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Harbour workers
exposed to harm
in handling coal
Charity patients
being eased out
in govt hospitals
CCP Statement
fgfdgkjfgjfhgfgf
Rebel’s jail transfer
tied to spy exposé
China sends patrol ships to Spratlys
De Lima, 15 others
accept nomination
Palace says Aquino won’t
use theatrics in speech
Pinoy taken
by militants
in Somalia
Plan to plunder tribe’s 51-ha ancestral domain in Agusan bared
Truce monitors. Indonesian Army soldiers, civilian sconflict-resolution experts salute during the welcoming ceremonies at the Indonesian Embassy in Makati
City. They will join a Malaysia-led international contingent safeguarding a ceasefire in Mindanao. Right photo shows presidential adviser on the peace process
Teresita Deles greeting Indonesian Ambassador to the Philippines Yohannes Kristiarto Soeryo Legowo. DANNY PATA
Not even a hanky. Coal workers do not wear
protective gear.
World’s largest. The Guinness Book of Records declared on July 1 that the Philippines’ saltwater crocodile, nick-
named “Lolong,” which measures 20.24 feet and weighs more than a ton, is the world’s largest in captivity.
How it’s done. A coal-fired power plant complex in Pagbilao, Quezon, (left photo) shows how coal is handled and stockpiled to protect the environment. Compare
the picture at right.
TODAY
Standard
Manila
Vol. XXVI No. 117 16 Pages, 3 Sections
P18.00 MONDAY, July 2, 2012
www.manilastandardtoday.com • mst@mstandardtoday.com
By Christine F. Herrera
PHOTOGRAPHS of the mountains of coal near
Manila Bay taken by Environment Department
staff on Friday and furnished the Manila Stan-
dard showed that the workers handling the coal
are being exposed to toxic substances because
there is no conveyor that would safely unload
the coal from the barges.
Unknown to Environment Management Bu-
reau Director Roberto Sheen, some members
of his team furnished the Manila Standard with
the pictures but asked not to be named out of
fear they would lose their jobs.
“We want the truth to come out. We will
not allow ourselves to be party to any cover-
up,” a member of Sheen’s team told the Ma-
nila Standard.
Malacañang has ordered The Environment
and Transport Departments to explain the moun-
tains of coal near Manila Bay and why those were
being allowed there.
By Macon Ramos-Araneta
A NATIONAL organization of doctors, nurses
and other health workers on Sunday said the
administration’s policy of privatizing health
care had reduced the number of charity pa-
tients being treated in government hospitals.
“We are challenging [Health Secretary En-
rique] Ona to come out with the number of char-
ity patients serviced by government hospitals,”
said Geneve Reyes, a doctor and secretary-gen-
eral of Health Alliance for Democracy.
“The number is becoming smaller and
smaller due to privatization.”
The Aquino administration’s universal
health care policy says public-private part-
nerships are the main engine for improving
health facilities.
By Florante S. Solmerin
COMMUNIST rebels on Sunday condemned
the transfer of Alan Jazmines, of one of their
consultants, from the police headquarters to a
regular jail in Camp Bagong Diwa in Bicutan,
Taguig City, for exposing the alleged pres-
ence of US Federal Bureau of Investigation
agents inside the national police headquarters
in Camp Crame.
“The Communist Party of the Philip-
pines condemns the arbitrary transfer of Alan
Jazmines,” the group said in a statement.
“Jazmines is a consultant of the National
Democratic Front of the Philippines in peace
negotiations.”
NAIROBI—Kenyan police and
military forces on Saturday pur-
sued Somali attackers and their
four foreign hostages, including
a Filipino, who were taken from
a refugee camp a day earlier, but
a police commander said it was
possible the group had crossed
into Somalia.
The commander, Philip Ndolo,
also said that a security escort had
originally been arranged to ac-
company a high-ranking delega-
tion from the Norwegian Refugee
Council, but that the aid group
decided at the last minute to travel
through the Dadaab refugee camp
without an armed escort.
CHINA has sent four patrol ships to a disputed
area of the South China Sea amid increasing
tension with Vietnam and the Philippines, state-
owned Xinhua news agency said Sunday.
The patrol ships, which Xinhua described as
surveillance vessels, reached Huayang Reef in
the South China Sea Sunday after sailing from
south China’s coastal city of Sanya on June 26.
The team was expected to travel more than 2,400
nautical miles during the patrols, Xinhua said.
China, Vietnam, the Philippines and other
neighboring countries have conflicting claims
over the South China Sea, including the Spratly
and Paracel islands, which are believed to be rich
in oil and gas deposits.
Vietnam’s state-run oil explorer last week
warned China to halt efforts to develop disputed ar-
eas of the South China Sea that Hanoi’s leaders had
already awarded to companies, including Exxon
Mobil Corp. and OAO Gazprom.
By Rey E. Requejo
THE number of people who have accepted their
nomination for chief justice climbed to 16 on Sunday
after Justice Secretary Leila de Lima said she had
accepted her nomination, and on the heels of acting
Chief Justice Antonio Carpio’s acceptance of his.
On the other hand, 16 nominees have rejected
their nomination, while four others have declined
and instead endorsed more senior justices.
The number of people who had accepted their
nomination reached 14 on Friday, but the total would
reach 16 once De Lima and Carpio had officially
informed the Judicial and Bar Council of their ac-
ceptance.
By Joyce Pangco Pañares
PRESIDENT Benigno Aquino III, who marked his sec-
ond year in office on Saturday, will employ visuals and
not theatrics for his third State-of- the-Nation Address
on July 23, deputy presidential spokeswoman Abigail
Valte said on Sunday.
“The President has no inclination for theatrics. Nor-
mally, the President sticks to visuals and not theatrics,”
Valte said.
“Visuals become the default [form of presentation].
But as to what kind of visuals, we do not know yet... The
The report, submitted in May by
the Anti-Illegal Logging Task Force,
claims that officials in the provincial
government and the regional office
of the National Commission on In-
digenous People-Ancestral Domain
Office could have been behind a
conspiracy to abuse the ancestral
Manobo land under
threat from loggers
Next page
Next page Next page
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By Florante S. Solmerin
GOVERNMENT officials are conniving
with illegal loggers and miners in the 51,000-
hectare Manobo Agroforestation Complex in
Agusan del Sur, a report submitted to Presi-
dent Benigno Aquino III says, the Manila
Standard learned Sunday.
home of the Manobo tribe.
From May 4 to 6, the task force’s
ground commander, retired Maj. Gen.
Renato Miranda, sent a team of in-
vestigators led by Sharon Quitzon to
validate information on the efforts by
some groups to drive the Manobos
away from their ancestral home.
Quitzon’s group found out that the
regional NCIP office had allowed un-
authorized tribal elders and other orga-
nizations represented by Datu Silon-
ganan Eddie B. Coguit to convert the
certificate of ancestral domain claim
under the name of Datu Haudun into
a certificate of ancestral domain title
that would grant them dispensation to
harvest, transport, process and sell re-
sources within the ancestral home.
Investigators also found that the
NCIP office had allegedly entered
into an agreement with Indonesia for
a mining project within the Manobo
Complex.
“The Manobo chieftain reports that
said the regional NCIP office had en-
tered into an unlawful mineral min-
ing agreement with Indonesia in their
CADC deserves further scrutiny ,” the
investigators said.
Quitzon also said some officials
News
ManilaStandardToday mst.daydesk@gmail.com JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A2
Gatdula’s lawyer says he’s
not speaking for the Iglesia
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LAWYER Abraham Espejo on Sunday
said his opinions on the matter of the
frustrated murder charges filed against
former NBI director Magtanggol
Gatdula were his own and not the Iglesia
ni Cristo’s.
“I was speaking only as a law-
yer of Director Gatdula and not
for the Iglesia Ni Cristo,” Espejo
said by phone, adding he was not
speaking for the Iglesia because he
was not authorized to do so.
“I am just a lawyer for Director
Gatdula,” he said.
“I have no authority to speak
for the [Iglesia] because I am not
the institution’s spokesperson.”
Espejo maintained that Gat-
dula was innocent of the charg-
es against him, and that they had
a “good line of defense.”
Justice Secretary Leila ac-
cuses Gatdula and his friend,
businessman Tyrone Ong, of
hatching the plan to liquidate
NBI lawyer Reynaldo Lasala
for stalling the payment of the
P150 million that the NBI owed
Ong.
Lasala and his brother, SPO2
Nilo Esmeralda, were ambushed
on Feb. 21, 2012 on their way
home but survived it.
Ong is connected with Stra-
tegic and Comprehensive Con-
sultants Inc., a company that
was in a joint venture with Real-
time Data Management Service
Inc., the service provider of the
NBI in its clearance project.
De Lima said Esmeralda had
ordered Strategic replaced and
refused to pay Ong.
Espejo said Gatdula was “ex-
tremely demoralized” after he
was tagged as the brains behind
the ambush of his former col-
league at the bureau.
He denied Gatdula’s involve-
ment in the ambush, and said his
client would do no such thing.
He said they would not stop un-
til they had proven Gatdula’s in-
nocence.
“We will pray and we will
face this before the courts of
law,” Espejo said.
Macon Ramos-Araneta
MINDANAO-BASED environ-
mentalists on Sunday expressed
disappointment over the continu-
ing illegal logging on the island
despite President Benigno Aqui-
no III’s Executive Order last year
declaring a moratorium on the
cutting or harvesting of timber in
natural and secondary forests.
They made the statement af-
ter forces from the National Bu-
reau of Investigation, the Coast
Guard and the Bureau of Cus-
toms seized around 55 container
vans containing undocumented
and illegally cut logs worth P16
million inside the Manila North
Harbor on Friday.
Environment Secretary Ra-
mon Paje had ordered the im-
mediate relief of 31 regional and
provincial officials for failing to
curb the illegal logging in East-
ern and Southern Mindanao and
the filing of administrative and
criminal charges against them if
warranted.
But environmentalist group
believed that the order for the
relief of regional and provincial
officials was not enough to stop
the nefarious activities of illegal
loggers since they were allegedly
in cahoots with local government
units, law enforcement agency
and DENR officials.
But the environmentalists
said a top-to-bottom revamp of
the Environment Department
was necessary because environ-
mental laws were being violated
and the principle of command re-
sponsibility must take effect.
Agham party-list Rep. An-
gelo Palmones has also called
for Paje’s relief for his alleged
failure to enforce environmental
laws.
Paje has said the relief of the
31 officials is part of his depart-
ment’s efforts to pursue good
governance.
He said his department had
already dismissed or suspended
32 employees, while 34 had been
charged with various offenses.
One-hundred-seventy-six others
were under investigation, he said.
Groups criticize illegal
logging in Mindanao
Rebel’s...
National police spokesman
Senior Supt. Generoso Cerbo
Jr. did not reply to questionson
Jazmines’ alleged transfer.
Earlier, Jazmines and some
of his fellow detainees claimed
that the FBI was holding office
inside the Custodial Center
as an extension of their con-
dominium office near Camp
Crame.
Cerbo, however, denied
Jazmines’ claim.
“The alacrity with which the
[National Police] carried out
Jazmines’ transfer shows that
it was likely carried out upon
the orders of US intelligence
officers who are actively op-
erating in the Philippines and
who wish to isolate Jazmines
and make him ineffective in
defending the cause of politi-
cal prisoners and exposing US
government intervention,” the
CPP said.
“US intelligence operatives
in the Philippines have been in-
creasingly active and working
closely with the [National Po-
lice] and the [Armed Forces of
the Philippines] in conducting
surveillance and counter-guer-
rilla combat operations against
Filipino anti-imperialist forces.
“The US has used the so-
called Balikatan exercises in
the past several years as a cam-
ouflage to set up its physical
and organizational espionage
network in the Philippines.
There are also plans to set up
a satellite office of the gestapo
New York Police Department
right inside the [police head-
quarters].”
The communists said the
rights group Karapatan would
also investigate reports that
Jazmines was being denied his
right to a legal counsel and was
prohibited from even calling
his lawyers.
Harbour...
Agham Rep. Angelo Palmo-
nes has accused Environment
Secretary Ramon Paje of allow-
ing businessman Reghis Romero
to stockpile the coal at the Har-
bour Centre Port Terminal and
the Manila Harbour Center.
He said the mountains of coal
were polluting the air and waters
of Manila Bay in violation of a
Supreme Court writ protecting
the bay.
Sheen on Saturday defended
Romero, saying his environ-
ment compliance certificate al-
lowed him to stockpile 40,000
metric tons of coal and not 40
metric tons, which was a typo-
graphical error.
Based on the photographs,
the coal on the bay was being
unloaded to 10-wheeler trucks
from the barges manually, and
the workers unloading it were
not wearing protective gear.
The workers were shoveling
the coal to the stockyard without
masks or gloves in violation of
the Supreme Court’s writ pro-
tecting the bay and some labor
laws, Sheen’s team said.
Some of the workers were
wearing boots, but others were
wearing only slippers and us-
ing only handkerchiefs to pro-
tect them from the coal dust, the
team said.
The same set of photographs
were also given to Palmones,
prompting him to decide to file
a resolution on Monday direct-
ing the House committees on la-
bor, ecology, transportation and
health to investigate Romero.
“Why are these government
agencies allowing unscrupulous
businessmen like Reghis Rome-
ro to expose our people and en-
vironment to harm and danger
when he can afford to provide
them with protective gear since
he makes billions out of his port
business?” Palmones said.
“Why are they allowing
Romero to mock and undermine
our laws, particularly brazenly
disregarding the Supreme Court
writ of Kalikasan that comes
with it a continuing mandamus?”
A continuing mandamus
means Manila Bay must be kept
clean as long as the bay.
Sheen’s staff said the moun-
tains of coal were also a fire haz-
ard because a spontaneous com-
bustion was waiting to happen
in the absence of sprinklers and
other safety measures.
The Manila Standard has
tried but failed to reach Romero
for comment.
