWS
The court ordered a presentence investigation and set sentencing for Aug. 8. A second count of trafficking was dismissed for his plea. Hamilton Martinez, age 51, Phillipsburg, changed his plea to guilty to theft of a credit card, a felony five. A second charge of theft from an elderly person was dismissed for his plea. The court ordered a presentence investigation and set sentencing for Aug. 8. Moses Wilder, 29, Van Wert was sentenced following his plea to a charge of domestic violence, a felony of the fourth degree. He was sentenced to three years of community control with up to six months at the WORTH Center, an additional 30 days jail, 200 hours community service, substance abuse and psychological assessments and treatment, 2 years intensive probation, pay attorney fees and court costs. He was released on a surety bond until WORTH Center but ordered to have no contact with his victim. He had a 12-month prison sentence deferred pending completion of community control. Britney Mitchell, 19, Van Wert, changed her plea to guilty to possession of drugs, a felony five. She then requested and was granted Treatment in Lieu of Conviction. Further proceedings were stayed pending completion of the treatment program. Orman Goings II, 26, of Latty, changed his plea to guilty to operating a vehicle while intoxicated, fourth offense in 6 years making it a felony of the fourth degree. The court ordered a presentence investigation and set sentencing for Aug. 8. Defendant was ordered held without bond because he had a one car accident after consuming alcohol while out on bond from this case. Brittany Bermudez, 21,

Hamidiyeh Market, an area crowded with families stocking up on food and other supplies for the weekend, which begins on Friday in Syria. Witnesses reported hearing one blast, but state-run TV said two explosions struck the area. The report also said a roadside bomb was found but did not explode. Syria has been hit by a wave of massive explosions in recent months, killing dozens of people. Most of the explosions targeted the security agencies of President Bashar Assad, who is fighting to end a 15-month-old uprising against his rule. Last month, an explosion targeted a military intelligence compound south of Damascus killing 55 people. It was Syria’s deadliest blast.

Delphos weather

WEATHER

High temperature Wednesday in Delphos was 89 degrees, low was 56. High a year ago today was 83, low was 65. Record high for today is 101, set in 1934. Record low is 49, set in 2004. WEATHER FORECAST Tri-county Associated Press TODAY: Very hot. Mostly sunny. Windy. Highs around 105. Southwest winds 10 to 20 mph becoming west 20 to 30 mph in the afternoon. TONIGHT: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 70s. Northwest winds 15 to 20 mph decreasing to up to 10 mph overnight. FRIDAY: Very hot. Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 90s. West winds 5 to 10 mph. FRIDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy. Lows in the lower 70s. West winds around 10 mph. SATURDAY-SUNDAY NIGHT: Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 90s. Lows in the lower 70s. M O N D A Y INDEPENDENCE DAY: Mostly clear. Highs in the mid 90s. Lows in the lower 70s.

The Delphos Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor Ray Geary, general manager Delphos Herald, Inc. Don Hemple, advertising manager Tiffany Brantley, circulation manager The Daily Herald (USPS 1525 8000) is published daily except Sundays, Tuesdays and Holidays. By carrier in Delphos and area towns, or by rural motor route where available $1.48 per week. By mail in Allen, Van Wert, or Putnam County, $97 per year. Outside these counties $110 per year. Entered in the post office in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as Periodicals, postage paid at Delphos, Ohio. No mail subscriptions will be accepted in towns or villages where The Daily Herald paper carriers or motor routes provide daily home delivery for $1.48 per week. 405 North Main St. TELEPHONE 695-0015 Office Hours 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to THE DAILY HERALD, 405 N. Main St. Delphos, Ohio 45833
Vol. 143 No. 11

Arcadia, was sentenced after pleading guilty to attempted burglary, a felony of the fourth degree. She received 3 years community control, 30 days jail with credit for 15 days served. This time will be served concurrently with a similar sentence from Putnam County, 200 hours community service, substance abuse assessment and treatment, no unsupervised contact with Logan Weis, must live with her father, 2 years intensive probation, pay attorney fees and court costs, 9 months prison deferred pending completion of community control. Rodney Walker, 40, Van Wert, was sentenced after his plea to attempted trespassing in a habitation, a felony of the fifth degree. He was sentenced to 3 years community control, 30 days jail with credit for time served, 200 hours community service, substance abuse assessment and treatment, 2 years intensive probation, pay attorney fees and court costs, 9 months prison deferred pending completion of community control.

ST. RITA’S A boy was born June 28 to Jessica Jettinghoff and Cory Bertling. BECKMANN, Mary Elizabeth “Betty,” 90, of Delphos, Mass of Christian Burial will begin at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church, the Rev. Melvin Verhoff will officiate. Burial will be in the church cemetery. Friends may call from 2-8 p.m. Friday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home, where a parish wake service will be held at 7:30 p.m. RICHCREEK, Lela R. (Peltier), 98, of Delphos, Graveside services will begin at 11 a.m. Saturday in Walnut Grove Cemetery, the Rev. David Howell officiating. Friends may call from 4-8 p.m. Friday at Harter and Schier Funeral Home. Memorial contributions may be made to Trinity United Methodist Church. CLEVELAND (AP) — These Ohio lotteries were drawn Wednesday: Mega Millions Estimated jackpot: $75 M Pick 3 Midday 5-3-0 Powerball Estimated jackpot: $40 M Ten OH Midday 02-03-08-09-11-12-15-1722-24-27-30-31-36-43-46-4950-61-64

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Answers to Wednesday’s questions: Conway Twitty’s name was tweaked to provide the name of Conrad Birdie, the title character in the popular stage and Hollywood musical Bye Bye Birdie. There are seeds in some citrus fruit that is sold as seedless because citrus fruit with up to five seeds is commercially classified as seedless. Today’s questions: What is the three-word motto of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point? What Hollywood couple posed as a 1960s-era husband and wife for a 60-page W magazine photo feature entitles “Domestic Bliss?” Answers in Friday’s Herald. Today’s words: Metopomancy: fortunetelling using the face Xiuhtecutli: the Axtec fire god

LOTTERY

The Delphos Fire Association would like to thank everyone for making the 138th N.O.V.F.A. Convention a tremendous success. We would like to thank the citizens of Delphos, the City Administration, and the Delphos Police Dept. for allowing us to use your city for the events on Friday and the parade on Saturday. To the local business owners and volunteers we would like to thank you for all of your support and donations. Thank you to Delphos City Schools and Delphos St. John’s for allowing us to use your venues for our special events. Without all of your support, this event would not have been possible. We would also like to thank all of the Fire Dept. Retirees and volunteers for your very active roll and we appreciate all that you have done for the association. To the surrounding Fire and EMS Departments, we thank you for helping us through the busy weekend. We would like to thank anyone who purchased a “Big Ticket” as well as souvenirs and advertising in the yearbook. The “Big Ticket” winner was Al Hilvers of Delphos. A complete list of the winners is available at http://www.novfa. net. The money raised during this great event will be used to purchase items that will help us in protecting you, the citizens we serve. Sincerely, The Delphos Fire Association Corn: Wheat: Beans:

THANK YOU

LOCAL PRICES
$6.83 $7.32 $14.49

By The Associated Press Today is Thursday, June 28, the 180th day of 2012. There are 186 days left in the year. Today’s Highlights in History: On June 28, 1712, philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau, one of the most influential thinkers of the 18th century Enlightenment, was born in Geneva. On this date: In 1778, the Revolutionary War Battle of Monmouth took place in New Jersey; it was from this battle that the legend of “Molly Pitcher” arose.

TODAY IN HISTORY

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Thursday, June 28, 2012

The Herald –3

Smoking

BRIEFS

STATE/LOCAL Hunger doesn’t take Caution

(Continued from page 1)

a summer vacation

(Continued from page 1)

tem goes into effect in September, and the University of Missouri at Columbia is going smoke-free in 2014. Ohio higher education officials plan a vote next month urging all public campuses to ban tobacco use. That includes Ohio State, one of the nation’s largest universities, which currently bans only indoor smoking. According to the surgeon general’s report for 2012, tobacco use among people ages 18 to 25 remains at epidemic proportions nationwide. The review found 90 percent of smokers started by age 18, and 99 percent by age 26. About a quarter to a third of college students smoke, studies have found. The study found the U.S. would have 3 million fewer young smokers if success in reducing youth smoking by state tobacco-cessation programs from 1997 to 2003 had been sustained. Many of the programs have been hit by budget cuts. Health and education officials, anti-smoking groups and a generation of students who grew up smoke-free are increasingly united on the issue, says Bronson Frick, associate director of Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights. “There are many reasons why a college or university may choose to pursue this type of policy, whether secondhand smoke, dorm fires, or other issues,” he says. “They are also questioning what the role of tobacco is in this academic setting, where we’re supposed to be standing for truth and training the next generation of leaders.” According to data kept by the nonsmokers group, campus tobacco bans have risen from virtually zero a decade ago to 711 today. That includes both four-year and two-year institutions, both public and private. One of the first campuses to ban tobacco was Ozarks Technical Community College in Springfield, Mo., which endorsed the move in 1999 and put it in place four years later. The school also established a research center that works with other colleges and hospitals pursuing similar moves, now known as the National Center for Tobacco Policy. Ty Patterson, the center’s director, says Ozarks quickly realized that its previous policy of allowing smoking in designated outdoor areas was impractical and couldn’t be properly enforced.

