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L1BRARY OF PARLIAMENT

1 9 2012
BIBLIOTHQUE DU PARLEMENT
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Cover
James Hart. The ThfeeWatchmen (2ee3, cast 2010), NGC
Gift of Michael Audaln and Yoshlko Karas-awa, Vancouver, 2011
National Gallery of Canada'"
380 Sussex Drive
p,o, Box 427, Station A
Ottawa, Ontario
KIN 9N4
613.990.1985
www.gallery.ca
*Throughout this document, references to the"National Gallery of Canada",
the"NGC" and"the Gallery" include the Gallery's affiliate museum,
the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography (CMCP).
National Gallery Mu"e de. beauxam
of Canada du Canada
2
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Chair
Michael Audain
Vancouver, British Columbia
Vice-Chair
Michael Tims
Calgary, Alberta
Trustees
Paul Baay
Calgary, Alberta
Jean-Franois Bland
Gatineau, Quebec
Allan Benoit
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Guy Bourgeois
St-Bruno, Quebec
Fred Fountain
Head of St . Margaret's Bay, Nova Scotia
Linda Hutchison
I<entville, Nova Scotia
Howard I<roon
Calgary, Alberta
Liza Maheu
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Harriet Walker
Toronto, Ontario
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
SENIOR MANAGEMENT
Marc Mayer
Director and Chief Executive Officer
David Baxter
. Deputy Director, Administration and Finance
I<aren Colby-Stothart
Deputy Director, Exhibitions and Installations
Paul Lang
Chief Curator and Deputy Director,
Collections, Research and Education
Stephen Gritt
Director, Conservation and
Technical Research
Allen LeBlanc
Director, Institutional Advancement
Matthew Symonds
Director, Corporate Secretariat
and Ministerial Liaison
Serge Thriault
Director, Publishing, New Media 8... Distribution
Vacant
Director, Human Resources
1. INTRODUCTION
This Corporate Plan Summary outlines the'National Gallery of Canada's (NGC) strategie priorities
for the 2012/13 to 2016/17 planning period, It also delineates the capital and operating budgets
forthe 2012/13 fiscal year
The Gallery's Board of Trustees has established the following five strategie priorities for 2012/13
through to 2016/17:
Strengthening the Collection
Engagement and Appreciation of Art
Diversity
Infrastructure
Funding
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Key results, strategies, performance measures, and targets for each priority have been developed
and can be found in Section 5 of this document.
2. MANDATE, MISSION, VISION AND VALUES
MANDATE
The Museums Act (1990), mandates the Gallery to develop, maintain and make known throughout
Canada and international/y, a col/ection ofworks of art, both historie and contemporary, with special but not
exclusive reference to Canada, and to further knowledge, understanding and enjoyment of art in general
among ail Canadians.
MISSION
The strength of the National Gallery of Canada lies in its collection of art, especially Canadian art,
and its accessibility to the public across the country. The collection opens the way for an apprecia-
tion of the finest in artistic expression, with works of art that reveal the past, celebrate the
present, and probe the future. The collection must be expanded, preserved, interpreted and used
extensively by the public for pleasure and understanding, for research, and for the advancement
of knowledge.
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VISION
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
The National Gallery of Canada strives to provide Canadians with a sense of identity and pride in
Canada's rich visual arts heritage. Through its collection, onsite and travelling exhibitions, loans
program, educational programs and publications, professional training programs, and outreach
initiatives, the Gallery aspires to be a model of excellence in furthering knowledge of the visual arts,
both at home and abroad. Through collaboration with national and international institutions, the
Gallery seeks to make art accessible, meaningful, and vital to diverse audiences of ail ages.
VALUES
Accessibility: programs are developed with the public in mind - not only for visitors to the
Gallery, but also for those across the country and abroad.
Excellence and Scholarship: The Gallery builds upon the high standards attained overthe
years in ail its endeavours, from research to acquisitions, exhibitions, publications, public
programs, and overall service standards.
Corporate Citizenship: The Gallery meets its public policy and legal obligations.
Leadership: The Gallery is a recognized leader in the national and international art museum
communities.
Collaboration: The Gallery collaborates with the art museums network across Canada and
abroad, and with its partners in the Government of Canada. .
Valued Workforce: The Gallery values its workforce and creates a work environment in which
people can maximize their potential and contribute fully to the success of the organization.
3. CORPORATE PROFILE
HISTORY
The National Gallery of Canada was founded in 1880 by then Governor General the Marquis of
Lorne, in concert with the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. The federal government assumed
responsibility forthe Gallery with the enactment of the National Gallery of Canada Act in 1913.
ln 1985, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography (CM CP) was created from the for-
mer Still Photography Division of the National Film Board and became an affiliate of the Gallery.
On )uly l,1990, the National Gallery of Canada became a Crown corporation with the proclama-
tion of the Museums Act, which also confirmed the CMCP as an affiliate of the Gallery.
GOVERNING LEGISLATION
Under the Museums Act, the Gallery is a distinct legal entity, wholly owned by the Crown. While it
functions at arm's length from the Government in its daily operations, as a Crawn corporation
and member of the Canadian Heritage Portfolio, the Gallery contributes to the achievement of
the Government's broad policy objectives. The Gallery is subject to Crown corporation accounta-
bility established under Part X of the Financial Administration Act.
GOVERNANCESTRUCTURE
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Underthe MuseumsAct, the Gallery's Board of Trustees serves as its governing body and is
accountable to Parliament. through the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Offlcial Languages,
for stewardship of the museum. The ll-member Board, representing most regions of the country,
is appointed by the Governor-in-Council on the advice of the Minister of Canadian Heritage and
Offlcial Languages.
Through its Chair, the Board is accountable to the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Offlcial
Languages, who, in turn, is the link between the Gallery, Cabinet. and Parliament. The Board of
Trustees delegates authority for day-to-day management of the Gallery to the Director and CEO,
who is supported by three Deputy Directors and fve Directors.
THE COLLECTION
The National Gallery's collection includes appraximately 46,100 works of art and has immeasura-
ble historical, cultural and monetary value. The collection not only preserves the country's herit-
age for future generations but is also the sou rce for scholarly research, for exhibitions in Ottawa
and travelling exhibitions across the country, and for loans to other museums throughout Canada
and abroad.
Built by purchase and gift since the 18805, the comprehensive collection of Canadian art traces
Canada'shistoric and cultural origins. Ranging from 18th century religious Quebec sculpture,
through to the avant-garde paintings of the 19605, to works by today's prominent and emerging
artists, the Canadian collection renects the diversity of Canadian creativity - including its First
Nations, Mtis and Inuit people - from ail regions of the country.
The Gallery also has important collections of Western European and American art that date fram
the 14th century to the present, including a prestigious collection of prints, drawings and photo-
graphs of historical and contemporary signifcance, ail ofwhich help place Canadian art in its
broader context .
The CMCP collection focuses on Canadian contemporary photography, both as an art form and as
social documentation. The collection comprises over 17,475 works by contemporary Canadian
photographers (plus holdings of some 144,000 negatives and transparencies).