Manila Harbour Centre has
said that, as a port, it has a permit
to handle coal and other break-
bulk cargo materials of its con-
cessionaires.
Sheen refused to comment
on the photographs taken by his
men and did not return the calls
made by the Manila Standard
even as he promised to do so af-
ter his “meetings” on Sunday.
His team said he went against
the department’s legal advise
not to attribute the violation to a
mere “typographical error.”
But Sheen said Romero was
allowed to stockpile coal as
much as 40,000 metric tons and
not 40 metric tons as indicated in
his ECC.
“We went to the Manila Har-
bour Center Port Terminal and
confirmed the presence of the
coal stockpiles,” Sheen had said.
“But the port terminal is al-
lowed to do so. We found out
that it was us that made a mistake
and committed a typographical
error in the environment compli-
ance certificate.
“We have rectified the typo-
graphical error. The 40 metric
tons was a mistake. It should
have been 40,000 metric tons.”
Angered by what he learned
and saw from the photos, Pal-
mones directed the Environment
Department to immediately sus-
pend Romero’s coal mountain
operations pending the result of
Palace...
need for visuals comes more or
less after the speech has been
concretized, and at this stage we
are just on the first draft.”
Former President Joseph Es-
trada gave Mr. Aquino a pass-
ing grade of “seven to eight” at
the weekend.
Valte said Mr. Aquino would
also be comfortable having his
predecessor, Pampanga Rep.
Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, in
Congress to listen to his speech
in the event she was allowed to
post bail. Arroyo under hospital
arrest as a result of the electoral
sabotage case filed against her.
“She is under detention,”
Valte said.
“We do not know if she will
ask permission
from the court to personally
attend the SONA. But she is
a representative of the Lower
House, so her right to be there
is a given.”
The Cabinet submitted the
first draft of Mr. Aquino’s speech
two weeks ago. Presidential
Communications Secretary Ra-
mon Carandang said it would be
a report to the Filipino people on
what the Aquino administration
had accomplished so far.
He was coy when asked if
the ouster of Chief Justice Re-
nato Corona would be included
in the speech. He said there
would be a “long back and
forth” process until the speech
was finalized, noting that last
year’s speech had 14 drafts.
“Normally, when you report
on what happened in the past
year, you report on the signifi-
cant accomplishment, so it is up
to you to decide whether you
feel that will be included.
“Let us just wait for the
draft... This is the report of the
President to the Filipino people,
to our bosses. We are going to
give a bit of an accomplishment
report, where we want to go
looking forward.
Charity...
As a result, 26 government
hospitals are being pushed to
“corporatize,” while various pri-
vate businesses have found their
way into the public health care
system.
But Reyes said privatiza-
tion would result in less and not
more access to health services.
“Our fears are coming true
now,” she told the Manila Stan-
dard.
“Look at what’s happening
at the PGH [Philippine General
Hospital]. Even those patients
under Category D, or those to-
tally incapable of paying, are
being made to pay. There are no
more charity patients.”
Reyes said that happened af-
ter a private hospital was built
inside the PGH compound, and
supposedly to augment its in-
come and services.
Instead of promoting the
commercialization and sale of
public hospitals, the President
should provide a meaningful
budget that will allow public
hospitals to fulfill their mandate,
Reyes said.
“But the PPP is his core pro-
gram, and he’s proud of it. He
even extolled it in a State-of-
the-Nation Address,” Reyes
said.
She recalled that it was Ona
who recommended the possibil-
ity of inviting foreign investors
in state-run hospitals at a PPP
conference in 2010.
In that conference, Ona an-
nounced that the Research Insti-
tute for Tropical Medicine in Al-
abang, Muntinlupa, San Lazaro
Hospital in Sta. Cruz, Manila,
the Philippine Orthopedic Hos-
pital in Quezon City, and other
government hospitals could be
placed under the PPP program.
Under the new profit-orient-
ed approach, even the East Av-
enue Medical Center in Quezon
City will not perform laboratory
examinations without pay, and
even in emergencies.
“We’re finding it more and
more difficult to refer indigent
patients or those who are ex-
tremely poor to our public hos-
pitals since we need money to
pay for everything,” Reyes said.
She chided the Aquino admin-
istration for making a business
out of government hospitals.
“They’re using government
hospitals to rake in money and
profits---contrary to the essence
in which government hospitals
were built to provide free servic-
es to poor patients,” Reyes said.
China...
Hundreds of Vietnamese
staged a demonstration in Hanoi
Sunday to protest China’s moves
to bolster its claim to disputed is-
lands in the South China Sea and
efforts to auction oil explora-
tion blocks in offshore areas that
Vietnam claims as its own.
Vietnam Oil & Gas Group,
also known as PetroVietnam,
said it would “unwaveringly
oppose” any foreign companies
that sign contracts with China to
explore for oil in the nine areas
being bid out by China.
The tender threatens to esca-
late tensions after Chinese ves-
sels last year cut the cables of a
PetroVietnam survey ship and
chased away a boat in waters de-
limited by the Philippines. The
blocks are the southernmost put
out for bid by China in about two
decades, according to Arthur
Ding, a research fellow at the In-
stitute of International Relations
in Taiwan.
“This is one way for China
to assert its maritime territory,”
he told Bloomberg last week.
“There’s probably more to come.
Domestic pressure was building
up so they had to do something.”
China, meanwhile said, it
would oppose any military prov-
ocation in its territorial waters
and protect its sovereignty.
De Lima
“I had a brief talk with the
President wherein he said he
will respect my decision to my
accept nomination for chief
justice,” De Lima said in a text
message on Sunday.
“What the judiciary needs is
an effective and trusted leader.
That, to me, is the call of the
times. I sincerely believe that, at
the minimum, I have my charac-
ter and resolve as a person, and
my track record and passion as a
public servant, to offer for such
a crucial and revered post.”
De Lima said she would send
her conforme to the Judicial and
Bar Council on the last day for
applying for or being nominat-
ed to the post of chief justice,
which is today.
De Lima has received the
most number of nominations for
chief justice. She was endorsed
by Volunteers Against Crime
and Corruption founding chair-
man Dante Jimenez, Bangsa
Moro Party chairman and La-
nao Sultan Firdausi Abbas, In-
tegrated Bar of the Philippines
Zambales president Christopher
Lawrence Monato, Civil Service
assistant commissioner Rogelio
Limare, former defense Secre-
tary Avelino Cruz, Court of Ap-
peals Associate Justice Francis-
co Acosta, and lawyer Reynaldo
Bagatsing.
De Lima has no experience in
the judiciary and is considered
an outsider in the high court,
but her the nominations have
cited her “utmost competence,
diligence, probity and indepen-
dence.”
President Aquino is said to be
considering appointing an out-
sider to the judiciary as the next
chief justice.
Still, various sectors have
expressed opposition to the ap-
pointment of a member of the
Cabinet or aspirants closely
identified with the President,
saying independence should be
the main qualification for the
post of chief justice.
Pinoy...
Norwegian Refugee Council
Secretary General Elisabeth Ras-
musson was present during Fri-
day’s attack but was not harmed or
taken.
Rasmusson said Friday that the
attack happened on a main road to-
ward the city of Dadaab in “what
is recognized as the safe part of the
camp.” She said four men with pis-
tols carried out the attack against
the two vehicles. The attackers
only took one of the vehicles.
The Norwegian Refugee
Council is not identifying the na-
tionalities of the four kidnapped
workers. But a security official
familiar with the case said that
two are from Canada, one from
the Philippines and one from
Norway. One of the Canadian
passport holders was of Pakistani
origin, the security official said.
After an attack on a Doctors
Without Borders convoy last year
in which two Spanish women were
abducted, some aid groups began
using security escorts in Dadaab, a
series of sprawling camps connect-
ed by sandy roads. But the Norwe-
gian Refugee Council did not have
guards on Friday.
“They had arranged the previ-
ous day [Thursday] with the un-
derstanding they would get some
security officers in the morning,,”
Ndolo said. AP
Manobo...
had lodged fabricated charges
such as illegal possession of
firearms and murder against the
Manobo chieftain and her hus-
band, Datu Bunanat Francisco
Hernandez.
“On the first night of our visit,
an emissary was sent to her [the
chieftain] and told her to just
agree to split the land in two so
that the conspirators will stop
their harassments because their
interest is solely to dig out the
gold underneath,” Quitzon said.
He said they had details and
identities “with substantive legal
documentation” of all the illegal
logging conspirators, politicians
and regional government officials,
which could only be disclosed by
the task force chairman, Environ-
ment Secretary Ramon Paje.
“Communal fear of eradica-
tion, harassment, sabotage over
control of the Manobo CADC
timber, the multi-million dollar
agroforestation complex invest-
ment, and the gold underneath
the land pointed to a conspiracy
orchestrated by the provincial
government of Agusan del Sur,”
the task force report says.
Agusan del Sur is part of the
Caraga region in Mindanao,
where rampant illegal logging
and mining remain unabated de-
spite a logging ban imposed by
President Aquino.
On Saturday, Mr. Aquino
sacked some environment offi-
cials in the Caraga Region, which
is made up of Agusan del Norte,
Agusan del Sur, Surigao del Norte
and Surigao del Sur, and Region
11, composed of Compostela Val-
ley, Davao del Norte, Davao del
Sur and Davao Oriental.
Fired were Region 13 execu-
tive director Leonardo Sibbaluca;
Region 11 executive director Jim
Sampulna; Musa Saruan and Har-
dinado Patnugot, technical direc-
tors for forestry in Region 13 and
11, respectively; Belo Udarbe,
Emelyn Garong, Domino Ca-
brera Jr., Marcia Isip, Gregorio
Lagura, and Julius Valdez, pro-
vincial Environment and Natural
Resources officers for Agusan del
Norte, Agusan del Sur, Surigao
del Sur, Davao del Norte, Davao
Oriental and Compostela Valley,
respectively.
Also relieved were commu-
nity Environment And Natural
Resources officers in Butuan City,
Tubay and Cabadbaran, Bayugan,
Bunawan, Loreto, San Francisco,
Talacogon, Cantilan, Bislig, Li-
anga, and Tandag towns, as well
as in Davao City, Baganga, Lupon,
Mati, Manay, Maco, Monkayo and
Nabunturan towns.
Paje said the officials would be
investigated and charged if war-
ranted.
Earlier, National Police chief
Gen. Nicanor Bartolome sacked
some commanders in the region
pending investigation as a result
of their inability to stop illegal log-
ging in their areas of jurisdiction.
Sacked were Agusan del Sur
Provincial Police Office Senior
Supt. Rodolfo Dasmariñas; Se-
nior Inspector Ronnel Bangal-
isan, Chief of Police of Esperan-
za; Senior Inspector Joel Liong,
Chief of Police of San Luis; Se-
nior Inspector Ehpraim Detuya,
Chief of Police of Talacogan;
Senior Inspector Wilson Corpuz,
Chief of Police of Loreto; Inspec-
tor Jesse Rey De Gracia, Chief
of Police of Las Nieves; Senior
Supt. Pedro Obaldo Jr., Chief of
Police of Butuan City.
Bartolome also required the
Caraga police director, Chief
Supt. Reynaldo Rafal, to shed
light on the inability of the units
under his command to stop ram-
pant illegal logging.
Also on Sunday, the Philip-
pine Ports Authority reported that
it had intercepted 51 containers
of illegal logs at the North Harbor
in Manila.
The seizure came as Interior
Secretary Jesse Robredo called
on local officials in Mindanao to
stop illegal logging, which is be-
lieved to be the cause of flooding
in the area.
PPA General Manager Juan
Sta. Ana, in a report, said the
intercepted containers were part
of the 55 containers shipped and
consigned to One Stop Logistics.
The company was able to fa-
cilitate the release of four out of
the 55 containers last June 28.
The 51 containers were still
being held at the North Harbor
at the request of the National Bu-
reau of Investigation, Sta. Ana
said.
The containers, which were
supposed to contain cement,
were shipped from Davao, pass-
ing through Cebu with the North
Harbor as its final destination. It
was shipped through the Lorcon
Dumaguete Shipping Line.
With Jonathan Fernandez
News
ManilaStandardToday
mst.daydesk@gmail.com JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A3
Police promotion rules eased
Mercury-laced cosmetics sold in mall
Sin taxes urged to finance public school clinics
Decision undermines
SC integrity, De Lima
Approved house bill hits online opposition
Holding the line. Childrens plays on the seawall of Brgy. Tanza , Navotas City, which used to be the pathway to an adjas-
cent squatter area. MANNY PALMERO
They’re back. A vendor at Badoc, Ilocos Norte fixes garlic displays that returned to roadside stores after several days of rain.
SONNY ESPIRITU
MEMBERS of the House of Repre-
sentatives asked the Aquino govern-
ment on Sunday to set aside a portion
of the “sin tax” collections to finance
and maintain first aid stations to 22.1
million public school students in the
country.
Aurora Rep. Juan Edgardo Anga-
ra, chair of the House Committee on
Higher Education, said tobacco and
liquor taxes can be used to hire health
personnel to improve the capability of
public school clinics.
Just five percent of the annual ex-
cise tax and value-added tax from
such products as gin and cigaretttes
will address the chronic lack of doc-
tors and medicines in public schools,
Angara said.
Records show schools have only
one doctor for every 147,000 students
and they have an annual medicine bud-
get of only P1.50 per student. Excise
tax and VAT proceeds from sin prod-
ucts are expected to hit P70 billion this
year and expected to soar to P100 bil-
lion annually once the bill increasing
the excise taxes is signed into law.
One of the reasons cited for the in-
crease in six taxes was to have more
money for health. Five percent would
put more doctors, nurses, dentists,
new equipment and stock of medi-
cines in school clinics.
Ifugao Rep. Teddy Baguilat, Chair-
man of the Committee on National Cul-
tural Communities, said the proceeds
from six taxes would provide alterna-
tive livelihood to tabacco farmers.