More than 840,000 children people who don’t have their in Ohio depend on school for nutritional needs met – stackmore than an education. For ing the odds not only against children living well-below their well-being, but also burthe poverty line, schools also dening Ohio’s Medicaid sysprovide a dependable source tem and economy. of food and nutrition. Although Summer Food During the school sites are located throughyear, more than out the Buckeye 840,000 Ohio state, only 66,000 children receive of the 840,000 nutrition assischildren who tance through receive nutrition free or reducedassistance durprice school ing the academic lunches. So what year participate happens to these in summer meal children durprograms. That’s ing the summer why two years months? While ago, I co–hosted critical lifea first-of-its-kind lines – providing hunger summit essential support at the Mid-Ohio – are available, Foodbank with Brown many Ohio famileading anti-hunger lies don’t know advocates from about them. across Ohio. This past year, Now that school is out for USDA Undersecretary Kevin summer, these Ohio children Concannon came to Ohio to whose parents, grandparents, hold the second summit. or guardians are struggling to Rather than lament a growmake ends meet can still have ing problem, we discussed healthy meals. how Ohio stakeholders can With our nation’s abun- work together to increase the dance, no child should ever number of community leadgo hungry even when school ers, sponsors, volunteers, and is out for the summer. To sites that can provide children close the hunger gap, the with nutritious meals during United States Department both the school year and sumof Agriculture’s (USDA) mer months. Summer Food Service proWhile 11 Ohio counties (Continued from page 1) gram works with the Ohio that lack summer food serDepartment of Education to vice program sites, it’s not provide school-aged chil- too late for potential spon- for sure.” Temperatures in the area dren with the healthy meals sors to set up a program have hovered around 111 they need to grow strong and in their town. Though the thrive academically. official deadline was May degrees or higher for the past The Summer Food Service 31, interested sponsors and four days, and nine cities in Program – which provides volunteers can still work western Kansas broke records on Tuesday. breakfast, lunch, or a snack with the Ohio Department of Only in the earliest mornfor children under 18 – is crit- Education to establish new ing hours do hardy farmical to staving off a potential centers for children to get ers dart out to ensure their lack of nutritious food during meals. livestock’s water troughs the summer months that can At schools in Appalachia, are filled and their irrigation further disadvantage children places of worship in urban wells are quenching parched who live in food deserts or areas, summer camps in rural crops. They quickly return to who come from low-income, areas, and recreational centers cooler locales. working-class families. in big cities, young Ohioans Much of the fortunes in the The demand for these ser- can get the food they need to Menlo area are tied to corn vices is significant. Last year, succeed. crops, whose yields contribnearly 1,500 food service Summer break shouldn’t ute not only to foodstuffs but sites throughout Ohio reached mean a break from good also to ethanol-blended gasochildren in 74 counties. And nutrition. The single biggest line. But day after unyieldthis year, there are even more thing we can do is to make ing day of blazing sun and sites to which Ohio families sure more people know about high heat have baked the top can turn—more than 1,700 this program. Outreach and six inches of soil, and plant across 77 counties. With public awareness are critical roots can break through to the too many families still out components to ensure that the moister soil below. “It is getting to look ugly, of work, we have to expand end of the school year doesn’t the longer this keeps going outreach to the families who mean an end to hunger. need help now. For a complete list of sum- on without a drink,” Baalman Ensuring that schoolchil- mer food service program said. __ dren have access to healthy sites in Ohio, please call 800Frying bacon in the sun food during the summer is crit- 808-MEAL (6325) or visit Aaron Anderson and his ical because malnutrition dur- brown.senate.gov. 4-year-old son bypassed the ing childhood can lead to major health problems in the future. YOUR HOME IMPROVEMENT STORE Childhood obesity, diabetes, delayed growth, and THE PROFESSIONALS brittle bones are all possible health effects for young

To help avoid heat injuries and illness, people should plan outdoor activities for either early morning or late evening, when the sun is less direct. Wear loose-fitting, light-colored clothing and a wide-brimmed hat to protect against sunburn. Move to the shade or into an air conditioned building at the first signs of becoming overheated. Heat-related symptoms can come on quickly. Use the following tips from ODH and Ohio EMA to help beat the heat: • Drink cool (not icy cold) fluids • Active people should drink 2-4 glasses (16-32 ounces) of cool, non-alcoholic fluids every hour. Drinking water is best. • Do not take salt tablets without a physician’s advice. • Avoid beverages that contain alcohol or caffeine, because they can add to dehydration and increase the effects of heat illnesses. Monitor or limit outdoor activities • Young children may become preoccupied with outdoor play and not realize they are overheated. Adults should mandate frequent breaks and bring children indoors to cool down and have cool drinks. • Children or adolescents

Heat

involved in team sports should be closely monitored for signs of heat stress. Consideration should be given to modifying practice or games during the hottest parts of the day. Know how to treat heat exhaustion • Symptoms of heat exhaustion include: heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea or fainting. • People experiencing these symptoms should be moved to a shady or air-conditioned area. Remove or loosen tight clothing and apply cool, wet clothes or towels. • Have person sip on a half glass of cool water every 15 minutes. If the person refuses water, vomits or loses consciousness, call 911 or the local emergency number. Know how to treat heat stroke • Heat stroke is a lifethreatening situation. Call 911 immediately. Symptoms include: a body temperature of 103 degrees or higher, red, hot and dry skin with no sweating, rapid pulse, headache, dizziness, nausea, confusion, unconsciousness, and gray skin color. • Before medical help arrives, begin cooling the person by any means possible, such as spraying person with water from a garden
proverbial cooked egg on Tuesday, opting instead to fry bacon on their driveway in Coweta, Okla. Anderson’s thermometer read 105 degrees around 4:30 p.m., about the same time his son, Aaron Paul, said it felt like his feet were cooking. Sky-high temperatures aren’t unusual in this part of the country, but it is warm enough this week that five records were set on Tuesday. Anderson preheated the skillet for 10 minutes in the sun, and it took an hour for the meat to fully cook. And, yes, they ate it. “My only regret is it was turkey bacon instead of pork bacon, but that’s all we had,” Anderson said. __ Not everyone is sweltering In the northern corners of the United States, the weather was the opposite of infernal. It looks like March, not June, in Seattle. People are clad in coats and scarves, using umbrellas to shield themselves not from the bright sun but raindrops. Tuesday was more than 10 degrees colder than usual,

hose or by placing the person in a cool tub of water. Never leave children or pets in vehicles • Even in cool temperatures, cars can heat up to dangerous temperatures quickly. Even if the windows are cracked open, interior temperatures can rise almost 20 degrees within the first 10 minutes. • Children or animals left inside a vehicle is at risk for serious heat-related illnesses or even death. • When traveling with children (even routine drives), remember to do the following: — To remind yourself that a child is in the car, place bags, phones or other items you will take with you in the back seat. This will force you to turn around before exiting the car. — When leaving your vehicle, check the front and back seats to make sure no sleeping children (or pets) are left in the car. For additional information on how to beat the heat, go to the Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness website at weathersafety. ohio.gov; or the Federal Emergency Management Agency website at fema.gov/ areyouready/heat.shtm; or the Ohio Department of Health website at odh.ohio.gov.
with temperatures hovering around 60 degrees. As of Monday, Seattle had seen almost double the normal rainfall, said National Weather Service meteorologist Chris Burke. Patty Carlson didn’t think she’d need a sweater Tuesday. But there she was, ordering a latte at a downtown espresso shop. “Take a look around the street,” the 30-year Seattle resident said. “Would you guess it’s June?” Meanwhile, New England kicked off summer with 90-degree heat and high temperatures in Vermont and Maine. But as Mark Twain famously summed up the region’s fickle weather, “If you don’t like the weather in New England, just wait a few minutes.” Last weekend, a summertime nor’easter, flooding and thunderstorms knocked temps down across much of New England, and temperatures dropped to the 60s in some parts Tuesday and Wednesday.

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POLITICS

“Man is born free; and everywhere he is in chains. One thinks himself the master of others, and still remains a greater slave than they.”
— Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)

Senate leaders say they have student loan deal
By ALAN FRAM Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Senate’s top Democrat and Republican said Tuesday that they’ve reached a deal that would prevent interest rates on college loans from doubling beginning this weekend for millions of students. But House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has yet to decide whether the pact will be acceptable to his Republicanrun chamber. The agreement, if approved by Congress, would spell an end to one of this election-season’s higher profile conflicts between President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans. Even so, the battle has been a bitter one, with Republicans accusing the White House of dragging out the fight to score political points and Democrats accusing the GOP of blocking action on the issue. “The president’s been largely uninvolved in that, but Senator Reid and I have an understanding that we think will be acceptable to the House,” Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters. “We basically have the student loan issue worked out,” Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said separately. Under the agreement, interest rates for new subsidized Stafford loans would remain at 3.4 percent through next June 30. Without congressional action, interest rates on the By JOAN LOWY Associated Press loans would double to 6.8 percent for new loans beginning July 1, this Sunday, for 7.4 million students the government estimates would get such loans over the next year. That increase, should it occur, would not affect loans currently held by students. The higher rate would cost the average student an extra $1,000 over the life of the loan, which typically takes more than a decade to repay. White House press secretary Jay Carney issued a statement expressing support for the agreement, adding, “We hope that Congress will complete the legislative process and send a bill to the president as soon as possible.” About $5 billion of the measure’s $6 billion cost would come from Democratic pension-related proposals, including a change in how companies compute the money they must set aside to fund their pensions. The change would make their contributions more consistent year to year and in effect lower them — which business desires — and result in fewer corporate tax deductions for those payments. In addition, fees that companies pay to have their pensions insured by the quasigovernment Pension Benefit Guaranty Corp. would rise to reflect increases in inflation. The remaining funds would come from a GOP plan to limit federal subsidies for Stafford loans for undergraduates to six years. Currently,

IT WAS NEWS THEN
One Year Ago • St. Peter Lutheran Church in Delphos was hosting its Kids’ Summer Breakfast program from 8-9 a.m. Monday through Friday through Aug. 19. Children enjoyed a free hot or cold breakfast, including pancakes, French toast or scrambled eggs, cereal, fruit roll-ups, juice and on Fridays, sweet rolls. 25 Years Ago — 1987 • The Delphos Senior Citizens Center has named Joyce Hale of Delphos the new director of the center. She previously served as program technician for the meal site program at the center for five years. She succeeds Candi Osborn who resigned to take a position with MPW Co., a contracting company at Standard Oil Refinery, Lima. • Several area young men are participating in Buckeye Boys State, sponsored by the American Legion at Ashland College. Michael Schlereth, sponsored by Post 268, has been selected a county auditor. Jeff Schwinnen is serving on the Sulenicka city board of health and the civil service commission. Kent Wiechart is serving as clerk of municipal court. Tim Utrup is serving as the secretary to the governor. • Teresa Devitt, daughter of Jack and Helen Devitt of Ottoville received her master’s degree in social work from the Ohio State University. She recently received the Edwin Sharpe Burdell monetary award for her achievements in the areas of service, scholarship and commitment to the profession within the college of social work. 50 Years Ago — 1962 • Officers for the coming year were installed at the meeting of Delphos Rotarians at NuMaude’s Restaurant Wednesday. Installed as president were Paul Harter, Jr. Dr. Burl Morris was installed as vice president and Gene Stites as secretarytreasurer. In addition to the officers, the board of directors is made up of Korn, John Shenk and D. Arnold Scott. • The auxiliary to Jacob P. Smith Veterans of Foreign Wars Post in Ottoville met Tuesday evening with 39 members present. It was announced that the auxiliary had presented a new 50-star flag to the library branch in Ottoville. The door award went to Betty Weiman and in card games played after the meeting, prizes were awarded to Rita Steinbrenner, Mary Wittler, Veronica Beining and Ruth Horstman. • The Little League Cardinals blanked the Reds, 7-0, Tuesday evening and the Pirates whipped the Braves, 9-3. For the Cardinals it was their fifth straight victory without a setback. Terry Wisher went all the way for the winners. Chuck Fischer made his first start for the Pirates. In posting his win, he struck out nine, walked one and allowed four hits. 75 Years Ago — 1937 • The Delphos Gun Club held its regular monthly shoot Sunday at their range in Fischer’s Grove, south of Delphos. The five highest of the day, based on a possible 100 targets, were: L. E. Shaw, Columbus Grove, 86; James Feathers, 78; John Pitsenbarger, 71; George Henderson, 63; and Tom Weger, 38 out of 75. • E. E. Coriell of Bowling Green, G.K.R.S. of the Knights of Pythias, will come to Delphos Wednesday night to present Fifty Year Veteran certificates to three members of the lodge here. Frank Krutsch, Samuel Roberts and Frank Kollsmith will receive the certificates which will entitle them to life membership in the K. of P. Lodge. These three men have been members of the lodge for fifty years. • Teachers and school bus drivers for the year 1937-38 were employed Saturday night at a regular meeting of the Marion Rural School District held at the township house on South Main Street. All of last year’s staff was re-employed with the exception of two teachers, Doris Orman of Lafayette, and Robert Thompson, near Delphos, who will take positions formerly held by Orpha Knepper and Mary Copus.