6 SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
The Gallery's Library and Archives houses the country's largest collection of research material on
the history of the visual arts: these materials are used by scholars and the public across the coun-
try and include about 900 active and l300 inactive periodical titles.
THE FACILITIES
The Gallery's real property holdings include the main building on Sussex Drive in Ottawa and two
leased warehouse facilities in the National Capital Region. The main building includes exhibition
galleries, art storage vaults, laboratories, offices, workshops and special events areas, as weil as
a library, a 400-seat auditorium, a lecture hall, gift shop, cafeteria, and underground parking
garage.
The Gallery's stewardship extends also to the Canada Pavilion in Venice, Italy used for Canada's
representation at the Venice Biennale - a world-renowned contemporary art event.
FINANCIAL RESOURCES
The Gallery receives an nuai appropriations from the Government of Canada, which it supplements
through revenue-generating activities and additional funds from the National Gallery of Canada
Foundation. Parliamentary appropriations for 2012/l3 will total $48.206 million, including $8 mil-
lion for the acquisition of art and other costs attributable to this activity, as weil as $4.874 million
for capital projects. In addition, the Gallery anticipates self-generated revenues and contributions
of $11.2l3 million. The figure below illustrates the Gallery's 2012/l3 resource base for operations
and art acquisitions; the $4.874 million in annual capital funding is excluded.
Resource Base for Operations
and Art Acquisitions, 2012-13
Contributions 2 %
Appropriations 79 %
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Depending on many factors including the pulJlic's response to the summer exhibition, self-gener-
ated gross revenues and contributions range between 15 and 20% of the total operations and art
acquisitions budgets. The Gallery has estimated self-generated revenue (commercial operations,
memberships. sponsorships, contributions and donations in cash) at 21% for 2012/13.
4. MAIN PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES, AND RESULTS
ACHIEVED DURING THE LAST FISCAL YEAR
The Gallery's program Activity Architecture (PAA) comprises four key activities and associated
sub-activities:
Collection: acquisitions, research, and preservation:
Outreach: exhibitions. education. and communications:
Accommodation: building operations and capital expenditures:
Internai Services: governance. administration. and revenue-generation.
OVERVIEW OF MANDATE AND EXPECTED OUTCOMES
BASED ON A PROGRAM ACTIVITY ARCHITECTURE (PAA)
Legislated Mandate 1 To develop, maintain and make known throughout Canada and internationally, a collection
of works of art, both historic and contemporary, with special but not exclusive reference
to Canada. and to further knowledge. understanding and enjoyment of art i n general
among ail Canadians.
-- --_.-----------_._------------------------------
Strategie Outcome Interest in. knowldge of and appreciation and respect for visual art through a collection
of h.iStoric and contemporary works of art, prograrns and research that renect a special
but not exclusive perspective on Canada.
_ pr_o_g_ra_m __ A_ct ._i_vi_ti_e_s _-+_C_o_I_le __ c_t _iO_ " ____ __
Expectd Otitcomes Strong national Enhanced knowledge. : Sare. secure and 1 m'ective corporate
for Each program collection represent
c
and 1 accessible facilities I n:anagement
Actvity ing Canadianand enJoyment of art r for the national i tlces and controls ln
international visual amongCanadians 1 collection. visitors 1 place for resources to
arts for present and through dynamic ! and staff i be managed
future generations nationaland interna- I l efficientlY and opera-
lional programming litions cirried out
1 ! effectively
1 ----------
Acquisitions ExhibitiQns El Building Operations 1 Governance Sub-Activities
Research Education Capital Expenditures Administration
Preservation Communications 1 Revenue Generation
--... ----------+---------- - 1--------- --- 1 - ---.--- ----- , ---------
StrategC Prortes for
the Planning period
Strengthening the Engagement and Il Infrastructure 1 Infrastructure
Collection AP. preciation of Art 1 Il Diversity
Di\tersity ! Funding
8 SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
Through these programs, the Gallery achieves its mandate consistent with the Government's
priorities for the Heritage Portfolio and makes a sign ificant contribution to the enrichment of the
heritage and culturallife of ail Canadians.
The Gallery's fixed costs for its facilities, including amortization, payments in lieu of taxes and
security, consume a high percentage of its useable resources - 36% of its operating budget. These
non-discretionaryfixed costs are not indexed against inflation and are expected to escalate.
After removing accommodation and costs for internai services - including those to generate reve-
nue - 42% of the operating budget remains for the Gallery's core activities related to the
Collection (14 %) and Outreach (28 %).
Expenses by program Activity
Excluding Art Purchases - 2012/13
Outreach 28 %
Collection 14 %
MAIN PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES - COLLECTION
The Collection program activity is essential to the Gallery's mandate to strengthen, care for,
and share the collection. The Collection activity comprises three sub-activities: Acquisitions,
Research, and Preservation.
Acquisitions
Canada's national collection makes a priceless contribution to preserving and raising awareness
of the country's patrimony. Canadian and international fine arts museums regularly approach the
Gallery for loans from its collection, a testament to the outstanding quality of the Gallery's
acquisitions.
Acquisitions build on the strength of and address gaps in the collection. Each acquisition is made
in accordance with the Gallery's Acquisition Policy. The Gallery's acquisition budget is augmented
. by generous donations of outstanding works of art from private donors and by designated
endowments and funds from the National Gallery of Canada Foundation.
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Research
Consistent with its mandate, the Gallery researches individual works of art and the cultural,
historical, and theoretical context in which they were created. It also studies the best way to pre-
sent and interpret works of art to promote understanding and appreciation among its diverse
audiences. Carefully documented and catalogued, the works are on view at the main facility in
Ottawa orthroughout Canada and abroad.
With regard to technical art history, the Gallery leads or partners with other institutions in high
profle restoration ortechnical research projects. The results are often shared in associated publi -
cations and lectures, and testify to the Gallery's standing as a vibrant and prominent art museum.
The Gallery's Library and Archives houses the country's largest collection of research material on
the visu al ~ r t s , with special but not exclusive reference to Canada. Gallery curators, scholars as
weil as other institutions across Canada and abroad, rely on the Library and Archives as the
preeminent centre for the study of visual arts history in Canada.
Preservation
Conservation encompasses a broad range of activities within the museum context : prevention
of deterioration and damage; scientifc examination and technical research; documentation;
conservation treatment; management of risks within the exhibitions and loans programs; and
education.
The Gallery's restoration and conservation activities are fundamental to its collection and out-
reach activities. The Acquisitions and Conservation policies require conservators to carefully examine
ail works being considered for acquisition to ensure their quality, condition, and authenticity. The
Gallery's Annual Giving program directly supports projects to preserve works of art .
COLLECTION - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: STRENGTHENING THE COLLECTION
Under its Collection program activity, the Gallery adopted Strengthening the Collection as a strategic
priority in 2011/12, along with the following key results:
Greater number of art donations of outstanding significance and national importance with a strategie
approach to building the collection.
Strategy is in place to purchase highly desirable artworks and cultural heritage collections that would
enhance the collection.
Results:
The Gallery developed an Acquisitions Plan that spans the diverse heritage preserved by the insti-
tution. Endorsed by the Board of Trustees in September 2011, the Plan clarifes the Gallery's vision
forthe national collection with future priorities in mind.