Agham party-list Rep. Angelo Pal-
mones, Vice Chairman of the Com-
mittee on Science and Technology,
supported Angara’s proposal because
it would entice doctors to stay in their
localities rather migrate to the cities.
In addition to the 22.1 millions
students, the public schools also have
about half a million teachers. The
Department of Education reported in
2008 that it has 3,254 medical offi-
cers, which include doctors, dentists
and nurses. Maricel Cruz
By Maricel Cruz
AN approved bill in the House of
Representatives seeking to lower the
minimum age of criminal liability of
youth offenders to 12 years-old met
stiff opposition from respondents in
its on-line survey, the House official
website said on Sunday.
It said 67 percent of 1,020 respon-
dents opposed the measure declaring
the minimum age for criminal liabil-
ity to be 12 to 15 although sentence
can be suspended and the youthful of-
fender to be committed to the custody
of the Social Welfare Department or
any duly licensed agency.
“A great majority of the respon-
dents who participated in the on-line
voting were not supportive of the
measure,” the website said.
The House approved on final read-
ing before it adjourned sine die last
month House Bill 6052, which seeks
to amend the Juvenille Justice and
Welfare Act of 2006. This Act states
that children with ages of 15 years old
and below and those above 15 years,
“who acted without discernment” are
spared from criminal liability.
Without discernment means the
children were unaware of the gravity
of their actions. But those accused of
serious crimes such as rape, robbery,
drug trafficking and other crimes
punishable by more than 12 years are
presumed to have acted with discern-
ment.
Gabriela party-list Rep. Luzvimin-
da Ilagan said the proposed amend-
ment would increase the number of
youth offenders in the country and
many aspects of the 2006 Act were
neglected such as setting up rehabili-
tation centers for youth offenders.
Social Welfare Undersecretary
Alicia Bala said the state must treat
youthful offenders not as hardened
criminals but as victims of circum-
stances beyond their control.
We should not be sending more
children to jail, she said.
By Rey Requejo
A DECISION by the Third Di-
vision of the Supreme Court
awarding P60 milion to a for-
eigner who worked in the coun-
try without permit was highly
irregular and it could undermine
the integrity of the high court
unless it was corrected, Justice
Secretary Leila de Lima said on
Sunday.
Endorsing to the Court a let-
ter from businessman Eulalio
Ganzon, De Lima said Austra-
lian Andrew McBurnie sought
damages for losing his job from
E. Ganzon, Inc but “he had no
working visa, and no employ-
ment permit, among so many ir-
regularities.”
“The decision will judicial-
ly legislate a rule allowing for-
eigners to work in the country
absolutely without need of an
alien employment permit and a
work visa, and effectively re-
voke all laws to the contrary,”
the letter said.
The 2009 Third Division de-
cision, written by now retired
justice Consuelo Santiago, was
based on the original ruling of
a labor arbiter who handled the
case. The National Labor Rela-
tions Commission (NLRC) later
overturned the decision.
McBurnie left the country
three years before the labor case
was filed and he never came
back. He also never appeared in
14 hearings heard by the labor
arbiter.
Ganzon said the Third Divi-
sion has denied his peititon for
reconsideration and asked the
Supreme Court en banc to re-
view the case, citing the findings
of the NLRC that there was “no
plausible reason to find legal or
factual basis to grant the claims
of complainant McBurnie.”
Ganzon said McBurnie was
not an employee but his busi-
ness partner in a hotel project in
Baguio City that did not take off
because of lack of funds and his
employment agreement with E.
Ganzon Inc was intended to sup-
port his application for an alien
employment permit, which he
never got.
He said McBurnie left the
Philippines for Australia two
months after the start of the al-
leged employment agreement
but despite these facts “La-
bor Arbiter Salimathar Nambi
awarded McBurnie $985,162
plus interest and damages of
P2 million and 10 percent at-
torney’s fees.”
“Moreover, the Labor Arbiter
rendered the decision based on
a psotion paper filed out of time
a year after the complaint was
filed by petitioner in absentia,”
Ganzon said.
The Eco Waste Coalition
pinpointed the Baclaran
Terminal Plaza in which
FDA banned products such
as whitening lotions and
creams were openly sold by
vendors.
“It’s high time that
unscrupulous traders face
the strong arm of the law for
selling hazardous products
laced with mercury,” said
EcoWate Coalition head
Manny Calonzo.
The FDA has banned at least
50 products for containing
mercury above the allowable
limit. The group has identified
By Ferdinand Fabella and Macon Ramos-Araneta
A watchdog group for toxic products asked the Food and
Drugs Administration (FDA) on Sunday to stop vendors sell-
ing mercury-laced cosmetics inside a shopping mall in Pasay
City, posing a danger to the health of consumers.
at least five products being
hawked inside the mall.
Inorganic mercurty found
in skin lightening soaps and
creams can damage the kidney.
It can also cause skin rashes,
skin discoloration, scarring
and resistance to bacterial
and fungal infections,
according to the World Health
Oganization.
Calonzo said the FDA
should close down stalls
selling the banned products and
force the mall managment to
ban importation, distribution,
and selling of cosmetics
with excessive amounts of
mercury.
“Unless and until the FDA
shows it means business in
combating this illegal trade,
the sale of these dangerous
products will not cease,”
Calonzo said.
“Mercury in soaps, creams
and other cosmetic proudcts
is eventually discharged into
the wastewater. The mercury
then enters the environment
and becomes part of the food-
chain as a highly toxic fish,”
he said.
Calonzo called on the FDA
to send a team of inspectors
to the mall and to confiscate
the banned products, issue a
notice of violation against the
shops and impose a temporary
closure order.
The banned products found
inside the mall were Jiaoli
Miraculous Cream, Jiaoli
7-Days Specific Eliminating
Freckle AB Set, Miss Beauty
Excellent Therapy Whitening
Cream (gold, blue and purple
color), and S’Zitang.
By Ferdinand Fabella
FOR the first time in six years, police officers
with the rank of major or chief inspector may
now be able to take an eligibility examina-
tion normally reserved for higher ranking of-
ficers, the National Police Commission said.
Napolcom Vice Chairman Eduardo Es-
cueta said the rank requirement has been
adjusted for the Police Executive Service
to maintain a steady pool of third-level eli-
gibles in the National Police.
Started in 2006, PESE is an annual eli-
gibility examination offered to third-level
ranks (senior superintendent or colonel and
higher) in the PNP.
PESE is originally a requirement for pro-
motion to the next higher rank for Senior Su-
perintendent (colonel), Chief Superintendent
(brigadier general), Director (major general),
Police Deputy Director General (lieutenant
general) and Police Director General.
Promotion to higher ranks, however, re-
quires possession not only of the PESE but
also of other qualifications such as educa-
tion, experience/time-in-grade and training,
Escueta pointed out.
Escueta said police chief inspectors and
superintendents (lieutenant colonels) may
now file their application for PESE, which
will be held on August 26.
“This innovation is aligned with the lower-
ing of the rank requirement for first and second
level eligibility exams adopted by the NAPOL-
COM earlier this year. We will accept applica-
tions until July 20, 2012,” Escueta said.
PESE has two phases- written examina-
tion and panel interview. Only those who
passed the written examination will go to the
next phase, according to Escueta.
VALENZUELA City Mayor Sherwin
Gatchalian assured business leaders that the
city government is investing heavily in edu-
cation with strong foundation in informa-
tion technology to produce highly employ-
able graduates.
Gatchalian, in a recent forum “Driving
Cost Efficiency, Maximizing Profitability:
The cost of doing business in the Philip-
pines”, told executives human capital de-
velopment is essential in keeping the coun-
try’s position as the global leader in the
lucrative business processing outsourcing
industry.
“The BPO employers, like call centers,
noted the industry demands a consistent
supply of quality graduates in order to sus-
tain its growth and remain competitive,”
Gatchalian said.
“All public high schools in the city are
equipped with top-of-the-line Internet-con-
nected computer laboratories,” he said, add-
ing that teachers and administration staff
undergo periodic training with Synergia
Foundation and Temasek Holdings of Sin-
gapore. Gigi Muñoz David
Valenzuela
banks on
education
Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A4
WITH little fanfare—or concrete
achievement—President Benigno
Aquino III marked his second
year in office. Befitting this lack
of accomplishment, there were no
activities to mark the milestone,
no meetings to assess what had
gone before and what more needs
to be done.
Of course, the President will
trumpet his “achievements” at
the yearly State-of-the-Nation
Address later this month, focusing
on “genuine and meaningful
change” under his “straight path”
policy, a Palace spokesman said
over the weekend.
To this list, the President will
indubitably add the ouster of the
chief justice—whose main sin was
the Palace perception that he was
too close to the former President,
whom Mr. Aquino has managed to
detain under house arrest—to his
other major accomplishment to date.
The chief justice’s other great
sin was the temerity to stand
up to the President, exhibiting
a type of judicial independence
that Mr. Aquino clearly will not
brook. From this perspective, Mr.
Aquino’s great achievement has
been to place an erstwhile equal
branch of government under the
Executive’s thumb.
There have been other minor
“achievements,” none of which
has truly moved this nation toward
economic development.
First, there has been the mind-
boggling expansion of a dole
program for the poor that essentially
uses taxpayer contributions to
reward people for not working.
Under Mr. Aquino’s watch, the
conditional cash transfer program
has ballooned from only P10 billion
in 2010 to P21 billion in 2011 and
to P34 billion in 2012. If the rubber-
stamp Congress behaves according
to its craven pattern, this will rise
to P45 billion in 2013.
But even the administration’s
leftist allies have attacked the
program for turning this country
into a “Republic of Mendicants
and Beggars” by mobilizing hard-
earned taxpayers’ money into a
national charity fund instead of
creating jobs, implementing social
justice driven by land reform, and
providing the country the much
needed resources for education,
social services and mass housing.
In his last two years in office, Mr.
Aquino has also successfully soured
the country’s relations with China,
a major trading partner, first by
ignoring its calls for justice during
the embarrassing Luneta hostage
crisis in which eight Chinese tourists
were killed as a result of official
police bungling, and then by acting
belligerently in the disputed West
Philippine Sea, with no resources to
back his tough talk.
Of course, the President will also
point to the latest 6.4 percent growth
in the gross domestic product without
mentioning that it comes in the
wake of four consecutive quarters
of lackluster performance, or the
fact that in the last two years, the
administration has done so little to lay
the basic infrastructure for growth.
The Burmese Nobel Peace Prize
laureate Aung San Suu Kyi, who
lived under house arrest for almost
15 years from 1989 to 2010, was
recently asked if she could forgive
the military leaders who were
responsible for her incarceration.
Her reply was clear and simple: in its
post-authoritarian future, her country
needed to focus on “restorative”
rather than “retributive” justice.
Sadly, Mr. Aquino, who has
suffered no such abuse in his own
unremarkable career, seems to
be going the other way, forgoing
honest-to-goodness efforts to
rebuild the country for a single-
minded campaign to repay old
political debts. No wonder we have
little to show after two years.
Two wasted years
The icon
TODAY, the second of July, thousands
of pilgrims will, as they have done
unceasingly in the past, congregate in
Piat, a rather nondescript municipality
of Cagayan, there to venerate at the
Shrine of Our Lady of Piat. To this
shrine, the Vatican has conceded the
title “basilica minore”. It is the revered
image of Our Lady of the Visitation
(historically, Our Lady of the Most
Holy Rosary) that will be at the center
of the devotion of the pious. “To Piat”,
Monsignor Domingo Mallo, one of the
most learned priests
the Archdiocese of
Tuguegarao ever
had, once said,
“the Cagayano
will come with his
trophies or with his
wounds.” But not
Cagayanos only, but
a fair representation
of “el pueblo
amante de Maria...
the nation in love
with Mary”. The
image enshrined
in Piat is a 400-year-old statue, said
to have originated from Macau—
where the Dominican Friars were in
the colonial period and taken first to
Lallo, then the seat of the Diocese
of Nueva Segovia. It is often talked
about as a “miraculous image” because
the devout will bear witness to the
prodigies, through years, worked at
Piat after those in need had sought the
prayers of “Y Yena Tam”...Our Mother.
That of course justifiably causes, at the
very least, the eyebrows of the more
critical to rise inquiringly because that
comes very close to attributing power
to a statue. But all who know Piat and
what goes on there will know that those
bent in supplication are able, in their
simplicity, to recognize that strength
and power come not from wood or
stone—as Catholics are so often
unfairly (ignorantly, perhaps) accused
of believing—but from the prayers of a
simple Galilean woman who, by God’s
design, is “blessed among all women”
and “the mother of my Lord”.
There is,to be sure, plenty of
attachment to the image and an
abudance of reverence for the icon
(that, for purposes of this piece, I
will not distinguish from a statue,
to the consternation of students of
iconography). It is said that there
were rumors of civil disturbance when
Spanish friars sought to return the
image from the Itawes Region (where
Piat is) to Lallo. But are we not like
that? Do we not revere objects that
we know fully well to be bereft of life
or power? The reverence with which
we will not allow the flag to touch
the ground easily comes to mind, as
does the ceremony attending wreath-
laying at the Rizal Monument by
visiting dignitaries—many of whom
may not have the faintest idea of who
Rizal was!
Jean Luc Marion develops a
unique philosophy of God using as
key concepts “idol” and “icon”. I do
not claim to paraphrase him here, but
to distinguish between “icon” and
“idol” provokes thought. An idol
is the truncation of the Holy. IT is
holy. Incense burned before an idol
is FOR it. Paradoxically then because
it is an object among other objects, as
Holy, it is evanescent. To capture the
Holy is to miss it, and that, exactly, is
what an idol attempts to do. An idol
makes it easy to pray because one
HAS an idol, but one never has God
or the Divine. Very like the magic
word, it is the attempt to harness
Divine power, to reduce to sameness
the total otherness of the Holy! The
icon, by contrast, presents itself, but
erases its presence. It is painted or
crafted because the Holy has irrupted
into the human horizon, but it always
effaces itself because the icon is not the
Holy, the statue is not divinity. Ever
maintaining the cadence of erasure,
the devotee will kiss the statue, will
pray before the
icon, but will
allow the otherness
of the Divine to
cause the authentic
movement of
t r a ns c e nde nc e .