House rejects bid to slash rural airline subsidies

Moderately confused

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Tuesday turned back an attempt by a tea party-backed GOP conservative to slash taxpayer subsidies for air service to isolated smaller cities and towns that can cost hundreds of dollars a ticket. The 238-164 vote killed a bid by Rep. Tom McClintock, R-Calif., to slash the Essential Air Service program, which subsidizes flights to 120 communities in 35 states in the continental U.S. and Puerto Rico and 43 towns in Alaska. The vote came as the House debated a $107 billion transportation spending bill for the budget year beginning Oct. 1. Republicans controlling the House had voted to eliminate the oft-criticized program last year while they considered renewing federal aviation programs, but a coalition of Democrats and Republicans representing rural America reversed the move in the Senate. Despite modest changes to the program enacted earlier this year, its budget now would reach a new high — to $214 million — under Tuesday’s legislation. McClintock’s amendment would have eliminated $114 million in direct taxpayer subsidies; he was blocked under House rules from attacking $100 million in subsidies automatically financed by “overflight” fees paid by aircraft that fly over the U.S. but don’t take off or land here. “This is about the easiest choice the House could possibly make, to put an end to the so-called Essential Air Service that lavishly subsidizes some of the least essential air services in the country,” McClintock said. “Rural life has both great advantages and disadvantages, and it is not the job of hardworking taxpayers who choose to live elsewhere to level out the differences.” The program awards contracts, usually worth between $1 million and $2 million a year, to subsidize airlines that serve airports such as Altoona, Pa., Paducah, Ky., and Cape Girardeau, Mo. Such subsidies can be quite modest, but can reach hundreds of dollars each way on a round trip ticket from places like Ironwood in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula or several towns in Montana. The changes enacted earlier require that subsidized routes must average at least 10 passengers a day if they are to be renewed when current contracts are up, and new communities are blocked from receiving the subsidies. Last year, Congress prohibited subsidies from exceeding $1,000 a passenger. The savings from such steps will take a while to take hold but are likely to prove modest. Supporters of the subsidies say having access to air service is crucial to the economies of rural towns. “This program plays a key role in the economic development in many rural communities by ensuring that air service continues,” said Rep. Tom Latham, R-Iowa. In fact, the wide reach of the program contributes to the sweeping support it gets, both from Democrats but also from conservative Republicans who suspend their anti-big government rhetoric when their districts are affected.

Lawmakers reach tentative deal on highway bill
Environmental Protection Agency from regulating the toxic ash generated by coalfired power plants. The ash is used as an ingredient in some types of cement. Sen. James Inhofe, R-Okla., a key negotiator on the bill, told reporters that both the Keystone and coal ash provisions had been dropped. House Republicans won concessions from the Senate on environmental reviews of highway projects and on a program that funds bike paths, pedestrian safety projects, beautification and other “transportation enhancements,” Senate aides and environmentalists said. The law requires that the government study potential environmental impacts before starting highway construction projects, but that can cause delays and drive up costs. The deal struck Wednesday would reduce the average time it takes to complete a highway project from 15 years to about eight years. The agreement also makes other kinds of transportation programs eligible for the same pool of money that funds transportation enhancements, which means there will probably be less money to go around for biking and

the government charges no interest while students are still in school, even if it takes them longer than six years to graduate. The financing was described by Senate Democratic and GOP aides who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss details of the emerging agreement. Asked if Boehner would sign off on the agreement, spokesman Michael Steel said, “We’ll take a look.” The pension money was also being discussed as way to finance an extension of federal transportation programs, which expire this weekend. Leaders were hoping agreement on both bills could be approved before Congress leaves town for its July 4 break at week’s end. Obama spent part of this spring traveling to college campuses to underscore his effort to prevent the interest rates from rising. In so doing, he was appealing to student-age voters who supported him strongly in the 2008 presidential election. Hoping to pre-empt Obama from using student loans as an issue this fall, GOP presidential challenger Mitt Romney said in April that he supported extending the lower loan rates. Congressional GOP leaders said they supported an extension as well, though some rank-and-file Republicans still oppose the idea, arguing it is too expensive and that financial markets should set the lending rates.

WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders have tentatively agreed on a twoyear bill to overhaul federal highway programs that drops a requirement that the government approve the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Senate aides said they were working Wednesday to put the agreement into legislative language, which must happen before House and Senate leaders formally sign off on the deal. The leaders will also want time to sound out their members’ support for the measure. The aides described the deal on condition of anonymity because the deal wasn’t final. House Republicans had pushed for inclusion of a provision that would go around President Barack Obama by requiring a federal energy agency approve the oil pipeline, which would transport oil from Canada’s tar sands to Port Arthur, Texas. The White House threatened to veto the bill if Keystone were included. Also eliminated from the bill was another provision sought by House Republicans that would have blocked the

FDA clears first new weight-loss pill in 13 years
By MATTHEW PERRONE AP Health Writer are obese or are overweight and have at least one weightrelated comorbid condition,” said FDA’s drug center director, Dr. Janet Woodcock, in a statement. Arena and its partner Eisai Inc. of Woodcliff Lake, N.J., expect to launch the drug in early 2013. With U.S. obesity rates nearing 35 percent of the adult population, many doctors have called on the FDA to approve new weight loss treatments. But a long line of prescription weight loss offerings have been associated with safety problems, most notably the fen-phen combination, which was linked to heart valve damage in 1997. The cocktail of phentermine and fenfluramine was a popular weight loss combination prescribed by doctors, though it was never approved by FDA. In a rare move, the FDA explicitly stated in a press release that Belviq “does not appear to activate” a chemical pathway that was linked to the heart problems seen with fen-phen. The FDA said the drug acts on a different chemical pathway in the brain, which is believed to reduce appetite

pedestrian projects. Republicans have criticized the enhancements program as wasteful, saying it pays cities to plant flowers. Highway landscaping has been an eligible category for funds under the program, but supporters say far more money has gone to biking and walking projects. Under the agreement, the highway bill would be combined with another bill to prevent a doubling of student loan interest rates. That’s because lawmakers plan to use pension law changes to help pay for both measures. Congress is also facing weekend deadlines for both bills: Highway programs and the government’s power to levy federal gasoline and diesel taxes are due to expire on Saturday. Interest rates on subsidized Stafford loans would double from their current 3.4 percent for 7.4 million students expected to receive such loans in the year beginning July 1 unless Congress acts. Both parties see the transportation bill as a jobs creator, and Congress’ best bet to do something about the nation’s stubbornly high unemployment rate before the November election.
by boosting feelings of satiety and fullness. Obesity Society President Patrick O’Neil said he’s encouraged by the drug’s approval because it underscores the idea that lifestyle changes alone are not enough to treat obesity. “This is good news because it tells us that the FDA is indeed treating obesity seriously. On the other hand, it’s not the answer to the problem — or even a big part of the answer,” said O’Neil, who teaches at Medical University of South Carolina and was the lead researcher on several studies of Belviq. Even if the effects of Belviq are subtle, experts say it could be an important first step in a new line of treatments that attack the underlying causes of obesity. “The way these things tend to work is you have some people who do extremely well and other people don’t lose any weight at all. But if we had 10 medicines that were all different and worked like this, we would have a real field,” said Dr. Louis Aronne, director of the weight loss program at Weill-Cornell Medical College.

WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration has approved Arena Pharmaceutical’s anti-obesity pill Belviq, the first new prescription drug for long-term weight loss to enter the U.S. market in over a decade. Despite only achieving modest weight loss in clinical studies, the drug appeared safe enough to win the FDA’s endorsement, amid calls from doctors for new weight-loss treatments. The agency cleared the pill Wednesday for adults who are obese or are overweight with at least one medical complication, such as diabetes or high cholesterol. The FDA denied approval for Arena’s drug in 2010 after scientists raised concerns about tumors that developed in animals studied with the drug. The company resubmitted the drug with additional data earlier this year, and the FDA said there was little risk of tumors in humans. “The approval of this drug, used responsibly in combination with a healthy diet and lifestyle, provides a treatment option for Americans who

www.delphosherald.com

Thursday, June 28, 2012

The Herald – 5

LANDMARK
Delphos Post Office

COMMUNITY

Kitchen Press
Chicken and Pineapple Kebobs 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1/3 cup dark rum 1/4 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce 1/4 cup chopped green onions 1 jalapeño, seeded, chopped (optional) 2 tablespoons molasses 2 tablespoons lime juice 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 2 teaspoons garlic 2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger 2 teaspoons curry powder 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice 2 pounds boneless skinless chicken thighs, trimmed, cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 cup fresh pineapple pieces 1 sweet or red onion, cut into 1-inch pieces Puree pineapple juice, rum, soy sauce, green onions, jalapeño (if using), molasses, lime juice, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, ginger, curry powder, coriander, cayenne, cinnamon and allspice in a blender until smooth. Place chicken in a zipper top plastic bag. Pour in mixture from blender. Refrigerate, turning bag occasionally, at least 2 and up to 4 hours. Prepare grill for medium heat. Remove chicken from marinade, reserving marinade. Pat chicken dry. Pour marinade into

UF announces spring graduates

CAMPUS NOTE

CALENDAR OF
TODAY 5-7 p.m. — The Interfaith Thrift Shop is open for shopping. 7:30 p.m. — American Legion Post 268, 415 N. State St. FRIDAY 7:30 a.m. — Delphos Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St. 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift Store is open for shopping. SATURDAY 9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith Thrift Store, North Main Street. St. Vincent DePaul Society, located at the east edge of the St. John’s High School parking lot, is open. 10 a.m to 2 p.m. — Delphos Postal Museum is open. 12:15 p.m. — Testing of warning sirens by Delphos Fire and Rescue 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. 7 p.m. — Bingo at St. John’s Little Theatre. SUNDAY 1-3 p.m. — The Delphos Canal Commission Museum, 241 N. Main St., is open. MONDAY 11:30 a.m. — Mealsite at Delphos Senior Citizen Center, 301 Suthoff Street. 7 p.m. — Delphos City Council meets at the Delphos Municipal Building, 608 N. Canal St. Delphos Parks and Recreation board meets at the recreation building at Stadium Park. Washington Township trustees meet at the township house. 7:30 p.m. — Spencerville village council meets at the mayor’s office.