10 SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
The Gallery, in partnership with the NGC Foundation, took concerted steps towards forming
long-lasting relationships with various communities of collectors, with the aim of securing long-
term loans or trusts that fi Il gaps in the collection: in the future, these loans and trusts could
become gifts or bequests. The current list exceeds twenty collectors: work continues to nurture
these relationships.
During the year ended March 31,2012, the Gallery acquired 324 works of art of outstanding
significance and national importance, 132 of which were donated as gifts.
MAIN PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES - OUTREACH
Comprising the three sub-activities - Exhibitions, Education, and Communications - the Outreach
program embraces the Gallery's legislated mandate. The Gallery aims to foster broad access both
nationally and internationally, while maintaining its existing audience and building a wider base
both in Canada and abroad. With a commitment to being a truly national institution, the Gallery
achieves this goal through: the presentation of exhibitions in Ottawa; an extensive national
traveling exhibitions program; on-site and online educational programming; and publications.
Partnerships with other museums on exhibitions and research, along with art loan programs
and various collaborative projects, serve as vehicles to further knowledge of Canada's rich visual
arts culture.
Exhibitions
Exhibitions and installations, accompanied by original research, publications, and related educa-
tional activities are the most visible means to showcase the national collection. The Gallery is
recognized both nationally and internationally for its capacity to contribute to exhibition research
projects at the highest levels of scholarship and to bring sophisticated organizational and produc-
tion management talent to its national and international partnerships.
The annual exhibitions program includes 8 to 12 featured exhibitions at the Gallery's main site in
Ottawa, and 15 to 25 exhibitions at museums across Canada and internationally, which are pre-
sented through the Gallery's travelling exhibitions program and satellite partnerships. Organizing
travelling exhibitions since 1919, the Gallery has the largest program of its kind in the world . The
NGC Foundation's Distinguished Patrons have established an On Tour Endowment that supports
this flagship program, which is vital to the delivery of the Gallery's national mandate.
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Education
Appealing to various levels of art knowledge, interest and ability, the education and public pro-
grams are a vital aspect of the Gallery's mandate and include, among others, keyeducational
offerings such as school tours, instructional resources forteachers, self-guided tours, and
adapted tours for people with disabilities. Many of these programs are developed into online
resources and made available on the Gallery's website: others support the travelling exhibitions
and satellite programs.
Available in five languages - English, French, Mandarin, German and Spanish -the Gallery's adult
audioguides address the needs of an increasingly diverse audience. The special exhibition audio-
guides for adults and, when appropriate, for children (du ring the summer), include verbal descrip-
tion stops for the visually impaired.
Several of the Gallery's education and public programs are supported by the Foundation's
patrons, eitherthrough donations or sponsorships.
Communications
The Communications sub-activity encompasses copyright. marketing, distribution, website
efforts and publishing activities, the latter being fundamental to the Gallery's mandate to develop
and document the collection and its exhibitions. The wide-ranging body of scholarly publications
and research mate rials produced annually by the Gallery makes a major contribution to advancing
the knowledge of art history. The NGC often partners with other institutions and publishers in
the production of exhibition catalogues.
Communication activities also include strategie communications and media relations, which are
vital to protecting and enhancing the Gallery's reputation.
OUTREACH - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: ACCESS AND DIGITAL INNOVATION
The Gallery adopted Access and Digital Innovation as a strategie priority under its Outreach program
activity, along with the following key result:
The National Gaffery was made widely accessible and interactive through the use ofweb-based commu-
nication taols.
Results:
ln 2011, the Gallery redesigned its website, resulting in significant growth in web usage and rec-
ognition. Rendered more user-friendly, the interactive web domain offers an easily accessible
design with a newly integrated search engine that allows web visitors to explore the entirety of
the NGC data base.
12 SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
Visitors to the new website increased in the first quarter of fiscal year 2011/12: the number of visits
rose from 898,360 to 1,251,052, while the number of pages viewed during that period escalated
fram 15.5 million to 118.8 million.
Number of NGC Website Pages Viewed
120,000,000
80,000,000
40,000,000
lSt Quarter 2009 lSt Quarter 2010 lSt Quarter 2011
To appeal to audiences who favour quick, mobile access to the Internet. the Gallery also launched
a new mobile website in April 2011. This simplified version of the Gallery's main website provides
key information such as exhibitions on view, an events calendar, contact and admission informa-
tion. Users have the ability to connect to the main gallery.ca website - also mobile-friendly - to
expand their browsing experience.
To offer a rich menu of educational programs on-line, the Gallery formed an interdivlsional Web
and New Media Content Committee. Work continues on the development of the Gallery's suite of
on li ne educational tools.
Throughout the year, the Gallery added rich online content intended to enhance the visitor experi-
ence such as new podcasts and artist biographies. The national online contest 50 Vou Want ta be an
Artist used Facebook Connect to engage teens and their supporters in ail regions of the country,
with more than 50,000 site visits and 22,000 votes cast for 126 submitted artworks.
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OUTREACH - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: ACCESS AND DIGITAL INNOVATION
A second key result was established for the strategie priority Access and Digital Innovation, namely:
Canadians in ail regions of the country had physical access to the NGC collection through meaningful
programs and installations.
Results:
The Gallery's exhibitions support cultural tourism, which, in turn, has a signifcant economic
impact on host venues and their local economies. The NGC's travelling exhibitions program
achieved signifcant success in reaching small communities as weil as large urban centres by
providing a range of exhibitions of various sizes, covering diverse subject matter and media-
from the most recent contemporary acquisitions to modern and historical works.
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ln 2011/12 the Gallery set a target of reaching 20 venues that book through the On Tour program.
During the year ended March 31,2012,26 venues hosted or booked the Gallery's travelling
exhibitions.
ln keeping with its national mandate, the Gallery augmented it extensive travelling exhibitions
program with successful partn.erships, aimed at ensuring that Canadians can experience their
national art collection where they live. The Gallery added to its three-year partnership with the Art
Gallery of Alberta (NGC@AGA) by entering into a similar partnership with the Museum of
Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto (NGC@MOCCA). Through these innovative arrangements,
the National Gallery of Canada creates semi-permanent exhibitions using exceptional works of art
drawn from the national collection while demonstrating the commitment to sharing the collec-
tion with wider audiences and expanding its presence in Canada's vibrant metropolitan centres.
For 2011/12, the Gallery set a target of reaching 693,000 visitors to the permanent collection and
exhibitions in Ottawa, NGC@ locations and tour venues. As at March 31, 2012, the Gallery
recorded an attendance level of 762,710 visitors to ail venues combined.
OUTREACH - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: DIVERSITV
For 2011/12, the Gallery set Diversity as a strategie priority under its Outreach program activity.
Specifcally, the following key result was pursued:
The Gallery targeted and reached diverse audiences.
Results:
ln terms of diversity, the Gallery aims to attract more non-traditional visitors of ail ages from vari-
ous ethnie and cultural backgrounds.
