www.smdailyjournal.

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Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 • Vol XII, Edition 273
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By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Turned away
at the Supreme Court, congressional
Republicans sketched a strategy
Friday to repeal
the nation’s
health care law
in 2013 that
requires a
sweeping elec-
tion victory car-
rying Mitt
Romney to the
presidency and
the party at least
to narrow control of the Senate.
R o m n e y
sought to turn
the court’s
d e c i s i o n
upholding the
two-year-old
law into a
campaign bat-
tle cry, saying
the 5-4 ruling
had injected
“ g r e a t e r
urgency” into his challenge to
President Barack Obama. “I think
many people assumed that the
Supreme Court would do the work
GOP charts
strategy on
health care
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The two top vote-getters county-
wide in the June primary election
for District Four supervisor also
nabbed the key spots by voters who
live in that district, according to the
certified results released by the
Elections Office this week.
The numbers
showing Warren
Slocum and
Shelly Masur
carried the dis-
trict as well as
the entire county
comes just days
after county
s u p e r v i s o r s
agreed to let vot-
ers this fall
decide if the
position should
be chosen at-
large or only by
an individual
position’s con-
s t i t u e n t s .
County supervi-
sors are chosen by the entire county
electorate but represent an individ-
ual district. San Mateo County is the
only county statewide that chooses
its supervisors this way and some
argue, among other reasons, that it
is unfair because a candidate could
theoretically secure his or her dis-
trict but lose because countywide
voters supported somebody else. In
fact, during the special May 2011
election, now-Supervisor Dave Pine
lost his district to opponent Gina
Papan but won the District One seat
because of overall totals.
In June, Slocum received the most
votes with 38.4 percent overall fol-
lowed by Masur with 21.4 percent.
District Four tally matched countywide results
Top vote-getters in supervisor race election also led in home district
Warren Slocum Shelly Masur See RESULTS, Page 20
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Does the San Mateo Union High
School District discriminate against
certain students when it comes to
school assignments?
The U.S. Department of
Education’s Office of Civil Rights is
investigating such a complaint, a
spokesman confirmed this week.
While details of the complaint are
sparse, the allegation is that “the
San Mateo Union High School
District investigated
for discrimination
Families allege they weren’t allowed school of choice
Romney turning Supreme Court’s
decision into campaign battle cry
See page 6
Inside
White House
wants Hill Democrats
to fight on taxes
Mitt Romney
See GOP, Page 20
See DISTRICT, Page 18
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
Shannon Abbott and Sara Saunders use a lightbox to examine X-rays at the new Humane House at the Tom and
Annette Lantos Center for Compassion in Burlingame Tuesday.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Children on the Peninsula have a
cool new playroom where they can
feel firsthand what it’s like to be vet-
erinarian, sniff exciting animal smells
and learn how to use a microchip
scanner.
The Peninsula Humane Society
opened its new Humane House
Saturday and children participating in
day camps at the Tom and Annette
Lantos Center for Compassion on
Rollins Road in Burlingame this
week have already made it their own.
Scott Delucchi, PHS’s vice presi-
dent and outreach coordinator, held a
soft launch of the new playroom last
Thursday.
He learned that “anything not bolt-
ed down will be moved, kicked and
thrown” and that some of the parents
will even join in.
Tuesday, he watched over a group
of about 10 children who got their
first chance to explore the 400-
square-foot playroom.
They got to don a vet’s white lab
coat and other uniforms, use a wall-
mounted lightbox to view X-rays of
animals treated by the staff at PHS
and enjoy the Humane House’s Sniff
Zone.
There is even a kitty litter box right
next to the Sniff Zone that doubles as
a game. Children can sift through the
box with a scooper to find five hidden
items.
There is also a stuffed toy cocker
spaniel named Joe that children can
use a mounted microchip scanner to
check for its identity.
When asked, most of the children
who visited the Humane House said
that careers as veterinarians were in
their futures.
“We’ve learned lots about different
species,” said Jenna Williamson. She
is working on making a poster this
week to highlight the things she has
learned at daycamp in a presentation
at the end of the week.
Her presentation will be on bun-
nies.
They have learned about rats, par-
rots, turtles and have had some dog-
training classes, said Shannon
Abbott, 11.
Abbott and Sara Saunders, 10, used
the lightbox to check out some X-
rays. They looked intently at one X-
PHS playroom a hit with children
Interactive learning space now open at Peninsula Humane Society
See HUMANE, Page 20
DISTRICT PLAY OPENS
WITH BIG ALPINE WIN
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Boxer Mike Tyson
is 46.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1912
Canada’s deadliest tornado on record
occurred as a late-afternoon cyclone
struck Regina, the provincial capital of
Saskatchewan, killing 28 people and
destroying or damaging 500 buildings.
“The man who has done
his level best is a success, even though
the world may write him down a failure.”
— B.C. Forbes, Scottish journalist (1880-1954)
Actor-comedian
David Alan Grier is
56.
Olympic gold
medalist Michael
Phelps is 27.
Birthdays
ROSIE LINARES/DAILY JOURNAL
Members of the first class at Draper University of Heroes in downtown San Mateo celebrate by throwing masks in the air after
Friday’s graduation ceremony. The masks were in lieu of caps since they were justed dubbed ‘superheroes’ by university
founder Tim Draper.The university just completed a pilot program at the Benjamin Franklin Hotel in San Mateo.
Saturday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog
and drizzle in the morning. Highs in the mid
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog
and drizzle after midnight. Lows in the
lower 50s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday: Cloudy in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog and drizzle in the morning.
Highs in the mid 60s. West winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday night: Partly cloudy in the evening then becoming
mostly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows around 50.
West winds 10 to 20 mph.
Monday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Patchy fog. Highs in the mid 60s.
Monday night through Friday: Mostly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6,in first place; California Classic,No.5,in second
place; and Lucky Charms, No. 12, in third place.
The race tme was clocked at 1:43.92.
(Answers Monday)
NOVEL OCTET LESSON PARADE
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: As the owner of the most successful sandwich
shop in town, he was this — ON A ROLL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
GITTH
SLSIB
KANBIG
MRUEES
©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

o
n

F
a
c
e
b
o
o
k

h
t
t
p
:
/
/
w
w
w
.
f
a
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e
b
o
o
k
.
c
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/
ju
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A:
4 7 7
28 34 39 45 53 34
Mega number
June 29 Mega Millions
4 5 12 17 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 7 2 5
Daily Four
8 4 9
Daily three evening
In 1859, French acrobat Charles Blondin walked back and
forth on a tightrope above the gorge of Niagara Falls as thou-
sands of spectators watched.
In 1860, the famous Oxford University Museum debate on
Darwin’s theory of evolution took place as Anglican Bishop
Samuel Wilberforce led his side in denouncing the concept,
while biologist T.H. Huxley defended it.
In 1908, the Tunguska Event took place in Russia as an aster-
oid exploded above Siberia, leaving 800 square miles of
scorched or blown-down trees.
In 1921, President Warren G. Harding nominated former
President William Howard Taft to be chief justice of the United
States, succeeding the late Edward Douglass White.
In 1934, Adolf Hitler carried out his “blood purge” of political
and military rivals in Germany in what came to be known as
“The Night of the Long Knives.”
In 1936, the epic Civil War novel “Gone with the Wind” by
Margaret Mitchell was first published by The Macmillan Co. in
New York.
In 1952, “The Guiding Light,” a popular radio program, began
a 57-year television run on CBS.
In 1958, the U.S. Senate passed the Alaska statehood bill by a
vote of 64-20.
In 1963, Pope Paul VI was crowned the 262nd head of the
Roman Catholic Church.
In 1972, for the first time, a leap-second was added to
Coordinated Universal Time to account for the slowing rotation
of the Earth.
In 1982, the proposed Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S.
Constitution expired, having failed to receive the required
number of ratifications for its adoption, despite having its
seven-year deadline extended by three years.
Actor Tony Musante is 76. Actress Nancy Dussault is 76.
Singer Glenn Shorrock is 68. Jazz musician Stanley Clarke is 61.
Actor David Garrison is 60. Rock musician Hal Lindes (Dire
Straits) is 59. Actor Vincent D’Onofrio is 53. Actress Deirdre
Lovejoy is 50. Actor Rupert Graves is 49. Rock musician Tom
Drummond (Better Than Ezra) is 43. Actor Brian Bloom is 42.
Actor Brian Vincent is 42. Actress Monica Potter is 41. Actor
Rick Gonzalez is 33. Actress Lizzy Caplan is 30. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Fantasia (“American Idol”) is 28.
The first female African-American
millionaire was Madame C.J. Walker
(1867-1919). She made her fortune
selling hair care products in the early
1900s. Walker donated her money to
dozens of black charities.
***
Television, the dishwasher, nylon and
fluorescent lights were first introduced
during the 1939 New York World’s
Fair.
***
Bengay, a balm for muscle pain relief,
is named after the French pharmacist
that created the medicated cream in the
late 1800s, Dr. Jules Bengué.
***
Ever wonder why whole airplanes are
not made out of the same material used
to make the damage-proof “black
box?” It is because the plane would be
too heavy to get off the ground.
***
Do you know which comic book hero
is the Queen of the Jungle? See answer
at end.
***
Chefs in Japan need a license to pre-
pare the delicacy fugu, a blowfish that
contains lethal amounts of poison in its
organs. If the fish is not prepared cor-
rectly, the consumer can die of asphyx-
iation, caused by muscle paralysis.
***
The severity of a coma is assessed by
the Glasgow Coma Scale. The scale
evaluates the coma patient’s eye open-
ing response, verbal response and
motor response.
***
The best-selling commemorative stamp
ever issued by the U.S. Postal Service
is the Elvis Presley (1935-1977), first
released in 1993. The post office let the
public vote on which image of Elvis
should be used on the stamp — a pic-
ture from the 1950s or the 1970s. The
image of young Elvis won overwhelm-
ingly.
***
In the television sitcom “Mork and
Mindy” (1978-1982) Robin Williams
(born 1951) plays an alien named
Mork from planet Ork sent to study
humans on Earth. He lives with Mindy,
played by Pam Dawber (born 1951), in
Boulder. Colo.
***
During World War II, the original
copies of the U.S Constitution and the
Declaration of Independence were kept
at Fort Knox, Ky.
***
Since 1889, the mascot for Yale
University has been a bulldog named
Handsome Dan. At death or retirement,
Handsome Dan is replaced with anoth-
er bulldog. The current mascot is
Handsome Dan XVI.
***
One of the things to do in Pontedassio,
Italy is visit the Museo Storico degli
Spaghetti, Italian for Historical
Museum of Spaghetti.
***
The smallest designated unit of time is
a yoctosecond, equivalent to one septil-
lionth of a second.
***
The Impossible Mission Taskforce
(IMF) was assigned secret missions
deemed impossible in the television
spy series “Mission: Impossible”
(1966-1973). Members of the IMF
were informed of their secret missions
by the “Secretary” via cassette tapes
that self-destructed.
***
Irish Soda Bread is so named because
the Irish recipe uses baking soda for
leavening.
***
Answer: Sheena. As a child Sheena
was orphaned and left in the jungle.
She grew up there and communicates
with wild animals. Sheena’s first comic
book debuted in 1942.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
4 19 38 42 44 19
Mega number
June 27 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Creating a garden at Taylor Middle School
was a small wish Principal Lesley Martin
shared with parents this school year.
Martin hadn’t expected the casual mention
to turn into much more. She often met with
parents at coffee chats to discuss what was on
their mind. It also gives Martin a chance to
share upcoming school events and goals, like
planting a small garden. Last weekend,
through the help of a variety of people in the
community, such a garden was planted on the
Millbrae campus. Despite it being summer, a
group of students and parents came together
to use a variety of donations and make a gar-
den that will aid in student learning this fall.
Martin explained the idea was a simple one.
For starters, Martin is a believer in getting
kids outside and comfortable in a garden any-
way. But also, she said Taylor school is beau-
tiful. It’s currently under construction. Adding
plants could be a nice way to spruce things up,
she said.
Hearing the idea was all it took for Taylor
parent Karen Atkinson, who also really enjoys
gardening, to become involved. Atkinson is
admittedly shameless when it comes to asking
for donations to support local schools. She got
to work right away by reaching out to Lowe’s
Home Improvement. Her small request for the
equipment needed to create a small sprinkler
system was granted.
With work under way, Martin reached out to
Millbrae’s Environmental Programs Manager
Shelly Reider, who was thrilled to help. The
city has a green emphasis and often Reider
puts on or coordinates educational presenta-
tions in schools on things like recycling and
water conservation. By Martin reaching out,
Reider was able to put the school in contact
with a local expert who could guide the
process of deciding which plants stay and
what native, drought tolerant plants should be
added. Additionally, the city funded the com-
post, plant material and landscape design
services.
On Saturday, June 23, parents, students and
local church volunteers gathered to install an
irrigation system, amendments and a drought
tolerant native garden in the 230-square-foot
planting bed at the front of the school.
Atkinson brought her children to help with
the day.
“We like to give them the chance to help the
community,” she said, adding while at work
her daughter’s friend happened to jog by.
She stopped and asked if she could help.
Not only was she welcomed, but the girl
called her sister to join, Atkinson said.
“It’s so important for kids to understand
things don’t just happen,” Atkinson said, but
they can make things happen.
During the school year, student groups will
assist in the garden as part of their seventh
grade science curriculum of exploring the
structure and function of living systems, said
Martin.
Garden grows from community effort
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Welfare check. A women calling from New
Jersey told police her husband was in town on
business and was staying at the Marriot
Courtyard on Veterans Boulevard. She said she
hadn’t heard from her husband for six hours
before 9:57 p.m. on Wednesday, June 27.
Suspicious activity. A real estate agent arrived
at a property he was selling to find a suspicious
car parked in the driveway and neighbors said it
had been there since last week on Wilms Avenue
before 8:25 p.m. on Wednesday, June 27.
Fireworks. Fireworks were heard on Ridgeview
Court and Carnelian Road before 8:09 p.m. on
Wednesday, June 27.
Traffic law violation. A black SUV was cited
for being parked on the sidewalk and blocking
pedestrians on Commercial Avenue before 2:51
p.m. on Wednesday, June 27.
UNINCORPORATED SAN MATEO
Warrant arrest. Four people were found occu-
pying a vehicle with the lights off on Third and
Main streets in Montara. When contacted by
police, a woman was found to be wanted on a
$5,000 warrant and was arrested and transported
to San Mateo County Jail before 3:49 a.m. on
Thursday, June 28.
Burglary. A rock was used to break a conven-
ience store window causing approximately $400
in damages on the first block of Alhambra
Avenue in El Granada before 5:15 a.m. on
Wednesday, June 27.
Police reports
Gordon Ramsay?
A person was reportedly yelling and
smashing things in a restaurant on the
1100 block of Broadway in Burlingame
before 12:20 a.m. Thursday, June 19.
Students help plant a garden at Taylor Middle School in Millbrae.
4
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Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
Ex-VP Spiro Agnew
widow dead at 91
ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The
widow of former Vice President
Spiro Agnew has died. Judy Agnew
was 91.
Agnew’s daughter Susan Sagle
said Friday her mother died on June
20 in Rancho Mirage, Calif., with
her four children present.
Sagle says her mother’s health
had been deteriorating since 2005
and she developed pneumonia.
The wife of the man who became
known as President Richard
Nixon’s strident point man stayed
out of politics, focusing on family
life.
“I think she had a very quiet and
enjoyable life with friends and fam-
ily and stayed very much involved
with her family, which was the
most important part of her life,”
Sagle said in a telephone interview
Friday.
Former U.S. Rep. Helen Bentley,
a Maryland Republican and long-
time friend, described her as a
pleasant woman.
Former head of
troubled city found dead
VERNON — The body of the
former administrator of the indus-
trial city of Vernon has been found
on the San Francisco Bay area’s
Angel Island — on the same day
the California auditor’s office
issued a critical report of the way
he and others managed Vernon.
Angel Island Park
Superintendent Amy Brees says the
body of Eric T. Fresch was found
Thursday after he did not return
from a day trip.
Brees says Fresch was discov-
ered floating in the water near his
bicycle.
Around the state
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A San Francisco woman accused
of running over a man hanging to
her vehicle after she snatched his
cellphone pleaded not guilty to
charges of theft, robbery and
assault.
Meylin Jessica Reyes, 23, is also
charged in similar crimes else-
where.
After entering her Superior Court
plea, Reyes was scheduled for trial
Aug. 20.
Prosecutors say on April 28 Reyes
drove up to the man who was walk-
ing near 22nd Avenue in San Mateo
and asked to borrow his phone
because her phone had died. The
35-year-old man dialed the number
for Reyes and held the phone to her
ear at which time she grabbed his
wrist and phone before driving
away, according to the District
Attorney’s Office.
The man was dragged 300 to 400
feet down the street before falling
off and Reyes reportedly ran him
over. The man suffered a severed
artery in his arm requiring surgery
and road rash to his face and body.
On May 2, Reyes reportedly used
the same ruse, once in San Mateo
where the victim handed over the
phone and another at Stanford
University where police were able
to detain her.
Cellphones for both May 2 vic-
tims were found in Reyes’ car,
according to prosecutors who say
she committed similar thefts at
Stanford on April 11 and in Palo
Alto on April 4.
Reyes remains in custody on
$100,000 bail.
Woman pleads not guilty to running over man during robbery
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A man accused of brutally
assaulting and raping a woman in
an abandoned South San Francisco
home before she escaped with the
help of his cousin will stand trial in
November on multiple felonies
that could send him to prison for
life.
Sergio Cortez, 28, pleaded not
guilty Friday to charges of kidnap-
ping for the purposes of rape,
forcible copulation and forcible
rape. After entering his Superior
Court plea,
Cortez was
scheduled for a
pretrial confer-
ence in October
followed by a
Nov. 5 jury trial.
Cortez faces
25 years to life
in prison if con-
victed of the
kidnapping charge in the Sept. 8,
2011 attack on a woman who
allegedly met him and agreed to
have sex.
Prosecutors say Cortez drove the
woman to an alley where he
punched her in the face and forced
oral copulation before taking her at
knifepoint to an abandoned home in
the 600 block of Third Lane in
South San Francisco. Cortez
allegedly broke into the home,
forced the woman into a water
heater closet where he urinated on
her and called his male cousin to
come over.
The cousin allegedly smoked
methamphetamine with Cortez and
left at which point authorities say
the woman had her faced smashed
against the bathroom wall and toilet
tank before again being sexually
assaulted.
The cousin returned with clothing
and the men drove the woman to his
house where she was told to shower.