EVENTS

Gather family and friends together for a Fourth of July celebration in your own backyard. A salute to the USA!

Kitchen Press

a small saucepan. Add brown sugar and mustard. Bring to a boil. Cook until sauce is reduced by half, about 6 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, thread chicken onto skewers alternating with pineapple and onion pieces. Grill kebobs, basting with sauce and turning frequently, until chicken is cooked through, about 10 to 16 minutes. Yield: 6 servings.

Kitchen Press

Patriotic Banana Split 4 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese 1/2 cup marshmallow crème 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel 1/2 medium seedless watermelon 6 large ripe bananas, quartered 1/3 cup fresh blueberries 1/3 cup reduced-fat granola cereal without raisins In a mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese, marshmallow crème, lemon juice and peel until smooth; set aside. Using an ice cream scoop, scoop six balls from watermelon (save remaining melon for another use). In shallow dessert bowls, arrange four banana quarters; top with a watermelon ball. Spoon cream cheese topping over melon. Sprinkle with blueberries and cereal. Serve immediately. Yield: 6 servings. If you enjoyed these recipes, made changes or have one to share, email kitchenpress@yahoo.com.

Approximately 675 degrees were awarded from The University of Findlay during spring commencement ceremonies on May 5. Area graduates include: Elida Jason Hays, master of business administration Aaron Jacobs, master of occupational therapy Dana Martin, bachelor of science in pre-occupational therapy, summa cum laude Delphos Erin Burris-Nuce, bachelor of science in natural science Laura German, master of occupational therapy Spencerville Rocky Kill, master of arts in education

Local pair elected to Girls State positions
Delphos American Legion 268 Ladies Auxiliary has been notified by Buckeye G i r l s State that both delegates they sponsored w e r e elected to hold positions in Thompson the offices they campaigned for. Destiny Thompson from Jefferson High School held the position of a city councilman from Allen City. Jessica Recker from St. John’s High School held the position of Director of Department of Taxation from Zeller City. The week-long Buckeye

Rhodes State Foundation awards student scholarships

Girls State session ended on June 16. Nearly 900 young ladies f r o m across the state of Ohio s p e n t the week c a m paigning, holding e l e c Recker tions and running their city, county or state government jobs. They shared in actively participating in BGSU government activities and gained many new friendships. Thompson and Recker will be invited to attend an auxiliary meeting and share their experiences with the local members.

SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
WEEK OF JULY 2-6 MONDAY: Tomato soup, grilled cheese, pea salad, fruit, coffee and 2% milk. TUESDAY: Baked ham, baked sweet potatoes, cauliflower, bread, margarine, lemon dessert, coffee and 2% milk WEDNESDAY: Sr. Luncheon Cafe is closed in observance of Independence Day. THURSDAY: Sweet and sour meatballs, mashed potatoes, mixed vegetables, dinner roll, margarine, dutch apple bake, coffee and 2% milk. FRIDAY: Taco salad, fruit, coffee and 2% milk. JUNE 28-30 THURSDAY: Margie Rostorfer, Courtnie Rostorfer, Lorene Jettinghoff, Mary Lou Krietemeyer, Sue Vasquez and Mare Lee Miller. FRIDAY: Mary Jane Watkins, Martha Etzkron, Lorene Jettinghoff and Mary Sanchez. SATURDAY: Valeta Ditto, Mary Lou Wrocklage, Cindy Elwer and Helen Kimmett. REGULAR THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9 a.m.- noon Saturday. To volunteer, contact Catharine Gerdemann, 419-6958440; Alice Heidenescher, 419-692-5362; Linda Bockey 419-692-7145; or Lorene Jettinghoff, 419-692-7331. If help is needed, contact the Thrift Shop at 419-6922942 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. and leave a message.

The following Rhodes State College students were awarded scholarships for the 2012-13 academic year: Cloverdale Tracy Tumblin Earl Belch Putnam County Scholarship, Jack and Margaret Howell Putnam County Scholarship Delphos Brianne Brickner Dr. Robert D. and Ann M. Brunk Scholarship Faculty and Staff Student Scholarship Jamie Delaney Dr. Norman and Margaret Browning Scholarship David and Marie Steiner Scholarship Elida Tamara Beach Rhodes State Scholarship Andrea Beery Dr. Nancy P. Redding Memorial Scholarship Lauren Diglia Borra Family Foundation Scholarship Frank and Shirley Hill Scholarship Brooke Kirk Dr. Norman and Margaret Browning Scholarship David and Marie Steiner Scholarship

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6 – The Herald

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Jefferson routs Fort Jennings in ACME Obituary for the Bowl
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

SPORTS

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By JIM METCALFE

FORT JENNINGS — Jefferson’s ACME summer baseball team put it all together at the plate versus Fort Jennings Wednesday night: 13 hits, nine bases-onballs, eight stolen bases and two hit batters; plus getting the benefit of five Musketeer errors and two balks. In the end, it ended up being a 17-5 rout on a warm evening at Fort Jennings Village Park. For the third game in a row, the Wildcats (8-6) got off quickly, scoring five times in the first inning. Tyler Wrasman (4 runs scored, 2-for-4, 2 runs batted in) was hit by a pitch from Musketeer starter Dylan Van Loo (2 2/3 innings pitched, 8 hits, 10 runs, 6 earned, 3 walks, 1 hit batter, 1 balk) to lead it off, stole second and took third on an error on the play. Zach Ricker (3-for-4, 3 runs, 2 RBIs) singled him in. He took second on an error on a pickoff play. A single to left by Austin Jettinghoff (3-for5, 2 runs) singled him to third and stole second himself. Zach Kimmett bounced out to third to plate Ricker for a 2-0 lead, with Jettinghoff taking third. An out hence, Seth Wollenhaupt walked and also swiped second. An error on Zavier Buzard’s grounder scored Jettinghoff and advanced Wollenhaupt. An error on a pickoff play allowed Wollenhaupt to score and put Buzard at third, from where he scored on Nick Fitch’s blooper to short left for a 5-0 spread. That largesse staked Jefferson southpaw Gaige

Rassman (3 IPs, 4 hits, 2 earned runs, 1 wild pitch). Ricker got aboard on a 1-out ground single to left in the second and stole second but remained there. The Musketeers got within 5-2 in the home half. Josh Wittler singled to right; two outs later, Caleb Bankey also singled to right. Spencer Dray doubled to left to score both. Delphos made it 10-2 in the third. Drew Kortokrax walked to lead it off, stole second and took third on a grounder by Wollenhaupt. Buzard walked and burgled second. Fitch launched a sacrifice fly to left to score Kortokrax. Rassman shot a sinking liner into center to score Buzard and himself swiped second, scoring as Wrasman ripped a double down the left-field line. In turn, Ricker blooped a single down the left-field line to score Wrasman. Jettinghoff nailed a ground-rule double to left center to finish Van Loo and bring in Brent Clay (3.2 IPs, 5 hits, 7 runs, 6 earned, 4 BBs, 2 Ks). A wild pitch brought Ricker in for a 10-2 edge. Van Loo commenced the Musketeer half with a double to left center that Buzard dove for and took third on a wild pitch. However, Rassman got out of the frame unscathed. In the Wildcat fourth, Buzard beat out an infield hit with two down and stole second. Fitch walked. Both advanced on a balk and

MLB
The Associated Press National League East Division W L Pct Washington 43 30 Atlanta 40 34 New York 40 36 Philadelphia 36 41 Miami 35 40 Central Division W L Pct Cincinnati 41 33 Pittsburgh 39 35 St. Louis 40 36 Milwaukee 34 41 Houston 32 43 Chicago 26 49 West Division W L Pct Los Angeles 43 33 San Francisco 43 33 Arizona 37 37 Colorado 28 46 San Diego 27 49 ___ GB .589 .541 .526 .468 .467 GB .554 .527 .526 .453 .427 .347 GB .566 .566 .500 .378 .355 — 3½ 4½ 9 9 — 2 2 7½ 9½ 15½ — — 5 14 16 American League East Division W L New York 46 Baltimore 41 Boston 40 Tampa Bay 40 Toronto 38 Central Division W L Chicago 40 Cleveland 37 Detroit 36 Kansas City 34 Minnesota 30 West Division W L Texas 47 Los Angeles 42 Oakland 37 Seattle 32 ___ Pct 28 33 35 35 37 Pct 35 37 39 39 44 Pct 29 33 39 45 GB .622 .554 .533 .533 .507 GB .533 .500 .480 .466 .405 GB .618 .560 .487 .416 — 5 6½ 6½ 8½ — 2½ 4 5 9½ — 4½ 10 15½

Knights pound Panthers in ACME
By Brian Bassett Times Bulletin Sports Editor sports@timesbulletin.com

scored on a throwing error for an 11-2 edge. Connor Wollenhorst was hit by Jefferson reliever Ricker (2 IPs, 1 unearned run, 1 hit batter, 1 wild pitch, 1 walk, 2 Ks) with one out in the home half and advanced as Bankey bounced out but couldn’t score. The Red and White made it 12-2 in the fifth. Wrasman led off with a free pass, advanced on a wild pitch, a groundout by Ricker and another wild toss. Jennings got a 1-out free pass to Van Loo in the fifth, a stolen base, a wild pitch and scored as Clay’s grounder was booted for a 12-3 edge, keeping the game going. Wollenhaupt doubled down the right-field line with one out in the Delphos sixth but was left there. Jennings tried to get closer in its half against Buzard. He plunked Wittler to lead it off and also hit Wollenhorst an out later. Bankey’s comebacker advanced both but they could get no farther. The Wildcats (8-6) tallied five more in the seventh. Dylan Haehn beat out an infield hit to short, got to third on a wild pitch and passed ball and scored on a single to left by Wrasman. He advanced on a wild pitch. Ricker walked. Jettinghoff grounded a sharp single into right to score Wrasman and

put Ricker at third. Kimmett walked to finish Clay on the mound and bring on Mark Metzger. He plunked Kortokrax, scoring Ricker. An out later, Buzard walked to force home Jettinghoff for a 16-3 edge. Fitch forced Buzard at second to get Kimmett home and that 17-3 bulge. Jared Hoersten led off the host seventh by drawing a walk off Kimmett, the fourth Delphos pitcher. Van Loo walked and both advanced on a wild pitch. An out hence, Metzger bounced out to score Hoersten. After Van Loo stole third, he touched the dish on a wild pitch to finish the night’s scoring. Jefferson is at Ottoville 6 p.m. Friday.