An idol never
summons; the icon
allows the summons
to resound and to be
remembered. One
looks at an idol; but
one is invited by the
icon to look beyond
it! Those religions are to be respected
that reject all forms of representation.
But there will always be some kind
of icon or sacred symbol in them: a
sacred book, a sacred verse, a sacred
place —even sacred calligraphy, and
whatever it is, it will receive the same
kind of veneration religions that keep
icons give theirs! That is merely
a restatement of the rather paltry
proposition that we are beings for
whom sensation is fundamental!
“The miraculous image of Our
Lady of Piat”—that is the simple
soul’s way of putting what we, who
put on airs of speculative thought,
will articulate in a more roundabout
manner: A world suffused with the
Divine is always a world of miracles,
a world summoned to the best and the
most sublime that it can be. But there
is something different about Piat,
because there are indeed some spots
on this earth of intense experiences
of the Holy: Sinai, Mount Moriah,
Mecca, under the Bo Tree, the
Ganges River, Jerusalem, Calvary,
Fatima and Lourdes, etc. There will
be constant need for catechesis, of
course, because enthusiasm blurs
lines that should be kept distinct,
and there will always be need for the
critical moment, because fanaticism
is the bane of all true religion and
idolatry is a constant curse!
With that rather lengthy preface,
I can sincerely and earnestly invite
my fellow devotees to participate
in the Eucharistic Celebration the
heart of which is always a Magnificat
to the greatness of God....My soul
doth magnify the Lord! I have been
requested by my Tita Mameng, Dna.
Carmen Carag, to announce to all
devotees of our Lady of Piat who
cannot make it to Piat this year that the
Mass commemorating the Visitation
will take place at the Sto. Domingo
Church, Quezon Avenue, on July 7,
Saturday at nine in the morning.
rannie_aquino@sanbeda.edu.ph
rannie_aquino@csu.edu.ph
rannie_aquino@yahoo.com
EDITORIAL
No more excuses
A FEW weeks ago, a major local
television network aired an episode which
showcased the proliferation of “cheap”
medicines from China being openly
peddled at the Divisoria market.
The TV program underscored the
very same concern that we, and other
media colleagues, have raised in print
media: the proliferation of medicines
imported from Pakistan, India and
China, the safety and efficacy of which
are highly questionable.
The show validated and confirmed
many of the issues we raised, among
them, that these imported medicines—
peddled as “cheap”—have been brought
to the country by traders and have not
been tested in laboratory in the country.
If we remember correctly, the TV
show’s producers did get the side of the
local Food and Drugs Administration.
The latter was asked why these suspicious
imported “cheap” medicines have been
allowed to flood the local market. The
FDA answer: It does not have enough
manpower. Not enough to police and
stop the proliferation of pharmaceutical
products that can very well put the health
and life of poor Filipinos at serious risk.
This is a very sad admission from
the FDA. By virtually admitting that it
is useless in this situation, it has placed
the entire government in an awkward
situation. The public cannot now help but
feel that the government cannot protect
ordinary Filipinos with limited financial
resources from the danger posed by
unscrupulous businessmen who flood the
local market with untested imported drugs
for the sake of margins.
Of course, for many, the issue is not so
much FDA’s manpower. It is whether the
agency has the will.
The FDA’s admission on television
may have raised further the level of
the public’s nervousness regarding
“cheap” imported medicines. This is
understandable—the countries where
they come from have long been reeling
under the misery of major scandals.
As earlier mentioned by our media
colleagues, some 100 people died not
too long ago in Pakistan in the aftermath
of a major pharmaceutical industry
scandal. This was triggered by the fatal
contamination of a medicine for the heart.
In China, people were shocked to
find out that a number of pharmaceutical
products were contained in capsules that
had high and toxic levels of chromium—
the very same substance that coated the
Terra Cotta warriors.
In India, the latest scandal which
exploded just over a month ago was the
finding that its own regulatory agency—
the Drug Controller General—had been
approving licenses for pharmaceutical
productswithout the mandatory clinical
trials for over two years .
That anomaly was uncovered by the
Indian Parliament itself. It found out that
the chief Indian regulator had approved
“an overwhelming number of drugs
without any scientific evidence”.
Pakistan, India, and China—these
are the same countries from which local
traders source the “cheap” imported drugs
being sold to Filipino patients desperately
in need of a cure for their illnesses with
the little money they have.
This is the tragic situation which FDA
says it is too helpless to stop.
Helpless, because it does not have the
manpower. Helpless, because its leaders
probably do not have the will.
FDA’s virtual surrender to the forces
that flood the country with cheap imported
drugs with questionable safety and quality
may have also further underscored the gap
between the rich and the poor.
The rich buy their medicines from
established outlets which will never sell
contaminated or toxic products. These
establishments won’t risk their reputation.
They will always make sure their products
are safe and effective.
The poor will always go for what is
“cheap”. Medicine is not a priority item
in their household budget. So, they will
scout for hole-in-the-wall outlets where
the cheap Pakistani, Indian and Chinese
medicines are being sold, hoping that what
they are buying are safe and effective.
They know there is no guarantee, but
what can they do and what choice do they
have?
Here comes government’s duty to
protect the poor. Here is an area where the
poor cannot protect themselves.
Who’s going to provide poor Filipinos
with protection from imported drugs that
come from countries rocked by scandals
concerning the very safety and quality of
their pharmaceutical products ?
It’s supposed to be the FDA.
Now that the FDA has confirmed that it
does not have the capability—and perhaps
the will—to provide that protection, who’s
going to look after our poor countrymen?
Should we tell them to look out for
themselves?
That may lead to another question: ano
pa ang kabuluhan ng gobyerno (for what
else is the government there)?
Of what use is government if it cannot
protect the poor?
Our food and drug officials better
answer that question.
ALVIN
CAPINO
COUNTER-POINT
FR. RANHILIO
CALLANGAN AQUINO
PENSÉES
Do we not revere
objects that we
know fully well to
be bereft of life or
power?
ROLANDO G. ESTABILLO Publisher
RAMONCHITO L. TOMELDAN Managing Editor
CHIN WONG/ RAY S. EÑANO Associate Editors
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JOEL P. PALACIOS City Editor
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JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A5 Opinion Adelle Chua, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
mst.lettertotheeditor@gmail.com
I DID not expect to receive an avalanche
of emails in reaction to my article in
this column entitled “An alarming
House Bill.” In that article, published
on June 4, 2012, I wrote that there is a
consolidated measure in the House of
Representatives seeking to amend the
Milk Code and the Expanded Breast-
feeding Promotion Act of 2009. Those
who emailed me expressed disgust and
anger over the bill which will effec-
tively weaken the mandate of the Milk
Code and the Expanded Breastfeed-
ing Act and will doubtless favor milk
manufacturers.
One female doctor, in her email,
said that this measure by Congress is
very frustrating as it defeats the very
essence and the spirit of the Milk
Code. She said that she was one of
those who fought for the approval of
the Revised Implementing Rules and
Regulations of the
Milk Code which
was challenged all
the way to the Su-
preme Court. She
said she saw with
her own eyes how
strong the interfer-
ence was from poli-
ticians and the milk
manufacturers. The
victory of the De-
partment of Health
in getting the re-
vised IRR declared
constitutional by
the Supreme Court
was a victory for
the generations of Filipinos to come,
she said.
And, indeed, the doctor—who re-
quested that I withhold her name—
cannot be more correct. Infant for-
mula and artificial milk products can
never match the nutritional value and
health benefits of breast milk. Worse,
the wrong use of milk formula or its
contamination can lead to infant dis-
eases which can be fatal. Among poor
families, for instance, because of the
steep cost of milk formula—which
can be as much as P1,700.00 per can
—milk is diluted with more water
than prescribed. Often, water used
is not even purified and the feeding
bottles and nipples are not properly
sterilized. Sometimes, mothers in
poor families use condensed milk or
evaporated milk to feed their infants
because these are much cheaper. Ob-
viously, these milk products do not
contain the nutrients needed by an in-
fant to attain full physical and intel-
lectual development. No wonder an
estimated 16,000 children around the
world die from illnesses and compli-
cations each year caused by improper
feeding practices and the use of in-
fant formula.
A strong Milk Code is needed,
therefore, to encourage nursing
mothers to breastfeed their babies for
36 months, even longer. Our pres-
ent Milk Code and the Breastfeed-
ing Act of 2009 are good laws in that
they prohibit milk manufacturers
from giving away samples of milk
formula in health centers, nurseries
and hospitals. This is crucial because
even when mothers desire to start, or
to continue, to breastfeed, they will
naturally stop producing milk as soon
as their babies are also fed with ar-
tificial milk formula. Nature has en-
sured that a mother will continue to
produce milk for as long as she con-
tinuously breastfeeds.
Under the present laws, the milk
manufacturers are mandated to put bi-
lingual (English and Filipino) literature
—stating that mother’s milk is superior
—in milk cans or boxes. The instruc-
tions for use of milk products are also
required to be in these two languages.
Very significantly, too, the present laws
provide that nursing employees shall
be entitled to lactation breaks, in addi-
tion to breaks for meals, to breastfeed
or express milk at certain times during
office hours. For an eight-hour period
of work, lactating mothers are entitled
to breaks totaling 40 minutes which
shall be compensable.
The consolidated bill will consid-
erably weaken the Milk Code and the
Expanded Breastfeeding Act of 2009.
For one, it will narrow down the
application of the Milk Code from
36 months to only six months, thus
weakening it. Also, the bill removes
the entitlement of lactating mothers
to breastfeed or
express milk dur-
ing work hours.
Then, too, the bill
will now allow,
once again, milk
companies to give
away free samples
of artificial milk
products in the
health care system.
The consolidated
bill also lifts the
requirement that
instructions for use
be written in two
languages. What
is perhaps most
damaging is that the bill allows ar-
tificial milk manufacturers to get in-
volved in educational activities and
the production of materials relating
to infant and young child care and
nutrition. Naturally, this will ensure
the entry of artificial milk products
in the mainstream of children’s care
and nutrition through the industry’s
creative promotions and advertising.
Many who emailed me said that
the sponsors of the bill stand on du-
bious grounds. They asked: What
motivated Representatives Lani Mer-
cado-Revilla, Lucy Torres-Gomez,
Magtanggol Gunigundo, Rufus Ro-
driguez and Josephine Lacson-Noel
to want to amend the present laws on
breastfeeding?
The bill has been approved in the
Committee level and is set to be pre-
sented for approval by the plenary.
Party list representatives Raymond
Mendoza and Luz Ilagan have vowed
to oppose the bill. Advocates of breast-
feeding promise to closely watch Con-
gress and to remember during election
time those who will thrash the present
laws in favor of the multi-million dol-
lar milk industry rather than the babies
who do not have the capacity to speak
for themselves.
As for me, I cannot help remember-
ing what the internationally-known
speaker on women fs health and well-
ness, Dr. Christiane Northrup, said:
“Thinking that baby formula is as
good as breast milk is believing that
30 years of technology is superior to
three million years of nature’s evolu-
tion. ”
Emai l : ri t al i ndaj @gmai l . com
Visit: www.jimenolaw.com.ph
Amending
the Milk Code
Hard times at sea
BONG C.
AUSTERO
ARE WE THERE YET?
STILL lost in the seas off Bolinao,
Pangasinan are the intrepid fishermen
whose boat was either sunk by a big
wave or a bad ship.
Amid this confusion, one fact
is also missing in the reportage of
their disappearance: The reason the
fishermen were there.
There is more to describing the
tragedy than a hit-and-run caper in the
high seas or a banca the size of a banana
trunk meandering into a busy nautical
highway in the middle of what is fast
becoming a Chinese lake.
What should dawn on us all is
that the experience of their Bolinao
brethren typifies the struggle of the
Filipino fishermen – and that is they are
venturing farther and farther into the
sea for fewer and fewer catch.
From the bow of a ship or from
the bridge of a ship of state, one
outrigger canoe with four souls may
look like specks indistinguishable
from rest of the flotsam. Still, their
story should beep loud in the national
radar so as to lock our attention to
their plight.
The larger context is that fish are
getting hard to catch and those caught
are getting more expensive.
A trip to city markets would bear
this out. Twenty years ago, they were
showcases of the richness of our marine
life. They were a sight to behold and
when bought didn’t hurt the pocket
Today, farmed fish like tilapia
and bangus are the main staple, giving
the fish section of our markets a
homogeneous look.
Even galunggong, whose price once
upon a time was used as the bellwether
of economic stability, had long
shed its masa credentials and with
its price has been elevated to rock star
status.
In the June 28 market monitor
issued by the government, “GG” and
alumahan were fetching P140 per kilo
in Metro Manila
Tuna? Forget about it—it has
become royalty. Lapulapu is a
jetsetter, rushed to distant shores where
it can command a better price. Crabs
have become a mentality and no longer
an affordable delicacy.
The only fish affordable to the people
now come in cans. But not so long ago,
prices of sardines also shot up when
they became scarce due to overfishing
in the waters west of Mindanao.
Down south of that island, the busy
tuna highway near Indonesia is seeing
less traffic.
For subsistence fishermen, the times
are as hard as choppy seas.
One of the greatest ironies I have
repeatedly witnessed is that of an
ordinary fisherman borrowing money
so he can buy a can of sardines to feed
his brood.
The inconvenient truth is that fish
is no longer the Filipino’s only cheap
source of protein. There is a marked
shift to poultry as the latter is cheaper
than fish.
When it comes to eating preferences,
it is the pocket over the palate for the
Filipino. So it comes as no wonder
that Filipinos now spend a measly five
centavos for every peso budgeted for
food on fish.