After Cortez left, the cousin’s broth-
er called South San Francisco police
who arrived and located the suspect
shortly after.
At the time of his arrest, Cortez
was on misdemeanor court proba-
tion for a petty theft conviction.
He remains held without bail.
Violent rape suspect pleads not guilty
By Alan Fram and Joan Lowy
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Congress
emphatically approved legislation
Friday preserving jobs on transporta-
tion projects from coast to coast and
avoiding interest rate increases on
new loans to millions of college stu-
dents, giving lawmakers campaign-
season bragging rights on what may
be their biggest economic achieve-
ment before the November elections.
The bill sent for President Barack
Obama’s signature enables just over
$100 billion to be spent on highway,
mass transit and other transportation
programs over the next two years,
projects that would have expired
Saturday without congressional
action. It also ends a bare-knuckle
political battle over student loans that
raged since spring, a proxy fight over
which party was best helping voters
muddle through the economic down-
turn. Obama signed a one-week tem-
porary measure Friday evening, per-
mitting the highway and loan pro-
grams to continue until the full legis-
lation reaches his desk.
Under the bill, interest rates of 3.4
percent for subsidized Stafford loans
for undergraduates will continue for
another year, instead of doubling for
new loans beginning on Sunday as
scheduled by a law passed five years
ago to save money.
Had the measure failed, interest
rates would have mushroomed to 6.8
percent for 7.4 million students
expected to get the loans over the com-
ing year, adding an extra $1,000 to the
average cost of each loan and antago-
nizing students — and their parents —
four months from Election Day. The
Democratic-led Senate sent the meas-
ure to Obama by a 74-19 vote, just
minutes after the Republican-run
House approved it 373-52. The unusu-
al display of harmony, in a bitterly par-
tisan year, signaled lawmakers’ eager-
ness to claim credit for providing
transportation jobs, to avert higher
costs for students and their families
and to avoid being embarrassed had
the effort run aground.
Congress passes student loans and highway jobs bill
Sergio Cortez
6
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Helen Frances Gruber
Helen Frances Gruber, age 93, born in Bakersfield April 11,
1919, died June 27, 2012.
She was a longtime resident of San Mateo.
She was predeceased by her husband Curtis L. Gruber (9/04),
son Curtis Gary Gruber (8/91) and brother Robert Cummings
(6/94).
She is survived by son Glenn Gruber and wife Pam of Half
Moon Bay, son Richard and wife Patti of Half Moon Bay, sister-
in-Law Roberta Cummings of Placerville, grandchildren
Katherine Gruber of San Mateo, June Gruber and husband Raul
Saucedo of Hamden, Conn., Laura and Ben Gruber of Half
Moon Bay and great-grandson Kasani Williams of San Mateo.
Helen worked 40 years at Pacific Bell Phone Co. She was a
devoted wife, mother and grandmother.
Helen requested no service be held.
Many thanks to Sutter VNA & Hospice staff Mary, Gary, Rita
and Pam.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Sutter VNA &
Hospice 700 S. Claremont St., Ste. No. 220, San Mateo, CA
94402.
Arrangements by Sneider & Sullivan & O’Connell’s Funeral
Home, (650) 343-1804, www.ssofunerals.com.
Dolores Dornell
Dolores Dornell, age 88 years, late of Millbrae and San Mateo
County resident for 65 years, died in Burlingame June 28, 2012.
She was the wife of the late Lloyd Dornell who died in 1981,
mother of Karen, Don (his wife Deb), Donna, Paul (his wife
Leslie) and Lisa (her husband Forrest). She is also survived by
her grandson Andrew, her niece and nephews.
Formerly a very active parishioner at Saint Dunstan’s Catholic
Church. She always enjoyed her time at the cabin at Tahoe.
The funeral will leave the Chapel of the Highlands, El Camino
Real at 194 Millwood Drive in Millbrae 10:15 a.m. Tuesday,
July 3 for Saint Dunstan’s Catholic Church in Millbrae where a
funeral mass will be celebrated at 10:30 a.m. Committal will fol-
low at Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in Colma. Family and
friends may visit after 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. Monday at the Chapel
of the Highlands, with a vigil service beginning at 7 p.m.
Her family prefers donations to the Alzheimer’s Association.
As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of
approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the
date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email infor-
mation along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.
Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar.
If you would like to have an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an
inquiry to our advertising department at
ads@smdailyjournal.com.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• On Monday, the Millbrae
Planning Commission will hold a
public hearing to discuss a condi-
tional use permit application to open
HS2 Academy, an academic tutor-
ing business at 101 El Camino Real.
The commission meets 7 p.m.
Monday, July 2 at City Hall, 621 Magnolia Ave.
Obituaries
N
ine San Mateo Union High
School District seniors were
named 2012 National
Hispanic Recognition Program
Scholars. The program, created by the
College Board, singles out roughly
5,000 U.S. high school seniors of
Hispanic descent annually. District hon-
orees include: Jeremy Hardy of
Aragon High School; Patrick Avil,
Vanessa Neumann, Adrian Patino,
Adrienne Pollack and Dylan Resnick
of Burlingame High School; Maria
Poppin Luevano of Capuchino High
School; Derek DeSola of Mills High
School; and Roland Del Pozo of San
Mateo High School. Separately,
Aragon’s Maria Chacon was honored
as a National Achievement finalist.
***
On May 3, Diane Tavenner, CEO of
Summit Public Schools, was honored
with the Dreamer of the Year Award
by the Young Dreamer Network for
her commitment to providing a high-
quality education for students through-
out San Mateo County. Tavenner
received the award at the Young
Dreamer Network benefit dinner, taking
place at the Fox Theatre in Redwood
City.
The Young Dreamer Network is an
organization that provides students with
leadership training, and community
service and career exploration opportu-
nities. Summit students have participat-
ed in the Young Dreamer Network for
the past two years, including engaging
in an anti-bullying campaign for middle
school students and a service project in
Guatemala. During the 2011-12 school
year, approximately 60 of our students
from Summit Preparatory Charter
High School and Everest Public High
School are participating in the program.
***
Two local youth and members of
Boys & Girls Club of the Peninsula
were named the winners in a national
digital arts competition for their creativ-
ity and use of technology in movie mak-
ing. Leticia Guerrero and Tyler Gil
were recognized as the national winners
for the Movie Tech film category of the
Club Tech Digital Arts Festivals for
the 10-12 (Guerrero) and 16-18 (Gil)
age groups.
The Digital Arts Festivals are present-
ed by Boys & Girls Clubs of America
through its partnership with founding
sponsor Microsoft and Comcast. The
Festivals recognize club members who
use artistic expression in six categories:
photography, music, graphic design,
game design, movie animation and film.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at
(650) 344-5200, ext. 105 or at
heather@smdailyjournal.com.
By Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The White House
is urging congressional Democrats to
engage Republicans in a fight over taxes,
pressing them to go on the offensive
after the Supreme Court’s health care
decision gave prominence to the issue.
White House senior adviser David
Plouffe is sending a memorandum to the
House and Senate Democratic caucuses
saying Republicans are misrepresenting
Obama’s record. In a memo obtained by
the Associated Press, Plouffe said the
White House welcomes a debate on
taxes.
Obama has called for tax increases on
households earning more than $250,000,
but has also said existing tax cuts should
be extended permanently for the middle
class.
The court upheld the law, declaring
that a penalizing people who can afford
insurance but don’t buy can be treated as
a tax.
White House wants Hill Dems to join tax fight
REUTERS
Barack Obama has called for tax increases on households earning more than
$250,000, but has also said existing tax cuts should be extended permanently for
the middle class.
7
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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NATION/WORLD 8
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
San Mateo County Office of Education
Career Technical Education
By Larry Margasak and Pete Yost
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Justice
Department declared Friday that
Attorney General Eric Holder’s decision
to withhold information about a bungled
gun-tracking operation from Congress
does not constitute a crime and he won’t
be prosecuted for contempt of Congress.
The House voted Thursday afternoon
to find Holder in criminal and civil con-
tempt for refusing to turn over the docu-
ments. President Barack Obama invoked
his executive privilege authority and
ordered Holder not to turn over materials
about executive branch deliberations and
internal recommendations.
In a letter to House Speaker John
Boehner, the department said that it will
not bring the congressional contempt
citation against Holder to a federal grand
jury and that it will take no other action
to prosecute the attorney general. Dated
Thursday, the letter was released Friday.
Deputy Attorney General James Cole
said the decision is in line with long-
standing Justice Department practice
across administrations of both political
parties.
“We will not prosecute an executive
branch official under the contempt of
Congress statute for withholding sub-
poenaed documents pursuant to a presi-
dential assertion of executive privilege,”
Cole wrote.
In its letter, the department relied in
large part on a Justice Department legal
opinion crafted during Republican
Ronald Reagan’s presidency.
Frederick Hill, the spokesman for
Rep. Darrell Issa, said it is regrettable
that “the political leadership of the
Justice Department” is taking that posi-
tion. Issa, the House Oversight and
Government Reform Committee chair-
man, is leading the effort to get the mate-
rial related to Operation Fast and
Furious.
Although the House voted Thursday to
find Holder in criminal and civil con-
tempt, Republicans probably are still a
long way from obtaining documents
they want for their inquiry into
Operation Fast and Furious, a flawed
gun-tracking investigation focused on
Phoenix-area gun shops by Justice’s
Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms
and Explosives.
The criminal path is now closed and
the civil route through the courts would
not be resolved anytime soon.
“This is pure politics,” White House
spokesman Jay Carney said.
“Remarkably the chairman of the
committee involved here has asserted
that he has no evidence that the attorney
general knew of Operation Fast and
Furious or did anything but take the right
action when he learned of it.
“No evidence, so if you have no evi-
dence as he has stated now about the
White House and the attorney general,
what else could this be but politics?”
More than 100 Democrats walked out
of the House chamber to boycott the first
of two contempt votes, saying
Republicans were more interested in
shameful election-year politics than doc-
uments.
Justice won’t prosecute Holder
Some at Gitmo could
be sent to Afghanistan
By Anne Gearan
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is considering
a new gambit to restart peace talks with the Taliban in
Afghanistan that would send several Taliban detainees from the
military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to a prison in
Afghanistan, U.S. and Afghan officials told the Associated Press.
Under the proposal, some Taliban fighters or affiliates cap-
tured in the early days of the 2001 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan
and later sent to Guantanamo under the label of enemy combat-
ants would be transferred out of full U.S. control but not
released. It’s a leap of faith on the U.S. side that the men will not
become threats to U.S. forces once back on Afghan soil. But it
is meant to show more moderate elements of the Taliban insur-
gency that the U.S. is still interested in cutting a deal for peace.
Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and others have
said that while negotiations with the Taliban are distasteful, they
are the best way to settle the prolonged war.
The new compromise is intended to boost the credibility of the
U.S.-backed Afghan government. President Hamid Karzai and
U.S. officials are trying to draw the Taliban back to negotiations
toward a peace deal between the national Afghan government
and the Pashtun-based insurgency that would end a war U.S.
commanders have said cannot be won with military power
alone.
REUTERS
The Justice Department said Friday that it will not bring a congressional contempt
citation againstAttorney General Eric Holder.
OPINION 9
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Issues with Lempert
Editor,
Regarding Sue Lempert’s June 18 col-
umn, “Bay Meadows Comes to Life,” the
real Bay Meadows is dead, killed by Sue
Lempert and San Mateo city leadership.
“The easiest decision she ever made was
to oppose the 24 hour card room at the race
track.” No kidding. The money coming in
for her supposedly “grassroots effort” from
other Peninsula card rooms that didn’t want
competition, must have made it very easy.
She’s boasting about single-handedly
opposing a Bay Meadows card room and
her vote to develop the track. She mentions
City Manager Arne Croce, but doesn’t men-
tion other councilmembers, planning com-
missioners or city leadership that made sure
the track was closed. Her self opinion is no
surprise. Anyone following the issue easily
saw that Lempert was the tail wagging the
dog. She says none of the ideas she and
Croce discussed for developing the track
were possible. Sadly all sensible, doable
and profitable ideas presented by the public
were ignored.
Former Mayor Lempert (through rotation
only, not public vote mind you) referring to
a card room at Hollywood Park, says, “I
gasped in surprise at the rows of old
despondent men bent over their cards and
cigarettes in the smoke filled room.” Has
she ever been in the Jockey Club right here
in San Mateo where she adamantly opposes
gambling? She would gasp again at the
rows of old despondent men bent over their
programs and racing forms, betting and
gambling, just gambling ... no horses, cer-
tainly no jockeys at the “Jockey Club,” no
blue skies, no sunshine, no green grass, no
dirt, no fresh air, no kids playing and
laughing, no family functions, just straight-
up, hard-core gambling. Ya, that’s the way
we like it in San Mateo. Such hypocrisy!
A lot of real nice people work there
though!
Linda Slocum Lara
San Mateo
A different reaction
to health care law
Editor,
Regarding the story, “Local reaction posi-
tive” about the health care law in the June
29 edition of the Daily Journal, with all the
information we don’t have regarding the
“health care” bill, it is no wonder to me
“how thrilled” the doctor in the article is.
Just think now what this splendid “health
care” bill will mean for the medicos. They
will be free to manufacture yet undiscov-
ered new diseases and conditions.
Groundbreaking advances in treating nor-
mal grieving could be just around the cor-
ner now that those who lose someone close
to them will be covered by Obamacare.
It is embarrassing to me that we have let
the federal government convince enough of
us all that we are children and the Supemes
have said yes to the expansion of the feder-
al government. Sixteen-thousand new IRS
agents added to collect fines for not paying
this new tax? How many of you reading
this really think this is about heath care?
“U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
said the ruling’s core concept is that afford-
able health care is a right instead of a privi-
lege.”
This is a stunning quote that says it all
about Democrats whose focus it is to define
for us, a Constitution that they think needs
to be done away with.
Tim Chafee
Burlingame
Democrats get a
great deal of respect
Editor,
Patrick Field noted that “Our Democratic
leaders get no respect” in his letter to the
editor in the June 19 edition of the Daily
Journal. Although he referenced the lack of
respect given to former presidents, I am not
so sure that this is true. The presidents cited
created some of their misadventures while
other events were probably dictated by
world events that were out of their control.
In San Mateo County and the Bay Area,
our electorate must respect our Democratic
leaders as there are probably few
Republicans holding elected offices. Instead
of electing new candidates, we re-elect
incumbents even if they are termed out of
office. In spite of that fact, we are in a
political gridlock locally and nationally,
and the art of negotiation between parties
has failed to push a moderate, progressive
agenda.
Regardless of who is elected, there are
grave omissions in the way Democrats and
Republicans provide social services. I
would think that both branches would be
astonished by how much money is wasted
through fraud and waste in the executive
branch programs funded by the Legislature.
Instead of bickering we should have com-
prehensive compliance reviews and meas-
ure the product of the legislation consigned
to state government departments, boards
and commissions. We should scrap ineffec-
tive programs and redirect tax dollars where
it will benefit the needy who demonstrate
that the benefit is greater than the harm and
will improve or eliminate services where
there are shortcomings.
Jack Kirkpatrick
Redwood City
Can you please cover
Bradley Manning’s case?
Editor,
I’m writing to call on your paper for
increased coverage of Pfc. Bradley
Manning’s trial.
Manning, who has been accused of leak-
ing the largest document dump in U.S. his-
tory to Wikileaks, will be in Fort Meade for
a pretrial hearing on July 16 and currently
faces 23 different charges including one of
“aiding the enemy.” If convicted, he faces a
sentence of life imprisonment.
Despite over 760 days in pretrial confine-
ment, many media outlets have been too
silent on Manning’s case, allowing the gov-
ernment’s mistreatment of him to continue
in near secrecy.
A reckless, opaque conviction for Pfc.
Manning could have dire consequences for
future whistleblowers, journalists and
activists. Because of this, the media must
do its part to engage the American public in
a conversation about this trial and our gov-
ernment’s behavior before it’s too late.
I ask that you do your part and increase
coverage of the Bradley Manning trial,
beginning with his hearing on July 16.
Mark Cappetta
San Mateo
Online privacy
Editor,
I would like to commend Michelle
Durand on her very timely column on
social media (“Open (Face)book” in the
June 28 edition of the Daily Journal). The
pace of technological change has resulted
in massive amounts of personal information
being collected, publicized and shared
without much thought about privacy or
impact on professional life. Additionally,
human nature is such that we judge people
on the basis of any number of factors, even
if it is done subconsciously. This is why
laws were passed to provide guidelines
about collection and consideration of eth-
nicity, marital status, etc. by potential
employers. Now, all of this is in danger of
being circumvented by social networking
websites.
In addition, it seems we are creating a
generation that has little time for deep
reflection. The significant amount of time
spent responding to multiple inane mes-
sages (that in turn creates a feeling of
“being left out” when not online), does not
allow for concentrated reading or analysis.
Maybe it is time for rapid maturity on
part of both government and consumers in
this area. Corporations would love to see
growth without much restriction because it
feeds a massive marketing machine. It is
proper laws and demand by consumers to
be able to easily restrict personal informa-
tion that will help better protect everyone.
Rahul Bahadur
San Mateo
Other voices
A smart move
to save money
on Cal Grants
— The Sacramento Bee
C
alifornia’s economic future
depends on an educated work-
force, so it’s no cause for celebra-
tion that the state budget crunch is forcing
cuts in college tuition grants for needy stu-
dents.
But at least the governor and Legislature
are going about it in a way that wrings
most of the savings from for-profit private
schools with the worst graduation and loan
repayment rates.
The spending plan before Gov. Jerry
Brown cuts $103 million from the Cal
Grant program by 2013-14 and tightens the
rules for private colleges to be eligible for
the money.
These sensible standards are long over-
due. Preserving access to higher education
for poorer students is important, but not at
any price and not at any school.
The cost of Cal Grants has ballooned
from $460 million for 147,000 awards in
2003 to $1.5 billion for 330,000 awards
now. The maximum grant has been the
same at all private schools, whether non-
profits or for-profits. And until recently,
students could use Cal Grants at almost
any school, no matter how abysmal its
record at turning out successful graduates.
Under the changes, only colleges where
at least 30 percent of students are graduat-
ing and where no more than 15.5 percent
are defaulting on loans will be eligible to
receive Cal Grants for new students. The
new standards will disqualify about 4 in 5
for-profit private colleges, affecting more
than 11,000 students statewide at places
such as Heald College, ITT Technical
Institute and University of Phoenix.
“If a lot of students don’t succeed, we’re
not going to pay for students to go to
school there anymore,” Steve Boilard, the
higher education director at the Legislative
Analyst’s Office, told The Bee’s Laurel
Rosenhall. “You’re not saying ‘no’ to stu-
dents; you’re saying ‘no’ to schools.”