JEFFERSON (17) ab-r-h-rbi Tyler Wrasman 2b 4-4-2-2, Zach Ricker 3b/p 4-3-3-2, Austin Jettinghoff ss 5-2-3-1, Zack Kimmett 1b/p 4-1-0-1, Drew Kortokrax rf/cf 3-10-1, Seth Wollenhaupt lf/3b/rf/1b 4-1-1-0, Zavier Buzard cf/p 3-3-1-1, Nick Fitch c 3-0-1-3, Gaige Rassman p 2-1-1-1 Dylan Haehn ph/lf 2-1-1-0. Totals 34-17-13-12. FORT JENNINGS (5) ab-r-h-rbi Dylan Van Loo p/cf 2-2-1-0, Brent Clay ss/p 4-0-0-0, Mark Metzger 3b/ss 4-0-0-1, Josh Wittler 1b/3b 3-1-1-0, Ryan Rau c 3-0-0-0, Connor Wollenhorst cf/rf 1-0-0-0, Caleb Bankey lf 3-1-1-0, Spencer Dray rf/1b 3-0-1-2, Jared Hoersten 2b 2-1-0-0. Totals 25-5-4-3. Score by Innings: Jefferson 5 0 5 1 1 0 5 - 17 Ft. Jennings 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 - 5 E: Van Loo 2, Rau 2, Kimmett, Clay; DP: Jefferson 1; LOB: Jefferson 8, Fort Jennings 5; 2B: Wrasman, Jettinghoff, Fitch, Van Loo, Dray; SB: Buzard 2, Van Loo 2, Wrasman, Ricker, Jettinghoff, Kortokrax, Wollenhaupt, Rassman; SF: Fitch. zIP H R ER BB SO JEFFERSON Rassman (W) 3.0 4 2 2 0 0 Ricker 2.0 0 1 0 1 2 Buzard 1.0 0 0 0 0 1 KImmett 1.0 0 2 2 2 2 FORT JENNINGS Leeth (L) 1.1 3 4 4 3 1 Hines 2.0 2 5 5 3 1 Friesner 1.1 1 5 0 3 1 Clay pitched to 5 batters in 7th WP: Clay 5, Kimmett 2, Rassman, Ricker; HBP: Wrasman (by Van Loo), Kortokrax (by Metzger), Wollenhorst 2 (by Ricker, Buzard), Wittler (by Buzard); Balk: Van Loo, Clay; PB: Rau.

Wednesday’s Results Milwaukee 8, Cincinnati 4 N.Y. Mets 17, Chicago Cubs 1 San Francisco 3, L.A. Dodgers 0 Pittsburgh 11, Philadelphia 7 Atlanta 6, Arizona 4 Miami 5, St. Louis 3 Houston 1, San Diego 0 Washington 11, Colorado 5 Today’s Games Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 8-2) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 2-7), 1:05 p.m. Washington (E.Jackson 4-4) at Colorado (Outman 0-3), 3:10 p.m. Arizona (Bauer 0-0) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 1-2), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (Cashner 3-3) at Houston (Keuchel 1-0), 8:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (C.Young 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 9-2), 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 9-3) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 9-4), 10:15 p.m. Friday’s Games Houston (B.Norris 5-4) at Chicago Cubs (Maholm 4-6), 2:20 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 10-3) at Miami (Jo. Johnson 4-5), 7:10 p.m. Washington (Detwiler 4-3) at Atlanta (Delgado 4-8), 7:35 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 5-7) at Milwaukee (Wolf 2-5), 8:10 p.m. San Diego (Marquis 1-3) at Colorado (Francis 0-1), 8:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Correia 3-6) at St. Louis (Wainwright 6-7), 8:15 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Dickey 11-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Harang 5-4), 10:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Leake 2-5) at San Francisco (M.Cain 9-2), 10:15 p.m.

Wednesday’s Results N.Y. Yankees 5, Cleveland 4 Chicago White Sox 12, Minnesota 5 Boston 10, Toronto 4 Kansas City 5, Tampa Bay 4 Oakland 2, Seattle 1 L.A. Angels 13, Baltimore 1 Texas 13, Detroit 9 Today’s Games Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 9-2), 7:05 p.m. Cleveland (McAllister 1-1) at Baltimore (W.Chen 7-3), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 5-7) at Toronto (Cecil 1-0), 7:07 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 6-5) at Tampa Bay (Shields 7-4), 7:10 p.m. Oakland (T.Ross 2-7) at Texas (Feldman 1-6), 8:05 p.m. Boston (F.Morales 1-1) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 5-5), 10:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Chicago White Sox (Quintana 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Warren 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Cleveland (D.Lowe 7-6) at Baltimore (Arrieta 3-9), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-8) at Toronto (Villanueva 2-0), 7:07 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 8-4) at Tampa Bay (Price 10-4), 7:10 p.m. Oakland (Griffin 0-0) at Texas (M.Harrison 10-3), 8:05 p.m. Kansas City (Mendoza 2-4) at Minnesota (Duensing 1-3), 8:10 p.m. Boston (A.Cook 1-1) at Seattle (Noesi 2-9), 10:10 p.m.

Youth Baseball
Monday’s Results Tri-County Little League Greif Rangers 6, K of C Indians 4 VFW Cardinals 8, Ft. Jennings Musketeers 3 Delpha Chevy Reds 9, Delphos Pirates 0 1st Federal Athletics 9, Young’s Waste Service Yankees 5 Tuesday’s Results Delphos Minor League Dodgers 11, Reds 8 Pirates 7, Mets 6 Cubs 6, Orioles 2 Tigers 10, Indians 1 Buckeye Boys Pony League Wallace Plumbing 18, Willshire 2 Grover Hill 12, Ohio City 2 Inner County League Lee Kinstle Pirates 12, Cubs 2 Optimist Reds 11, Middle Point Gold 1 Wednesday’s Results Tri-County Little League VFW Cardinals 4, Delphos Braves 2 Delpha Chevy Reds 10, Young’s Waste Service Yankees 3 Today’s Schedule Delphos Minor League Indians at Pirates, 6 p.m. Tigers at Reds, 6 p.m. Orioles at Dodgers, 8 p.m. Mets at Cubs, 8 p.m. Buckeye Boys Pony League VW Alspach-Gearhart vs. Willshire, 6 p.m. Willshire Van Wert Elks vs. Wallace Plumbing, 6 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3 Wren vs. Ohio City, 6 p.m. Ohio CityFireman’s Field Grover Hill vs. Convoy, 6 p.m. Convoy Inner County League Winner of Astros & Red Sox vs. Middle Point Blue, 6 p.m. Middle Point-Field A Friday’s Schedule Buckeye Boys Pony League Middle Point vs. Wallace Plumbing, 6 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3 Tri-County Little League Young’s Waste Service Yankees vs. Delphos Pirates, 6 p.m. Delphos LL Inner County League Winner of Astros/Red Sox-Middle Point Blue vs. Middle Point Blue, 8 p.m. Middle Point-Field A Saturday’s Schedule Buckeye Boys Pony League Van Wert Elks vs. VW Alspach-Gearhart, noon Smiley Park-Field 3 VW Alspach-Gearhart vs. Van Wert Elks, 2 p.m. Smiley Park-Field 3 Inner County League Middle Point Blue vs. Spencerville, 9 a.m. Middle Point Blue vs. LCC, 11:15 a.m. Sunday’s Schedule Delphos Minor League/Fourth of July Tournament 1 Cubs vs. 8 Indians, 5 p.m. LL 2 Tigers vs. 7 Orioles, 5 p.m. Dia. 4 4 Reds vs. 5 Dodgers, 7 p.m. LL 3 Pirates vs. 6 Mets, 7 p.m. Dia. 4 JULY 4 Delphos Minor League/Fourth of July Tournament Semifinals Cubs/Indians winner vs. Reds/Dodgers winner, 9 a.m. LL Tigers/Orioles winner vs. Pirates/Mets winner, 11 a.m. LL Finals Cubs/Indians-Reds/Dodgers winner vs. Tigers/Orioles-Pirates/Mets winner, 5 p.m. LL Tri-County Little League/Fourth of July Tournament VFW Cardinals vs. Delpha-Chevy Reds, 1 p.m. LL Delphos Pirates vs. Delphos Braves, 3 p.m. LL Finals VFW Cardinals/Delpha-Chevy Reds winner vs. Delphos Pirates/Delphos Braves winner, 7 p.m. LL

CONVOY - The Parkway ACME baseball team visited Convoy Wednesday evening to take on Crestview; after second baseman Cain Pontsler led the game off with a double and later scored, it looked like it would be a good night offensively for the Panthers. Unfortunately, Pontsler would be the only Panther to cross the plate on the evening and the Knights rolled to an 11-1 run-rule victory in six innings. After Pontsler’s double, rightfielder Brandon Moorman (2-for-2) singled him home with two outs to give Parkway a 1-0 lead. Knight pitcher Isaiah Simerman then struck out Panther catcher Kameron Roehm. Crestview answered by plating an unearned run in the home half. Simerman struck out to open but a passed ball allowed him to take first. First baseman Damian Helm singled him home to tie the game. Simerman went back to work on the mound, not allowing another Parkway run — five innings, four hits, one earned run, three strikeouts. The Knight offense broke free in the third when third baseman Nick Thomas singled and centerfielder Cam Etzler and second baseman Brock Rolsten walked to load the bases. Simerman helped his cause with a 3-run double. Simerman was later forced out on the base paths but shortstop Bryce Richardson, who was hit by a pitch, came around to score on a single by leftfielder Alec Heffner to give

Crestview a 5-1 lead. Parkway starting pitcher Jordan Strader gave way to Pontsler on the mound. Rightfielder Alex Brown walked and scored on an RBI single by Etzler to give the Knights a 6-1 lead. Moorman and Roehm each singled with one out in the top of the fourth but Moorman was caught stealing third base. A flyout then ended the Parkway threat. Crestview plated a pair of runs in the fourth. Helm and Heffner posted back-toback singles before catcher Nate Owens plated both with a 2-run single, extending the Crestview lead to 8-1. After a scoreless top of the fifth, Crestview had a chance to end the game early. Etzler and Rolsten reached with consecutive 1-out singles, Etzler scored on another Simerman RBI but the Knights could only score one run in the frame, extending their lead to 9-1. Thomas entered on the mound in the top of the sixth for Crestview and hurled a perfect inning. Heffner drew a walk in the home sixth and Owens followed with a single. Thomas helped his cause with a 2-run single to end the game an inning early. Simerman led the Knights at the plate; 2-4 with a double, a run scored and four RBIs. Owens and Thomas each added two RBIs. Strader took the loss for the Panthers: two innings, four hits and five runs (4 earned). He walked three, hit a batter and struck out three.

Parkway 100 000 x - 1 4 1 Crestview 141 210 x 11 13 1 WP - Simerman; LP - Strader. 2B - (P) Pontsler. (CV) Simerman, Helm.