And when smuggled chicken
quarters land here at P60 per kilo,
despite the fact that they were trucked
and then shipped in refrigerated vans
from halfway across the globe , and yet
ends up cheaper by 75 percent than a
squid fished near the shore, then there
is really something wrong with our fish
stocks.
When a kilo of lamb raised in some
Australian outback is cheaper than a
kilo of locally-caught tangigue, then
make no mistake about it: Our fisheries
are languishing in ICU.
Yet despite the expensive price of
seafood, our fishermen are far from
living like Colossuses of the sea. On
the contrary, nine in ten of them lead
marginalized lives.
In fact, the payroll of the
government’s cash dole program
consists of a chockfull of indigents who
live by and off the sea.
There is no unfathomable mystery
here. What is clear is that fishermen
have to spend more money (gas) to
spend longer hours in overfished,
ecologically-damaged seas only to end
up with a meager catch which can never
recoup the cost of the fishing trip.
In one study, it was found that up to
80 percent of the selling price of fish
represents fuel charge.
For fear of returning to
shore emptyhanded, the Bolinao
fishermen probably believed that
only by losing sight of the coast and of
the dangers will they be spared of the
misfortune of sailing back more poorer
than the day they set sail.
Multiply this story hundreds of
thousand times a day. And that is the
sum of all our fishermen’s fears .
By Adam Minter
AT 6 a.m. on Wednesday, residents
rushed out of a Shanghai housing
compound and discovered the bloody
aftermath of the latest episode in what
may be China’s most ancient and
intractable conflict: the war between
mother-in-law and daughter-in-law.
In this case, the carnage was
particularly ferocious. Two women,
a 60-year-old mother-in-law, and her
five-month pregnant daughter-in-law,
left a trail of blood from the building
to their respective ambulances. The
supposed cause of the bloodshed
became an immediate Internet
sensation:
At the hospital, administrators
allowed television cameras to film
the battered faces and bodies of the
injured women as they mumbled
their grievances. From her stretcher,
the daughter-in-law insisted that her
mother-in-law had used her hammer
on herself before turning on her
pregnant in-law. The mother-in-law,
meanwhile, recited a litany of claims
against her daughter–in-law, the most
serious of which is that she wasn’t
filial - that is, that she failed to show
the respect due an elder relative.
None of this—except the
extremity of the violence—comes as
a surprise to most Chinese. Online,
the topic of mother-daughter-in-law
conflicts is omnipresent, appearing
incessantly on advice forums, blogs
and microblogs, and is developed at
great length on sitcoms and dramas.
A pessimistic view of mother/
daughter-in-law relations doesn’t
belong exclusively to insomniacs
and Internet addicts.
Historically, when a young woman
goes to live with her husband’s family,
she’s expected to maintain her own
family name. However, far from
being a signifier of independence, the
maintenance of that identity was (and
perhaps is), a signifier of outsider
status, even after children are born.
Likewise, a maternal grandmother is
commonly referred to as the “outside
grandmother.” A daughter-in-law’s
place (and that of her family) is never
certain, and traditionally second-class.
As an outsider, the daughter-in-law
is expected to provide grandchildren,
demonstrate filial respect and serve
the mother-in-law. Chinese literature
is filled with examples of how to
do this, as is contemporary Chinese
media. For example, in 2011,
several Chinese media outlets ran a
hagiographic piece on an 80-year-old
widowed daughter-in-law who had
devoted the (presumably) last years of
her life to serving her mother-in-law.
“Although Tao is now 80 years old,
in order to give her mother-in-law a
better life she continues to work in
the fields, and collects used goods to
sell every day, the English-language
China Daily wrote approvingly.
China’s rapid economic and
social development over the last
decade has put under stress what was
once the well-defined, traditional
status of mothers-in-law. Ironically,
many of those stresses have to do
with the rising status of women in
contemporary China. No longer is a
young woman expected to go and live
in her in-law’s home; rather, she’s
capable of having her own career, as
well as a period of social development
independent of her husband and his
family. That’s a striking contrast
to the generations of women who
came of age before China’s gradual
economic and social opening in the
1980s, and an occasional cause of
conflict.
However, in the popular
imagination, those who belong to the
post-1980s generation are known as
much for being spoiled and selfish
as they are for being independent. In
large part, this is the result of China’s
so-called one-child policy, and the
advantages and pressures that a
nation of only-children produces.
Last week, Chinese media reported
that the country’s divorce rate rose
7.3 percent in 2011. No statistics
were provided on why the rate rose,
but in recent years several studies
have alluded to extramarital affairs as
the primary cause. Anecdotes relayed
by state-owned media, among other
places, aim to show that poor mother-
daughter-in-law relations are among
the top causes.
For example, last week, the
party mouthpiece People’s Daily
republished a February article from a
small, regional paper that condemned
“spoiled members of the post-80s
generation (with divorce rates that
range as high as 40 percent) for the
breakdown in traditional values—
and thus soaring rates of broken
marriages. The original headline,
as published in the Xi’an Evening
News, summarizes the argument:
“The Primary Cause of Divorce in
the post-80s Generation: mentally
immature, irresponsible, and lacking
in patience.” Bloomberg
Two theater stalwarts
PHILIPPINE theater lost two of its
strongest pillars within a span of only
five days last month. Noted playwright,
director and founder of Gantimpala
Theatre Foundation Tony Espejo suc-
cumbed to multiple organ failure at the
Manila Doctors Hospital on June 21. At
around the same time that Philippine
theater was mourning the passing of
Espejo, Mario O’Hara, acclaimed actor
and director, was fighting for his life at
the San Juan de Dios Hospital. O’Hara
passed on Tuesday last week.
The deaths of Espejo and O’Hara are
a major loss to Philippine theater. Al-
though we’ve been witnessing how a
new generation of playwrights, directors,
and actors has been slowly taking on the
mantle of sustaining the local theater
scene, it cannot be denied that the likes
of Espejo and O’Hara are irreplaceable.
When my theater friends and I gathered
over the weekend to pay our own tribute
to the two theater stalwarts, we couldn’t
help but note with great sorrow that the
masters are slowly taking their final
bows one at a time. We’ve lost, seem-
ingly in quick succession, Lino Brocka,
Ishmael Bernal, Ella Luansing, Rolando
Tinio, Zeneida Amador, Jose Mari Avel-
lana, etc. A friend noted that Philippine
theater must now be staging great pro-
ductions in heaven.
The deaths of Espejo and O’Hara are
painful reminders of our mortality; but
they also brought to fore the sad fact that
even the best of our local theater artists
continue to be deprived of the recogni-
tion they so richly deserve while they are
still alive. Glowing tributes are now be-
ing heaped on both Espejo and O’Hara,
but one wishes such— and more—were
made when both were still alive. The-
ater people were still trying to raise the
necessary resources to pay off the medi-
cal bills of Espejo and to give the great
man the burial he so greatly deserved. It
has been noted that O’Hara was reclu-
sive and disdained public recognition of
his genius, but so much more could have
been done to honor the man and his con-
tributions to the flowering of the arts in
this country.
I’ve had the privilege of having
interacted with Espejo on a few occa-
sions when I was still active in theater.
He was a very simple man with an
overwhelming passion for Philippine
theater. As the moving force behind
Gantimpala Theatre Foundation, he
valiantly and tirelessly kept on mount-
ing and putting on tour The Four Clas-
sics (Florante at Laura, Ibong Adarna,
Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusteris-
mo) year after year after year so that
students would continue to appreciate
the wealth of Philippine Drama.
I never had the opportunity to meet
O’Hara in person but I have always
been in awe of his immense talent. I
personally believe that his obra mae-
stra of a movie Tatlong Taong Walang
Diyos, which he wrote and directed,
and starred Nora Aunor, Christopher
de Leon and Rafael Roco Jr., is eas-
ily one of the best—if not the best—
Filipino film ever made. I’ve watched
him perform in several plays and have
always been impressed at the way he
could live a character onstage.
To honor Espejo and O’Hara, my
friends and I trooped to the Cultural
Center of the Philippines over the
weekend where the eighth edition of
the Virgin Labfest is currently run-
ning. The full-length play Totong
Hilot (Jose Dennis Teodosio, writer;
Roobak Valle, director) was playing to
a crowd composed mostly of students.
The play was headlined by one of cin-
ema’s top thespians, Tommy Abuel,
who showed everyone what a master
craftsman could do to a role.
At the end of the play, members
of the audience were allowed to ask
questions from the cast, the writer and
the director. Abuel was asked by a
member of the audience what it was
like performing with very young ac-
tors (the lead role of Toto was played
by 10-year old Alon Severino, son of
TV journalist Howie Severino). Abuel
talked about how it is important for
members of the older generation of
artists to help develop the passion,
dedication, and enthusiasm for theater
and the arts among the younger gen-
eration. He could very well have been
imparting a powerful message to all
Filipinos.
We must, as a people, do more to
help our local artists, particularly those
who toil in Philippine theater “on Sky-
flakes and cat food,” to borrow someone
else’s intemperate words. Government
must put more resources in the arts, par-
ticularly in programs that help widen the
expanse of Philippine theater. We must
continue to honor the memory of Espejo
and O’Hara and the others who have
passed on by ensuring that their legacy
is not laid to waste.
China’s new war
Infant formula
and artificial milk
products can
never match the
nutritional value
and health benefits
of breast milk.
RITA LINDA
V. JIMENO
OUT OF THE BOX
FEATURE
PASTOR APOLLO
QUIBOLOY
PLUMBLINE
News
ManilaStandardToday
mst.daydesk@gmail.com JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A6
Baldoz: No fixed pay, no line renewal
Pasig River ferry: Beyond bean counters
Firm sues Tulfo
over raid, arrests
Water-filled drums replace bollards
Bear good fruits. City Mayor Florencio Bernabe Jr. shows students how to plant an atis seedling at the
Parañaque Elementary School Central. Also called sugar apple, the fruit was brought by the Spaniards from the
Americas. Bernabe wants a greening program to add fruit trees to the ornamental and shade varieties.
Anti-dengue drive.
Quezon City Mayor
Herbert Bautista and
Prince Tunku Naquiyud-
din ibni Tuanku Ja’afar of
Malaysia sign a mani-
festo calling for unity
and cooperation in the
prevention and control of
mosquito-borne diseases.
The prince heads a foun-
dation on a global health
advocacy that includes
the fight against dengue
fever
I NVI TATI ON TO BI D
(MST-July 2, 2012)
Republic of the Philippines
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS AND HIGHWAYS
Region XI
DAVAO DEL SUR 1
ST
DISTRICT ENGINEERING OFFICE
OFFICE OF THE DISTRICT ENGINEER
Digos City
DPWHINFRA-07 - Standard Advertisement-Revised IRR
The Davao del Sur 1
st
District Engineering Ofhce, through its Bids and Awards
Committee (BAC), invites contractors to apply to bid for the following contracts:
Contract ID: 12LD0029
Contract Name: Cluster IV - Concreting of Roads
a. Brgy. Bato, Sta. Cruz
b. Brgy. Luna-Balintawak, Digos City
Contract Location: Davao del Sur
Scope of Work: Concreting of Roads
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): a. P 1,470,000.00
b P 2,450,000.00
Total = P 3,920,000.00
Contract Duration : 60 calendar days
Contract ID: 12LD0030
Contract Name: Construction of Water System at Brgy. New Visayas
Contract Location: Matanao, Davao del Sur
Scope of Work: Construction of Elevation Tank/ Drilling
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC): P 1,960,000.00
Contract Duration : 60 calendar da’s
Contract ID: 12LD0031
Contract Name: Cluster V - Construction in of Box Culvert/Fiood Control
a. Sitio Lasogbong, Brgy. San Isidro, Hagonoy
b. Brgy. Zone III, Sta. Cruz
Contract Location: Davao del Sur
Scope of Work: Construction of Box Cuivert/Flood Control
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC):a. P 1,470,000.00
b. P 980,000.00
Total = P 2,450,000.00
Contract Duration : 60 calendar days
Contract ID: 12LD0032
Contract Name: Cluster VI - Construction of Multi-Purpose Building
a. Brgy. La Union, Hagonoy
b. Brgy. Bonifacio (Elementary School), Bansalan
c. Brgy. Tibongbong, Matanao
d. Brgy. Lower Malinao, Padada, Davao del Sur (High
School Annex)
e. Brgy. Zone I, Sta. Cruz
f. Brgy. San Isidro, Hagonoy
Contract Location: Davao del Sur
Scope of Work: Construction of Multi-Purpose Building
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC); a. P 1,237,500.00
b. P 1,089,000.00
c. P 1,237,500.00
d. P 1,089,000.00
e. P 495,000.00
f. P 396,000.00
Total = P 5,544,000.00
Contract Duration : 60 calendar days
Contract ID: 12LD0033
Contract Name: Cluster VI. Construction of Multi-Purpose Building
a. Brgy. NCO Padada
b. Brgy. Lapulabao (High School Annex), Hagonoy
c. Brgy. Tagaytay, Magsaysay
d. Brgy. Brgy. Zone 3, Digos City (DepEd District Offce)
e. Brgy. Palili, Padada
f. Matanao NHS, Manga Extn., Manga, Matanao
Contract Location: Davao del Sur
Scope of Work: Construction of Multi-Purpose Building
Approved Budget for the Contract (ABC):a. P 1,237,500.00
b. P 1,089,000.00
c. P 1,237,500.00
d. P 1,485,000.00
e. P 792,000.00
f. P 495,000.00
Total = P 6,336,000.00
Contract Duration : 60 calendar days
Bidding will be conducted through open competitive bidding procedures in
accordance with R.A. 9184 and its Revised Implementing Rules and Regulations.