Also, starting next year, students at for-
profit schools that do meet the new stan-
dards will have their maximum grant cut
by more than half, to $4,000 a year.
Scholarship amounts will also be
reduced for students at qualifying nonprofit
private colleges like University of the
Pacific, but by far less, to a maximum of
$8,056 in 2014. Less than 1 in 5 nonprofit
private schools fall short of the new stan-
dards.
Thankfully, Cal Grants are protected for
students at public campuses: the University
of California, California State University
and community colleges.
The state Student Aid Commission,
which oversees the grants, is pleased about
that, and also that the Legislature rejected
Brown’s earlier proposal to raise the grade-
point average required for students to qual-
ify for the grants.
The changes rightly emphasize the eligi-
bility of institutions instead of the eligibili-
ty of individual students, the commission’s
Ed Emerson told The Bee’s editorial board
Wednesday. And the budget enacts the
commission’s recommended tougher stan-
dards for for-profit schools.
If these schools did as well at educating
students as they do pocketing government
grants and loans, they might have more of
an argument against the cuts.
The powers that be in Sacramento have
finally recognized that taxpayers have no
duty - and in these times certainly can’t
afford — to write blank checks to these
colleges.
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BUSINESS 10
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 12,880.09 +2.20% 10-Yr Bond 1.659 +5.20%
Nasdaq2,935.05 +3.00% Oil (per barrel) 84.870003
S&P 500 1,362.16 +2.49% Gold 1,598.60
By Daniel Wagner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Financial markets around the world
stormed higher Friday after European
leaders came up with a breakthrough
plan to rescue banks, relieve debt-bur-
dened governments and restore investor
confidence.
The Dow Jones industrial average
climbed 277 points, and the Standard &
Poor’s 500 index had its best day of the
year. Stocks advanced even further in
Europe, in strong and weak countries
alike.
The price of oil posted its biggest one-
day increase in more than three years,
and other commodities shot higher —
signs of hope that a deal in Europe will
remove a big barrier to a healthier world
economy.
In Brussels, leaders of the 17 countries
that use the euro appeared finally to have
found a broad strategy to fight a debt cri-
sis that has hounded European govern-
ments and world investors for three
years.
The leaders agreed to pump money
directly into stricken banks, let some
countries tap into rescue money without
submitting to stringent budget require-
ments and, later, tie European govern-
ments closer in economic union.
David Kelly, chief global strategist at
JPMorgan Funds, said it was becoming
clear that European leaders will compro-
mise to solve the crisis. One of the
biggest stock gains Friday came in
Germany, which took a hard line in ear-
lier negotiations.
“The whole language is positive here,”
he said. “Every time they’ve stared over
the cliff into the abyss of a euro breakup,
they’ve realized it’s much wiser to get
closer together.”
There was a sign immediately that
Europe’s latest plan was working: The
cost for the troubled government of
Spain to borrow money on the bond mar-
ket fell dramatically, by more than half a
percentage point, to 6.34 percent.
Previous market rallies tied to
progress in Europe have proved tempo-
rary. But for the day, at least, global
stock markets were jubilant:
• In New York, the Dow Jones indus-
trial average closed up 277.83 points, its
second-best showing this year. The S&P
500 index soared 33 points, or 2.5 per-
cent. The rally left the S&P a gain of 8.3
percent at the halfway mark for the year.
• The benchmark stock index in
Germany rose 4.3 percent, by far its best
performance this year. Germany has the
biggest economy in Europe, and it
depends heavily on exports, so it needs
other countries to stay healthy.
World markets surge
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Friday on the New York Stock Exchange
and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Nike Inc., down $9.11 at $87.78
The athletic shoe company’s second-quarter
profit dropped 8 percent,and investors worried
that the weak global economy would hurt
growth.
Bank of America Corp., up 44 cents at $8.18
The bank led gains in shares of big financial
companies on investor relief after European
leaders agreed to easier bank bailouts.
Ford Motor Co., down 50 cents at $9.59
The automaker predicted a lower second-
quarter profit because of growing losses in
Europe and other regions outside North
America.
Constellation Brands Inc., up $5.30 at $27.06
The wine company secured the right to
distribute Corona beer in the U.S.by buying out
distributor Crown Imports LLC for $1.85 billion
from Grupo Modelo.Modelo is being acquired
for $20 billion by Anheuser-Busch InBev.
KB Home, up $1.10 at $9.80
The homebuilder’s second-quarter loss shrank
as its home deliveries,average selling prices and
orders all increased.
Elster Group SE, up 93 cents at $20.30
Britain’s Melrose is buying the German maker of
electricity, gas and water measurement and
control tools for $2.3 billion.
Nasdaq
Research In Motion Ltd., down $1.74 at $7.39
Investors worried about the future of the
BlackBerry maker as it delays the launch of
critical new phones and cuts 5,000 jobs.
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc., up $2.16 at $61.80
The home furnishings retailer is set to complete
its buyout of home decor chain Cost Plus Inc.
after a successful tender offer.
Big movers
By Paul Wiseman
and David McHugh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BRUSSELS — Europe’s leaders final-
ly rose to the challenge Friday, backing
bold ideas to help weak countries and
frail banks ravaged by a debt crisis that
has crippled economic growth and
threatened the global financial system.
Markets roared their approval.
For the first time in 19 summits since
the start of the crisis, the EU leaders
defied low expectations by announcing
plans to:
• Bail out banks, without putting any
financial burden on strapped govern-
ments.
• Ease borrowing costs on Italy and
Spain, the euro region’s third- and
fourth-largest economies.
• Seek stronger, centralized regulation
to European banks.
• Rescue floundering countries, with-
out forcing them to make painful budg-
et cuts if they’ve already made econom-
ic reforms.
• Tie their budgets, currency and gov-
ernments more tightly.
Europe’s leaders trumpeted the agree-
ment. The prime minister of Ireland —
one of the five euro countries that has
required emergency funds — said the
plans marked a “seismic shift in
European policy.” British Prime
Minister David Cameron said that “for
the first time in some time we have actu-
ally seen steps ... to get ahead of the
game.”
There was a sign immediately that
Europe’s latest plan was easing fear in
financial markets: The cost for the trou-
bled government of Spain to borrow
money on the bond market fell dramati-
cally. The interest rate, or yield, on the
country’s 10-year bonds fell by more
than half a percentage point, to 6.34 per-
cent.
The Dow Jones industrial average
recorded one of its biggest gains of the
year, and stocks advanced even further in
Europe — in strong and weak countries
alike. The benchmark stock index in
Germany rose 4.3 percent, by far its best
performance this year. Germany has the
biggest economy in Europe, and a warm
reaction there was a crucial sign of
approval for the plan. Prices for oil and
other commodities shot higher.
The decisions made at the European
Union summit in Brussels won’t end the
crisis that has gripped Europe for nearly
three years. Plenty of questions remain
about how the bank bailouts would
work, whether there’s enough money
committed to rescue banks and govern-
ments and whether impoverished,
indebted Greece will be forced out of the
euro club.
Europe finds rescue plan
By Martin Crutsinger
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — U.S. consumers
spent no more in May than in April after
seeing almost no gain in their pay. The
lack of growth in consumer spending
and wages suggests that a faltering job
market is slowing the economy.
The Commerce Department said
Friday that consumer spending was
unchanged in May. Income growth
edged up 0.2 percent, but that was most-
ly because of gains from investments.
Wages, the largest component of
income, were essentially flat.
Americans cut back spending on cars
and other long-lasting manufactured
goods, even though they paid less for
gas. Consumers did increase how much
they spent on services for the second
straight month, one of the few positive
signs.
The government also said spending
after adjusted for inflation was weaker in
April and March than first thought.
Consumer spending drives roughly 70
percent of economic activity. The most-
ly disappointing report suggests growth
in the April-June quarter could be weak-
er than the previous quarter’s modest 1.9
percent annual pace.
Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist for
Capital Economics, said annual growth
in the second quarter could be closer to
1.5 percent.
Consumer spending, wages flat in May
By Chris Kahn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Oil soared the most
in more than three years after European
leaders took surprisingly aggressive
steps to halt a debt crisis that has under-
mined confidence in the global econo-
my.
Benchmark U.S. crude jumped by
$7.27, or 9.4 percent, on Friday to end
the week at $84.96 per barrel in New
York. Brent crude, which helps set the
price of imported oil, rose by $6.44, or 7
percent, to $95.51 per barrel in London.
The surge could end a nearly three-
month decline in U.S. gasoline prices.
The national average for gas had
declined from $3.94 per gallon in the first
week of April to $3.35 on Friday.
Oil rose after eurozone leaders
unveiled a plan to rescue ailing banks,
relieve debt-burdened governments in
Italy, Spain and elsewhere and restore the
confidence of markets. The progress in
dealing with Europe’s lengthy debt crisis
is good news for that continent’s — and
the world’s — economy. Economic
growth drives energy consumption.
The deal was struck as borrowing rates
in Spain and Italy surged to levels that
were considered unsustainable. Leery
investors were surprised and energized
by the breakthrough — they rushed to
buy riskier assets like oil and stocks and
sold ultra-safe U.S. Treasuries.
Oil soars 9 percent as Europe moves to tackle crisis
Toyota to recall Lexus SUVs to fix floor mat
DETROIT — Toyota’s problems with runaway acceler-
ation just won’t go away.
Three years after the company recalled its first cars over
unintended acceleration, it has identified two more models
at risk. They are the 2010 Lexus RX 350 and RX 450H
SUVs.
Toyota said Friday it will recall 154,000 of the SUVs
because their floor mats can trap the gas pedal and cause
the SUVs to speed up without warning. U.S. safety regu-
lators, who asked Toyota to recall the vehicles, may inves-
tigate whether the company reported the problem fast
enough.
Toyota’s action adds to a string of embarrassing safety
recalls that began in 2009. The Japanese automaker has
recalled more than 14 million vehicles globally to fix prob-
lems including sticky gas pedals and floor mats.
Business brief
<< Rangers slip past A’s again, page 12
• World Series of Poker to host $1M event, page 14
Weekend, June 30-July 1, 2012
TWO STREAKS END: REDS END GIANTS SCORELESS STREAK AS WELL AS RUN OF FOUR-STRAIGHT WINS >>> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
On a close play at the plate, Ravenswood’s DeMaurier Jackson is called out as Alpine catcher John McGrory applies the tage during Alpine’s
10-0 win in the first round of the District 52 Majors All-Star Tournament Friday afternoon.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The road to the Little League World Series
got under way Friday afternoon with the first
game of the District 52 Majors all-star tourna-
ment, featuring kids ages 11 and 12.
Because of the sheer number of teams in the
district, Ravenswood and Alpine were two of
the four to have first round games. Alpine
manager Dominic Andrighetto hopes that the
extra game allows his players to get in a
rhythm and get the pre-tournament jitters out
of the way early.
“I think it was the unluck of the draw (to be
one of four teams playing first-round games),”
Andrighetto said. “We’re thankful to have it,
though.”
Alpine should be riding high and in a
groove heading into a Sunday morning game
against Half Moon Bay after Alpine beat
Ravenswood 10-0 at Highlands Park in San
Carlos in a game shortened to just 3 1/2
innings because of the 10-run mercy rule.
Alpine scored 10 runs on just eight hits, tak-
ing advantage of four Ravenswood errors in
the process. Timmy Goode had a big day at
the plate, going 2 for 3 with two runs scored
and three RBIs, including a two-run homer to
right-center field to end the game.
“In the dugout, I was thinking about it (hit-
ting a walkoff home run),” Goode said. “But
when I got up there, I just wanted to hit it
hard.”
Said Andrighetto: “The last couple of weeks
… [Goode’s] just been a terror.”
Connor Burns also had strong performance,
going 3 for 3 with a RBI and two runs scored.
Adam Joss and Dominic Cacchione both had
a ground-rule double, with the ball hopping
A walkoff win
Alpine opens District 52 All-Star action with 10-0 victory
ASHLEY HANSEN/DAILY JOURNAL
Shawn Johnson, former Olympic silver
medalist and national champion, was forced
to retire due to a knee injury.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
SAN JOSE — Shawn Johnson is a conflict-
ed young woman. You can tell. It’s much too
obvious.
Sitting and relaxing on a white sofa chair
fielding questions since 5:30 a.m. while flash-
ing that golden smile isn’t her thing, though
she does it well — both the answering of
questions and the hiding of her discomfort.
Down there, some three or four stories
below the Procter & Gamble suite at the HP
Pavilion in San Jose, down there where mats,
bars, beams and vaults dot the arena floor, sur-
rounded by chairs, cameras and Olympic
dreams, down there is where you get the sense
Johnson would rather be. While the words that
come out of her mouth are those of an opti-
mistic woman who knows she is only 20 years
old and thus has an entire life ahead of her, the
side of her that wants to jump out of her seat
and rush down to that floor, throw some chalk
on her hands and knock out a bar routine is
obvious. Passion for something you’ve loved
your entire life is one of the hardest things to
hide. Johnson tries her best, but it’s not quite
there yet.
Johnson, a former national, world and
Olympic medalist is retired. She has an
injured knee to thank for that.
“It’s scary,” Johnson said after she was
asked for at least the 12th time that day what
retirement feels like. And just like she had
every time before that, she answered with one
of those smiles that swayed between gleeful
and terrified.
“Gymnastics has been a part of my life
since I was 3 [years old] and even in 2008
when I took two years off, the door was still
open. I was still able, I was still wondering,
‘Should I? Could I?’ kind of with one foot in
the door. Whereas now, the door is closed. I’ve
never had that feeling before. It’s liberating —
I finally get to turn a new chapter and try new
stuff. I’m very conflicted emotionally right
now.”
San Jose loves Johnson and Johnson loves
One chapter
closed, rest of
her life ahead
See JOHNSON, Page 14
See ALL STARS, Page 14
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PORTO NOVO, Benin — Oscar Pistorius’
four-year quest to run in the 400 meters at the
London Olympics came down to less than a
quarter-second at the end.
That’s how close the “Blade Runner” was to
carving out his place in history.
The South African double-amputee missed
out on qualifying in his individual event by an
agonizing 0.22 seconds on Friday in his last
chance ahead of next month’s games.
Silver at the African Championships and a
first major individual medal in an able-bodied
race was only small consolation for the
world’s most famous disabled athlete, who has
defied doubts over his ability throughout his
career and came a little more than two-tenths
of a second from reaching
the pinnacle of his sport in
his final qualifying race.
He still should be picked
for South Africa’s 1,600
relay team, but the dream
of testing himself against
the world’s best runners
over one lap in Olympic
Stadium is gone for
Pistorius — for now.
Rio de Janeiro in 2016 will likely be the 25-
year-old’s very last opportunity to run the 400
at the Olympics on his carbon fiber blades and
realize a dream he’s had since a rugby injury
forced him to take up athletics as a teenager
less than 10 years ago.
‘Blade Runner’ fails to
qualify for Olympics
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — The San Francisco 49ers
are asking a judge to decide if Santa Clara
County can redirect $30 million originally ear-
marked for the team’s new stadium for other
uses.
A Sacramento judge on Thursday set a court
hearing in the case for July 3. The 49ers are
expected to ask for a temporary restraining order
freezing the use of the funds until the matter is
settled.
The dispute arose after a county board respon-
sible for allocating redevelopment funds said the
money should be used for more pressing com-
munity needs.
The 49ers argue the money is legally theirs
because it was allotted by voters in 2010 to help
build the $1.2 billion stadium. The city of Santa
Clara agrees.
Court fight begins over
$30M for 49ers stadium
Oscar Pistorius
SPORTS 12
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas — Craig Gentry’s
bases-loaded triple in the eighth capped a four-
run rally and Matt Harrison pitched eight strong
innings to win his 11th game, lifting the Texas
Rangers past the Oakland Athletics 4-3 on
Friday night.
Gentry, who entered in the seventh, lifted a
fly ball to deep left off Oakland reliever Ryan
Cook that gave the Rangers a 4-2 lead. Yoenis
Cespedes appeared to misjudge Gentry’s ball as
he took a few steps in at first before it flew over
his head.
Oakland reliever Grant Balfour (1-2) issued a
bases-loaded walk to Nelson Cruz with two
outs in the eighth before he was replaced by
Cook.
Harrison (11-3) threw a season-high 121
pitches, allowing two runs and eight hits. The
left-hander joined Tampa Bay’s David Price as
the American League’s only 11-game winners.
Oakland rookie A.J. Griffin made his second
career start allowed two hits in six shutout
innings.
The Rangers, who won their fourth in a row,
had only two hits coming into the eighth inning
before Elvis Andrus singled with one out.
Balfour walked Josh Hamilton and Michael
Young to load the bases. On a 3-2 pitch, Cruz
walked to force in Andrus.
Cook, who had allowed opponents to hit just
.102 this season, relieved Balfour and gave up
Gentry’s game-deciding triple.
Tanner Scheppers gave up a solo homer to
Chris Carter with two outs in the ninth. He
retired Seth Smith to end the game and pick up
his first career save.
Harrison is making a push for his first All-
Star game appearance two days before the
teams are announced. He hasn’t lost since May
12 and is 5-0 in June.
Griffin struck out four and walked two
against baseball’s top-scoring team. The 24-
year-old pitched six innings in his big league
debut Sunday against San Francisco. Hamilton
and Cruz had the only hits off Griffin, who start-
ed the season pitching for Double-A Midland.
A’s lose by a run again
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Mike Leake pitched a
nine-hitter for his first career complete game and
homered off Matt Cain, and the Cincinnati Reds
beat the San Francisco Giants 5-1 on Friday
night.
Zack Cozart hit the first pitch of the game
from Cain over the wall in left-center and, just
like that, San Francisco’s franchise-record
streak of four straight shutouts had ended.
Jay Bruce added a two-run double in the first
among his four hits to stake Leake (3-5) to a
quick cushion as the Reds got to Cain early to
snap a four-game road skid. Leake homered
with two outs in the sixth, his second of the year.
Cain (9-3), pitching at home in sold-out
AT&T Park for the first time since tossing the
22nd perfect game June 13 against the Astros,
had his career-best eight-game winning streak
snapped.
The right-hander allowed three runs in the
first inning for the first time since June 24, 2010,
at Houston.
San Francisco’s pitching staff went 36 innings
without allowing a run, beginning after Cain’s
start at Oakland last Sunday and lasting until his
next outing. It was the longest scoreless innings
streak in San Francisco history and second-
longest to the franchise mark of 38 accom-
plished by the New York Giants in 1903 and ‘33.