So the Bowl to actually do less. Might try to argue that Championship Series will go the way of the do-do not every men’s match goes 5 and many women’s come 2014. Everyone can now matches got the distance but that is not true either; there breathe a sigh of relief. The powers-that-be — a are a lot of 5-setters. committee of JIM METCALFE 12 university presidents — in the game of college football voted Tuesday to adopt a jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com 4-team playoff to determine the The only way this works national championship. They followed the rec- is if they pay by the hour or ommendations of the com- the set. When both play bestmissioners of the top footof-3, I have no problem with ball conferences. It’s still not perfect that. That is equal because because no one knows who the times tend to level out. I’m not sure I agree will be on this new committee — assigned to make with his other statement what most definitely will be that men’s tennis is ahead tough picks — and exactly of the women’s overall — what criteria will be used yes, the top-ranked woman but it seems that a consen- could not beat the 100thranked man, for example, sus has been reached. Basically, the title game but I don’t think that’s the will be within the first week issue here. Sometimes, things can of the New Year. That’s a good thing because the just be plain funny in the usual stumbling block world of sports. Take this example from against a playoff has always been they didn’t want to the “farm system” of Major take the student-athletes out League Baseball. It started during interof the classroom any more league play when New time. They also wanted to York Mets closer Frank keep the bowls — all 2,342 Francisco called the New of them — relevant and this York Yankees chickens — his explanation was that they apparently does. This committee will complained (“clucked?”) apparently help put together a lot, especially balls and strikes, and he wanted to other matchups, too. There was plenty of strike them out — leading moolah before — and plen- up to the Subway Series. By the way, if you do ty of complaints. The way it sounds, there will be even that, you’d better not lose more moolah — and you five out of the six games can bet there will still be you play against those complaints, though they “chickens” but that is anothwill not come from Nos. 3 er matter. Another Mets reliever, and 4. The plan is to stick with the admittedly wacky Tim this for 12 years before the Byrdak, took it “literally”, usual “adjustments” will be bringing a live chicken — made to see what went right “Little Jerry Seinfeld” — and what went wrong. If I into the clubhouse Friday had to make a prediction, it as a joke. Good for him — Byrdak, will eventually go to more teams; the more the mer- not the chicken! We need a little more humor and a lot rier. After all, four years ago, less taking-ourselves-toothe powers-that-be were seriously. Obviously, the bird dead-set against a playoff couldn’t stay at Citi Field. and now look. Byrdak searched for a I just wonder what conferences will look like then home for the bird on Twitter and how many there will and found a new “farm system” for the animal, Farm be. I also saw a headline or Sanctuary of Watkins Glen, two about whether this new N.Y. Think they’ll bring up format will mean money for the players themselves. “Seinfeld” if they need Interesting. another wing — er, arm? Now, if only they can The 2012 interleague do something about some schedule is now finished of these ridiculous non- and the American League conference “matchups” that won it for the ninth straight remain on schedules! Bring year and 12th time in the 16 back the old “intersection- years we’ve had this foral” games and off with their mat. heads for the rest of them! I know some baseball I wonder how long “purists” don’t like it — it will be before Gilles Simon, the Frenchman they claim it waters the who is the newest mem- competition down, along ber of the Association of other claims — but personTennis Professionals Player ally, I like it and I think the Council, will be picketed by fans do, too. Why shouldn’t the women’s groups for daring to speak an opinion against Reds and Indians play, for example? Or the Mets and political correctness. You see, he dared to Yankees? That never made any opine that when it comes to the Slams, there should not sense to me. be equal pay for the men It will be interesting to and women. see what happens next year Quite frankly, he is right. when the Houston Astros The men got best-of-5 sets head to the American and the women best-of-3. League to even the teams How they can consider out and there will be an THAT equal is beyond me. interleague series all the Women’s are making more time.

Championship Series

Metcalfe’s Musings

Olympic Trials Roundup
The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — Michael Phelps finally gets a night off from battling Ryan Lochte. The 14-time Olympic gold medalist has the spotlight to himself in the 200meter butterfly final tonight at the U.S. Olympic trials. Phelps qualified thirdfastest in the semifinals on Wednesday night, trailing leader Bobby Bollier and second-place Davis Tarwater. Phelps finally earned his first victory — and beat Lochte for the first time — at the trials in the 200 freestyle. Lochte won their first showdown of the 8-day meet in the 400 individual medley on opening night. He followed record of 58.85 seconds. The 17-year-old will swim the 200 free final tonight. The 29-year-old Coughlin owns 11 Olympic medals in her long career and has one more chance to make her third Olympic team. She swims the 100 free prelims on Friday. Tonight’s third final is the women’s 200 IM. Caitlin Leverenz and Elizabeth Beisel are the two fastest qualifiers, followed by Ariana Kukors. Grevers won the 100 back on Wednesday night with the second-fastest time ever, 52.08. Breeja Larson scored a big upset in the 100 breaststroke, outracing world champion Rebecca Soni to make her first Olympics in her first trials.

up by edging Phelps in the 200 free semifinals before Phelps got his revenge in the final. Lochte will be around this morning competing in the prelims of the 100 free. Missy Franklin won the 100 backstroke, chasing down 2-time defending Olympic champion Natalie Coughlin on the final lap to win with an American

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Thursday, June 28, 2012

The Herald — 7

Towns try to loosen reins on food producers
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Towns in several states are adopting local ordinances that exempt farmers from state and federal regulations if they sell their products directly to consumers, despite warnings that the ordinances are invalid. Residents in Livermore and Appleton, Maine, approved so-called local food and community self-governance ordinances at town meetings this month, joining six other Maine towns that did the same thing last year. Residents in Fayette, however, voted down a similar proposed ordinance. The votes should send a message that Maine residents want more local say on how to regulate small farms that process food ranging from poultry and milk to cheese and jam that are sold to people in their area, said Douglas Wollmar, a small-scale produce farmer in Blue Hill, which passed a similar ordinance last year. Ultimately, supporters would like to see a state law passed that addresses their concerns. “We’re trying to get more towns to pass the ordinance, because at the state level we’re not getting any attention,” Wollmar said. “The response we got from legislators is it’s nice you got five or six towns but what you need is 50 towns before we’ll listen.” The situation isn’t unique to Maine. Towns in Massachusetts, Vermont and California have all passed so-called food sovereignty ordinances or resolutions in the past year or so. In Sandisfield, Mass., Brigitte Ruthman, the owner of Joshua’s Farm, proposed a resolution at last year’s town meeting after she received a cease-and-desist order from the state saying her dairy operation was illegal. Ruthman sells shares of her small dairy herd to people in the region, who then get a share of the raw milk from her cows. To comply with state demands, she would have had to invest tens of thousands of dollars for a new cooling system, septic system and other equipment, she said. That might be reasonable if she were a commercial dairy, but the state was coming after her for milk from a single cow that was shared by three people, she said. “On a micro level, this is really the aggravation we have with government,” she said. “You can’t control our lives, you can’t control our food choices that are very personal. Stop it.” Pete Kennedy, president of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund, said he expects more towns to follow suit. “Right now Maine is way ahead of the curve as far local food ordinances, but the trend is going in that direction,’ Kennedy said. Blue Hill, Sedgwick, Penobscot, Trenton, Hope and Plymouth last year passed ordinances proclaiming that federal and state regulations hinder local food production and usurp people’s rights to foods of their choice. Supporters say the ordinances promote family farms, sustainability and healthy eating. But state agriculture officials say the ordinances don’t hold legal muster and that regulatory oversight is essential for food safety and public health. Agriculture Commissioner Walt Whitcomb, who co-owns a dairy farm, said he’s supportive of local food producers, but his department has to ensure the products are safe. The department strives to work with food processors, and licensing requirements aren’t as onerous as some people make them out to be, he said. Licenses require some basic common-sense requirements to ensure the public’s health.

AGRIBUSINESS

“The inspection personnel try very hard to explain not only the law but the reasons why it’s beneficial for their future sales, as well as what is healthy for the consuming public,” Whitcomb said. “Setting aside the legal aspects, there’s nothing worse for sales from somebody getting sick from what they just bought from you.” The local ordinances, he said, are invalid because they’re superseded by state and federal laws. That warning, though, wasn’t enough to dissuade residents in Livermore and Appleton from green-lighting the same ordinance in their towns last week. Cathy Lee, who collected signatures to force a vote at Livermore’s town meeting, said there’s a long history of home rule in Maine. Food safety issues, such as E. coli and salmonella problems, are more likely to crop up with large food corporations than with local farms. State regulations, she said, require added paperwork, more inspections and expensive upgrades that are geared toward large farms and corporations. The regulatory burden, she said, is enough to put some farms and food producers out of business. In Maine, people in Fayette voted down a proposed food self-governance ordinance on Saturday. Town Manager Mark Robinson said residents and the board of selectmen are supportive of local farms and small-scale food producers. But they realized that a local ordinance wouldn’t carry any legal weight. “The ordinance really did nothing other than send a message,” he said. “It gives the issue attention, but I would think so could an effort to amend state laws to address the issue.”

Delphos FFA member Luke Wrasman, above, recently exhibited market steers and goats at the 2012 Putnam County fair. In his market steer classes he placed second and third respectively. Below: In his market goat class, Wrasman placed second also in both of his classes. One of his goats placed third overall out of all goats showed in the market show.

FFA members start fair Season at Putnam

Photos submitted

Putnam fair adds Best of Beef Challenger
New this year to the Putnam County Fair was the Best of Beef Challenge. The event was under the direction of the Putnam County Cattlemen Association. For this competition, those choosing to participate prepared their favorite ground beef casserole. This competition was open to anyone, there was no entry fee or exhibitor’s pass required. Those participating had to make their casserole and have it on the judges table by 7 p.m. on June 20. There were 15 entries. The judges picked the top three casseroles. First place medal and $50 went to Margie Schmersal, above, second from right; second place medal and $30 went to Nicole Ruhe, second from left; and third place medal and $20 went to Doris Noffsinger. Putnam County Cattlemen Association representative Denny Schroeder congratulates the winners.