To bid for this contract, a contractor must submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) and
must meet the following major criteria: (a) prior registration with DPWH, (b) Filipino
citizen or 75% Filipino-owned partnership, corporation, cooperative, or joint venture
with PCAB license applicable to the type and cost of this contract, (c) completion of
a similar contract costing at least 50% of ABC within a period of 10 years, and (d)
Net Financial Contracting Capacity at least equal to ABC, or credit line commitment
for at least 10% of ABC. The BAC will use non-discretionary pass/fail criteria in the
eligibility check and preliminary examination of bids.
Unregistered contractors, however, shall submit their applications for registration
to the DPWH-POCW Central Offce before the deadline for the receipt of LOÌ.
The DPWH-POCW Central Offce will only process contractor's applications for
registration, with complete requirements, and issue the Contractor's Certifcate of
Registration (CRC).
The signifcant times and deadlines of procurement activities are shown below:
1. Receipt of LOI from Prospective Bidders
June 26, 2012 to July 12, 2012 @
2:00 p.m.
2. Issuance of Bidding-Documents June 26, 2012 - July 17, 2012
3. Pre-Bid Conference July 4, 2012 @ 2:00 am.
4. Receipt of Bids July 17, 2012, 2012 @ 2:00 p.m.
5. Opening of Bids July 17, 2012 @ 2:10 p.m.
Prospective bidders shall submit their duly accomplished forms as specifed
in the Bidding Documents (BD’s) in two (2) separate sealed bid envelopes to the
BAC Chairman. The frst envelope shall contain the technical component of the bid,
including the eligibility requirements. The second envelope shall contain the fnancial
component of the bid. Contract will be awarded to the Lowest Calculated Responsive
Bid as determined in the bid evaluation and the post-qualifcation.
Prospective bidders may download the Registration from the DPWH
website:www.dpwh.gov.ph . The BAC will issue hard copies of Bidding Documents
at Davao del Sur 1
st
District Engineering Ofhce, Digos City Davao del Sur,
upon payment of a non-refundable fee of P 10.000.00 for Item 4 & 5 and P 5.000.00
for Item1, 2 and 3, Prospective bidders that will download the Bidding Documents
shall pay the same amount upon submission of their Bids. Bids must accompanied
by a bid security in any acceptable form in the amount stated in Section 27.2 of the
Revised IRR.
The Davao del Sur 1
st
District Engineering Ofhce. Digos City. Davao del Sur
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bid and to annul the bidding process
anytime before Contract award, without incurring any liability to the affected bidders.
Approved by:
(Sgd.) AMPARO M. CLAR
BAC Chairman
Starting July 1, bus drivers and conductors
of public utility bus around the country
will be entitled also to performance-based
compensation based on DOLE Order 118-12.
They will be considered as formal regular
workers, putting them under the protective
mantle of the Labor Code.
Bus operators/owners are required to
provide their drivers and conductors with
income not lower than the applicable
minimum wage while the performance-based
pay will be based on their productivity, safety
performance, business performance and
related parameters.
“We have already moved past the discussion
stage about this new system for the last six
months. We are now in the implementation
mode,” Baldoz added.
“We’ve begun inspecting the workplaces
of 158 bus companies in Metro Manila to
determine their level of compliance with the
order,” said Baldoz.
On record, the firms field at least 5,238
buses involving 10,476 drivers and a similar
number of conductors.
“We have provided them templates of
employment agreements and taught them
the modes and methods of computing the
fixed-part and the performance-based part
compensation of their drivers and conductors
who, under the new wage system, should not
earn lower than what they presently receive
under the straight commission-basis. This is
following the non-diminution principle.”
Meanwhile, Baldoz said the department
was starting the five-day Basic Occupational
Safety and Health for the safety officers of
87 bus companies plying the Metro Manila
routes with principal offices and/or garage/
terminal located in the National Capital
Region, Central Luzon, and Southern Tagalog
provinces.
“The BOSH, which is a mandatory safety
and health standard, should have been
conducted for the bus firms earlier, but we
had to iron out some kinks and overcome the
resistance of some bus operators,” she said.
“I have instructed Director Teresita Cocueco
to give the training free of charge to the bus
companies and their safety officers.”
By Jonathan Fernandez
LABOR Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz on Sunday said bus
firms cannot have their franchises renewed unless they pay
their employees fixed salaries.
By Gigi Muñoz-David
COMMUTERS mostly students and workers
along with traders found out one morning in
January last year that the ferry boat service
along Pasig River was throwing in the towel.
Federico Sebastian, 18, now a sophomore
in a downtown Manila university, wonders
when the water bus will return to give
students like him a suitable ride away from
polluted and jampacked roads.
“Coming from Pinagbuhatan in upper
Napindan Channel near the foot of C-6
road bridge in Pasig City, I enjoyed the
28-kilometer trip to Intramuros,” he told
Manila Standard when asked about the
cruise long gone.
“At the time, the boat had aircondition,
piped-in music or video on certain trips plus
separate rest rooms for male and female
passengers.”
Sebastian said the student fare was P20.
“It was really a big help not only to us but
also to our parent’s purse.”
It was earlier reported that despite several
rounds of increase in the prices of diesel and
gasoline, the Pasig River Ferry kept is rate.
A frequent rider, Noel Recuerdo mused
over his fortnightly schedule on the white twin-
hulled vessel to stock his village store in Taytay,
Rizal province to feed his family, pay rent and
utilities, and send two kids to school.
“My wife belonged to a women’s group
making stuffed dolls and animals which I
delivered to buyers in Divisoria,” he said,
adding that the ferry had cargo space at the
front deck of the catamaran-type vessels.
“On the return trip, I bring merchandise
such as dry goods, groceries, vegetables and
other foodstuff for my sari-sari store.”
Noemi del Sol, a teacher from San
Joaquin, Pasig, took a brisk walk to the
terminal, reminding herself that the blaring
horn at nearby Bambang station meant three
minutes for her to get a ticket.
“I don’t want to miss the boat,” she told
Manila Standard with a telling smile to mean
the captain and his crew, in their regulation
white uniform, cap, epaulet and all.
Del Sol said she remembered the well-
groomed and courteous sailors who oriented
passengers on safety including the use of the
life vest which was found beneath every seat.
In early 2010, Sebastian and Del Sol
returned to smog and gridlock because the
ferry service was stopped. Sebastian had to
scale down his store inventory for his small
business to survive.
The Commission on Audit found that
river ferry service was draining since 2007
the kitty of the Pasig River Rehabilitation
Commission to the tune of P94 million.
In its 2010 review of PRRC books, state
auditors noted that operations cost P101.4
million against an income of P7.33 million.
When the boats dropped anchor for
good, the bottomline was not to throw
good money after bad.
But one cannot overlook a social cost
benefit that river travel had somewhat
spurred action to revive the main waterway
at the heart of the metropolis.
In many ways, the ferry helped inspire
people to believe that Pasig River can flow
with life again.
By Rio N. Araja
TO PREVENT mishaps along flyovers, the
Metro Manila Development Authority on
Sunday said yellow-colored drums filled with
water will be installed as safety buffers.
Neomi Recio, chief of Traffic Engineering
Center, said Chairman Francis Tolentino
has tasked her to look into why vehicular
accidents occur at flyover splits.
She blamed reckless motorists, saying
MMDA has installed blinkers, reflectorized
cats eyes, hazard markers, and bollards at
the approaches of the infrastructure.
“Accidents occur because drivers don’t
slow down before reaching the flyover,”
Recio said.
She said they will set up water-filled
drums to prevent crashes that can cause
deaths and damage to property.
“We keep on replacing our bollards,”
Recio said, noting that vehicles have been
bumped at the splits despite the presence of
safety fixtures.
For good measure, MMDA has set
dedicated lanes to discourage swervings,
placed rumble bars to keep sleepy motorists
awake and replaced concrete barriers as
lane dividers.
“If an accident still happens at flyover
splits, there must be something wrong with
the driver,” Recio said.
A MONEY remittance firm has filed a
damage suit against TV program BITAG host
Ben Tulfo for illegally raiding its office along
Commonwealth Avenue in Quezon City.
BITAG crew, accompanied by Quezon
City policemen and an official of the QC
Business Permit and Licensing Office,
allegedly made an entrapment last June 22
at the premises of Global Pinoy Remittance
and Service over questionable transactions
leading to the arrest of 25 employees.
GPRS lawyer Noel Neri said the raiding
team failed to show any warrant to show
the operation was legitimate and the arrests
were lawful.
Neri said BITAG crew’s unlawful acts
caused irreparable injury to his client’s
business for which payment for damages is
called for.
He said criminal charges would also be
filed against the police and city officials
who took part in the raid.
GPRS is engaged in money remittance
services, bills payment, loading, ticketing,
and pawnshop. It has expanded to
franchising with several here and abroad,
until a franchisee named Luz Evardone
claimed being na victim of a hoax and
complained before Tulfo.
GPRS president Emmanuel Pascual
appealed to BITAG to verify first all
complaints before acting on them.
“Tulfo should have heard our side to be
fair to both parties,” he said.
Jonathan F ernandez
IN late 2010, Skyway project builder Citra
Group submitted to the Toll Regulatory
Board its interest to construct the 5-kilometer
Skyway-NAIA Expressway extension.
The SNEE is a four-lane elevated
expressway that starts from the existing
NAIA ramp on Sales Street along Andrews
Avenue toward the Airport-NAIA roads and
linking up with Macapagal Avenue parallel
to Roxas Blvd. The project will serve NAIA
terminals 1, 2 and 3 and the proposed Pagcor
Entertainment City.
I is desinged to connect traffic from
Cavite, Roxas Blvd and Macapagal Avenue
to Makati City and Southern Manila.
If it gets the chance to implement the
SNEE project, the Citra Group is confident
that with its unique technology and expertise
in building elevated highways, and based on
the latest updated study, it can construct the
SNEE in less than two years for P12 billion
including P1.15 billion for right of way
cost’, the company said in a statement.
Citra said the cost is lower than the
estimate of the government, thereby
requiring lower subsidy support.
If allowed to start the SNEE construction
in 2013, the SNEE could be expected to
open to traffic after 24 months. Considered
a Skyway extension, the project can be
implemented faster with shorter approval
process, according to the firm.
Skyway-NAIA project to cost P12b
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A7 Sports Riera U. Mallari, Editor
ManilaStandardToday
sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
Barriga our strongest golden hope in London
De Jonge takes 1-stroke
lead over Tiger, 2 others
CYAN MAGENTAYELLOW BLACK
AL S. MENDOZA
ALL THE WAY
IN BRIEF
UE pays Dalupan,
Warriors a tribute
Get Fit Run slated
RULES are rules.
That was the stern message rammed
through our throats when the world ama-
teur boxing officials nixed our bid for our
Charly Suarez to be given a free ride to the
boxing London Olympics.
Yes, Suarez had a strong showing in a
recent slugfest in China. He lost a close
contest in the finals against a hometown
bet. Before that, Suarez also made a good
accounting of himself in other tournaments
abroad.
But the rule was clear: You go to Lon-
don only when you win the gold medal in
a pre-Olympic qualifying. You don’t, you
stay home.
The book was thrown at us and that was
it. Not even the letter-appeal of Manny
Pacquiao, accompanying an impassioned
appeal from Philippine amateur boxing
president Ricky Vargas, was of any help.
Thus, we have to make do with only one
boxer (Mark Anthony Barriga) in the Lon-
don Games set to blast off on July 27.
Barriga is a light-flyweight. Does that
bode well for us since our last Olympic
medal-winner was also a light-flyweight?
Onyok Velasco won the silver in the
1996 Atlanta Olympics, losing the gold to
a Bulgarian in the closely contested finals.
That was only the second Olympic silver
for us after the runner-up finish of boxer
Anthony Villanueva, a bantamweight, in
the 1964 Tokyo Olympics.
Which brings us back again to that time-
honored belief: Only in boxing will we
ever have the strongest chance for a first
ever Olympic gold.
First, our physique is built in for box-
ing. It’s in our blood and psyche, too, that
we can excel in this sport that is why since
time immemorial, we’ve been world-class
in it. Olympic-class even.
And second, in hand-to-hand combat
like boxing, with equal weight divisions
between both protagonists thorough-
ly considered, each side has an equal
chance at victory. Only in boxing, al-
most, that virtually all factors of triumph
are at play.
Twice we missed the Olympic gold al-
ready. But we aren’t stopping. And this
time, through Barriga, we pin our ardent
hopes once more in boxing to nail that elu-
sive Olympic dream.
“He is leaving on July 3 for Cardiff
(Wales) for further training,” said Ed
Picson, our hard-working Abap execu-
tive director, of Barriga. “From there, he
proceeds to London for the Olympiad.
Through you, let me express, on behalf
of Abap, our sincerest gratitude for all the
support you’ve thrown behind our efforts
to finally win our first Olympic gold.”
Always, you have our prayers, pare.
* * *
PACQUIAO PITCH PUZZLES. Still
puzzled over Manny Pacquiao’s seem-
ing sudden change of heart in that he now
doesn’t want a rematch with Timothy Bra-
dley and instead, he prefers to fight either
Juan Manuel Marquez or Miguel Cotto?
Either, they are trying to pull our leg
again or Pacquiao has completely gone
crazy.
Everybody wants that rematch and, hey,
who wants to watch another Pacquiao-
Marquez bore, or even a Pacquiao-Cotto
mismatch?
Although Pacquiao’s fights with Mar-
quez had all been that close, those three
bouts were all Pacquiao’s. Pacquiao was
robbed of a win in 2004, resulting in a
draw. But in 2008 and 2011, Pacquiao was
the clear winner to both fights, however
close the results may have seemed.
Against Cotto, Pacquiao was the crystal-
winner, practically mauling the Puerto Ri-
can all throughout before the referee halted
the punishment and awarded Pacquiao a
12th-round TKO win.
So, who wants either of those fighters for
Pacquiao?
None, of course.
Nobody wants a rehash, OK?
The call of the times is a rematch.
But I’m pretty sure the Pacquiao-Brad-
ley rematch will surely be held. With Bob
Arum still in command of the baton, the
rematch is very much alive. It’s the only
right thing to do.