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SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
ln identifying Diversity as a strategie priority, the Gallery focused on the relevance of program-
ming to an increasingly diverse Canadian population. This was evident in the nature and scope of
the institution's installations, exhibitions, projects, and partnerships, including:
Several permanent, collection-based exhibitions, including Dont Stop Me Now!, Carl Beam and
Steeling the Gaze: Portraits by Aboriginal Artists, presented both in Ottawa and through the
Gallery's travelling exhibitions program; and
The permanent collection displays in the Inuit Galleries, as weil as the Art ofthis Land project,
presenting a diverse range ofwork by Indigenous artists.
To enrich the experience of diverse audiences on-site, three new audioguides for the national col-
lection were launched, featuring content for children, for visually impaired visitors, and for the
Mandarin-speaking audience.
Consistent with its commitment to engage visitors in new ways, the education and interpretive
programming for the Caravaggio exhibition - one of the most ambitious and varied ever-planned
by the Gallery - was extremely well-received: it helped to boost the overall participation rate in
education programs from 28% to 55.% of total Gallery attendance compared to previous years.
ln efforts to reach diverse - particularly younger - audiences, the Gallery's social media has
recorded signiflcant growth. For 2011/12, the Gallery set a conservative target of Facebook,
Twitter and YouTube referrals at 1,100 based on the low number recorded in 2010. Throughout
the year the Gallery noted a signiflcant increase in engagement levels through ail three social
media with 18,683 followers by March 31, 2012.
MAIN PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES - ACCOMMODATION
The Gallery is committed to the long-term sustainalJility of its landmark building and to providing
a safe and secure environment forthe public. staff, volunteers, and contractors. It also ensures
the secur'ity of as sets and information entrusted to its care. The Accommodation program activity
encompasses Building Operations (including Security) and Capital Expenditures.
Building Operations
The Building Operations sub-activity covers ail functions related to operating and securing the
Sussex Drive property and the two facilities leased by the Gallery, as weil as contract manage-
ment for maintenance and repair of the Canada pavilion in Venice, Italy.
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The Gallery places a high priority on protecting its collection and ensuring the secure and cost-
effective operation of its property holdings. It strives to operate its facilities in an environmen-
tally-sustainable manner within strict operating parameters necessary to preserve the collection
and fulfill contractual obligations for works of art on loan. The Gallery fulfills its corporate respon-
sibilities by proactively meeting health and safety requirements and responding to emergency
preparedness issues.
Capital Expenditures
I<eeping its land mark building on Sussex Drive fit and functional is critical to the Gallery's long-
term sustainability and to its ability to maximize earned revenues and attract visitors, donors,
and sponsors. The Gallery maintains a Long-term Capital Plan, which is updated annually, to
ensure that the facilities remain readily accessible and suitable for the preservation and exhibition
of the national collection.
ACCOMMODATION - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: INFRASTRUCTURE
Under its Accommodation program activity, the Gallery adopted Infrastructure as a strategic priority
in 2011/12. Specifically, the Gallery sought to achieve the following key result:
Use of existing space was optimized and requirements for additional capa city secured (art storage
space, gallery &. programming spa ces, and office accommodation).
Results:
ln pursuit of this priority, the Gallery secured 18,700 square feet of additional offsite art storage
space and completed construction fit-up, which included sophisticated environ mental controls.
As a result, ail planned space acquisition for art storage is complete. This additional storage space
represents a 40% increase in overall art storage space and at present, suffciently addresses the
Gallery's art storage requirements.
Concerning building operations, the Gallery is proud to advise that, wherever possible, it strives
to implement new greening strategies. During the 2011/12 fiscal year, undesirable products used
in mechanical systems were replaced with less toxic nuids. Energy reduction initiatives are ongo-
ing, including lighting retrofits and installation of energy-saving technology.
MAIN PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES - INTERNAL SERVICES
The Gallery follows the principles of sound management and governance articulated in the
Financial Administration Act and the Federal Accountability Act. The institution is firmly committed to
managing the public and private funds invested in it in a transparent and accountable manner
while optimizing its contribution to Canadian society.
Internai Services include three sub-activities, Governance, Administration and Revenue Generation.
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Governance
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 Ta 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
The National Gallery is committed to fulfilling its mandate in a way that reflects best practices,
clear accountability, and cost effectiveness. Sound governance contributes to the achievement of
both public policy objectives and the Gallery's commercial objectives and enables Gallery
Management and its Board of Trustees to ensure that the institution has the appropriate struc-
ture, policies and practices to effectively and efficiently achieve results, ensure accountability to
Canadians, and comply with applicable legislation and policy.
Administration
The goal of the Administration activity is to efficiently manage resources entrusted to the Gallery.
The Gallery's sound stewardship of resources is accomplished through an effective financial man-
agement regime and a shared set of values and ethics. The Gallery currently employs approxi-
mately 237 full-time equivalents, 81% of whom are unionized.
Revenue Generation
Revenue generated from the Gallery's commercial activities, donations, memberships and
sponsorships is a critical component of the Gallery's total resource base as it supplements
Parliamentary appropriations to support the realization of the Gallery's mandate. The ability to
attract membership, and secure sponsorship revenues and donations is highly dependent on the
Gallery's reputation for excellence. Revenues generated by admission charges, bookstore sales,
parking, education and public programs, rentai of its facilities for special events, and commission
fees from on-site restaurant operations are directly affected by attendance levels. Management
continuously reviews the pricing and delivery of Gallery services to optimize revenue
opportunities.
INTERNAL SERVICES - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: INFRASTRUCTURE
The following highlights the Gallery's accomplishments in advancing the strategie priority enti-
tled Infrastructure, which has as its key result:
Appropriate information management (lM) architecture was implemented.
Results:
Significant progress was made on Information Management in 2010/11. Development of the
Retention and Disposition Schedule was undertaken and vital records were identified. progress
continued in 2011/12 with the development and approval by the Board of Trustees of the Policy on
Information Management. Additionally, lM training was provided to Gallery staff.
ln 2011/12, implementation of the supporting technical infrastructure Continued:
A new E-Vault archiving tool was installed and archived mail on 93% of users' systemsby the
end of the fiscal year;
21% of ail live data has been successfully transitioned to a new storage area network (SAN) ; and
75% of backup traffic is now being handled bya new disk-based backup tool.
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INTERNAL SERVICES -STRATEGIC PRIORITV: DIVERSITV
ln addition to Diversity as a strategie priority related to diverse programming and audience reaeh,
the Gallery foeused on creating a diverse workforce and set the fQllowing key result :
The Gallery's workplace was representative of the diversity in Canadian society.
Results:
Concrete steps taken in 2010/11 to address the Canadian Human Rights Commission's (CHRC)
audit report on under-representation at the Gallery, resulted in the development of a comprehen-
sive Ernployment Equity Plan and the CHRCs determination that:
1 'The overall representation of women and aboriginal people at the Gallery is higher than the
labour market availability estimates; and
2 Overall, the NGC, in eomparison with the federally regulated service industry, is eonsidered
"a leader within its sector" .
Throughout 2011/12, the Gallery continued to work on creating a workforce representative of
Canada's diverse population, primarily by taking action on the strategies outlined in its
Employment Equity Plan, with a speeiflefoeus on revising its staffing guidelines to remove any
potential systemie barriers in the staffing and recruitment process.