Bruce also hit an RBI double in the seventh
that chased Cain, matching his career high with
four hits for the fifth time he has done it.
Cain’s 11 hits in 6 2-3 innings matched his
most given up this year and the right-hander lost
for the first time in 11 starts since a defeat to
Miami on May 1. He allowed five runs, struck
out seven and walked one.
While Cain has the perfecto to his name, it
was everybody else in the rotation — Barry
Zito, Ryan Vogelsong, Tim Lincecum and
Madison Bumgarner, in that order — involved
in the remarkable string of shutouts. San
Francisco also was the first team in major league
history to blank four clubs when the opponent
had begun the day in first place.
Leake came out for the ninth and allowed
Giants lose streak, game
Rangers 4, A’s 3
Stanford reinstates LB Skov
with one-game suspension
STANFORD — Linebacker Shayne Skov has
been reinstated to the Stanford football team and
will serve a one-game suspension this season
after he was arrested and jailed earlier this year
for driving under the influence.
Coach David Shaw said Friday that Skov, a
senior who missed most of the Cardinal’s 2011
season with a knee injury, will sit out the season
opener Aug. 31 against San Jose State. He was
arrested Feb. 5.
Skov led Stanford with 84 tackles and had 7
1/2 sacks as a sophomore, then sustained a sea-
son-ending torn ligament in his left knee in the
third game last fall. Shaw said Skov is close to
100 percent healthy and that his rehab is going
well.
USADA files formal
charges against Armstrong
AUSTIN, Texas — The U.S. Anti-Doping
Agency has filed formal charges against Lance
Armstrong, accusing the seven-time Tour de
France winner of using performance-enhancing
drugs throughout the best years of his career.
The agency notified Armstrong, former team
manager Johan Bruyneel and several other
Armstrong team associates of the charges in a
letter on Thursday.
The charges came after a USADA review
panel examined evidence in the case, which now
goes to an arbitration panel to decide. If found
guilty, Armstrong could be stripped of the Tour
de France titles he won from 1999-2005. This
year’s Tour de France begins Saturday.
Armstrong maintains his innocence.
Armstrong attorney Robert Luskin called the
charges “wrong and baseless.”
Also charged are team doctors Pedro Celaya
Lezama and Luis Garcia del Moral; team trainer
Pepe Marti, and consulting doctor Michele
Ferrari. Because they are so closely linked,
USADA rolled all of the charges into a single
case.
Blake pulls a stunner in Jamaica
trials, beats Bolt in 100
KINGSTON, Jamaica — The Fastest Man
in the World wasn’t the fastest man in Jamaica
on Friday night.
That honor goes to Yohan Blake, who blew
away Usain Bolt out of the starting blocks and
finished the 100-meter final in 9.75 seconds to
upset the world-record holder by 0.11 seconds
in the Jamaican Olympic trials.
Blake is the reigning world champion, but
that victory came with an asterisk because
Bolt didn’t run that night after being disquali-
fied for a false start. This was their first
rematch, their first real race since then. Bolt
was considered the favorite, not only because
of his world record — 9.58 seconds — but
because Blake, his training partner, had never
run below 9.82 in his life.
Sports briefs
Reds 5, Giants 1
SPORTS 13
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Beth Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OMAHA, Neb. — Cullen Jones is
going to a second straight Olympics
after an up-and-down couple of
years.
Jason Lezak is headed to London,
too, as a 36-year-old father of two.
They were part of a loaded field of
Olympic medalists in the 100-meter
freestyle final on Friday night at the
U.S. swimming trials.
Nathan Adrian went in as the
favorite and won in 48.10 seconds,
fourth-fastest in the world this year.
The sprinter who trains at California
led at the turn and never let up.
The race was on for the second
individual spot.
Jones went out strong and hung
on from the far outside lane to touch
in 48.46, giving the first African-
American ever to win an Olympic
swimming gold medal a shot at
adding to his collection.
“It means a lot,” he said. “I had
some definite doubts the last couple
years.”
Now 28, Jones swam on the win-
ning 400 freestyle relay in Beijing
that set a world record. The victory
raised his profile and he parlayed his
credibility into a major role with
USA Swimming’s Make a Splash
campaign that encourages minori-
ties to learn to swim.
“Although a lot of my work is
positive in talking to kids, I wanted
to live, I wanted to enjoy what I had
gotten in 2008,” he said.
So he made the rounds of the
celebrity circuit. A fashion fiend
outside of the pool, Jones posed for
magazine spreads, attended parties
and enjoyed the spoils that come
from winning a gold medal.
That led to some quiet years since
Beijing, with Jones not making the
team for last year’s world champi-
onships in Shanghai and then miss-
ing the championship final of the 50
free at U.S. nationals.
“I refocused this past year,” he
said. “A lot of the coaches from the
national team who were in Shanghai
said to me, ‘We need you for this
relay, we need one of the best 100
freestylers in the U.S. to be ready
come London because the world is
getting faster,’ and I’m happy I
could answer that call.”
Lezak answered the bell from the
opposite side of the pool as Jones.
Stuck out in lane eight, the Olympic
relay star from Beijing finished
sixth in 48.88, grabbing the last spot
to be included in the relay mix.
“This 36-year-old body was run-
down and somehow I closed my
eyes for a little bit,” he said. “I’m
breathing to my right-hand side,
there is nobody there, and I actually
kind of visualized some things from
the past to help me get to the wall.”
Lezak was lucky to be in the final
at all, qualifying ninth-fastest in the
semifinals but getting in when Ryan
Lochte scratched.
“I was nervous,” he said. “It was a
big race for me, trained four years
for this, real hard. Nobody under-
stands how hard it’s been for me
except my wife and I. It’s a pretty
good accomplishment to get in
there.”
Lezak and his wife, Danielle,
have had two sons since 2008, when
he saved Michael Phelps’ bid for
eight gold medals in Beijing with a
stunning last leg of the 400 free
relay to overtake French star Alain
Bernard.
“He’s somebody definitely good
to have on the team,” Phelps said.
“We are going to have to do a lot of
work for that relay. This is some
kind of start. Having the experience
that Jason has, hopefully he can
help some of the younger guys get
up.”
Lezak has come full circle, mak-
ing his last Olympic team on a relay,
just like he made his first in 2000. In
between, he swam in individual
events and owns a total of seven
Olympic medals, including four
golds.
“It’s a great feeling because I’ve
learned a lot, and hopefully I can be
a team leader and help these guys
swim fast,” he said.
Also earning spots in the relay
pool were Matt Grevers (third),
Ricky Berens (fourth), and Jimmy
Feigen (fifth).
Garrett Weber-Gale, a 2008
Olympian, finished last.
Sprinters Jones, Lezak return to Olympics
REUTERS
While Cullen Jones and JasonLezak were the feel-good stories Friday night at the U.S.Olympic Trials,Cal’s Nathan
Adrian won the 100 free in the fourth-fastest time in the world this year.
By Nancy Armour
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Jordyn Wieber usu-
ally doesn’t worry too much about
rankings.
This is one meet, however, where
she really, really wants to finish first.
The reigning world champion is
halfway to the London Games after
breezing through the first night of
the Olympic trials Friday. The win-
ner of the two-day trials gets the
lone automatic spot on the five-
woman team, and Wieber has the
lead over Gabby Douglas after turn-
ing in the only clean performance of
the night.
“It would be a huge honor to take
that top spot,” Wieber said. “I try not
to think about standings, but at the
same time, everyone wants that
guaranteed spot.
Wieber scored 15.05 or better on
every event and finished with 61.7
points. She goes into Sunday night’s
competition with a 0.3-point lead
over Douglas, who had to work out
of a hole after making a big error on
uneven bars, her first event.
“I do want it very badly but I’m
trying not to think about first,”
Douglas said. “I need to think about
polishing up my skills.”
She’s not the only one.
Aly Raisman, normally rock
steady, finished a distant third at
60.3 after a big wobble on balance
beam and going out of bounds on
floor exercise, where she is the
reigning world bronze medalist.
Kyla Ross landed her vault on her
backside. McKayla Maroney fell off
both uneven bars and balance beam.
And it was another rough night for
reigning Olympic champion Nastia
Liukin.
Liukin knows she needs to put up
huge scores on uneven bars to have
any shot at the team, and has yet to
do it. Clearly out of gas near the end
of her routine, she stalled on a hand-
stand on the upper bar and, as the
crowd groaned, her legs folded over.
She managed to stay on, but it cost
whatever momentum she had left.
She didn’t get anywhere near the
height she needed for her dismount,
plopping onto the mat.
Her score of 14.05 was good
enough only for 10th on bars.
“Of course any athlete will tell
you when they don’t have a great
performance, especially when it’s at
Olympic trials, it’s disappointing,”
Liukin said. “But at the same time
you have to come back out there and
(show) that you are a fighter and
you’re not just going to give up.”
Wieber is the favorite for the all-
around title in London, having won
all but one — yes, one — all-around
competition since 2008. But she has
to get there first, and she started pil-
ing up the points from the minute
she stepped on the floor. She showed
big improvements on uneven bars,
where she’s had some trouble
recently. She was so smooth and
controlled she appeared to float as
she moved between the bars, and
there was a breezy confidence to her
release move.
She landed her upgraded dis-
mount with such ease it was as if
she’d been doing it for years, the
only movement coming from coach
John Geddert, who hopped across
the floor pumping his fists in cele-
bration.
While balance beam tripped up
Raisman and Ross, Wieber may as
well have been in a parking lot for as
easily as she made her tricks look on
the 4-inch wide slab that’s 4 feet off
the ground. She landed one of her
aerial skills on one foot, slowly
sweeping the other along the side of
the beam. Just watching her twisting
back somersault is enough to make
you dizzy, but she landed it perfect-
ly and moved right onto her next
trick.
She ended her night with a rous-
ing floor routine that may as well
have been a victory lap. Floor is the
one event the stoic Wieber lets her
personality show, and she was even
sassier than normal as she strutted
and pranced through her dance
moves. She stuck the landings of her
tumbling runs so emphatically you
could hear it throughout the arena.
“I just loved the way she went out
and attacked it,” Geddert said. “She
had some issues so there’s room for
improvement and it’s my job to
point that out. I don’t think we’ve
ever had a meet where I didn’t say,
‘There are things to improve.’ We’re
still waiting for the perfect meet.”
Douglas has emerged as Wieber’s
biggest rival, reminiscent of the bat-
tle between Liukin and Shawn
Johnson four years ago. But she
couldn’t overcome a mistake on her
very first event.
Going up last on uneven bars, she
lost her rhythm midway through the
routine and stalled on a pirouette.
She stayed motionless for several
seconds, gripping the bar tightly
with her hands and using every bit
of muscle she had not to fall off.
“Man, I was using every single
muscle,” Douglas said. “I just pulled
it out of nowhere. That was God.
And someone blowing (at) me from
the stands.”
She hung on somehow and com-
pleted the rest of her routine, but her
15.250 was well below her usual
score. She also had a big wobble on
balance beam.
But Douglas rallied on floor exer-
cise, posting the second-best score
of the night with a routine that was
worth every penny of the fans’ tick-
et.
Wieber halfway to London after first day of gymnastic trials
REUTERS
JordynWieber, the reigning world champion, leads the U.S. Olympic Trials with one day of competition left.
SPORTS 14
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Expires July 31, 2012
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1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
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the HP Pavilion back. In 2007, the world
watched her win the national championship on
the very floor where five new dreams will
come true following Sunday’s final at the 2012
U.S. Olympic Trials.
Johnson knows that euphoric feeling very
well, too. A year after capturing the country’s
top individual honor, she took off to Beijing
and the 2008 Olympics where her team
brought back silver. And so, perhaps fielding
questions about what happens next in a place
that once belonged to her heightens the nostal-
gia and makes it that much more difficult to
hide hints of discomfort.
At ease with sponsors, media
Don’t get it twisted though. Johnson is good
at this promotion/media thing. On Wednesday,
she was in San Jose announcing a $75,000
grant from Procter & Gamble to USA
Gymnastics’ sports youth fund which encour-
ages kids ages 6 to 16 to engage in physical fit-
ness through training, exercise and nutrition
awareness.
“It’s really just giving a kid the opportunity
to find an outlet to physical activity, exercise,
nutrition,” she said. “And sports have meant
the world to me throughout my entire life so
being able to partner with them in this is real-
ly close to my heart. It can potentially reach up
to a million kids, so I feel like I’m hopefully
make a difference.”
“Hopefully” is the key word. Chatting with
Johnson, you get the sense that every day out-
side the sport is a learning experience, and part
of that experience is figuring how to be confi-
dent outside of gymnastics. On the bars,
beams, vault and floor, confidence oozed out
of Johnson. Now as a retired star, Johnson
admitted that quality is slowly working it way
back into form.
“I was marketed because I was a competing
athlete going to the Olympics,” Johnson said.
“And when I decided to retire, I was no longer
competing to go to the Olympics. I understood
that the people who marketed me and signed
me potentially could not want me anymore,
which I respected, it’s the business side of
things. I balled like a baby the first time I
called my sponsor and instead of them saying,
‘Thank you, but we can’t work with you any-
more,’ they said, ‘Thank you and we’d like to
work with you more.’ And I did, I balled like a
baby for a few days.”
Injury forces her hand
Oh, dreaded knee, were it not for you, a con-
versation with Johnson would revolve around
whether she had what it takes to fend off the
young guns of the sport in a bid to make it to
London this weekend.
“I feel like if I had to personally make the
decision [to retire] I never would have,”
Johnson said. “You get into a momentum and
a lifestyle, it’s what I was used to and com-
fortable with. So I don’t think I would have
ever closed the door on my own. Having an
injury, my knee and my health closed it for me
is the only way I would have gotten out of the
sport. It’s kind of refreshing.”
Not that Johnson is lying when she says it’s
refreshing, but there is a noticeable dip in her
tone — like it really is but she feels a certain
level of guilt for it being that way.
“I haven’t really had time to think about any-
thing which is not a bad problem to have,”
Johnson said. “I was ready and prepared to
pack up and go to college because I’m not
competing anymore so I didn’t think people
would really want me. But, no, I’ve just been
working and I love it.”
Dreams will be realized, crushed
Big moments fueled Johnson during her
career and this weekend in San Jose promises
to hold the same for five gymnasts.
“These girls are like machines. Not much is
going through their heads except for training,”
Johnson said. “But I can tell you, it is on the
forefront of their minds that this competition is
the only thing standing in the way of their
dream and if they don’t do well here they can
potentially not be on that (Olympic) team. It’s
a scary feeling, it feels so close yet so far and
they’re just praying that they make it there.”
Johnson isn’t far removed from having her
once-prayer answered. The thought of it helps
her flash the biggest smile of the afternoon.
“Can you imagine in a second your entire
life’s dream is coming true?” she said. “It’s a
speechless, incredibly overwhelming moment.
I remember I was standing on the floor, con-
fetti was falling from the ceiling and holding
flowers and holding a medal and being told
you’re on the team. It’s like a fairy tale
moment. All the blood, sweat, tears and sacri-
fice was worth it. There is no greater feeling.
“I think in selecting a team you need to
select girls that get along,” Johnson said in
scouting the 2012 hopefuls. “I think it’s one of
the most important things because ultimately,
you’re there as a team and those girls aren’t
going to have their family, not going to have
their friends there. They’re going to have each
other. You need a strong sense of team spirit. I
think you can choose any of them. I don’t
know. That’s what’s hard. It’s going to be a
heartbreaking moment seeing that team
announced because there’s going to be 10 oth-
ers standing there who’s dream doesn’t come
true.”
Johnson’s dreams are slightly different now.
Mostly, you get the sense she wants to stay
busy until this initial wave of competitive nos-
talgia dissipates. She’ll be in London as a cor-
respondent for P&G — behind the scenes
when she’s always been the scene. It’s a con-
cept she isn’t completely sold on just yet. But
who can blame her? When you’re used to fly-
ing, sometimes the ground just won’t do.
Continued from page 11
JOHNSON
the fence in right-center field. Cacchione’s
drive plated the first two Alpine runs of the
game. Matt Gursky and Bradley Stillman each
scored a pair of runs for Alpine in the win.
Cacchione picked up the win, pitching two
innings of no-hit ball and striking out three.
Miles Conrad and Gursky each pitched an
inning of shutout ball as well. The three com-
bined to strike out eight of 16 batters.
Andrighetto didn’t hesitate to use his pitch-
ing staff or his bench. He wanted to get as
many players into the game and get them their
first taste of all-star play to be sure they would
be ready in crunch time.
“We pitch and play by committee,”
Andrighetto said. “We have four or five
[pitchers] that can get the job done. We’re not
leaning on one guy.”
Ravenswood was held to just three hits — a
third-inning double by DeMaurier Jackson,
and singles from Latanoa Faletau and Ingold
Faleofa in the top of the fourth.
Ravenswood’s best chance to score came in
the third inning. With two outs, Jackson dou-
bled to left field and moved to third on a wild
pitch. Lei Aholelei followed with a walk to
put runners on the corners. With Noah
Bloomquist at the plate, Aholelei took off for
second, hoping to draw a throw — which
Alpine obliged. As soon as Jackson saw the
catcher’s throw head for second, he took off
for home, only to be thrown out the plate on a
close play.
Following a scoreless first, Alpine took the
lead for good in the bottom of the second,
scoring two unearned runs. Conrad and
Gursky each reached on errors and moved up
a base on a wild pitch. Cacchione drove both
home when he crushed a pitch to the right-
center field gap. Despite a valiant effort by the
Ravenswood center fielder, the ball just elud-
ed him and bounced over the fence for a two-
run double.
Alpine all but put the game away when it
sent 10 batters to the plate in the third inning,
scoring five runs on four hits and two
Ravenswood errors. The first four batters of
the inning reached base, with Burns and
Goode each driving in a run. Goode ended up
scoring on a wild pitch and pinch hitter
Landon Smith drove in the final run of the
inning with a triple to the fence in left field.
Alpine ended the game early with three runs
in the fourth. In addition to Goode’s two-run
blast, Stillman drove in Burns, who had led
off the inning with a double.
“If my team played well and I played well,
we’d get the win,” Goode said.
With the loss, Ravenswood falls into the
consolation bracket and will play at 7 p.m.
Sunday at Highlands Park against a team to be
determined.
Parents and fans should be warned that the
city of San Carlos has set up barricades limit-
ing parking around the field to residents of the
neighborhood. Most parking can be found at
Heather Elementary School, which requires a
short walk to the field.
Continued from page 1
ALL STARS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — Wheelers, dealers, poker pros
and CEOs are putting up $1 million apiece for a
seat at a first-ever World Series of Poker event
offering the richest top prize in poker history.