They’re just trying to sweeten the pot,
the reason some kibitzers are cooking up
all this gobbledygook on a no-rematch re-
frain.
In boxing, you got it all.
ALL IN. Robert Jaworski’s jersey No.
7 is going to be retired on July 8 and, this
early, I’m sure his fans will come in droves
to the Smart Araneta Coliseum to watch
the ceremonies. After all these years, the
Big J still has that charisma to draw in the
crowds. In fact, if he runs again for sena-
tor in 2013, as what Sen. Honasan wants
Jaworski to do, I honestly believe the Big J
will win again.
There were those 6 a.m. prac-
tice rounds at the British Open.
Or the occasional PGA Tour
event where fans were evacuated
because of a thunderstorm and
hardly anyone returned at twi-
light when play resumed. There
surely was the odd junior event
he played when he was 8.
But teeing off in the late after-
noon at the AT&T National, on
a steamy but sun-filled day on a
fabled course in a golf-mad area
like Washington?
Woods had the largest crowd
of the day, even though it never
topped 100 people. Brendon de
Jonge, who had a 2-under 69 to
take a one-shot lead, had as many
birdies (three) as people in his
gallery on a strange, silent Satur-
day at Congressional.
A violent wind storm over-
night that toppled dozens of
trees and littered the course with
limbs forced tournament offi-
cials to keep spectators and all
but the essential volunteers away
from Congressional for the third
round. Considering the amount of
debris, it was amazing they even
played.
‘’I’ve played in front of people
like this,’’ Woods said. ‘’But not
generally for an 18-hole competi-
tive round.’’
De Jonge was steady in the
sweltering conditions for a third
straight round in the 60s, which
gave his first 54-hole lead on the
PGA Tour. One shot behind were
Woods (67), Bo Van Pelt (67) and
S.Y. Noh (69).
De Jonge, a South African go-
ing for his first PGA Tour win,
made his final birdie on the 12th
hole with a wedge out of the
rough that climbed over a ridge
and settled about 12 feet behind
the cup. It was worthy of ap-
plause, but there was only one
person in the gallery to see it -
Kandi Mahan, the wife of Hunter
Mahan. AP
THE University of the East
community will welcome
and see its basketball he-
roes and legends come
home to their Alma Mater
to join the fun of the first
UE Red Warriors Home-
coming and pay a tribute
to the multi-titled and leg-
endary Philippine basket-
ball coach Virgilio “Baby”
Dalupan on Tuesday, from
5 p.m. onwards, at the UE
Manila Dalupan Lobby,
Recto Avenue, Manila.
This tribute and home-
coming will honor the Da-
lupan, who scored 12 un-
precedented championship
titles of the 18 titles so far
for UE in the University
Athletic Association of the
Philippines competition,
including the unsurpassed
seven straight titles (from
1965 to 1971), and several
inter-collegiate titles.
UE Warrior greats Filom-
eno Pumaren Jr., Rhoel Na-
durata, Jimmy Mariano,
Robert Jaworski and Jerry
Codiñera will lead to honor
the legendary coach Da-
lupan. Jimmy Manansala,
Frederick Pumaren, Julio
Cruz, Boycie Zamar and
Jojo Mariquit, among oth-
ers have already confirmed
their participation in this
gathering.
For inquiries, call UE
Marketing Dept. and/or UE
Alumni Office, tel. nos. 735-
8562 / 735-8557 / 735-5471
loc. 458 / 459 / 310.
AROUND 2,500 runners
are expected to join the Get
Fit Run 2012 on July 8 at
the Quirino Grandstand in
Manila.
Race director Ralph Sogu-
ilon, a former member of
the national team and cur-
rent national record holder
in the 100-m and the 200-m
run, said medals and prizes
will be at stake in the four
categories of the men’s and
women’s divisions.
Participants will take part
in the 21-kilometer, 10-kil-
ometer, 5-kilometer and
the 3-kilometer runs of this
footrace organized by Hy-
persports Philippines, Inc.
Gun start is at 4:15 a.m.
for the 21-km race, which
is the first event of this
Philippine Amateur Track
and Field Association-sanc-
tioned races.
Registration is still ongo-
ing online and through the
Recreational Outdoor Ex-
change in Bonifacio High
Street, Taguig, the Royal
Sporting House in Glorietta
andRobinson’s Ermita, The
Shoe Shop-Alabang Town
Center, Reebok—Trinoma
and BrickFire—Katipunan.
Peter Atencio
NEW ORLEANS—The New Or-
leans Hornets have waived Rashard
Lewis, a move they’ve been ex-
pected to make since acquiring the
14-year veteran forward in a trade
with Washington.
The Wizards had sent Lewis
and the 46th overall pick in this
year’s NBA draft to New Orle-
ans on June 20 in exchange for
forward Trevor Ariza and center
Emeka Okafor.
Lewis was entering the final
year of a $118 million, six-year
contract, which included a $13.7
million buyout provision for the
last year of the deal.
The 6-foot-10 Lewis has aver-
aged 16.1 points, 5.6 rebounds and
1.8 assists during his career. Ham-
pered by knee injuries last season,
he played in only 28 games for the
Wizards, averaging 7.8 points and
3.9 rebounds.
In Minneapolis, for the second
time in four years, Michael Beas-
ley is on the move, hoping another
team will be willing to overlook his
inconsistency on the court and try
to harness the considerable talent
that has intrigued and frustrated so
many for so long.
The Minnesota Timberwolves
declined to make qualifying of-
fers to Beasley and Anthony
Randolph on Saturday, mak-
ing them both unrestricted free
agents. AP
ABAC Cordero of the Philippine
Star successfully retained his
men’s title, while a new wom-
en’s champion in Virgie Romano
of Abante was crowned Friday
in the second edition of the Phil-
ippine Sportswriters Association
Shooting Championships-Sen.
Chiz Escudero Cup at the Arms-
cor Shooting Range at the Maka-
ti Cinema Square.
Cordero failed to duplicate
his perfect score of 100 during
last year’s inaugural staging of
the shootfest for members and
officials of the country’s oldest
media organization. But he still
got the job done, nonetheless,
when he scored 99 points and
beat out the Inquirer’s Musong
Castillo (95) and Elech Dawa
of Remate (94).
Romano, meanwhile, de-
throned Kristel Satumbaga of
Bulletin/Tempo in the distaff
side. The sports editor of Abante
finished with 76 points.
Satumbaga placed third this
time with a 65, behind second
placer Jasmine Payo of the In-
quirer, who had 66.
Prior to the event, all
PSA members attended the
30-minute refresher course
conducted by Sen. Escudero
himself, with assistance from
officials of Armscor.
An avid sport shooting propo-
nent, Escudero personally hand-
ed out the prizes to the winners
during the lunch and program
that followed the tournament.
The shootfest, presented by
Senator Escudero, had the Phil-
ippine Basketball Association,
myPhone, Adidas Action 3, and
Harbour Centre as major spon-
sors. Philippine Sports Commis-
sion Chairman Ritchie Garcia,
Philippine Olympic Committee
and the Basketball Efficiency
and Scientific Training Center of
former national coach Nic Jorge
were the minor sponsors.
Murray will next play No.
16 Marin Cilic, coming off the
second-longest match in Wim-
bledon history. He took 5 1/2
hours Saturday to beat unseeded
American Sam Querrey 7-6 (6),
6-4, 6-7 (2), 6-7 (3), 17-15.
Defending champion Novak
Djokovic will next face unseed-
ed Viktor Troicki, and six-time
champ Roger Federer will play
unseeded Xavier Malisse.
On the women’s side, top-
ranked Maria Sharapova will play
No. 15-seeded Sabine Lisicki,
and defending champion Petra
Kvitova will face No. 24-seeded
Francesca Schiavone.
Four-time champion Ser-
ena Williams will face unseeded
Yaroslava Shvedova. Williams
hit a Wimbledon-record 23 aces
to beat Zheng Jie 6-7 (5), 6-2, 9-7,
while Shvedova won all 24 points
in the first set - a so-called ‘’gold-
en set’’ - and beat French Open
runner-up Sara Errani 6-0, 6-4.
‘’I had no idea,’’ Shvedova
said. ‘’My manager came and she
said like, ‘They checked the stats.
They said it’s really true. You won
24 points in a row.’’’ AP
MATTHEW O’Halloran of Team
Alaska TBB made his presence
felt by scoring twin-kills in the
two-day Tri United 2 held over the
weekend at Playa Laiya, San Juan,
Batangas.
O’Halloran, who simply want-
ed to test the sprint distance course
on the first day of action, but end-
ed with a title, endured the intense
heat on his way to conquering the
2 kilometer swim-60 Km bike-
15 Km run event to win the Elite
Male title in 2:50:27. Next to him
were Camsur’s Benjamin Rana,
who clocked 3:08:26 and bronze
medalist August Benedicto of
Unilab with 3:09:02.
On the distaff side in the event
sponsored by Unilab Active Health,
Batangas Gov. Vilma Santos-Recto,
Province of Batangas, Playa Laiya,
Dolfenal, Enervon HP, I-ON En-
ergy Drink, Landco, BikeKing,
PLDT SME Nation, Pocari Sweat,
Timex, Crystal Clear, Orbea, Ex-
plore Bohol, Corima, Runner’s
World, Men’s Health, Women’s
Health, Aboitiz Power, Weekend
Warrior and SwimBikeRun.ph,
TriMac’s Monica Torres outlasted
former national champion Ani de
Leon -Brown to claim the title in
3:19:55. Brown timed 3:31:06.
On the team competition (10
members per team), team PLDT-
BikeKing, led by former Philippine
coach Peter Gonzalez, coasted to a
clear win over its rivals by finishing
with a combined time of 37:48:34.
Unilab Active Health settled
for the silver with 39:36:50, while
the bronze went to TriMac, which
clocked 41:54:48.
Other winners of the event in-
clude:
Sprint distance: Eric Stroem
(18-24), Marisol Abad and Luigi
Robles (25-29), Andrea Barreto
(30-34), Brian Acosta and Kate
Abelarde (35-39), Oliver Kempo
and Maricel Laxa Pangilinan (40-
44), Ronald Honrede (45-49),
Edwin Cagiyat (50-54), and Gary
Brown (55-above).
Long distance: Nino Lagasca
and Keisha Fule (18-24), Don
Velasco and Izah Sueno (25-29),
Philip Atento and Camilla Brooks
(30-34), Julian Valencia and Ani
Brown (35-39), Peter Gonzalez
and Bernstein Tan (40-44), Celma
Hitalia (45-above), Albert Altura
(45-49), Eduardo Francisco (50-
54), Alfredo Santos (55-above)
and IMC-PAF Air Force (team
relay).
Over 620 participants joined the
BikeKing-organized event, which
was broadcast online via live
streaming.
Batangas Vice Gov. Mark Le-
viste, who took part welcoming
triathletes as well as giving the
awards, was impressed with the
huge turn out.
The third and final leg of the
Tri United series will be hosted by
Ayala Alabang Village in Muntin-
lupa City this November.
O’Halloran scores twin-kill in Tri United 2 triathlon
Rosol...
Hornets waive Lewis;
Beasley on the move
Cordero keeps PSA shooting crown
Senator Francis ‘Chiz’ Escudero (middle) poses with the participants of the 2nd Philippine Sportswriters
Association Shooting Championships-Sen. Chiz Escudero Cup on Friday in Makati. Virgi Romano, sports
editor of Abante, won the women’s division championship, while Abac Cordero (right) of the Philippine
Star, retained the men’s division crown.
BETHESDA, Md—Saturday at
Congressional was not the first time
Tiger Woods has played before so
few fans.
sports@manilastandardtoday.com sports_mstandard@yahoo.com
Sports
Manila Standard TODAY
Barako Bull trips Meralco, 81-79
Ang, Zulberti rule Carmona leg
Pacquiao’s sparmate
kayoes foe in Round 2
ALA wants
Banal title
fight in PH
Sore, Martes win Baguio stage
Hungry Altas take on favored Stags
CYAN MAGENTAYELLOW BLACK
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
A8
Riera U. Mallari, Editor
LOTTO RESULTS
6/49 000000
3 DIGITS 000
2 EZ2 00
P11.7M+
Rosol out 1
round after
beating Rafa
PBA SCORES
By Ronnie Nathaniesz
LIGHT welterweight Ruslan
Provodnikov, Fighter of the
Decade Manny Pacquiao’s chief
sparring partner, showed how
much he benefited from training
with the eight-division champion
when he scored a second-round
knockout over Jose Reynoso in
the main event on ESPN’s Friday
Night Fights.
Provodnikov, who trained with
Pacquiao in Baguio City and con-
tinued to spar with the Filipino
boxing icon at the Wild Card
Gym, soon proved how hard he
could hit as he stalked Reynoso in
the opening round, catching him
with some body shots.
Provodnikov, who had one of
Freddie Roach’s assistants Eric
Brown working in his corner, ad-
justed in Round 2 by cutting the
distance so his body shots would
have better effect.
The Russian attacked the body
and then switched with some
solid blows to the head. A hard
right hook to the head eventually
dropped Reynoso, who struggled
to his feet but failed to beat the
count and was counted out by
referee Raul Caiz Jr. at 1:52 of he
second round.
“I want to say that this is just
the payoff for me for a very long
training camp that I have, almost
three months. I was in train-
ing camp with Manny for two
months and I had to continue my
training camp. This is the payoff.
I am very glad. This is just the be-
ginning for me,” said Provodnik-
ov in a post-fight interview. said
Provodnikov credited Pacqui-
ao for his ability to adjust to Rey-
noso’s style of moving around.
ALA Promotions president
Michael Aldeguer is working to
bring the AJ “Bazooka’ Banal ti-
tle fight against Thailand’s Pun-
gluang Sor Sinhyu to Manila.
ALA faces a tough and finan-
cially backed Thai promotions
competitor in OneSongchai Pro-
motions, headed by Pariyakorn
Ratanasuban.