INTERNAL SERVICES - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: FUNDING
Under the Internai Services program aetivity, the Gallery set Funding as a strategie priority for
2011/12, along with the following key result to be aehieved:
An organization-wide, focused approach increased contributed revenue levels (sponsorships and dona-
tions - in cash and in kind).
Results:
Throughout 2011/12, the Gallery undertook a critieally important. organization-wide exereise to
assess institutional funding priorities, so as to plan and implement fund development aetivities
aligned with the strategie priorities. Efforts resulted in notable eorporate sponsorships in support
of the fortheoming Van Gogh: Up Close exhibition, the Gallery's eontemporary art biennial, and the
2013 Indigenous Quinquennial exhibition.
For 2011/12 the Gallery set a target of 4% of total annual resources in sponsorships and dona-
tions. As at Mareh 31, 2012, the Gallery reaehed a flgure of $2.3 million, whieh represents 4.3% of
total an nuai resources.
18
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012- 13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012- 13
The Gallery also restructured Membership and Annual Giving, resulting in significant operational
budgetary savings and an increased ratio of return on investment .
INTERNAL SERVICES - STRATEGIC PRIORITV: FUN DING
A second key result was established for the Funding strategie priority, namely:
Self-generated revenues grew incrementa/ly in percentage (against total resources) each year.
Self-generated revenue encompasses revenues from the following sources: admissions, audioguide
rentais, parking, memberships, bookstore sales and publishing, the rentai of public spaces, and
food services.
Due to the very strong special exhibition during the summer of 2011 - Caravaggio and His Followers
in Rome - the Gallery realized excesses in forecasted revenues for admissions as welt as parking.
For 2011/12, the Gallery set a self-generated revenue target of 13% of total annual resources. As
at March 31st. the Gallery recorded $7.2 million in revenue, which represents close to 13.9% of
total resources.
With the success of the Caravaggio exhibition, the bookstore increased its revenues significantly
in the first two quarters of the fiscal year, in part due to the fact that the exhibition catalogue,
Caravaggio and His Followers in Rome, was extremely well-received. Overall, the cumulative reve-
nues achieved in the first two quarters were higher by 28% than those achieved in the same
period last year.
NATIONAL GALLERY OF CANADA FOUNDATION
A philanthropie organization, the National Gallery of Canada Foundation is dedicated to ensuring
the long-term viability and success of the NGC. The Foundation has raised almost $30 million in
philanthropie gifts since its inception in 1997, ofwhich nearly $14 million has been dedicated for
endowment and special purposes. The Foundation is focused on providing leadership with regard
to MajorGifts, Endowments, Planned Giving, and the recently launched Distinguished Patrons initi-
ative. In addition to seeking and securing funding, throughout 2011/12, the Foundation focused on
developing the capacity of its Board of Directors and increasing the number and engagement of
Distinguished Patrons.
19
5. STRATEGie PRIORITIES FOR THE PLANNING PERIOD
OVERVIEW
At its an nuai planning retreat on September 18,2011, the Board of Trustees confirmed the follow-
ing strategie priorities forthe planning period of 2012/13 through to the 2016/17:
5trengthening the Collection,
Engagement and Appreciation of Art,
Diversity,
Infrastructure, and
Funding
The Gallery renamed its 2nd strategie priority Engagement and Appreciation of Art (previously enti-
tled Access and Digital Innovation) to renect a broaderfocus on engaging audiences in its outreach
efforts and promoting the importance of a visual arts culture in Canada.
The following section highlights the strategie priorities and their expected outcomes for 2012/13
through to 2016/17.
5trengthening the Collection
Expected outcome in five years: The Gallery enhanced and capitalized on the strengths of the national
collection while focusing on excellence.
Through the strategie approach of identifying gaps in the national collection, the Gallery will
acquire works of art of outstanding significance and national importance. By strengthening
Gallery-Donor relationships, acquisitions will be pursued to support the unique character of the
national collection. Additionally, the Gallery's heightened emphasis on conservation and
research - both of which contribute to technical art history - will assist the institution in nurtur-
ing the Gallery's reputation with donors and private collectors. In pursuit of this strategie prior-
ity, the Gallery will also explore its interest in commissioning public sculptures, working in
concert with the National Capital Commission to create a sculpture park or, as a minimum, to
identify locations to display these commissioned works: both the Gallery and the National
Capital Region will benefit from these art investments and the increased cultural tourism that
they are expected to generate.
20
Engagement and Appreciation of Art
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012- 13 TO 2016- 17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
Expected outcome in five years: The Gallery became widely accessible in Canada and played a key
innovative role in promoting the importance of the visual arts.
The Gallery will continue to enhance its physical and digital presence nationally and abroad
through its programming, exhibitions, partllerships, and collaborations with other institutions.
Active promotion and profiling of the Gallery through a newly redesigned web platform will play a
strategie role in this undertaking. The Gallerywill place special emphasis on engaging existing
and new audiences in its virtual outreach initiatives.
Furthermore, the Gallery will focus efforts on initiating a national discussion on promoting the
concept of "art matters". The Gallery recognizes that. over time, a major attitudinal shift in public
perception is required to reaffirm the fact that art is meaningful to Canadians. Such a change
would enhance pride in the national visual arts heritage and facilitate an active engagement of
Canadians in visual arts culture.
Oiversity
Expected outcome in five years: The Gallery responded to the changing face of Canada by adapting its
programming and promotion, and by implementing a comprehensive employment equity plan.
The Gallery will continue its current efforts to increase diversity in developing its programming
and to ensure that its workforce reflects changing Canadian demographics. To that end, the
Gallery will identify and work with visual arts leaders in different communities, initiate cultural
leadership and educator training programs, and work with Trustees to benefit from their connec-
tions in diverse communities across Canada.
1 nfrastructure
Expected outcome in five years: The Gallery increased space quality and efficiency and enhanced the
visitor experience. It also managed information as a strategie resource supported by enterprise-wide,
integrated processes and enabling technologies.
The Gallery will optimize its existing space in the main facility on Sussex Drive. It will implement
necessary surveys and conduct analysis in an effort to make better use of existing space while
enhancing the overall visitor experience.
2l
Additionally, over the planning period, the Gallery will aim to make the main facility compliant
with current building codes. As aspects of the various building codes have changed since
the main facility opened in 1988, the Gallery will aim to address building code deficiencies on
a priority basis.
The Gallery will also continue to implement its information management (lM) initiative 50 as to
gain improved effciency and effectiveness in the use of information thraugh shared access.
Funding
Expected outcome in five years: The Gallery maximized its contributed and self-generated revenues to
equal and stabilize at $9.85M annually.
Funding stability and growth will necessitate greater diversification fram traditional government
sources, additional fundraising efforts at the grassraots level, and greaterfinancial support
secured for the Gallery by the NGC Foundation. More focus will be required on enhanced
sponsorship opportunities, making better use of the Gallery's brand,increasing rentais of Gallery
facilities with new and diverse clients, and working to increase Gallery attendance.