Forty-eight players are expected for the three-
day no-limit Texas Hold’em event starting
Sunday at the Rio All Suite Hotel & Casino in Las
Vegas. It ends Tuesday with one winner likely to
take home more than $18 million, plus a champi-
on bracelet.
“I think the drama here is the size of the stakes
and the eclectic mix of characters sitting at the
table,” Mitch Garber, chief executive of tourna-
ment host Caesars Interactive Entertainment, said
Friday. “You have everything — billionaires, a
Facebook millionaire, venture capitalists and
business people.”
The event is called The Big One for One Drop.
The international water advocacy charity
OneDrop.org will receive an 11.1 percent portion
of the buy-in. That could amount to more than $5
million.
World Series of Poker hosting $1M buy-in event
15
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 44 31 .587 —
New York 41 36 .532 4
Atlanta 40 36 .526 4 1/2
Miami 36 40 .474 8 1/2
Philadelphia 36 43 .456 10
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 42 34 .553 —
Pittsburgh 41 35 .539 1
St. Louis 40 37 .519 2 1/2
Milwaukee 34 42 .447 8
Houston 32 45 .416 10 1/2
Chicago 27 49 .355 15
West Division
W L Pct GB
San Francisco 44 34 .564 —
Los Angeles 43 34 .558 1/2
Arizona 39 37 .513 4
Colorado 30 46 .395 13
San Diego 28 50 .359 16
Friday’sGames
Chicago Cubs 4, Houston 0
Miami 6, Philadelphia 2
Washington 5, Atlanta 4
Arizona 9, Milwaukee 3
Colorado 10, San Diego 2
Pittsburgh 14, St. Louis 5
Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 1
N.Y. Mets at L.A. Dodgers, late
Saturday’s Games
Pittsburgh (Karstens 0-2) at St. Louis (Lynn 10-3),
11:15 a.m.
Cincinnati (Latos 6-2) at San Francisco (Zito 6-5),
1:05 p.m.
Houston (Happ 6-7) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 3-6),
1:05 p.m.
Washington (Strasburg 9-2) at Atlanta (Minor 3-6),
1:05 p.m.
Philadelphia (Hamels 10-3) at Miami (Buehrle 6-
8), 1:10 p.m.
Arizona (Miley 9-3) at Milwaukee (Fiers 2-2), 4:15
p.m.
N.Y.Mets (J.Santana 5-4) at L.A.Dodgers (Eovaldi 0-
4), 4:15 p.m.
East Division
W L Pct GB
New York 46 30 .605 —
Baltimore 42 34 .553 4
Boston 41 36 .532 5 1/2
Tampa Bay 41 36 .532 5 1/2
Toronto 39 38 .506 7 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Chicago 42 35 .545 —
Cleveland 38 38 .500 3 1/2
Detroit 37 40 .481 5
Kansas City 35 39 .473 5 1/2
Minnesota 30 45 .400 11
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 49 29 .628 —
Los Angeles 43 34 .558 5 1/2
Oakland 37 41 .474 12
Seattle 33 46 .418 16 1/2
Friday’sGames
Chicago White Sox 14, N.Y.Yankees 7
Baltimore 9, Cleveland 8
Toronto 7, L.A. Angels 5
Tampa Bay 4, Detroit 2
Texas 4, Oakland 3
Kansas City 4, Minnesota 3
Boston 5, Seattle 0
Saturday’sGames
Chicago White Sox (Peavy 6-4) at N.Y. Yankees
(Kuroda 7-7), 10:05 a.m.
L.A. Angels (Richards 2-0) at Toronto (H.Alvarez 4-
6), 10:07 a.m.
KansasCity(J.Sanchez1-3) at Minnesota(Diamond
6-3), 10:10 a.m., 1st game
Cleveland (Tomlin 3-5) at Baltimore (Eveland 0-0),
1:05 p.m.
Detroit (Porcello 5-5) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 4-
3), 4:15 p.m.
Kansas City (Hochevar 5-7) at Minnesota (De Vries
1-1), 4:15 p.m., 2nd game
Oakland (Milone 8-5) at Texas (M.Perez 0-0), 4:15
p.m.
Boston (Beckett 4-7) at Seattle (Er.Ramirez 0-2),
7:10 p.m.
@Nats
8:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
7/4
@WCaps
4p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/22
vs.Fire
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/28
vs.Galaxy
7p.m.
ESPN2
6/30
@Portland
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@FCDallas
6p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/7
vs.RSL
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/14
@Nats
3:35p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/3
vs.FCDallas
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/18
vs.RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/2
@Rangers
4:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/1
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
D.C. 9 5 3 30 31 22
New York 9 4 3 30 31 24
Kansas City 9 5 2 29 20 16
Chicago 8 5 3 27 21 19
Houston 5 5 5 20 20 23
Columbus 5 5 4 19 14 15
New England 5 7 3 18 20 20
Montreal 5 9 3 18 24 29
Philadelphia 3 8 2 11 12 15
Toronto FC 2 10 2 8 16 28
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
San Jose 10 3 3 33 31 19
Real Salt Lake 10 5 2 32 28 19
Vancouver 7 4 5 26 18 19
Seattle 7 5 4 25 19 16
Los Angeles 6 8 2 20 22 23
Colorado 6 8 1 19 21 21
Chivas USA 5 7 4 19 11 18
Portland 4 6 4 16 14 17
FC Dallas 3 9 5 14 16 26
NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday’s Games
Toronto FC 3, Montreal 0
Friday’s Games
Chicago 1, Sporting Kansas City 0
Saturday’s Games
New York at Toronto FC, 4 p.m.
Montreal at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at New England, 4:30 p.m.
Real Salt Lake at Columbus, 5 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
Portland at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, July3
Chicago at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
San Jose at Portland, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July4
Sporting Kansas City at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Toronto FC at FC Dallas, 6 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 6:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 7 p.m.
Philadelphia at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
vs.RedSox
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/3
@Nats
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/5
vs. RedSox
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/4
vs.Seattle
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
7/6
@Pirates
4:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/6
vs. Reds
7:15p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/29
vs. Reds
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
6/30
@Rangers
5:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/29
vs. Reds
1:05p.m.
CSN-BAY
7/1
@Rangers
4:15p.m.
CSN-CAL
6/30
BATTING—Trout, Los Angeles, .342; Konerko,
Chicago, .337; Beltre,Texas, .325; AJackson, Detroit,
.324; Mauer,Minnesota,.324; AEscobar,Kansas City,
.318; Hamilton,Texas, .316.
RUNS—Kinsler,Texas,59;Ortiz,Boston,57;Bautista,
Toronto, 55; Cano, New York, 53; Granderson, New
York, 53; De Aza, Chicago, 51; Andrus, Texas, 50;
Hamilton,Texas, 50; AdJones, Baltimore, 50.
RBI—Hamilton, Texas, 69; MiCabrera, Detroit, 62;
Bautista,Toronto, 61; ADunn, Chicago, 58; Encarna-
cion, Toronto, 55; Ortiz, Boston, 53; Trumbo, Los
Angeles, 53.
HITS—Jeter, New York, 97; MiCabrera, Detroit, 96;
Beltre,Texas, 93; Kinsler,Texas, 91; Andrus,Texas, 90;
Cano, New York, 90; AdJones, Baltimore, 90.
DOUBLES—Kinsler,Texas, 25; Choo, Cleveland, 24;
AdGonzalez, Boston, 24; AGordon, Kansas City, 24;
Ortiz, Boston, 24; MiCabrera, Detroit, 23; Cano, New
York, 23.
TRIPLES—Andrus,Texas,5;Rios,Chicago,5;JWeeks,
Oakland,5; Reddick,Oakland,4; Zobrist,Tampa Bay,
4; 15 tied at 3.
HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 26; ADunn,
Chicago, 24; Hamilton, Texas, 24; Encarnacion,
Toronto,22;Granderson,NewYork,22;Ortiz,Boston,
21;AdJones,Baltimore,19;Trumbo,Los Angeles,19.
STOLEN BASES—Trout, Los Angeles, 22; RDavis,
Toronto, 20; Kipnis, Cleveland, 18; Andrus,Texas, 16;
Crisp, Oakland, 16; Kinsler, Texas, 15; Revere, Min-
nesota, 15.
PITCHING—MHarrison, Texas, 11-3; Price, Tampa
Bay, 11-4; Darvish, Texas, 10-4; Sale, Chicago, 9-2;
Nova, New York, 9-2; Sabathia, New York, 9-3; CWil-
son, Los Angeles, 9-4.
STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 121; Scherzer,
Detroit,114;FHernandez,Seattle,114;Darvish,Texas,
106; Sabathia, New York, 105; Shields, Tampa Bay,
99; Price,Tampa Bay, 97.
AMERICAN LEAGUE LEADERS
BASEBALL
National League
CHICAGOCUBS—AssignedRHPRandyWellsout-
right to Iowa (PCL).
COLORADO ROCKIES —Optioned LHP Edwar
Cabrera to Colorado Springs (PCL). Recalled RHP
Tyler Chatwood from Colorado Springs.
HOUSTONASTROS—ReinstatedRHPBudNorris
from the 15-day DL. Optioned LHP Xavier Cedeno
to Oklahoma City (PCL).
LOSANGELESDODGERS—Agreedtotermswith
OFYasiel Puigonaseven-year contract,placedhim
on the temporary inactive list and optioned him to
theArizonaLeagueDodgers.TransferredINFJustin
Sellers to the 60-day DL.
MILWAUKEEBREWERS—Announced a two-year
player development contract extension with the
Brevard County Manatees of the Florida State
League through the 2014 season.
SANFRANCISCOGIANTS—Purchased the con-
tract of RHP Brad Penny from Fresno (PCL). Placed
RHP Shane Loux on the 15-day DL,Transferred LHP
Eric Surkamp to the 60-day DL.
AmericanLeague
CHICAGOWHITESOX—PlacedRHPBrianBruney
on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 25. Selected
the contract of RHP Brian Omogrosso from Char-
lotte (IL).
CLEVELANDINDIANS—Optioned INF/OF Vinny
Rottino to Columbus (IL).
MINNESOTATWINS—RecalledRHPKyleWaldrop
from Rochester (IL). Agreed to terms with C Ryan
Doumit on a two-year contract through 2014.
TRANSACTIONS
NL STANDINGS AL STANDINGS MLS STANDINGS
By Chloee Weiner
A
couple of weeks ago, one of my
oldest classmates celebrated his
18th birthday. Upon seeing him
shortly after the big day, I
asked him how he’d cho-
sen to commemorate his
official entrance into
adulthood and he
answered with pride,
telling me that he’d
picked up a lottery ticket,
purchased a pack of ciga-
rettes and had registered
to vote. He hadn’t been particularly interested
in any of these opportunities before his birth-
day, but was now eager to take part in them
for the sole reason that he could. My friend
enthusiastically elaborated on all three of
these experiences for several minutes while I
was stuck imagining him in a voting booth. I
couldn’t believe that my friend, someone I’d
known since we were 10 years old, was
going to take part in deciding the future of
our country in November and it made me
wonder if he (or anyone his age, including
myself when the time comes) is ready to
make that decision. I’m sure my friend
knows some differences between President
Obama and Mitt Romney. He would definite-
ly be able to point them out in photos and
undoubtedly knows which political party to
which they belong — but is that enough
information to have a say in who should lead
the country? It’ll have to be enough, because
he, along with millions of other 18-year-olds
in the United States will vote in their first
election this fall.
I have to admit I spent some time wonder-
ing if there should be a test one must pass
before they vote. Those who wanted to vote
would have to be somewhat knowledgeable
on the economic and social policies of the
candidates up for election or would at least
The big one-eight
Want an
adventure?
Riding a wild river in
Glacier National Park
SEE PAGE 19
PHS Adopt-a-thon
Peninsula Humane Society Adopt-a-thon.
Choose your own adoption fee for dogs, cats
and small animals. Adoption fees waived for
Chihuahuas and Chihuahua mixes. Donations
accepted for the Pick of the Litter thrift store.
The event takes place from 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Saturday at the Center for Compassion, 1450
Rollins Road, Burlingame.
For more information call 340-7022.
Feline adoption fair
Cat/Kitten Adoption Fair and Education
Program. Books, DVDs and literature on cat
care available for checkout with free library
card. Foster care and rescue volunteers avail-
able for feline behavior advice and rescue
training. The fair takes place 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Saturday at the Millbrae Library, 1 LIbrary
Ave., Millbrae.
For more information call 697-7607.
Help Cañada get a Steinway
A Grand Night for a Grand Cause: Redwood
Symphony performs a fundraiser to purchase
a new Steinway piano for Cañada College.
Pianist and Gershwin specialist Richard
Glazier joins Maestro Eric Kujawsky to per-
form Gershwin’s Piano Concerto in F. $30
per person. The event takes place 8 p.m.-10
p.m. Saturday at Cañada College Main
Theatre, 4200 Farm Hill Blvd. in Redwood
City.
For more information visit www.red-
woodsymphony.org.
Best bets
By Christy Lemire
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Steven Soderbergh makes
movies about sexy subjects,
then strips away the sexiness
about them. He is fascinated
by process, often to a clinical
extent.
In recent years this has been
true of “The Girlfriend
Experience” (starring real-life
porn star Sasha Grey as a
high-priced Manhattan call
girl), “Contagion” (about a
viral outbreak that claims
lives worldwide) and
“Haywire” (featuring mixed-
martial artist Gina Carano as a
special-ops agent seeking
revenge for a betrayal). Even
the glitzy, star-studded
“Ocean’s 11,” one of
Soderbergh’s most pleasingly
escapist films, takes its time
laying out every detail of its
ambitious Las Vegas casino
heist.
Now he’s directed “Magic
Mike,” about the cheesy
world of male stripping at a
cheesy club in Tampa, Fla.
Yes, the dance numbers
themselves exude masculine,
muscular heat — how could
‘Magic Mike’ has substance, sex appeal
See MAGIC Page 18
See STUDENT, Page 18
18
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEEKEND JOURNAL
Redwood City July 4 Activities

Sponsored by the Peninsula Celebration Association
Event maps and information at www.parade.org

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Festival - Downtown

Arts & Crafts Booths on Jefferson
Great Food – Support your favorite local non-profit group
1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. “Battle of the Bands” - Stanford vs. UC Davis
Children’s Entertainment Stage
Children’s Play Area

10:00 a.m. 74th Annual Independence Day Parade

Stanford Marching Band Community Floats
Miss California Drill Teams / Baton Corps
Equestrian Units UC Davis Marching Band

Contributing Sponsors

City of Redwood City • County of San Mateo
San Mateo Credit Union • T&H Lumber • Graniterock
Woodside Patrol • Market Produce Sales • Recology
Broadway Auto • Redwood General Tire • Action Towing
* please go to www.parade.org for new parade
route infromation.
*
702 Marshall St., Ste. 400, Redwood City
650.369.8900
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have to be able to identify the politician’s
stance on a few legislative issues. I consid-
ered this voting qualification test for a few
minutes before realizing that, as corny as it
sounds, turning 18 should be about making
one’s own decisions — regardless of whether
these decisions are informed or not.
As the weeks go by, friend after friend
with summer birthdays become legal adults
and I continually find it difficult to believe
that the people I hang out with can now start
a 401K plan, adopt a child or go to federal
prison — among the rest of the “privileges”
that come with turning 18. The legal age of
adulthood in the United States is a topic
that’s often debated and discussed in context
of the legal driving and drinking ages. The
selection of 18 as the official end of one’s
childhood seems a bit arbitrary, but I can’t
think of an age that wouldn’t be. I know that
when I turn 18 in February, I won’t feel qual-
ified to make any adult decisions. In fact,
there’s no doubt that my parents will still
have to help me do my laundry, but I’m look-
ing forward to being thrust into the adult
world nonetheless because I feel as though
that’s the only way one can begin to learn.
Although 18 is not the age of the completion
of physical or mental development nor the
end of one’s teenage years, the age should be
considered the time one officially starts to
learn how to handle the responsibility of
adulthood instead of when one should auto-
matically be considered completely mature.
Despite the responsibilities and rights
given to legal adults, my friends whose birth-
days have passed have agreed that there isn’t
much, if any, of a notable difference marked
by their 18th year. They still live at home,
listen to their parents and even watch the
occasional cartoon. For now, I know the new
adults around me will spend far more time in
the months leading up to the election
engaged in childlike activities than they will
brushing up on their political knowledge or
trying to figure out how credit scores work,
but I can’t say that I’ll be any different when
my own birthday comes around.
Chloee Weiner is an incoming senior at Crystal
Springs Uplands School. Student News appears in
the weekend edition. You can email Student News
at news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 17
STUDENT
they not with guys like Channing Tatum,
Matthew McConaughey, Alex Pettyfer and
Joe Manganiello strutting on stage in barely-
there costumes? But Soderbergh and writer
Reid Carolin take us behind the scenes and
linger over the minutiae of these performers’
daily lives. They go thong shopping. They
rehearse their routines. They lift weights
backstage. And they count their dollar bills
when “It’s Raining Men” has stopped blaring
from the sound system and their work is done.
Even the after-hours hook-ups with liquored-
up ladies from the audience feel like one more
obligatory step, like brushing your teeth
before going to bed.
It all seems glamorous and thrilling at first
for Pettyfer’s character, Adam, who becomes
known as The Kid. A 19-year-old neophyte in
this neon-colored world, he serves as our
wide-eyed guide once the more established
Mike (Tatum) recruits him to be a dancer at
the Club Xquisite male revue. Comparisons to
“Boogie Nights,” both for the structure and
the sexual subject matter, are inevitable. But
Soderbergh, who also shot and edited the film
under his usual pseudonyms, intentionally
avoids the kind of high style and histrionics
that marked Paul Thomas Anderson’s lurid
look at the porn industry in the ‘70s.
A more apt point of comparison would be
the original “Sex & the City” movie; it’ll have
a similar appeal for straight women and gay
men in equal measure. This is a movie that’s
tailor-made for groups of friends to get
together and giggle and ogle at the spectacle
of it all. And it is a lot of fun — there’s no
shame, we’re all friends here — but it’s also
more substantial than you might expect, and
more mundane.
Tatum, who’s also a producer on the film,
understands the allure of this lifestyle: He
lived it when he was The Kid’s age, briefly
working as a male stripper before breaking
into acting, and “Magic Mike” is kinda-sorta
inspired by that time. Anyone who’s seen
“Step Up,” the 2006 movie that put him on the
map, knows what a gifted dancer he is. But
here, he’s just mesmerizing: confident, cre-
ative, acrobatic and, above all, seductive.