Schnipke Photography photo

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• Bumper • Bumper Boats • Bumper Boats Boats • Go Karts Karts • Go • Go Karts • Batting CagesCages • Batting • Batting Cages • 35 Hole • 35 Hole •Miniature Golf 35 Hole Miniature Golf Miniature • Ice Cream Golf • Ice Ice Cream The Place For For Family Fun!•and More!Cream The Best Best Place Family Fun! and and More! More! • Belly Bouncer Home of Squirty Worm! Home of Squirty Worm! • Laser Tag Bouncer 1996 W. 1996 W. Robb Ave. OH (1/4OH (1/4 mile East of Lima Mall) Belly Bouncer Robb Ave. • Lima, • Lima, mile East of Lima Mall) • • Belly (419) 228-GAME • www.squirtyworm.com • Double Rider Go Karts (419) 228-GAME • www.squirtyworm.com
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8 – The Herald

chairs, $50. C a l l wide located in Southside www.delphosherald.com (419)692-1968 & leave a community in Delphos. FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the Minimum Charge: 15 words, Deadlines: or less than $50. Only phone num- price of $3.00. message & 1 item per ad, 1 Call 419-692-3951. 2 times - $9.00 11:30 a.m. Card Of Thanks Announcements for the next day’s issue. Help Wanted GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per ad per month. ber. Each word is $.30 2-5 days Saturday’s paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come word. $8.00 minimum charge. $.25 6-9 days and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to “I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR LARGE UPSTAIRS Monday’s paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by send THE FAMILY $.20Hubert ADVERTISERS: YOUExtra is 11 a.m. Thursday musi- them to you. of 10+ days can CHURCH SEEKS Apartment, downtown Herald Garage $2.00 CARD OF THANKS: Sales base the person whose name will appear in the ad. Each word would for 3 place Youngpeter is $.10like to months a 25 word classified cian, organist, pianist or Delphos. 233-1/2 N. Main. Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regucharge + $.10 for each word. or more prepaid We accept thank Jim’s Restaurant, ad in more than 100 news- keyboardist. Should have lar 4BR,apply rates Kitchen, 2BA, Dining Delphos EMS, St. Rita’s papers with over one and experience with traditional 727 S. Clay area, large rec/living room. Medical Center, OSU a half million total circula- hymns and more contemThurs & Fri 8:30am-6pm $650/mo. Utilities not inMedical Center, and Van tion across Ohio for $295. porary choruses. Respond Sat 8:30am-noon cluded. Contact Bruce Wert Community Health It's easy...you place one with letter of interest stat- lots of tools, DVDs & 419-236-6616 Partners Inpatient Hospice order and pay with one ing recent experience to: VHSs, large dog cage, for assisting in the care of check through Ohio P.O. Box 208, Cairo, OH computer desk, lots of our father during his ill - Scan-Ohio Statewide 45820 House For Sale dishes, antique walnut taness. Also, thank you to Classified Advertising Netble, deep fryer, porch Father Mel and Father Ja- work. The Delphos Herald lamps, jewelry, craft paint, cob for the prayers and advertising dept. can set exercise bike, and much 604 W. Seventh St., Delphos. Rent To Own and DRIVERS & support that you offered this up for you. No other more!! OWNER OPERATORS Land Contract available us at the time of Dad’s classified ad buy is simon this remodeled 3 beddeath and funeral. Thank pler or more cost effective. Growing company is seekMULTI- FAMILY room home. chbsinc.com you to Harter and Schier Call 419-695-0015, ext ing drivers and owner opMoving & Garage Sale or 419-586-8220 Funeral Home, especially 138. erators for a dedicated 275 Elida Rd. customer in Van Wert. Gina, for the support you Thur. & Fri., 8:30-5:00 provided during the planCDL class A and 2 years Auto Repairs/ experience required. For Queen/King size bedding. ning and the funeral. Notice Parts/Acc. New & Used items. Thank you to both Lan details call (260)589-8112. deck and St. John’s Churches and to all those SPENCERVILLE who prepared the food for ANNUAL Community the luncheon at Landeck HIRING DRIVERS Garage Sale. Church. Finally, thank you with 5+ years OTR experi- June 28, 29 & 30. 9am-?? to all our family and ence! Our drivers average Sponsored by SpencerACROSS friends for the care that 42cents per mile & higher! ville EMS. Maps available Windshields Installed, New 1 Cast a ballot you have shown to Dad Home every weekend! Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors, and to us through this diffi6 Twiggy abodes $55,000-$60,000 annually. Misc. for Sale cult time. 11 Fiesta decor Benefits available. 99% no Hoods, Radiators $ .99 Pat and John Agner 50 lb. bag touch freight! We will treat 12 Cloud-seeding compound 4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima Dale and Carol you with respect! PLEASE I’M GIVING away Free 13 Takes place ON STATE RT. 309 - ELIDA Youngpeter CALL 419-222-1630 14 Jellyfish Bids. I have up to 500 419-339-6800 Paul and Deb Youngpeter 15 Brown in butter Bids to give away free to Keith and Carole 16 Sanskrit dialect play in my penny auction Youngpeter 17 Beech or oak Mobile Homes site. Register for free toServices Jill and Steve Neeley OTR SEMI DRIVER 18 Outlaw day and I’ll load your acBruce Youngpeter and NEEDED 19 Fifty-fifty count with free bids to play Randy Bender Benefits: Vacation, LAMP REPAIR 23 Road map nos. in the auctions and win RENT OR Rent to Own. 2 Rose and Larry Hesseling Holiday pay, 401k. Home with! Sign up today to lock bedroom, 1 bath mobile Table or floor. 25 Platitude Joe and Diane Webb home. 419-692-3951. weekends & most nights. in your spot. Come to our store. 26 Ms. Shriver Gary and Gail Webb Call Ulm!s Inc. Hohenbrink TV. http://harleychick92.zeekler. 29 Stationed Diane Webb 419-692-3951 419-695-1229 com/splash/ 31 Mandate

Classifieds
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Thursday, June 28, 2012

ble. Good an ad phone Bdrm, 2 bath ext. To placecondition with 2 2419-695-0015double 122

OLDER OAK drop leaf ta-

300 DELPHOS 600 HERALD
THE

Household Goods

Apts. for Rent

Today’s Crossword Puzzle

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Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

FOR RENT or rent to own.