22
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
KEY RESULTS, STRATEGIES, PERFORMANCE MEASURES AND TARGETS
The following tables highlight the key results for each of the five strategie priorities by program
activity for the 2012/13 to 2016/17 planning period. 1 n addition, strategies and performance
measures with targets (where possible) are outlined for each of the key results.
STRENGTHENING THE COLLECTION
Expected Outcome in 5 years
The Gallery enhanced and capitalized on the strengths of the National Collection while focusing
on excellence.
PAA Collection
Key Results Greater number of donors and increased
quantities of donated works of art and archi-
vai collections of outstanding significance
and national importance.
Strategy is in place to purchase works of art
of outstanding significance and national
importance.
Strategies Develop stronger donor relationships and a
robust donor recognition program
Encourage strategie collaboration throughout
the organization, including the NGC
Foundation, to identify and partner with
potential donors .
Encourage and facilitate promised gifts of out-
standing works of art and archivai collections
through long-term loans and planned
bequests
Clarify the vision with future priorities in
mind, and create strategies to build the col-
lection with emphasis on coherence and
excellence (Acquisitions Plan)
Maintain curatorial expertise. technical and
historical research on visual arts in support of
ail under-represented areas of the collection
Performance Measures
&. Targets
Number of donated works of art with a score
of 4 = outstanding signifcance and national
importance
N umber of purchased works of art with a
score of 4 = outstanding signifcance and
national importance
Risks
Scale 1-4
Number of donations of works of art and
archivai collections
for Acquisitions Rationale
4 Highest signifcance and national importance (absolutely"must have")
3 Very significant (very good to have - flls the gap within a strength of the collection)
2 Signifcant (nice to have - enriches a strength of the collection)
1 Signifcance of an evidential value
Strong competition for art donations among Cost pressures - Government appropriations
institutions for the acquisition of art are unlikely to
i ncrease while the priee of art rises
Limited resources for don or relations and
engagement opportunities Art is increasingly unaffordable and therefore
i naccessi ble
23
ENGAGEMENT AND APPRECIATION OF ART
Expected Outcome in 5 years
The Gallery became widely accessible in Canada and played a key innovative raie in pramoting the
importance of the visual arts.
PAA
Key Results
Strategies
Performance Measures
8.. Targets
Risks
Outreach
Canadians in ail regions of the country
had access to the NGC collection through
meaningful programs and installations, and
innovative technology-based tools.
Develop (in 2012/13) and implement (by
2016/17) a Social Media Plan to optimize the
social media networks
1 ncrease the number of works of art accessible
online
Offer a rich menu of educational initiatives
online to support informallearning around the
collection and exhibitions
Maintain current level of presence through
travelling exhibitions program and NGC@
initiative
Levels of engagement through social media:
N umber of Facebook, Twitter and YouTube
referrals to the NGC website:
Target for 2012/13 is 9,000
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is
50,000
Number of visits to NGC website:
Target for 2012/13 is 8,000,000
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is
45,000,000
Percentage of works of art from the NGC
collection posted on NGC website:
Target for 2012/13 is 55%
Target to reach by 2016/17 is 75%
Number of new educational initiatives posted
online:
Target for 2012/13 is 3
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is 15
Number of bookings through travelling
exhibitions program:
Target for 2012/13 is 28
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is 140
Limitations due to restrictive copyright laws
Rising insu rance and shipping costs create
challenges to the Gallery's ability to mount
and tour exhibitions
Limitations from increasingly restrictive
security and shipping regulations
The Gallery is a recognized leader in promoting
the importance of the visual arts in Canadian
society - "art matters".
Determine through web analytics a profile
of NGC visitors to target new audiences (in
2012/13)
Develop special programming to effectively
increase interest in visual arts of visitors on-
site and online
Partner with media, other institutions and
visual arts community stakeholders to
increase awareness of the importance of
visual arts
Profiles of NGC online visitors are determined
and target audiences are identified by
March 31, 2013
Number of special programming initiatives on-
site and online, aiming to increase audiences
and create interest in visual arts:
Target for 2012/13 is 2
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is 10
Number of unique partnerships created with
media, institutions and other visual arts
community stakeholders (i.e., other museums,
universities, agencies, artists, etc) to promote
that "art matters":
Target for 2012/13 is 3
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is 15
Attendance levels in Ottawa, NGC@venues,
travelling exhibitions and special partnership
locations:
Combined attendance target for 2012/13:
625,000 visitors
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is
2,745,000 visitors
Finding optimal balance in programming
to maintain existing audience levels while
attracting new audiences
Competing priorities with limited resources
24
DIVERSITY
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATrNG AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
Expected Outcome in 5 years
The Gallery responded to the changing face of Canada by adapting its programming and promotion,
and by implementing a comprehensive employment equity plan.
PAA
Key Results
Strategies
Performance Measures
8... Targets
Risks
Outreach
The Gallery targeted and reached diverse
audiences.
Reinstate the Gallery's Diversity working
Group and establish a cross-divisional
Evaluation Working Group to develop an inter-
nai common understanding of the Gallery's
real and potential audiences (in 2012/13)
Develop and implement tools to conduct vis-
itor research and evaluation (by 2016/17)
Continue to develop and implement initiatives
aimed at fostering the high-quality exhibition
and education programming/projects that
appeal to culturally-, ethnically- and age-
diverse audiences.
DiversityWorking Group and a cross-divisional
Evaluation working Group are established by
March 31, 2013
Range of tools for visitor research and evalua-
tion is in use by 2016/17
Range of diverse and balanced exhibition-
related programming is implemented in
Ottawa, travelling exhibitions, satellite and
special partnership locations
Number of diversity-related ed'ucation initia-
tives and participants in them
Target for 2012/13 is 2
Cumulative target to reach by 2016/17 is 10
Growing competition for limited leisure time
and money
Internai Services
The Gallery's .Workplace was representative of
the dlverslty ln Canadian society.
Develop an ~ c t i o n plan to meet the require-
ments Identlfied in the Canadian Human
Rights Commission (CHRC) Employment
Equlty Legislation
Promote career opportunities among diverse
Canadlan popu lations (career fairs)
Utilize social networking channels to attract
candidates from diverse backgrounds
Increase in diverse workforce represented in at
'Ieast one of four designated groups
1 Closing the representation gaps in the Gallery's
i employment equity plan
I lncreased. and tracked the number of candi-
dates for Job vacancies
Targets to reach by 2013/14 are:
Four Designated
Groups
Women
Aboriginal People
Visible Minorities
Persons with Disabilities
Targeted %
of NGC Staff
59-4%
2.7%
14.1%
4.8%
Resistance to self-identification by diverse
population
Risk of irrelevance if the Gallery's exhibition Lack of funding for new hires
and educational programming does not reso-
nate with Canada's increasingly diverse
population
25
INFRASTRUCTURE
Expected Outcome in 5 years
The Gallery increased space quality and efficiency and enhanced the visitor experience.
The Gallery managed information as a strategic resource supported byenterprise-wide,
integrated processes and enabling technologies.
PAA
Key Results
Strategies
Performance Measures
8.. Targets
Risks
Outreach
Use of existingspace was optimized, ofacilities
were building code-compliant and the visitor
experience was enhanced in relation to
accommodations.