‘Cause that’s the whole point.
“Magic Mike” follows one long booze-
infused summer as Mike, The Kid and their
co-stars work the ladies while their boss, strip-
per-turned-club-owner Dallas
(McConaughey), makes plans to expand to
Miami. This is an excellent fit for
McConaughey, who’s doing some of the best
work of his career lately between this,
“Bernie” and the upcoming thriller “Killer
Joe.” All the swagger is there — and the per-
formance does have some clever nods to his
off-screen party-boy persona — but he’s also
willing to show a darker and more dangerous
side as he gets older, as if he isn’t so interest-
ed anymore in making us like him. And that
actually makes him more likable.
Also showing an intriguing presence is
newcomer Cody Horn as The Kid’s older sis-
ter, Brooke, who lets him sleep on her couch
and tries in vain to help him find a real job.
She has a strong but laid-back presence, and
she remains the no-nonsense voice of reason
when The Kid’s hard-partying tendencies start
spinning out of control.
Yes, “Magic Mike” is a bit of a formulaic
cautionary tale about the perils of having too
much, too soon. And the character who’s the
catalyst for The Kid’s inevitable downfall,
played by Riley Keough, is barely introduced
and never feels fleshed out enough as a legiti-
mate threat.
Mike helps keep this fantasy world ground-
ed in truth; a self-described entrepreneur, he
strips — and works construction jobs, and
details cars — all in the hopes of saving
enough money to start his own custom furni-
ture business. There’s nothing magical or even
sexy about that: it’s just the cold, hard reality
of our time.
Come for the beefcake, stay for the eco-
nomics lesson.
“Magic Mike,” a Warner Bros. release, is
rated R for pervasive sexual content, brief
graphic nudity, language and some drug use.
Running time: 110 minutes. Three stars out of
four.
Tom Cruise and
Katie Holmes divorcing
LOS ANGELES — It always seemed more
than a little weird, didn’t it? The whirlwind
romance of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes
with its very public, very emphatic procla-
mations of love. It all occurred too quickly
and too loudly to seem real.
Now, after nearly six years of marriage,
Holmes is divorcing
Cruise. She filed the
papers on Thursday, said
Cruise’s lawyer Bert
Fields. The two share a
daughter, 6-year-old Suri,
who’s been featured in
celebrity media nearly as
frequently as her parents.
But it’s telling that
even in addressing their
split in the typically vague
fashion of famous people,
Cruise still refers to
Holmes by the name he
called her: Kate, as if to
distance her from the
adorable Katie audiences
came to know and love
from the teen soap
“Dawson’s Creek.”
“Kate has filed for divorce and Tom is
deeply saddened and is concentrating on his
three children,” Cruise’s representative,
Amanda Lundberg, told the Associated
Press. “Please allow them their privacy to
work this out.”
Continued from page 17
MAGIC
District discriminates against students of
Chinese descent in enrollment, by holding
them to different standards — for demon-
strating residency or guardianship — than
students of other races or national origins,”
according to the U.S. Department of
Education spokesman.
Those who have met the families who
lodged the complaint explained it stems from
students who live in Millbrae and had hoped
to attend Mills High School. Instead, students
were sent to Capuchino High School.
The school assignment policy generally
calls for students to attend the school of resi-
dency. Students living in Millbrae and those
who went through the Millbrae Elementary
School District, for example, are most often
assigned to attend Mills. There are exceptions
to that, however, said Kirk Black, associate
superintendent of human resources and
administrative services, speaking generally
about the policy.
For instance, students may have requested
and been approved for a transfer, have a sib-
ling or senior privilege for a school outside
of their normal assignment, to be part of a
program like English language development
or special that are not available at all
schools, or may be transferred to make up
units. School capacity issues can also play
into assignment, he said.
The district declined to give further details
but did provide a statement.
“The Office for Civil Rights is investigating
a complaint, and the district is fully cooperat-
ing with the investigation. We cannot, howev-
er, comment on the substance of an ongoing
investigation,” according to the statement.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
DISTRICT
People in the news
Katie Holmes Tom Cruise
WEEKEND JOURNAL 19
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR
CORRESPONDENT
RIDING A WILD RIVER IN
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK.
Bonecrusher. Could Be Trouble. Jaws.
Certainly not terms normally associated
with vacation. But, after all, vacation
should mean getting your mind off the
day to day, and when you white-water raft
on one of Montana’s famous wild rivers,
these colorfully named rapids mean you
have a whole lot more to think about than
that stack of paperwork back on your
desk. As your raft picks up speed heading
down a spectacular stretch of the Middle
Fork of the Flathead River along the edge
of Glacier National Park, your guide’s
admonitions about what to do if you end
up in the river instead of on it make it
abundantly clear that what lies ahead is
not Splash Mountain and that the churn-
ing, unpredictable liquid roller coaster is
about to get up close and personal. And
what a rush it is. Not to worry (much),
just get a tight grip on your paddle, do
what your guide tells you, and, well, see
you at the end of the run.
Explaining why he loves being a river
guide on the Middle Fork of the Flathead,
Joe Gallagher said, “Because of the look
in a child’s eyes when they hit the first
rapid of their life; because of water so
clear you can see 30 feet down in late
summer and so cold that even on the
hottest days my customers’ eyes triple in
size when they swim; and because of the
sound of the river, the muted murmur of
the slow stretches and the pulsing thunder
of the rapids — these sounds resonate
somewhere deep. The song of all things
that run to the sea.”
Great Northern Whitewater Raft &
Resort offers river excursions from two-
hours to several days long, including var-
ious horse ride, fly fishing and rafting
combinations. Highway 2. West Glacier,
Mont. greatnorthernresort.com or (800)
735-7897.
MOUNTAIN BIKING IN THE
ROCKIES. Want to do some mountain
biking in REAL mountains? Well, they
don’t get any more real than the Rockies,
and the Whitefish Trail, near the charm-
ing town of Whitefish (pop. 6357), just
west of Glacier National Park, is an invit-
ing network of pathways winding through
thick forests opening onto scenic panora-
mas. Bring your fly rod for an off trail
stop to cast for bluegill, bass and bullhead
trout at a secluded mountain lake. Great
Northern Cycles Owner Craig Prather
said, “Whitefish is decorated with 100s of
miles of classic pacific northwest single-
track. Positioned right on the Continental
divide we enjoy a variety of terrain from
dense old growth cedar to challenging
subalpine ridges and peaks. Our newly
constructed Whitefish trail serves as a
beacon of a perfectly constructed sustain-
able trail ... with its 19 miles of wide,
rolling well stacked loops, it easily
rewards the novice and advanced rider as
well.” Prather and his staff can outfit you
with just the right rental bike and get you
on your way fast like pancakes. Great
Northern Cycles. 328 Central Ave.
Whitefish, Mont.
greatnortherncycles.com or (406) 862-
5321.
HISTORIC BELTON CHALET.
After a day on the river or on the trails,
ease into a chair in the dining room of
the Arts and Crafts style Belton Chalet.
A National Historic Landmark, Belton
Chalet was built by the Great Northern
Railway in 1910 to promote the
‘American Alps’ in the newly opened
Glacier National Park. Today’s wait-
resses wear streamlined black and white
uniforms with broad cinch belts, a nod
to the Swiss costumes that outfitted the
original staff. Chef Melissa Mangold
blends ingredients from local farmers
and ranchers to create specialties like
Montana Delmonico (Montana raised
Wagyu beef topped with gorgonzola
butter, over smashed potatoes),
Montana meatloaf (buffalo meatloaf
wrapped in hickory-smoked bacon,
served with port wine mushroom demi,
roasted garlic mashed and savory
creamed corn), and tamale tart (corn
masa layered with black beans, sweet
potato and plantains topped with shred-
ded Chihuahua cheese, finished with a
roasted pablano cream, peptitas and
lacinato kale). And in this part of
Montana, it’s all about huckleberries, so
save room for some huckleberry ice
cream. Belton Chalet. 12575 Highway 2
East, West Glacier, Mont. belton-
chalet.com or (406) 888-5000.
GETTING TO GLACIER COUN-
TRY. United Airlines offers seasonal
direct flights from San Francisco to
Missoula, Mont., while Allegiant offers
year-round direct flights from Oakland to
Missoula and Oakland to Glacier Park
International Airport. Amtrak’s Empire
Builder stops at the Belton station, across
from Belton Chalet, at the west entrance
of the Park.
AND REMEMBER: “Half the fun of
travel is the esthetic of lostness.” — Ray
Bradbury.
Susan Cohn is a member of Bay Area Travel
Writers and North American Travel
Journalists Association. She may be reached
at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
JOSH BERRETH
Veteran river guide Joe Gallagher (in rear, with cap) takes a novice crew through
rapids on the Middle Fork of the Flathead River near Glacier National Park in Montana.
Frances Huang
Frances Huang, M.A., of Senior Focus, discusses the
many benefits of the Senior Focus Adult Day Health
Program, such as physical, occupational and speech thera-
pies, convenient access to medical professionals resulting in
early detection and family support. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Monday, July 9. City of San Mateo Senior Center. 2645
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. Call 522-7490 to
register.
All events are free unless otherwise noted. Please check before the
event in case of schedule changes.
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.; White House chief of staff Jack
Lew; Vicki Kennedy, widow of Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-
Mass.
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California; Gov.
Bobby Jindal, R-La.; former Gov. Howard Dean, D-Vt.
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio; Sens. Chuck
Schumer, D-N.Y., and Tom Coburn, R-Okla.; Govs. Martin
O'Malley, D-Md., and Scott Walker, R-Wis.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Lew; Gov. John Hickenlooper, D-Colo.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Lew; Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of
Kentucky.
Sunday news shows
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services at 8 & 11 am
Sunday School at 9:30 am
Website: www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
Every Sunday at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
LOTUS
BUDDHIST CIRCLE
(Rissho Kosei-kai of SF)
851 N. San Mateo Dr., Suite D
San Mateo
650.200.3755
English Service: 4th Sunday at 10 AM
Study: Tuesday at 7 PM
www.lotusbuddhistcircle.com
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo ShinshuBuddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Ryuta Furumoto
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997 650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance Agents are NOT created Equally!
M
any Homeowners believe that all Insurance Agents provide the same
services. Nothing could be further from the truth. Many Insurance
Agents Over-Insure their customers in order to make a larger commission;
others Under-Insure, in order to offer a sellable lower price.
Homeowners need to have the right coverage or they end up filing claims
that are not covered by their insurance plan, or pay for insurance they
don’t need. That’s why you need a proven expert.
All Home Pros screens local Insurance Agents in order to find the best of
the best. We work with many companies but we hand pick each individual
Agent based on their knowledge, integrity and attention to detail. You
can rest assured that your family and your assets are protected and your
service is top of the line.
When choosing a reliable and outstanding Insurance Agent or Broker, Trust
the Pros, All Home Pros-Because you deserve the best.
VISIT AllHomePros.com
OR CALL US AT
650.726.7700 or 415.ALL.PROS
you should expect Peace and
Security not Catastrophe and
Financial ruin.
When you choose an
Insurance Agent
SATURDAY, JUNE 30
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Community Breakfast. 8:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. The American Legion
San Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. Scrambled eggs,
pancakes, bacon, ham or sausage and
French toast will be served. There will
also be juice, coffee or tea. $8. $5 for
children under 10. For more
information call 583-1740.
State Sen. Joe Simitian’s sidewalk
office hours. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Palo
Alto Farmers’ Market, Behind the
downtown post office, Hamilton
Avenue and Gilman Street, Palo Alto.
Community members are invited to
stop by with their questions and
concerns about state issues. Admission
to the farmers’ market is free. For more
information call 688-6384 or visit
senatorsimitian.com.
Friends of the LibraryBooksale: San
Bruno Library. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. San
Bruno Library, 701 Angus Ave., San
Bruno. Entrance to the lower level is
located on the Angus Avenue side of
the library. $5 buys you a bag to fill to
the brim with books. Paperbacks 50
cents each, hardbacks $1 each.
Specials as marked. For more
information call 616-7078.
Meet Local Artist and Author Janet
Barker. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. San Bruno
Library, 701 W. Angus Ave., San Bruno.
Painting demonstrations and
discussion of her contribution to the
new book ‘Entrepreneur Success
Stories’ on how to become successful
doing something that you love. Free.
For more information call 616-7078.
Cat/Kitten Adoption Fair and
Education Program. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Millbrae Library, 1 LIbrary Ave.,
Millbrae. Books, DVDs and literature
on cat care available for checkout with
free library card. Foster care and rescue
volunteers available for feline behavior
advice and rescue training. For more
information call 697-7607.
Free Spinal Screenings. 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. New Leaf Community Markets,
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Free Spinal Screenings with Dr. Valerie
Spier, network chiropractor of the Sun
Center for Well Being. No appointment
necessary. For more information
contact patti@bondmarcom.com.
Adopt-a-thon. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Center
for Compassion, 1450 Rollins Road,
Burlingame. Those who participate
can choose their own adoption fee for
dogs, cats and small animals. Adoption
fees will be waived for all Chihuahuas
and Chihuahua mixes. Donations will
be accepted for the Pick of the Litter
thrift store. Free admission. For more
information call 340-7022.
Les Amis Salon’s First Birthday
Celebration. 5:30 p.m. Les Amis —
Salon et Spa, 113 De Anza Blvd., San
Mateo. There will be a live band and
more. Free. For more information visit
salonlesamis.com.
A Grand Night for a Grand Cause:
Redwood Symphony performs a
fundraiser to purchase a new
Steinway piano for Cañada College.
8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cañada College Main
Theatre, 4200 Farm Hill Blvd., Redwood
City. Pianist and Gershwin specialist
Richard Glazier joins Maestro Eric
Kujawsky to perform Gershwin’s Piano
Concerto in F. $30 per person. For more
information visit
http://www.redwoodsymphony.org.
SUNDAY, JULY 1
State Sen. Joe Simitian’s sidewalk
office hours. 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.
Menlo Park Farmers’ Market, Chestnut
Street between Santa Cruz and Menlo
avenues. Community members are
invited to stop by with their questions
and concerns about state issues.
Admission to the farmers’ market is
free. For more information call 688-
6384 or visit senatorsimitian.com.
St. LawrenceString Quartet: Annual
Chamber Music Seminar. 11 a.m.
Campbell Recital Hall, Stanford
University. Free. For more information
call 723-3811.
Summer Concert Series. 1 p.m. to 4
p.m. Twin Pines Park, 30 Twin Pines
Lane, Belmont. The Fred McCarthy
Band will perform country western
music. Those who plan on attending
should bring a blanket. Food will be
available for purchase at the concert.
Free admission. For more information
call 595-7441.
Jerry Peters’s ‘Vintage Trucks and
NewWorks.’ 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Portola
Art Gallery at Allied Arts Guild, 75
Arbor Road, Menlo Park. Paintings of
vintage trucks, and new still life
paintings and landscapes by Jerry
Peters. For more information visit
jppetersart.com.
First Sunday Line Dance with Tina
Beare and Jeanette Feinberg. 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Lesson at 1:30 p.m. $5. For more
information call 616-7150.
Encore Chamber Music Concert. 3
p.m. First Congregational Church of
Palo Alto, 1985 Louis Road, Palo Alto.
General admission $15. Student and
senior admission $10. For more
information visit
www.fccpa.org/FCCPA_Site/Concerts.
html.
Peggy Stern Quintet. 4:30 p.m. The
Douglas Beach House, 311 Miranda
Road, Half Moon Bay. $35. For more
information and for tickets visit
www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2
45743.
The Main Gallery’s Extravaganza. 6
p.m. to 8 pm. The Main Gallery, 1018
Main St., Redwood City. Featuring La
Luna with Anthony Williams and
‘Wearable Art in Gemstones’ by Elfi
Altendorfer. For more information call
578-9261.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
that was necessary in repealing Obamacare,”
he said, adding that the justices “did not get
that job done.”
Several Republicans seized on a portion of
Chief Justice John Roberts’ majority opinion
that said the centerpiece of the law, a require-
ment to purchase insurance, was constitution-
al because it is based on Congress’ power to
impose a tax. “Those who will end up paying
the heaviest burden for not buying govern-
ment-mandated insurance won’t be the
wealthiest Americans, but the very middle
class families the president claims to defend,”
said Senate Republican leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky.
The White House said that was an argument
it was happy to have. Presidential press sec-
retary Jay Carney said Obama has signed leg-
islation cutting middle class taxes repeatedly,
that Republicans want to extend existing
income tax cuts for the wealthy and then add
“another $5 trillion...that would dispropor-
tionately benefit” the same group.
At the same time, the administration
announced the latest in a series to steps to
implement a law that already has curbed
insurance company abuses and cut costs for
seniors with high prescription drug costs.
Officials said another round of financing was
available for states to set up health insurance
exchanges, the one-stop markets for con-
sumers scheduled to open in 2014.
Polls find Obama and Romney in a close
race four months before the election, with the
economy the nation’s overriding issue. The
battle for control of the Senate is also uncer-
tain, and one day after the court’s ruling, the
principal fallout was political.
Romney, Obama and congressional candi-
dates in both parties raised campaign money
from the ruling, in which Roberts unexpected-
ly joined four more liberal justices to uphold
the law’s core component — a requirement
that nearly all Americans purchase health
insurance beginning in 2014.
The Republican-controlled House is plan-
ning to vote in a little more than a week to
repeal the law. But that is a symbolic vote,
designed to show faith with opponents of
what the GOP scornfully calls “Obamacare.”
Party officials also hope to force some
Democrats into a difficult vote on legislation
that has never been popular with the public.
The repeal measure is doomed in the Senate,
where Democrats hold a majority.
Recognizing as much, Republicans were
turning their attention to 2013 as their next
realistic opportunity to erase legislation that
they say gives government control of health at
the same time it raises taxes, cuts Medicare
and swells deficits.
“One thing is clear: we need the majority in
the Senate,” Senate Republican Leader Mitch
McConnell of Kentucky wrote in a fundrais-
ing email to supporters. “Every path to repeal
depends on it.”
A 60-vote majority is normally required to
overcome adamant opposition to legislation in
the Senate, but under limited circumstances, a
mere majority can suffice. Democrats took
advantage of that when they pushed the health
care law to passage in 2010 when they con-
trolled 59 seats. Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., told
reporters, “I think with a ... majority in the
Senate, Republicans could do the same
things.”
The GOP currently has 47 seats in the 100-
member Senate, and needs to gain three for
effective control if Romney wins the presi-
dential election. Any repeal scenario also
assumes the Republicans maintain their
House majority in the fall.
A little more than 24 hours after the ruling,
Obama, Romney and congressional leaders
quickly adjusted.