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DOWN 1 Deputy 2 When actors enter (2 wds.) 3 Not as loose 4 Raison d’ -5 Trial VIPs 1-800-589-6830 6 Caroler’s tune 7 Swirled 8 Carbondale sch. 9 NFL scores 10 Continent divider 11 Etiquette guru 12 “-- -- Old Cowhand” 16 Turned down (2 wds.) 18 Joist 20 Goodbye, to Gaius 21 By Jove! 22 Information 32 Leafy climber 24 Ski lift (hyph.) 33 Change a bill Farm Produce 25 Sums Financial 34 Journal VIPs 26 Pocket bread 35 Ink for copiers 27 Say frankly � �� ��� �� � ��� � � � ��� � � � � SWEET � � and � � �OHIO � � � � corn � � �� � � � 37 Half of DJ 28 Chatty starling 39 Not at home IS IT A SCAM? The Del- other fresh produce now 30 Oklahoma town phos Herald urges our available at Gessner’s 40 Sprout 36 ��Gazing ��� � �� ��� ��� at ����� ��� ���� � �� � � � � � ���� �� �� � 41 Type of roast readers to contact The Produce. 1mi North of Del38 Moon feature Better Business Bureau, phos on 66 45 Legendary marshal 40 La -- Tar Pits (419) 223-7010 or 47 Cabbies’ income ��� ��Where � 42 ����� Asia begins���������� ����� 1-800-462-0468, before 48 Pagoda or mosque Pets & Supplies ���� ������� �� �� ���� ���� ���� � �� � 43 Brawl � ��� ��� � �� � ��� entering into any agree51 Heat conductors �� ������������ �� � � sound ��� � ������ �� �� � � � � �� ��� � 44 Furtive ment involving � �� ��� �� financing, � � ���� Mayberry sheriff � ������ ��� � ���� �� � ��� � ��� � � � � � � � � � 52 “Miss Kitty,” -- Blake � � � � � ��� � � � 46 ���� business opportunities, or FREE CATS and Kittens. 53 Brunch favorite ������� ���� �� � � � � 47 Wife, in legal jargon work at home opportuni- Both House and Barn va54 Pooch 48��Merry’s ��� ��� �� ����� ����� ��� � ��� opposite ������ ��� ��� �� �� ��� �� ties. The BBB will assist � rieties. � �� � �� � � Call 419-302-5971 ��� ��� � 55 To the point 49 Insurance gp. in the investigation of or 419-863.-0756 50 Scrap of cloth ����� ��� � ��� �� � ��� �� � ���������� these businesses. (This 51 �� ��� �� �� ���� � ��� ��� � �� � -- (witticism) ������� ���� � �� �� ������� Bon ��������� ���� notice provided as a cus�� � � ��� � ��� �� ���������� �� � ������ �� �� � � �� FREE: CALICO Cat. �� ���� � ����� ��� �� ��� ������� tomer service by The Del- 4yrs old, spayed, de ���� ���� � ������ � ��� ��� ��� ����� ������ �� � �� ��� ������� � ������ � ��� ���� phos Herald.) clawed, litter box trained. ������ � ���� ��� � ��� �� ������� ��� � ��� ������ ������� �� ���� ����� � �� ���� ��� Owner moving-can’t take ���������� � � ������� � �������� � ���� �� ���� ��������� ��� � ��� ���������� ��� � �������� �� cat. Must find new home. �� � ����� ���� ���� ��� � ������ Wanted to Buy ����� ��� � �� ������ ������� � ������ ��� ����� �� � �� ��������� � �� Call 419-303-9359 �� �� ���� � ����� � � ��� ���� � ��� �� ��� � ��� ��� *Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel. ������ � ��� ����������� ������ � ��� ��� ��� ��� �� ����� ������ � ����� ���� come. Call 888-471-7081 ��� �� ������ �� �������� ����� �� ���� ������� ������ Announcement A�������Regional Up ���� ���� ��� �� �� � ���8511������� Drivers: ����� www.deboertrans. ���� �� ���� ���� ��� *Will be trained by Microtel �� CPM Weekly Pay, �or apply online�� �www.� �� ������������ ���� ����� ��� � ���� ��� �� �����com � � � ��� �������� � ����� ����� ������� �� ��� Affordable Breathtaking to 42 ��� ��������� at ��� ��������� ���������� � �������� ��� ����� ��� ���� ��� Home Time, ��� ���� ������ ����� �� � ���� � rustic log and elegant Benefits, �� ������������� ��������� ���� ��� � �� ������ superservicellc.com � ����� �� � ���������� ��� ��������� � ��� � � � ��� � The selected candidate will �������� be as- ����� ����� ���� �� � ���� ���� � Paid���� �� *Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel. ���� ��� �� ��������� � ��� � �������� �� � ����� � � ������ ��� ��� ���������� ��� � Help ��� Wanted contemporary chapels. Sign On Bonus, ��� ���� � ������ � ����� ���� ��� �� �� �� �� ��� ������ ����� ��� ����� ������ �� � � �� �� ������ ������� Wanted� ���� ���� - International � �� ��� � ������������� �� -- ���� ���� �� ���� � *Will be trained by Microtel Specializing in storybook Orientation. 2 Years T/T ����� �� Help ���� ���� � ���� ����Truck � ���� signed a specific �� � � territory to �� ��� sales �� � ����� �� � �� Cultural ����� ���� ����� �� ����� � ���� ���800-524-5051 ������ ���� ��Trainees ����� �� ���� ���� ����� ����� �� ��www. ��� ��� ��� �� Needed!������� � ���Representative: ��� ��� ��� ����������� � � � � � ������� ��� �� �� weddings. � ��� �� �� � � � �� ���� ������������� �����Exchange provide Driver ��� ��������� ���� Cash for Gold �� � ������������������� �� ��� ���videog- Exp. ������� • ���������� �� ��� �� �� � ����� ������� Pet �� �� ����� �photography,We �� �� �� � � Food���� ����� � ���� �� ����������Let����������� ���������� � Earn�������� �� income ��� ��� us � �� ����� ���� � � � ��� supplemental � � �� �� ��� � � ��� sell a variety of print and web prod- Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry, ��� � help you ��� your put ��� ���� � ���� �� �� ����� �� gomcilvaine.com�� � ����� � ����� ������ �� � ����� � ������ �� ��� � ������ �� � �� ��� � �� �� ���� � �� ���� � ��� ���� ����� �� � �� ���� � �� �� ����� ��� life pro- placing and� � � ����� � �� ���� ��� � � �� Supplies ��� raphy, flowers, � formal- �� � �� �� ����� ����� ������ � drive!������ ��� � � • �� � ����� ��� �� � ����� � �� �� Silver coins, Silverware,� ��� � ������� �� ����� � � ������ �� �� �� � � �� ���� ��� ���� � ��� in �� �� �� ����� � ��� ����� �� � supervising ���� ucts to customers. � ��� �Pet � ������ �� ��� � � � ����� �� � � � � � � � � � wear, lodging,,�and � �� �� �� more. �� � � Help Wanted – Driver ������ ��� Local���� ���� �� ��stu- ����� � �������� � �������� �� ����� �� ����� �� �������16-Day train�� ��school �� � fessional ���������� high � ��� exchange �� �� � � ���� � � � � ������� ��������� � Pocket Watches, Diamonds. � � • � � �� � � � � Ministry� �Love. � � ��� � �� �� �� � Driver: ���� ���� ���� ���� ������ � dents.� Volunteer��������� ��� �� ��� �� � �� ���� ���� � � � � Purina Feeds � � ��� of���������� � ����� � � Tank� ����� �ing w/Roadmaster� �� ��������������� ��� �fam- ����� � � � �� �� �� � �� ��� ��1-800-� �CDL ������ � ������ ������� � �� ����� avail.���� ���� �������� �� �host��� ������ � � � � �� �� �� A ��� � ��� � �� � � � � � � � �� �� � � �� �� �� �� � ��� �Regional ��� ��� � �� Financial Assistance Avail � ��� �� ������� � ���� 2330 Shawnee Rd. �� �� � � � � �� 262-5683.� �� � � � � ��� �� � ��� � � � Lanes. ����� ����� ��������� ��� ilies also needed. Promote������ Local –�� � ������� � �� ��� ������������� �������� ������ �� � �� � � �� � �� � ������ � � � �� ���� � � �� � ��� ��� ���� � ���� � � ����� � � �� ���� �� � � � � ��� �������� � ����� � � �� � � � ��������� � �� � ��� ����� � ���those � ��� ���� qualify! ����� ������� � peace! www.afice. 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Wife unhappy with hubby, porn
Dear Annie: My husband of them, it would be both and I are in our late 40s and appropriate and kind to do have been married 30 years. so. Otherwise, please be sure there is hospitality provided (We married young.) “Eugene” has started look- at the resort specifically for ing at a lot of porn and seems them that includes some type to have a compulsion about of food (snacks, drinks, etc.). Dear Annie: This is in it. We have enjoyed adult videos as a couple and still response to the letter from do, but Eugene now watch- “Pennsylvania,” who asked es porn on the computer by about the etiquette of announchimself. I feel betrayed, and ing a death via email. A couple of months ago, it damages my trust. When I told him I don’t like that my husband’s sister emailed he looks at Internet porn so that an aunt had a stroke, and often, he became hostile and she said she would keep us defensive. He angrily told me posted. Several weeks later, I was throwing out an that “after 30 years old newspaper and of the same old spotted the aunt’s thing, a guy needs obituary, too late to to look at something attend the funeral. different.” No one in my husThat comment band’s family called hurt me deeply and him. I’ve had trouble getWhen I confrontting past it. For a ed his spacey sister little while, Eugene by phone, she said backed off the porn, she meant to send but now he’s sneaking around. Today, Annie’s Mailbox a follow-up email but forgot. When I discovered he has logged on to live chat rooms my husband confronted his and Internet porn dating sites. mother, she said, “Your When I confronted him about brother-in-law was supposed it, he was nonchalant, saying to send you an email.” It those sites just randomly pop turns out that the brotherup. But I know that’s not in-law offered to do so, but true. He’s visited those sites said the email bounced back with the wrong address. It numerous times. Eugene says I’m too sen- never occurred to him to then sitive and his behavior is call us. So don’t rely on email. normal. But, Annie, the fact that he’s sneaking around is Sometimes it gets lost in enough for me to know it’s cyberspace, bounces back or not acceptable. Do you think goes into spam, and some Eugene is looking for an people don’t check their affair? -- Not Comfortable email often. I guess this is less a comment about the with My Future Dear Not: We think your etiquette of sending an email husband is looking for some to announce a death and more thrills and he’s being quite a of a comment on my husjerk about it. This could be band’s ditzy family. -- Also a typical midlife crisis: He’s in Pennsylvania Annie’s Mailbox is written approaching 50 and needs to feel young again. But such by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy juvenile behaviors can dam- Sugar, longtime editors of the age a marriage beyond repair. Ann Landers column. Please Please ask Eugene to go with email your questions to you for counseling. Tell him anniesmailbox@comcast.net, you want to work on the or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, areas of your marriage that c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 are at risk. If he won’t go, go 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. without him. Dear Annie: My son is getting married next year at a somewhat remote and tiny resort. Due to the distance, some guests will be arriving at the resort the day before the wedding. The rehearsal dinner is the night before the wedding. I plan to pay for the dinner, but my wife thinks we should pay for any guests that happen to be at the resort that night. Is she right? It could be awkward if we don’t include them and have to see them in passing. The resort is small. What is the proper way to handle this dilemma? -- Unsure in Illinois Dear Unsure: All members of the bridal party, including parents, grandparents and officiants, are included in the rehearsal dinner. It is not mandatory to include all out-of-town guests, although if there aren’t too many

Thursday, June 28, 2012

The Herald – 9

Tomorrow’s Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 2012 Leaping from one project to another could turn out to be a fruitless waste of time in the year ahead, so try to get a handle on things. Take plenty of time to establish a strong foundation in any enterprise that you become involved in. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- In order to gratify a personal ambition, you might unthinkingly do something at the expense of another. Consider all of the ramifications before taking action. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Most of the time you’ll be very pragmatic, but some little thing you take for granted could be your downfall, causing you an unexpected loss. Be detail-conscious at all times. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -When it comes to your commercial dealings, keep your guard up constantly. If you’re naive, there’s a chance you could link up with someone who isn’t as ethical as you are. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Regardless of their ingenuity, if your ideas are not implemented properly they won’t produce the results you want. Make their execution as bright as your initial thinking. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Pay particular attention to details, especially if you are working on a group endeavor in which many folks have a finger. If someone makes a mistake, another will compound it. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- It would be best not to volunteer to help someone with a project about which you know nothing. You might be the one who is held accountable if anything goes wrong. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- In order to placate your mate, you might agree to do something that goes against your better judgment. You would be far better off hammering out an agreement that you can both live with. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Just in case something disruptive should occur that interrupts your work, it would be better for you to focus on getting essential tasks done early in the day. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -You can be a pretty good manager of your funds when you put your mind to it. However, it’ll be up to you to prevent your whimsical impulses from gaining the upper hand. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Nothing good will come of you and a colleague pulling in opposite directions. You’ll have to first straighten out your differences before you can work together. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Regardless of how juicy the news, you should check it out before passing it on as gospel. You could wrongly ruin someone’s reputation. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -It’s good to be enthusiastic about something that you want, but check out its price first before you make a financial commitment. It might be much cheaper somewhere else.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

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10 – The Herald

Thursday, June 28, 2012

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SAFETY
Fireworks are synonymous with summer. They mark special occasions, festivals and warm-weather holidays like Independence Day. When handled by professionals, fireworks can be quite the spectacle. However, if lit by amateurs, fireworks can be very risky. Though they offer awe-inspiring views, fireworks can be dangerous. According to data collected in 2008 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 7,000 people in the United States were treated in emergency rooms for injuries sustained from fireworks during the period of June 20 to July 20, 2008. Nearly half of all people injured were children under the age of 15. Most injuries occurred to young people under the age of 20.All types of fireworks have an inherent danger, even sparklers. Sparklers burn at more than 1,000 F and can ignite clothing very quickly. Those who take an active roll in the lighting and shooting of fireworks are more prone to injury. The most common injuries include burns and injuries to the eyes caused by cuts and foreign objects lodged in the eyes. Although fireworks injuries are common, they also are largely preventable. The following are a few safety tips aimed at helping people avoid injury when enjoying fireworks displays.
When lighting a firework, never stand with any part of your body over the firework, and always wear eye protection. Avoid storing fireworks. If you must keep them, store them in a cool, dry place, safely out of reach from children. Never throw unused fireworks in the trash. When lighting fireworks, use a smooth, flat, outdoor surface. It should be a safe distance away from homes and things that could catch fire, such as dry leaves.
DOWNTOWN: ELIZABETH AT MARKET WEST: ALLENTOWN AT CABLE EAST: BELLEFONTAINE AT KIBBY

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405 N. Main St. • Delphos 419-695-0015 Soak all used fireworks in water or let them cool off until the next day

If fireworks are legal in your state, exercise extreme caution when using them by carefully following all label warnings and instructions.

If you see an unexploded firework on the ground after a public display, avoid touching it and call the local fire department immediately.

One stop for all your printing needs!
Never attempt to relight a firework that did not fully function. Instead, contact your fire department for information about proper disposal of “live” fireworks.

710 Elida Ave. Ph. 419-695-2931

4 TIRE

226 S. Pierce St. www.4ktire.com Delphos 24 HOUR ON-SITE SERVICE -

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before disposing of them in a garbage can.

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Eagle Print

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111 E. Fourth St. • Delphos, OH 45833 Call 1-800-589-6950 419-695-0015 Fax 419-695-4675

Celebrate Safely by using only exempt trick or novelty fireworks. Supervise children and avoid combustibles and loose clothing.
Open 7 Days A Week: Monday-Saturday 10-8, Sunday 12-6

Never let children handle or ignite fireworks. Only children over the age of 5 should be given sparklers, to be used under the close supervision of an adult.

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