Review space needs of ail internai depart-
ments through their Senior Management rep-
resentative and develop an integrated space
reallocation plan for Senior Management
Committee (SMC) approval
Identify and address building code dejiciencies
on a corporate risk-basis
Develop and implement visitor survey con-
tent that focuses on the accommodation
experience
Space reallocation plan was implemented
according to corporate priorities and available
resources
Entire facilities were reviewed for building
code compliance and deficiencies were identi-
fied and addressed
Survey results showed minimum 70% of
respondents satisjied with the public facilities
supporting positive visitor experience
Targets for 2012/13 are:
Space reallocation plan completed and
approved by SMC including implementa-
tion timeline
50% of buildings reviewed for code compli-
ance and deficiencies identified
Survey content developed and imple-
mented within standard visitor survey
Targets to reach by 2016/17:
Ali physical changes implemented accord-
ing to space reallocation plan and available
resources
Entire building reviewed for code compliance
Survey results showed 75% of respondents
satisjied with positive visitor experience in
relation to accommodation
unexpected capital expenses related to the
aging building
Lack of sustainable capital funding to address
life cycle issues of building systems and
equipment
Rising costs of utilities, maintenance, and
repairs
Internai Services
Appropriate information management (lM)
architecture was implemented.
Impie ment four foundational pieces of the 1 M
strategie plan (while incorporating green
strategies):
lM POlicy
1 M Awareness
Retention and Disposition
Vital Records
Implement IT systems and software, as
required, to enable the management of the
Gallery's information resources
Targets for 2012/13 are:
The implementation plan to operationalize
the content of the 1 M foundational pieces
was created in 2012/13
Three pilot projects / proofs of concept
using SharePoint as the enabling technol-
ogy were developed and implemented in
2012/13
Targets to reach by 2016/17:
100% of electronic documents managed in
a central repository in accordance with the
relevant 1 M pOlicies
Team site and collaborative working tech-
nologies were in common use and available
to 100% Gallery staff
Lack of human and financial resources to
implement and sustain the initiative
26
FUNDING
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
Expected Outcome in 5 years
The Gallery maximized its cantributed and self-generated revenues ta equal and stabilize at
$9.85M annually.
PAA
Key Results
Strategies
Performance Measures
8.. Targets
Risks
Internai Services
sponsorship and donations grew incrementally
i (as compared to the results of the prev,ious
, fiscal year)
Establish a priority li st of institutional funding
objectives for the planning period (by March
31,2013)
Develop (in 2013/14), and implement (by
2016/17) a strategy with a five yearfocus and
annual targets for a sponsorship program
Develop (in 2012/13) and implement (by
2016/17) a strategy for naming spaces, inclu-
ding identifying spaces to be named, and esta-
blishing a naming policy and procedures
Increase in contributed revenue and spon-
sorship levels compared to the results of the
previous fiscal year:
Target for 2012/13 is $1.6M in spon-
sorships and donations;
Target to reach by 2016/17 is $2.7SM.
Decreased interest and involvement of private
sect or in corporate sponsorship of arts and
culture initiatives
Increased competition for private donors'
funds
Self-generated revenues stabilized at $7M per
fiscal year.
5tudy options for improving and harmonizing
commercial activities at the Gallery, with a
focus on making a profit that could be used to
fund core programs and services of the Gallery . .
Where practical, recommendations resulting
from the study are implemented.
Established targets for self-generated revenues
are met:
Target for 2012/13 is $9.6M"
Target for 2016/17 is $7.1M
"The target for 2012/13 exceeds the 2016117 objective
in recognition of the anticipated success of the
Van Gogh summer exhibition.
Fluctuating economy
Low levels of tourism and consequent
decrease in attendance
Price sensitivity among Canadians for discre-
tionary spending
"
6. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
PUBLIC SECTOR ACCOUNTING STANDARDS (PSAS)
The Public Sector Accounting Board (PSAB)'defined three classification standards for ail govern-
ment organizations, including Crown corporations:
Government business enterprises (GBE);
Government not-for-profit organization (GNPO); and
-. Other government organizations (OGO).
27
To determine which of the three classification standards best applies to the Gallery, management
analyzed the classification criteria presented in the Public Sector Accounting (PSA) Handbook and
concluded that the National Gallery of Canada meets the definition of a GN po. The Offlce of the
Auditor General notified the Gallery in 2011 that it was in agreement with the Gallery's
conclusion.
The financial statements accompanying this Corporate Plan Summary have been prepared in
accordance with the Public Sector Accounting Standards (Public Section 4200 series of standards
plus the PSA Handbook) that were in effect for the year ending March 31, 2012.
Key Assumptions in Corporation's Forecast
Parliamentary appropriations include only amounts approved as of November 25,2011. Revenue
projections are presented in a conservative manner based on the planned exhibitions forthe
respective years and also reflect the possible negative impacts associated with undertaking
major capital projects.
The expenditures are forecasted by activity based on historical expenditure patterns and based
on the Gallery's commitment to balance its budget for each year of the planning period.
Summary of Planned Major Capital Expenditures
The Sussex Drive facility is in the midst of a significant capital infrastructure renewal program.
The Gallery has developed a capital action plan to address the most urgent health and safety, and
program integrity issues. Implementation of the plan commenced in April 2008 and is expected
to carry through to 2014/15.
The following major capital projects are planned for 2012/13:
Rehabilitation of the front driveway and curbs;
Upgrading freight elevator E7; and
Engaging professional services for the Great Hall window and roof replacement project.