One effect of the decision was to make
Romney’s election essential for tea party-
aligned voters who fought his nomination in
winter and spring but now need him in the
White House if there is to be any real hope of
repeal.
In a fundraising pitch, the Tea Party Patriots
addressed both Romney and House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio., asserting “the
American people are putting you on notice.
We will not rest until this law is overturned.”
The court’s decision also injected the health
care issue into congressional races.
Crossroads GPS, an independent group
aligned with Republicans, introduced an ad in
North Dakota noting that Democratic senato-
rial candidate Heidi Heitkamp “endorsed
Obamacare.” The commercial says the law
raises taxes, cuts Medicare and gives federal
bureaucrats “the power to restrict seniors’
care.” It encourages viewers to lobby her to
swing behind the repeal effort.
Continued from page 1
GOP
ray of a crow that had some bullet fragments
removed from it by PHS staff.
The crow made a full recovery, they learned.
They have also learned that animals have
rights, said Lauoen Shannon, who said she will
one day volunteer for PHS.
The Humane House is open the same hours
PHS is open for adoptions from 11 a.m. to 7
p.m. on weekdays and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on
weekends. It is located on the second floor at
1450 Rollins Road.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
HUMANE
The same held true in District Four where the
two maintained the same positions — Slocum
received 4,557 votes and Masur 4,125 — fol-
lowed by Kirsten Keith, Carlos Romero,
Memo Morantes, Andy Cohen and Ernie
Schmidt.
District Four includes Redwood City,
Menlo Park and East Palo Alto and the unin-
corporated areas of North Fair Oaks and Oak
Knoll.
Slocum said he is “gratified” to have carried
both and all cities but Menlo Park where Keith
secured a majority. With Keith now a support-
er, Slocum hopes that will help him in those
precincts this fall.
Masur said she is also happy to see “such
great support in the district” but that all of her
backing countwide is important.
As the top two in this race with neither
grabbing more than 50 percent, Slocum and
Masur will have a runoff in November. In that
same election, county voters will be asked if
they prefer to keep the status quo or shift to
district elections.
A lawsuit set for an August trial against the
county may also play a role. The suit on
behalf of six county residents argues the exist-
ing voting system is inequitable to minorities
because Latinos and Asians each compromise
approximately 25 percent of the county’s pop-
ulation, but only one Latino has held a seat on
the Board of Supervisors since 1995 and no
Asians.
The county’s elections process has long
been debated between those who say all vot-
ers should be able to weigh in on elected offi-
cials who represent all residents and oppo-
nents who argue it causes a fundraising bur-
den for candidates who must throw their net
wider for money and votes.
Slocum supports district elections and said
he supports the board’s decision to let voters
settle the question. However, he added that he
understands the countywide premise because
the board’s decisions affect more than just a
narrow slice of constituents.
Masur previously supported district contests
but as a candidate believes at-large elections
forces one to hear from people countywide
and gain new perspectives.
“I do support the board putting it on the bal-
lot. It’s time to do that for sure and I’m very
curious to see what people think,” she said.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
RESULTS
SATURDAY, JUNE 30, 2012
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- It won’t hurt your im-
age today to admit to not being able to do something.
However, it would arouse the ire of others if you
pretend to be able to do something that they want to
but can’t.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Instead of treating certain
fun, competitive activities for what they are -- merely
games -- you might take things seriously and take
some foolish risks. Stick to your comfort zone.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Respect the talents and
abilities of others, but just because you can’t do
some things that others can, don’t credit them with
bigger assets than they have. It would unnecessarily
make you feel inadequate.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Don’t spread things
on too thick, and make sure you have all the facts
before you speak up. Persons who usually take you
at your word might challenge what you tell them.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- If you fnd yourself in
the position of making a choice between paying off
an old obligation and buying something new, you
know it would be smarter to rid yourself of debt.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Be careful,
because even those who are usually supportive of
you might not stand up for you. Plus, your enemies
are likely to be more actively working against you
than usual.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Make a list of your
duties and try to eliminate them one at a time. If you
allow things to pile up on you, chances are you will
lose your footing.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- All it will do is make
both parties angry if you allow yourself to get caught
in the middle of two warring friends. Stay out of it, no
matter whom you think is right or wrong.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Success is possible,
but only if you rely more upon yourself and less upon
Lady Luck. Unfortunately, when you’ll need her the
most, she might be cozying up to your opponent.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Tell it like it is, even
if you think it might put you in a bad light in some
people’s eyes. If you attempt to color the facts, it
could make things far worse in other ways.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- You might not be as
sharp of a horse trader as the person you’re doing
business with, so be extra careful. That individual
may be trying to take the whole farm.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Since you do have a
natural ability to easily see both sides of an issue,
you can’t help but use it. However, if you become too
obsessed with weighing and balancing everything,
you could be rendered ineffective.

COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
6-30-12
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PREVIOUS
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1
through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes, called
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1 Primatologist -- Fossey
5 Beauty pack
8 -- mater
12 Therefore
13 Not sm. or med.
14 Unsmiling
15 Fibbed
16 Utterly uncivilized
18 Double curves
20 Opposing vote
21 JAMA readers
22 Ballpark
25 Interest amt.
28 Europe-Asia range
29 Botanist’s wings
33 Graduates
35 Palm foliage
36 Type of headache
37 Turning right
38 Outback mineral
39 Swear
41 Tofu base
42 Snorkeling areas
45 Have to pay
48 Butter serving
49 Piano exercise
53 Sold
56 Give off
57 Pinnacle
58 Epoch
59 Prefx for second
60 Speckled horse
61 FICA number
62 Every now and --
DOwN
1 Edit out
2 Part of the eye
3 Becomes mellow
4 Knots or bumps
5 White Sox org.
6 Kampala’s nation
7 Jump the tracks
8 Tooth-puller’s org.
9 Byron title
10 Naturalist John --
11 Spark coil outputs
17 Provo sch.
19 Blows away
23 Uris hero
24 Adult flly
25 El --, Texas
26 Barrette
27 Canned fsh
30 Hi’s wife
31 Livy’s year
32 Uptight
34 Refect deeply
35 Ancient plants
37 Earth, in combos
39 Rock tumbler stones
40 Citizens
43 It has long arms
44 Fragrance
45 FitzGerald’s poet
46 City on the Brazos
47 “Cope Book” aunt
50 Bombay nanny
51 Finish a jacket
52 School near Windsor
Castle
54 Mr. Follett
55 Karate level
DILBERT® CROSSwORD PUZZLE
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Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
TUTORING
Credential Teacher
Resume Available
Pre-K to College
Multiple Subjects
Contact Elizabeth
opendoortutoring@yahoo.com
110 Employment
LINE COOK - Night Shift,
1201 San Carlos Ave., San Carlos.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
We’re a top, full-service pro-
vider of home care, in need of
your experienced, committed
care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits.
Call for Alec at
(650) 556-9906
or visit
www.homesweethomecare.com
HIGH END OUTDOOR FURNITURE
SALES Patioworld San Carlos. Reliable
team players only. Full time incl.
Sat/Sun. (650)592-9353
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES -
WellnessMatters Magazine is seeking
independent contractor/advertising
sales representatives to help grow
this new publication for the Peninsula
and Half Moon Bay. WellnessMatters
has the backing of the Daily Journal.
The perfect contractor will have a pas-
sion for wellness and for sharing our
message with potential advertisers,
supporters and sponsors. Please
send cover letter and resume to: in-
fo@wellnessmattersmagazine.com.
Positions are available immediately.
JEWELRY SALES
Entry up to $13 Dia up to $20
650-367-6500 FX:650-367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY
RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday
& Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 514116
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Pamela Zaragoza
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Pamela Zaragoza filed a peti-
tion with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Pamela Arizbet Zaragoza
Zavala, aka Pamela A. Zaragoza, aka
Pamela Zaragoza
Proposed name: Pamela Arizbeth Cortez
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on July 17,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, at 400 County
Center, Redwood City, CA 94063. A
copy of this Order to Show Cause shall
be published at least once each week for
four successive weeks prior to the date
set for hearing on the petition in the fol-
lowing newspaper of general circulation:
Daily Journal
Filed: 06/14/12
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/14/2012
(Published 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12,
07/07/12)
CASE# CIV 514118
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Angelina Sheri Franceschini
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Angelina Sheri Franceschini
filed a petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Angelina Sheri France-
schini, aka Angelina S. Franceschini, aka
Angelina Piccolotti, aka Angelina S. Pic-
colotti, aka Angelina Sheri Piccolotti
Proposed name: Angelina Sheri Piccolot-
ti
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on August 7,
2012 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 06/18/2012
/s/ Mark R. Forcum /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 06/14/2012
(Published, 06/30/12, 07/07/12,
07/14/12, 07/21/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250348
The following person is doing business
as: RCW Marketing Group, 464 Clinton
St., #206, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Ryan C. Wood, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
05/10/2012.
/s/ Ryan C. Wood /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/10/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250800
The following person is doing business
as: Salsaveda, 1 Olive Court REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Vera Quijano, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 06/7/2012.
/s/ Vera Quijano/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/7/2012. (Publish-
ed in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250585
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Omni Financial Network, 2) Omni
Investment Group, 6253 Mission Street,
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Omni En-
terprise, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Amie Chan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250574
The following person is doing business
as: Ulta Beauty, 119 Colma Blvd DALY
CITY, CA 94014 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Ulta Salon, Cosmet-
ics & Fragarance, Inc., IL. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 8/1/12
/s/ Scott Settersten /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 05/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250817
The following person is doing business
as: Nicholson Appliance Repair, 50
Woodside Plaza, Ste. 416, REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94061 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Zachary Nicholson,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Zachary Nicholson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/08/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250793
The following person is doing business
as: Jade Dragon Restaurant, 2450 S. El
Camino Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ai Lin Jue, 159 Ramsell St. San Francis-
co, CA 94132. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Ai Lin Jue /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/07/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250724
The following person is doing business
as: All In One Live Scan, 1777 Borel
Place, Ste. 311, SAN MATEO, CA 94402
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Tony Vain, 1777 Borel Place, Ste.
311, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Tony Vain /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/01/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250753
The following person is doing business
as: Hongry Kong, 407 Old County Rd.,
BELMONT, CA 94002 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: AW2gether,
CA. The business is conducted by a lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Monica Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/09/12, 06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250889
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: San Carlos Tan, 1065 Holly St.,
Ste. C, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Rebecca Stonoga, 1561 San Carlos
Ave., Apt. 1, San Carlos, CA
94070 and Lindsay Monohan, 164 Che-
sham Ave., San Carlos, CA 94070. The
business is conducted by a General Part-
nership. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Rebecca Stonoga /
/s/ Lindsay Monohan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250875
The following person is doing business
as: Marketpass Realty, 938 Hillsborough
Blvd., HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Information Engineering Consulting, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/04/12.
/s/ Barbara Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/13/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/16/12, 06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12).
23 Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City
of San Bruno, California (the “City”) at its regular meeting on,
Tuesday, July 10, 2012, at the Senior Center starting at 7:00
p.m., 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, will hold a Public
Hearing, and consider adopting a resolution of the City Council
of the City of San Bruno, amending the Master Fee Schedule,
establishing fees for a variety of municipal services.
The public is invited to attend the Public Hearing and com-
ment. Please call the Finance Department at 616-7080 if you
would like additional information or have any questions.
Certification and Posting: A certified copy of the full text of the
proposed resolution is available for public review in the City
Clerk’s Office, 567 El Camino Real, in San Bruno, California.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
June 26, 2012
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, June 30, 2012.
NOTICE OF ADOPTED ORDINANCE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of San Bruno, California (the “City”) at its regular meeting on, Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at the Senior Center starting
at 7:00 p.m., 1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno, held a public hearing and considered the following ordinance, then at its regular meeting on, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, the
City Council of the City of San Bruno, waived the first reading and introduced the following ordinance. Then at its regular meeting on Tuesday, June 26, 2012, the City Council of
the City of San Bruno, waived the second reading and adopted the following ordinance, by the indicated vote:
Passed unanimously by Councilmembers: Ibarra, Medina, O’Connell, Salazar, Mayor Ruane
ORDINANCE NO. 1806
ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SAN BRUNO
ESTABLISHING GARBAGE AND REFUSE RATES
The City Council of the City of San Bruno does ordain as follows:
Section 1. Article XI, Section 7 of the California Constitution and Government Code Section 54354.5 empowers the City of San Bruno, by and through its City
Council, to prescribe, revise and collect fees, tolls, rates, rentals or other charges in connection with garbage and refuse collection within the City of San Bruno.
Section 2. By its Ordinance No. 1701, this Council previously established comprehensive garbage and refuse rate structures. Ordinance No. 1701 is hereby re-
scinded and superseded.
Section 3. Notice of the rates established herein was given pursuant to Article XIII D, Section 6 (Proposition 218), a public hearing was held at which protests
were tabulated and it was determined that a majority protest did not exist under Article XIII D, Section 6(a)(2), the City Council found that the rates meet the requirements of Arti-
cle XIII D, Section 6(b), and the low-income discount program is funded from late penalties and not from rates paid by other ratepayers.
Section 4. The following rates for the collection of garbage and refuse are hereby established:
I. Monthly Residential (1-3 units)
Weekly Refuse and Recycling Services and Biweekly 96 Gallon Toter Waste Service Rate
Toter – 20 gallon (Includes 96 gallon green waste toter + biweekly service) $18.87
Toter - 32 gallon (Includes 96 gallon green waste toter + biweekly service) $24.34
Toter - 64 gallon (Includes 96 gallon green waste toter + biweekly service) $48.68
Toter - 96 gallon (Includes 96 gallon green waste toter + biweekly service) $73.02
Low Income 32 gallon (includes 96 gallon green waste toter + service) $18.26
Each additional 32 gallon (toter + service) $24.34
Additional 96 gallon green waste (toter + service) $7.37
Extra Bag (approximately 32 gallon) service $11.44 per pick up
II. Multi-Unit Residential (4+units)
Weekly Refuse and Specialized Recycling Services
Bins, Cans & Carts (4-99 units) $24.34/unit
Bins (100+ units) $23.12/unit
Bin Rental - 1 yard $30.61
Bin Rental - 2 yard $35.53
Commercial
Weekly Refuse and Specialized Recycling Services
Toter Monthly Rates:
Toter - 32 gallon, once per week pick up on weekday $30.94
Toter - 64 gallon, once per week pick up on weekday $61.88
Toter - 96 gallon, once per week pick up on weekday $92.82
Container Monthly Rates
P/U per Week 1yd 2yd 3yd 4yd 6yd
1 x per $ 129.85 $ 259.59 $ 361.75 $ 445.44 $ 612.86
2 x per $ 259.70 $ 519.18 $ 723.50 $ 890.88 $ 1,225.72
3 x per $ 389.55 $ 778.77 $ 1,085.25 $ 1,336.32 $ 1,838.58
4 x per $ 519.40 $ 1,038.36 $ 1,447.00 $ 1,781.76 $ 2,451.44
5 x per $ 649.25 $ 1,297.95 $ 1,808.75 $ 2,227.20 $ 3,064.30
Sat. p/u $ 195.10 $ 389.43 $ 542.63 $ 668.17 $ 919.31
Extra p/u $ 29.98 $ 59.89 $ 83.47 $ 102.80 $ 141.41
Bin Rental $ 30.61 $ 35.53 $ 38.77 $ 41.59 $ 44.67
IV. Debris Boxes (delivery and pick up included)
4 yard mini - Per day $160.14
6 yard mini - Per day $202.29
7 yard debris - 1-5 business days $387.70
16 yard debris - 1-5 business days $429.81
20 yard debris - 1-5 business days $471.99
25 yard debris - 1-5 business days $589.95
25 yard debris - Recyclables only $337.12
30 yard debris - 1-5 business days $684.35
Debris Box Hold-overs - After 5th Day 10% of rate per day
Compacted Garbage - Per yard $48.03
V. Special Disposal Services for Bulky Goods
Special disposal services of bulky goods shall be provided by Recology San Bruno at rates calculated by Recology depending upon
size, weight and means of disposal of items. Recology San Bruno shall make available a list of standard rates for frequently disposed of bulky
goods. Rates for special disposal services of bulky goods are subject to review and modification by the City Council.
VI. Inside Pull-Out Service
0 – 25 feet $7.70
VII. Key/Lock Service
Each use of a key (including key, keypad, combination lock, automatic door opener, or any other entry mechanism) is required to open
a lock or to enter or leave the premises, additional monthly charge of:
1 per week $8.80
2 per week $17.60
3 per week $26.40
4 per week $35.20
5 per week $44.00
Saturday $13.19
VIII. Excess Disposal/Overflowing Container Penalty
Service charge/penalty for excess disposal/overflowing container:
Per occurrence $12.51
Section 5. The City Council finds, pursuant to Title 14 of the California Code of Regulations, Section 15273, that this Ordinance is statutorily exempt from the re-
quirements of the California Environmental Quality act (CEQA) in that it deals with the establishment of rates and fees.
Section 6. If any section, subsection, sentence, clause, phrase, or portion of this Ordinance is for any reason held to be invalid or unconstitutional by the decision of any court
of competent jurisdiction, such decision shall not affect the validity of the remaining portions of this Ordinance. The City Council of the City of San Bruno hereby declares that it
would have adopted this Ordinance and each section, subsection, sentence, clause, phrase or portion thereof, irrespective of the fact that any one or more sections, subsec-
tions, sentences, clauses, phrases or portions be declared invalid or unconstitutional.
Section 7. This Ordinance shall be published according to law.
Section 8. The rates set forth in this Ordinance shall become effective 30 days after adoption.
The ordinance goes into effect 30 days after adoption. Please call the Finance Department at 616-7080 if you would like additional information or have any questions.
Certification and Posting: A certified copy of the full text of the adopted ordinance is available for public review in the City Clerk’s Office, 567 El Camino Real, in San Bruno,
California.
/s/ Carol Bonner,
San Bruno City Clerk
June 29, 2012
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250872
The following person is doing business
as: Coastside Bookkeeping Services,
8231 Pescadero Rd., LOMA MAR, CA
94021 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Carron Gomes, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
11/4/2002
/s/ Carron Gomes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251029
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Brehmer’s Handmade Candies, 2)
Brehmer’s Candies 126 Alvaravo St.,
BRISBANE, CA 94005 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cynthia
Brehmer, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/01/2007.