28
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAl POSITION
as at March 31
10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 l4-15 1S-16 16-17
(in thousands or dollars) Actual Forecast planned Planned Planned Planned Planned
Assets
Current:
Cash and investments $ 9,167 $ 9,524 $ 9,449 $ 9,374 $ 9,299 $ 9,224 $ 9,149
Restricted cash and cash equivalents 10,841 12,114 13,488 1,247 1,247 1,247 1,247
Accounts receivable 1,313 1,100 1,125 1,150 1,175 1,200 1,225
Inventory 526 825 850 875 900 925 950
Prepaid expenses 1,237 1,418 1,443 1,468 1,493 1,518 1,543
23,084 24,981 26,355 14,114 14,114 14,114 14,114
Collection 1 1 1 1 1 1 1
Capital assets 91,350 88,277 85,204 92,297 86,399 80,501 74,603
$ 114,435 $ 113,259 $ 111,560 $ 106,412 $ 100,514 $ 94,616 $ 88,718
LlABILITIES AND NET ASSETS
Liabilities
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable and
accrued liabilities 5,956 6,300 6,350 6,400 6,450 6,500 6,550
Deferred contributions for
the purchase of objects
for the Collection 1,607 1,000 0 0 0 0 0
Deferred contributions for
the purchase of capital assets 7,187 9,867 12,241 0 0 0 0
Otherdeferred contributions 1,931 l,BI 1.131 l,BI l,BI l,BI 1,131
16,681 18,298 19,722 7,531 7,581 7,631 7,681
Employee future beneflts 2,586 2,536 2,486 2,436 2,386 2,336 2,286
Deferred contributions for the
amortization of capital assets 90,727 87,655 84,582 91,675 85,777 79,879 73,981
109,994 108,489 106,790 101,642 95,744 89,846 83,948
Net Assets
Un restricted 3,703 4,032 4,032 4,032 4,032 4,032 4,032
Investment in Land 622 622 622 622 622 622 622
Permanentlyendowed 116 116 116 116 116 116 116
Total net assets 4,441 4,770 4,770 4,770 4,770 4,770 4,770
$ 114,435 $ 113,259 $ ll1.560 $ 106,412 $ 100,514 $ 94,616 $ 88,718
29
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
For the year ended March 31
10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15- 16 16- 17
(i n t housands of dollars) Actual Forecast Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned
Parliamentaryappropriations
Foroperating and capital
expenditures S 43,102 S 41,052 S 40,206 S 35,426 S 35,426 S 35,426 S 35,426
Appropriations deferred for the
purchase of capital assets (5,898) (5,180) (4,874) (1,000) (1,000) (1,000) (1,000)
Amortization of deferred
funding for capital assets 5,573 5,573 5,573 6,148 6,898 6,898 6,898
42,777 41,445 40,905 40,574 41,324 41,324 41,324
For the purchase of objects for
the collection 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000
Appropriations recognized from
prior periods 2,224 1,607 1,000 a a a a
Apprpriations deferred to
future periods (1,607) (1,000) a a a a a
8,617 8,607 9,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000
Total Parliamentary appropriations 51,394 50,052 49,905 48,574 49,324 49,324 49,324
Operating revenue and contributions 7,869 8,726 11,213 7,334 7,804 8,656 9,850
59,263 58,778 61,118 55,908 57,128 57,980 59,174
Expenses by activity
Collection
Operations 7,226 7,193 7,516 6,918 7,021 7,142 7,311
Art acquisitions 8,368 7,807 8,200 7,200 7,200 7,200 7,200
Total Collections 15,594 15,000 15,716 14,118 14,221 14,342 14,511
Outreach 14,086 14,022 15,052 13,486 13,686 13,922 14,252
Accommodation 18,740 18,655 18,693 17,943 18,707 19,021 19,461
Administration 10,822 10,772 11,657 10,361 10,514 10,695 - 10,950
Totalexpenses 59,242 58,449 61,118 55,908 57,128 57,980 59,174
Excess of revenue over expenses
for the period S 21 S 329 S a S o S a S o S 0
30
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
For the year ended March 31
l-ll 11-12
(in thousands of dollars) Actual Forecast
Operating activities
Cash received from clients S 7,266 S 6,783 S
Parliamentary appropriations received 45,110 43,872
Cash pa id to employees and suppliers (53,049) (53,648)
Interest received 234 300
Total cash now in operations (439) (2,693)
Capital activities
Acquisition of capital assets (5,933) (2.500)
Total cash now from capital activities (5,933) (2,500)
Investing activities
Increase in restricted cash and
cash equivalents (234) (1,273)
Total cash nowfrom investing
activities (234) (1,273)
Financing activities
Funding for the acquisition of
capital assets 5,898 5,180
Restricted contributions and
related investment income 1,580 1,643
Total cash nows from fnancing
activities 7,478 6.823
Total cash now 872 357
Cash, beginning of the year 8,295 9,167
Cash. end of the year S 9.167 S 9.524 S
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16- 17
Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned
9,963 S 6,009 S 6,359 S 6,981 S 7.900
43,332 42,426 42,426 42,426 42,426
(55,620) (49,835) (50,305) (51,157) (52,351)
250 175 100 100 100
(2,075) (1,225) (1,420) (1,650) (1,925)
(2,500) (13,241) (l,OOO) (1,000) (1,000)
(2,500) (13,241) (1,000) (1,000) (1,000)
(1,374) 12,241 a 0 0
(1,374) 12,241 a a a
4,874 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
1,000 l,ISO 1,345 1,575 1,850
5,874 2,150 2,345 2,575 2,850
(75) (75) (75) (75) (75)
9.524 9,449 9.374 9.299 9.224
9.449 S 9.374 S 9.299 S 9.224 S 9.149
31
SCHEDULE OF OPERATING AND CONTRIBUTION REVENUE
For the year ended March 31
10-11 11-12 12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17
(in thousands of dollars) Actual Forecast Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned
Operating revenue
Bookstore and publishing S 1,860 S 2,318 S 2,895 S 2,100 S 2,100 S 2,200 S 2,500
Admissions 1,303 1,511 3,550 920 1,140 1,235 1,450
Parking 836 863 918 794 864 884 934
Interest 234 300 250 175 100 100 100
Sponsorship 456 450 600 750 600 750 900
Traveling exhibitions 118 161 200 205 215 215 215
Rentai of public spaces 854 575 700 350 500 700 850
Art loans-recovery of expenses 169 125 150 150 150 150 150
Memberships 456 425 450 475 500 525 550
Audio guides 67 160 280 50 75 105 130
Food services 54 70 80 85 85 85 85
Ed ucational services 96 85 100 100 100 100 100
Other 10 40 40 30 30 32 36
6,513 7,083 10,213 6,184 6,459 7,081 8,000
Contributions
From National Gallery of Canada
Foundation 622 500 600 700 800 900 1,000
From others 734 1,143 400 450 545 675 850
1,356 1,643 1,000 l,ISO 1,345 1.575 1,850
S 7,869 S 8,726 S 11,213 S 7,334 S 7,804 S 8,656 S 9,850
32
CAPITAL BUDGET
as at March 31
10-11 11-12
(in thousands of dOllars) Actual Forecast
Deferred appropriations for the
purchase of capital assets at
beginning of year S 7,222 S 7,187 S
Parliamentaryappropriations 5,898 5,180
Total Available 13,120 12,367
Acquisition of capital assets 5,933 2,500
Deferred appropriations for the purchase
of capital assets at end ofyear S 7,187 S 9,867 S
Capital assets
Net book value at beginning ofyear S 90,990 S 91,350 S
Capital additions 5,933 2,500
96,923 93,850
Less amortization:
Amortization of building 3,898 3,898
Amortization other 1,675 1,675
5,573 5,573
Net book value at end of year S 91,350 S 88,277 S
SUMMARY OF THE CORPORATE PLAN FOR 2012-13 TO 2016-17
AND OPERATING AND CAPITAL BUDGETS FOR 2012-13
12-13 13-14 14-15 15-16 16-17
Planned Planned Planned Planned Planned
9,867 S 12,241 S a S a S a
4,874 1,000 1,000 1,000 1,000
14,741 13,241 1,000 1,000 1,000
2,500 13,241 1,000 1,000 1,000
12,241 S a S a S a S a
88,277 S 85,204 S 92,297 S 86,399 S 80,501
2,500 13,241 1,000 1,000 1,000
90,777 98,445 93,297 87,399 81,501
--- --
3,898 3,898 3,898 3,898 3,898
1,675 2,250 3,000 3,000 3,000
5,573 6,148 6,898 6,898 6,898
85,204 S 92,297 S 86,399 S 80,501 S 74,603