/s/ Cynthia Brehmer /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/21/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251047
The following person is doing business
as: California Association of Lubang and
Looc, 725 Kathryne Ave., SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: California Association of
Lubang and Looc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Sonia Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/22/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/23/12, 06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251035
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Burlingame Long Term Care, San
Mateo Rehabilitation & Wellness Centre,
3) San Mateo Healthcare & Wellness
Centre, 1100 Trousdale Dr., BURLIN-
GAME, CA 94010 is hereby registered
by the following owner: San Mateo
Healthcare Centre, LP, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/19/2012
/s/ Shlomo Rednitz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/20/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/27/12, 07/04/12, 07/11/12, 07/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251100
The following person is doing business
as: Dentu-Temps, 1149 Chestnut St #6,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: W. Kari
Hodges, 985 Sunset Dr., Santa Clara,
CA 95050. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ W. Kari Hodges /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/26/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/29/12, 07/06/12, 07/13/12, 07/20/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #251148
The following person is doing business
as: Jolly Junkman, 851 N. Amphlett Blvd.
#315, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Jo-
seph Michael Lamoureux, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Joseph Michael Lamoureux /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 06/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
06/30/12, 07/07/12, 07/14/12, 07/21/12).
203 Public Notices
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CLJ512133
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Jean Yi Aka, Jean Y Kim, Ri-
chard Chang and Does 1 to 10
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): JP Mor-
gan Chase Bank, N.A.
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
24
Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 “__ & Son”: “The
Bullwinkle Show”
feature involving
morality tales
6 Common 99-cent
buy
9 Rubbernecked
14 Brand pitched by
Bucky Beaver
15 Musical flourish
17 Printing error?
18 “Simply a patient
wolf”: Lana
Turner
19 Ones whose
business is going
down?
21 Crisper, e.g.
22 Unlikely remedy
23 Utah’s state
flower, e.g.
24 Farm male
27 Craigslist
condition
28 Unfriend?
29 Hit the roof
32 Hot stream
36 ’40s-’50s
Cleveland Indians
slugger
38 Setting for some
History Channel
programs
39 One coming
down
41 Like some airport
parking
42 Caribbean
music
43 Novelist Hoag
45 Reg.
46 Balkan Peninsula
peak
48 Game played with
two decks
51 All-around
vehicle, briefly
52 What excessive
volume might do,
facetiously
56 Couple’s
interaction
58 Restaurant
seating option,
perhaps
59 1995 film based
on an Elmore
Leonard novel
60 Sportswear
selections
61 1970s-’80s
Mantas, e.g.
62 First airline to
operate a
transpolar route
63 Slow on the
uptake
DOWN
1 Bugs
2 “Spartacus,” for
one
3 “Black Narcissus”
actor
4 Prelude to a
historic turning
point
5 Pacific island
nation
6 Team from
College Station,
Texas
7 Finish on top
8 Plywood cutter
9 Some nail
applications
10 Hydrocarbon
suffix
11 Debunked claims
that don’t go
away
12 Big chunk of
Christmas sales
nowadays
13 2006 NASCAR
Sprint Cup
Rookie of the
Year Hamlin
16 Key not used
alone
20 Hamm’s “Mad
Men” role
23 Some galleries
24 Way up a slope
25 It’s a crock
26 “You Learn”
singer
28 Game named for
a king
30 Dahl entrepreneur
31 Food stamp
33 Get lost
34 Neglect
35 Proceed
37 Fate of a bad
offer
40 Defense secretary
after Gates
44 Jolly Roger fliers
46 Expenditure
47 Be in hot water
48 Opponent of
Caesar
49 Halfhearted
50 Bewildered, after
“in”
52 Crib cries
53 __ blue: color
named for a
school
54 Boosts
55 Teaspoon, say
57 Night sch. staple
By John Farmer
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
06/30/12
06/30/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
203 Public Notices
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Harlan M. Reese, 118226, Joseph M.
Pleasant, 179571, Max A. Higgins,
270334, Dana N. Meyers, 272640
Reese Law Group,
6725 Mesa Ridge Road, Ste. 240
SAN DIEGO, CA 92121
(858)550-0389
Date: (Fecha) February 27, 2012
T. Judd, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND - Evan - I found your iPod, call
(650)261-9656
LOST - SET OF KEYS, San Mateo.
Reward. 650-274-9892
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST JUNE 12TH - Chain & pendant,
inscribed with “Grant Me the Serenity”,
(415)260-2930
LOST SIAMESE CAT on 5/21 in
Belmont. Dark brown& tan, blue eyes.
REWARD! (415)990-8550
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
210 Lost & Found
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
296 Appliances
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR GE, Black stainless
steel side by side, $300 (650)348-5169
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
STAINLESS ELECTROLUX dishwasher
4 years old $99 (650)366-1812
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new, SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
VIKINGSTOVE, High End beauitful
Stainless Steel, SOLD!
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
THULE BIKE rack, for roof load bar,
Holds bike upright. $100 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
"STROLLEE" WALKING Doll in Original
Box Brunette in Red/white/black dress
$25, (650)873-8167
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
3 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $40 for
all.(650)589-8348
67 OLD Used U.S. Postage Stamps.
Many issued before World War II. All
different. $4.00, (650)787-8600
AMISH QUILLOW, brand new, authen-
tic, $50. (650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard SOLD!
298 Collectibles
JIM BEAM decorative collectors bottles
(8), many sizes and shapes, $10. each,
(650)364-7777
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
MUCH SOUGHT after Chinese silver Fat
Man coin $75 (650)348-6428
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2”,
all $40., (650)518-0813
POSTERS - Message in a Bottle Movie
Promo Sized Poster, Kevin Costner and
Paul Newman, New Kids On The Block
1980s, Framed Joey McEntyre, Casper
Movie, $5-12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
RAT PACK framed picture with glass 24"
by 33" mint condition $60. (650)871-7200
SIGNED AUTOGRAPH Art and Gloria
Clokey, $40., (650)873-8167
STACKING MINI-KETTLES - 3
Pots/cover: ea. 6” diam; includes carry
handle for stacking transit. Unique.
Brown speckle enamelware, $20.,
(650)341-3288
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
‘50s RRECORD player Motorola, it
works $50 obo Sold!
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32” TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUDIO SPEAKERS, (2) mint condition,
works great, Polt stereo for computer,
TV, $10.00 both SOLD!
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HP COLOR Scanner, Unopened box,
Scan, edit, organize photos/documents
480 x 9600 DPI, Restores colors,
brightness, $40.00 (650)578-9208
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
NINTENDO NES plus 8 games,Works,
$30 (650)589-8348
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $50 (650)204-0587
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30” x 58”, light oak,
heavy, 1980’s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
304 Furniture
DESK SOLID wood 21/2' by 5' 3 leather
inlays manufactured by Sligh 35 years
old $100 (must pick up) (650)231-8009
DESK, METAL with glass top, rolls, from
Ikea, $75 obo, (650)589-8348
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all.SOLD!
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. SOLD!
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
SOLD!
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6’ x 2.5’, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
HAWAIIAN STYLE living room chair Re-
tton with split bamboo, blue and white
stripe cushion $99 (650)343-4461
KITCHEN/BAR STOOL wooden with
high back $99 (650)343-4461
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SIDECHAIR, WOOD arms & legs, Euro
sleek styling, uphol. seat cushion NICE
SOLD!
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TWIN BEDS (2) - like new condition with
frame, posturepedic mattress, $99. each,
SOLD!
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $30 each or both for $50. nice
set. (650)583-8069
VINTAGE WING back chair $90,
(650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
6 BOXES of Victorian lights ceiling & wall
$90., (650)340-9644
306 Housewares
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DINING ROOM Victorian Chandelier
seven light, $90., (650)340-9644
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FANCY CUT GLASSWARE-Bowls,
Glasses, Under $20 varied, call Maria,
(650)873-8167
IRONING BOARD $15 (650)347-8061
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
RONCO ROTTISERIE - New model,
black, all accessories, paid $150., asking
$75., (650)290-1960
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WE BUY GOLD
Highest Prices Paid on
Jewelry or Scrap
Michaels Jewelry
Since 1963
253 Park Road
Burlingame
(650)342-4461
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
SCNCO TRIM Nail Gun, $100
(650) 521-3542
STADILA LEVEL 6ft, $60
(650) 521-3542
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
4 DRAWER metal file cabinet, black, no
lock model, like new $5. SOLD
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
EPSON WORKFORCE 520 color printer,
scanner, copier, & fax machine, like new,
warranty, $30., (650)212-7020
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20 (650)871-7200
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS vintage
drinking glasses, 1970’s, colored etching,
perfect condition, original box, $25.
SOLD!
14 SEGA genius games 2 controllers
$20 (650)589-8348
20 TRAVEL books .50 cents ea
(650)755-8238
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
30 NOVEL books $1.00 ea,
(650)755-8238
3D MOVIE glasses, (12) unopened,
sealed plastic, Real 3D, Kids and adults.
Paid $3.75 each, selling $1.50 each
(650)578-9208
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes $100,
(650)361-1148
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AC/DC REFRIGERATOR - for RV or
Boat, 20” tall, 23” deep, 19” wide, $499.,
(650)580-3316
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SOLD
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
25 Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
310 Misc. For Sale
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 SOLD!
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5” long X 17”
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - “Fighting Aircraft of WWII”,
Jane’s, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CAR SUITCASES - good condition for
camping, car, vacation trips $15.00 all,
(650)578-9208
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
CLASSIC TOY Train Magazines, (200)
mint condition, educational, fun, instruc-
tions for building, photos, great hobby.
$25.00 (650)578-9208
CLEAN CAR Kit, unopened sealed box,
7 full size containers for leather, spots,
glass, interior, paint, chamois, $25.00
(650)578-9208
COLEMAN TWO Burner, Propane, camp
stove. New USA made $50 Firm, SOLD!
DELONGHI-CONVENTION ROTISSER-
IE crome with glass door excellent condi-
tion $55 OBO (650)343-4461
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FREE DWARF orange tree (650)834-
4926
FULL QUEEN quilt $20 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLF CART Pro Kennex NEVER USED
$20 (650)574-4586
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10), (650)364-
7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45”L, 20”W, 3”H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
JOHN K KENNEDY Mementos, Books,
Magazines, Photos, Placards, Phono-
graph Records, Ect. $45 all
(650)223-7187
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
MENU FROM Steam Ship Lurline Aug.
20 1967 $10 (650)755-8238
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $20
(650) 521-3542
ONE BOYS Superman Christmas Wrap-
ping paper $2., (650)873-8167
OUTDOOR SCREENS - New 4 Panel
Wooden Outdoor Screen, Retail $130
With Metal Supports, $85. obo, call Ma-
ria, (650)873-8167
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PLANT - Beautiful hybrodized dahlia tu-
bers, $3 to $8 each (12 available), while
supplies last, Bill (650)871-7200
QUEEN SIZE inflatable mattress with
built in battery air pump used twice $40,
(650)343-4461
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE Christ-
mas Wrapping Paper Retail $6 selling $2
each 6-7 yards, (650)873-8167
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TABLE CLOTH oval 120" by 160" with
12 napkins medium blue never used $25
(650)755-8238
TICKETS, BROADWAY by the Bay, (3)
Marvelous Wonderets Sat. 7/14; Chorus
Line Sat 9/22; Broadway by Year Sat.
11/10 Section 4 main level $80.00 all.
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
“TO THE MOON” The 1969 story in pic-
tures, text and sound. $35
(650)223-7187
TOILET SINK - like new with all of the
accessories ready to be installed, $55.
obo, (650)369-9762
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
TRUMPET VINE tree in old grove pots 2
@ $15 ea SOLD
UNOPENED, HARDCOVEED 556 page
BBQ book from many countries recipes
for spice rubs, sauces, grilling, photos
$12.00, SOLD!
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VICTORIAN DAYS In The Park Wine
Glasses 6 count. Fifteenth Annual
with Horse Drawn Wagon Etching 12 dol-
lars b/o (650)873-8167
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WOOD PLANT STAND- mint condition,
indoor, 25in. high, 11deep, with shelves
$15.00, (650)578-9208
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
JENCO VIBRAPHONE - Three Octave
Graduated Bars, vintage concert Model
near mint condition, $1,750.,
(650)871-0824
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - 2 cage
system with interconnecting tunnels,
Large: 9 1/2 x 19 1/2; Small 9 1/2 x 9
1/2, with water bottles, food bowls, exer-
cise wheel, lots of tunnels & connectors
makes varied configurations, much more.
$25., (650)594-1494
REPTILE CAGE - Medium size, $20.,
(650)348-0372
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BATHROBE MEN’S navy blue plush-ter-
ry and belt. Maroon piping and trim, 2
pockets. Medium size. $10., (650)341-
3288
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
316 Clothes
HARDING PARK mens golf dress shirts
(new) asking $25 (650)871-7200
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LEATHER COAT medium size (snake
skin design) $50 (650)755-8238
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MEN’S jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MEN’S PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING &
BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
WOMEN’S SUMMER 3 pc.SUIT:
blue/white stripe seersucker, jacket,
slacks, shorts, size 12, $10., (650)341-
3288
317 Building Materials
2 ANTIQUE Glass Towel bars $60 pair
(650)271-0731
3 FRAMLESS shower door 3/8th” thick,
25”x66”, 24”x70”, 26”x74”, $30 ea.
(650)271-0731
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
50 NEW Gray brick, standard size,
8”x4”x2” $25 obo All, (650)345-5502
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $50.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOOGIE BOARD, original Morey Boogie
Board #138, Exc condition, $25
(650)594-1494
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS - 155+, $19.
(650)766-4858 Redwood City
GOLF CLUBS - women RH complete set
W/ Cart & Bag used for only 5 lessons
like new $95 SOLD!
GOLF SHOES women's brand new Nike
Air Charmere size 7m $45 SOLD!
ICE SKATES, Ladies English. Size 7-8
$65 Please call Maria (650)873-8167
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE rack. Fits rectangular load
bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TREADMILL PROFORM 75 EKG incline
an Staionery Bike, both $400. Or sepa-
rate: $150 for the bike, $350 for the
treadmill. Call (650)992-8757
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
322 Garage Sales
BURLINGAME
ESTATE SALE
Entire Contents
Friday 6/29 &
Saturday 6/30
10am to 4pm
524 Francisco Dr.
Burlingame CA
94010
NEIGHBORHOOD
GARAGE SALE
Harbor Side Complex
Between Shell &
Beach Park
827 Spruce Ln.
Foster City
Saturday, June 30th
8:00 to 4:00
Furniture, Household
Items, Tools and More!
THE THRIFT SHOP
STORE-WIDE
CLEARANCE
50% OFF ALL SALES
10-2 pm Thurs. & Fri.
10-3 pm Saturday
Episcopal Church
1 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo 94401
(650)344-0921
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1550. 2 bedroom $1900.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
REDWOOD CITY- 1 Bedroom, all elec-
tric kitchen, close to downtown,
$1095./month, plus $700 deposit. Call
Jean (650)361-1200.
470 Rooms
FURNISHED ROOM for rent in Daly City,
$750., (650)773-1409
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
470 Rooms
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CADILLAC ‘93 Sedan $ 1,800 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
HONDA ‘10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
DATSUN ‘72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $3,600 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
PLYMOUTH ‘72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - ‘88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, SOLD!
635 Vans
1999 CHRYSLER Town & Country Van,
Runs Well $700 SOLD!
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
VAN GMC 92 van Dura 96K. Excellent
Condition. $2,500 obo (650)740-1743
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PROSPORT ‘97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
“WE FIX CARS”
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair • Restore • Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744 (650)349-2744
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085 (650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 RADIAL GT tires 205715 & 2356014
$10 each, (650)588-7005
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
67-68 CAMERO PARTS - $85.,
(650)592-3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
ALUMINUM WHEELS - Toyota, 13”,
good shape, Grand Prix brand. Includes
tires - legal/balanced. $100., San Bruno,
(415)999-4947
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8” diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. SOLD!
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors /
Building & Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484
www.risecon.com
L#926933
26
Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Pictures on Yelp
Qualifing
Special
flat & low
slope roofs
650-594-1717
Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Concrete
Construction
Construction
JOHN KULACZ CONSTRUCTION
Europena Quality! Worked in
San Mateo County for over 10 years,
20 years of experience
•INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR
REMODELING •KITCHEN •BATH
•DECKS, ECT.
(415)378-8810
email:
JKulaczConstruction@gmail.com
excellent references in SM County
license# 879568•insured, bonded
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at
(650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
Servicing Hillsborough,
Burlingame, Millbrae,
and San Mateo
We are a full service
gardening company
650 218-0657
to the
Burlingame
Leafblower
Law
Fully Compliant
Quality
Gardening
Gardening
J.B. GARDENING SERVICE
Maintenance, New Lawns,
Sprinkler Systems, Clean Ups,
Fences, Tree Trimming,
Concrete work, Brick Work,
Pavers, and Retaining Walls.
Free Estimates
Cell: (650) 400- 5604
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TOYOU.
FLOORING
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S
FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Window
Glass • Water Heater Installation
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting •Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
JON’S HAULING
Serving the Peninsula since 1976
Free Estimates
Junk and debris removal,
Yard/lot clearing,
Furniture, appliance hauling.
Specializing in hoarder clean up
(650)393-4233
Interior Design
REBARTS INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
SERVANDO ARRELLIN
Landscaping & Demolition
•Sprinkler systems • New fences
• Flagstone • Interlocking pavers
• New driveways • Clean-ups
• Hauling • Gardening
• Retaining walls • Drainage
(650)771-2276
Lic#36267
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIG’S PAINTING
• Interior & Exterior
• Quality Work w/
Reasonable Rates
• Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
GOLDEN WEST PAINTING
Since 1975
Interior/Exterior,
Complete Preparation.
Will Beat any
Professional Estimate!
CSL#321586
(415)722-9281
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plumbing
$69 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 898-4444
Lic#933572
Plumbing
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Flooring
Hauling
Construction
27 Weekend • June 30 - July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks,
tile, ceramic tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates • Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
JZ TILE
Installation and Design
Portfolio and References,
Great Prices
Free Estimates
Lic. 670794
Call John Zeriloe
(650)245-8212
Window Washing Window Washing
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Español
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specific directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
GULLIVER’S
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEAL’S COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave.
@ S. Railroad
San Mateo
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
Food
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way • San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
Health & Medical
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
Table Showers now available
One hour $50, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399 (650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
SPECIAL $10 OFF
SWEDISH MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
SUNFLOWER MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joe’s)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
YOU HAVE IT-
WE’LL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
• Gold • Jewelry
• Art • Watches
• Musical Instrument
• Paintings • Diamonds
• Silverware • Electronics
• Antique Furniture
• Computers • TV’s • Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Weekend • June 30- July 1, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
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t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
$â0
OFF ANY
ROLEX SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 7/31/12
WEBUY