Aldeguer and the Thai lady
promoter, who took over running
the promotions from her well-es-
tablished father, just like Michael
Aldeguer assumed the role of his
father Tony Aldeguer, have been
going back-and forth in nego-
tiations for the World Boxing Or-
ganization bantamweight title left
vacant by Mexico’s Jorge Arce.
Banal has a slight edge, be-
ing the No.1-ranked contender,
while Pungluang is ranked No.2.
But both sides know that in
the end, a fight will be consum-
mated based on the financial
considerations as well as other
perks, including the demands of
their respective television part-
ners and their audiences.
The initial stumbling block ap-
peared to be the Thai’s demand
that the fight be staged on a Fri-
day afternoon to fit into their TV
schedule, which could not be ac-
commodated by ALA Promotions
partners, broadcast network ABS-
CBN and The Filipino Channel,
which serves a huge world-wide
Filipino community, particularly
in the middle east. Ronnie Nath-
anielsz
THE cast of the semifinals is still
not complete. Not just yet.
Barako Bull Energy kept its
campaign alive after it notched
its most important win in the
elimination round by beating the
Meralco Bolts, 81-79, and snap
its three-game losing slide in the
2012 Philippine Basketball As-
sociation Governor’s Cup yester-
day evening at the Smart Araneta
Coliseum.
Leroy Hickerson scored a team-
high 22 points to go with six re-
bounds, four assists and four steals
to pace the Energy while Danny
Seigle provided help off the bench
with 16 points and seven rebounds.
The sixth and final semifinals
ticket is still up for grabs after
the Energy won this vital con-
test. Barako Bull, Meralco and
Powerade all finished their cam-
paigns tied at sixth with identical
4-5 records. The three squads will
dispute the final berth through
two playoff games.
The Energy and the Powerade
Tigers meet in a playoff on Tues-
day to see who moves on to face
Meralco on Wednesday. Meralco
held the highest quotient among
the three after Barako Bull failed
to win by five points or more.
‘’Sayang, we were up by 17
but we played not to lose and
we didn’t play to win. We’ll play
against Powerade on Tuesday.
The character of the team is that
they tend to relax when we’re
on top. We have to guard against
that,’’ said Barako Bull coach
Junel Baculi.
It was that solid third quarter ef-
fort that pushed the Energy to vic-
tory as the first two quarters saw
back-and-forth exchanges of runs.
Barako Bull outscored Mer-
alco, 28-20, in the third to carry
a critical double-digit spread, 69-
59, heading to the final 12 min-
utes of action. The Energy built
on that lead and took command
in the fourth where they even led
as many as 17 points, 77-60, with
eight minutes remaining.
But the Bolts, led by Mario
West, detonated an 18-3 explo-
sion to slice the deficit to only
two, 80-78, with 1:31 left.
YOUNG potential champs Jacob Ang of San
Miguel and Tai Zulberti of CityKart staged big
comebacks to rule their respective classes recently
in the fourth leg of the 2012 Philippine National
Karting Series at the Carmona Racetrack.
After ending deadlast in the qualifying heat, the
10-year-old Ang showed determination in ruling
the Pre-Final and Final races to capture the For-
mula Cadet Novice crown for the second straight
time on his second race in this event sanctioned by
the Automobile Association Philippines and spon-
sored by Motorstar and Aeromed.
Francis Tanlu of AUTSRacing copped the run-
ner-up finish, while Eduardo Coseteng Jr. took
third place. Jose Luigi Lachica of One Racing fin-
ished fourth, while Mickey Jordan wound up fifth.
Zulberti, who finished third in the qualifying
and second in the Pre-Final, rallied to forge a tight
three-way showdown with SEAOIL-Kart Wrecker
Dylan Arambulo and AT Tuason of Castrol-TRS
Kids for the lead in the dying laps and pulled the
crucial move near the finish line to clinch the For-
mula Cadet Expert title.
He wrapped up the 15-lap final race in 13 min-
utes and 15.298 seconds or just 0.419 of a second
ahead of runner-up Arambulo as Tuason, who was
leading most of the way, settled for third.
Jacob Chamness of CityKart and Xedrei Daqui-
gan landed fourth and fifth, respectively.
Despite Zulberti’s triumph, Arambulo still kept
his hold on the solo lead with 254 points, just a
nine-point advantage over the former.
The Formula SL class was equally exciting with
Raymond Cudala of SEAOIL-Kart Wreckers and
Jaz Monzones of Natmo Asia-GP1 Racing win-
ning the Novice and Expert titles, respectively.
BAGUIO--Hernanie Sore and
former MILO marathon queen
Cristabel Martes served notice of
their respective title-aspiration bid
by dominating the opening leg of
the 36th National MILO Mara-
thon on Sunday in Baguio City.
The 30-year-old Sore finished
the Baguio qualifying leg with
a time of 1:14:59, topping the
treacherous 21-kilometer up-
hill and downhill course in the
men’s category, while the ageless
32-year-old Martes finished with
a clocking of 1:34:46, leading the
women’s division.
According to Martes, she has
been joining running clinics to
prepare for the 36th MILO Mara-
thon hoping to reach the national
finals. Similarly, Sore had been
conditioning himself for the
42-kilometer distance run.
“I didn’t really train for the
21-kilometer distance run,” said
Sore. “I am surprised that I won
first place in this category. I will
continue to condition myself for
the Manila elimination leg at the
end of this month.”
Cesar Lastaneto Jr. was a close
second with a time of 1:15:03 fol-
lowed by Marson Tarcelo with
1:20:18.In the distaff side, Mercy
Taypok of University of Baguio
finished second with a time of
1:38:30.
And Gretchen Felipe followed
with 1:49:32.
Less than 48 hours after stunning Nadal, Lu-
kas Rosol lost Saturday to No. 27-seeded Philipp
Kohlschreiber, 6-2, 6-3, 7-6 (6). Afterward, fans
surrounded Rosol seeking his signature before he
returned to the obscurity of the minor-league chal-
lenger circuit.
‘’I knew that this can happen,’’ he said of the loss.
His resume suggested as much. The 26-year-old
Czech, ranked No. 100, was playing in the main draw
at Wimbledon for the first time after losing each of the
past years in the opening round of qualifying.
Rosol not only beat Nadal, he overpowered him.
There was no fluke about one of the biggest upsets
ever at tennis’ biggest tournament.
‘’I thought, ‘Thank God I didn’t have to play that
guy, because he definitely would have beat me 6-0,
6-0,’’’ Serena Williams said. ‘’He was hitting so
hard, and hitting winners on absolutely everything.’’
In the wake of the win, Rosol heard plenty about
how improbable it had been.
By Peter Atencio
THE University of Perpetual Help Altas
are hungry.
They showed it when they upset the
Letran Knights, 69-66, last Saturday.
And the Altas will definitely show their
appetite for more victories when they
battle the San Sebastian College Stags
today at the resumption of the 88th Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Association
men’s basketball tournament at The Are-
na in San Juan.
“Tingnan natin, mahirap manalo sa
San Sebastian. Kapag magkukumpiyansa
sila, pagkakataon na namin ito,” said Al-
tas coach Aric del Rosario as
they gun for their third con-
secutive victory against the
Stags at 4 p.m.
Del Rosario said it was
team’s disciplined approach
to the game, which allowed
them to get past their two pre-
vious opponents.
The showdown comes
before the San Beda Red
Lions, now with an almost
complete lineup, face the
Lyceum of the Philippines
University Pirates at 6 p.m.
The undermanned Red Lions escaped
with an 81-71 win over the
Arellano Chiefs a week ago.
San Beda will gun for its sec-
ond straight win with eight
veterans returning after serv-
ing a one game suspension.
The Stags, who escaped
with a 95-93 victory over the
College of St. Benilde Blaz-
ers, are not expected to take
their game against the Altas
lightly.
“Everyone (not just Per-
petual) is a threat. They all
want to beat us. We are the barometer. All
of the other teams will bring their A game
against us. Just like what happened to us
with CSB. We have to be ready for them,”
said Stags mentor Topex Robinson.
The Stags are trying to get their cohe-
sion back and now hold a 1-1 slate. Ronald
Pascual preserved their victory by block-
ing Blazers ace Carlo Lastimosa’s attempt
in the closing seconds.
Calvin Abueva tallied a game-high 22
points, grabbed a career-high 23 rebounds
and had six assists.
Ian Sangalang, who had 19 points, hit
the winning basket for the Stags with 40.1
seconds, 95-91, but they later got a scare
when the Blazers cut the gap with Lasti-
mosa’s drive 17 ticks later.
Serena Williams leaps for joy after beating China’s Zheng Jie, 6-7 (5), 6-2, 9-7, using a Wimbledon record 23
aces. She next faces unseeded Yaroslava Shvedova. AP
WIMBLEDON, England—
The man who beat Rafael
Nadal stood courtside sign-
ing autographs, his sudden
celebrity lasting longer than
he did at Wimbledon.
‘’All the people are like talking, ‘Maybe you will
lose (third) round. You can’t play like this again,’’’ he
said. ‘’I was thinking only just to don’t sleep and open
(my) eyes again and play good tennis.’’
His sequel came on cozy Court 12 instead of Centre
Court, with a crowd of only about a thousand specta-
tors and no live TV coverage. At one point, he tried
to challenge a call before realizing there’s no replay
review on Wimbledon’s smaller courts.
Windy conditions didn’t help the big-swinging
Rosol, who whiffed on one forehand. He hit just sev-
en aces after totaling 22 against Nadal.
Kohlschreiber, meanwhile, mixed his pace, hitting
slice backhands and short shots that kept Rosol off
balance and on the move.
‘’I think I have the right game plan against him,’’
the German said. ‘’Everything I saw against Nadal, I
figured out I think the perfect tactic.’’
Kohlschreiber conceded he caught a break with
Rosol’s upset win.
‘’Of course, I’m very happy that I’m not playing
against Rafael Nadal, that’s for sure,’’ he said. ‘’If I
would go to the match against Nadal, the chances would
be 90-10 to win or lose. Today was more 50-50.’’
Following Wimbledon’s traditional day off on the middle
Sunday, the entire fourth round is scheduled for Monday.
No. 4-seeded Andy Murray raced the clock to complete his
third-round match, beating Marcos Baghdatis 7-5, 3-6, 7-5,
6-1 and finishing under the Centre Court roof at 11:02 p.m.
Wimbledon has an 11 o’clock curfew. Turn to page A7
Aric Del Rosario
BARAKO BULL 81 – Hickerson
22, Seigle 16, Tubid 10, Kramer 8,
Miller 7, Allado 7, Cruz 6, Salva-
cion 3, Najorda 2, Pennisi 0.
MERALCO 79 – West 40, Taul-
ava 15, Cardona 8, Daa 5, Maca-
pagal 5, Bulawan 2, Mercado 2,
Hugnatan 2, Ross 0, Reyes 0.
Quarters: 22-14, 41-39, 69-59, 81-
79.
Business
Manila Standard TODAY
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
B1
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
IN BRIEF
PSALM’s debt hits
$16.6b despite sales
Ray S. Eñano, Editor extrastory2000@gmail.com
Roderick T. dela Cruz, Assistant Editor
TeaM Energy obtains
$220-m loan facility
Mango
exporters
eye new
markets
Govt reduces oil and gas drilling target
Finance asks insurance firms to build capital to P1b by 2010
By Alena Mae S. Flores
STATE-RUN Power Sector Assets and
Liabilities Management Corp. saw its
outstanding debt increase to $16.6 billion
this year from $16.4 billion in 2001,
despite the sale of $10.2 billion worth
of power plants and other energy assets
owned by the government.
PSALM, which was created
under the Electric Power Industry
Reform Act of 2001, assumed
all the assets and liabilities of
National Power Corp. Its debt
increased following the passage
of the Epira law, as Napocor
continued to operate the power
plants of independent power
producers at a loss.
PSALM reported total
liabilities of $16.6 billion, with
$12 billion or 72 percent of
them US-denominated. Another
$3 billion or 17.9 percent is
denominated in pesos and $1.5
billion or 9.1 percent in Japanese
yen. The rest of the liabilities
are in other currencies.
Proceeds from the privatization
of government’s power assets
supposedly reached $10.2
billion as of December 2011, but
the government had collected
just $5.3 billion so far from
the privatization of Napocor’s
generating, transmission and
power contracts.
Collected proceeds have
already been allotted to pay for
PSALM’s outstanding debts.
“The collection, including income
from interest, amounting to
$5.476 billion, was used to settle
outstanding debts,” PSALM said.
Data showed the total
proceeds included $3.01 billion
from the sale of Napocor’s
generating assets, including
decommissioned plants.
The sale of the transmission
assets generated $3.9 billion in
proceeds, but only $1.8 billion
has been collected so far.
The appointment of the
independent power producer
administrators to manage the
contracts of Napocor generated
$3.2 billion, but only $495 million
has been collected from these
contracts.
PSALM said it was working out
a possible prepayment scheme
with National Grid Corp. of the
Philippines for its remaining
concession fees. National Grid,
under its concession agreement
with PSALM, is supposed to
pay a semi-annual concession
fee for 25 years.
PSALM president Emmanuel
Ledesma Jr. said earlier they
were in talks with National Grid,
the winning concessionaire
of the government’s power
transmission assets, for a
prepayment scheme.
“Discussions with NGCP
[on the prepayment] is still
ongoing,” Ledesma said.
PSALM has successfully
privatized 79.6 percent of the
country’s power generating plants
as of December 2011, with total
capacity of 4,102.3 megawatts.
PSALM has also successfully
privatized 76.9 percent of the
contracted capacity produced by
IPPs through the appointment
of IPP administrators and other
entities, equivalent to 3,593.9
MW.
By Lailany P. Gomez
TEAM Energy Corp., the
country’s biggest coal-fired
plant operator, has obtained a
$220-million, 12-year credit to
refinance an existing mezzanine
loan facility with PPF Company
B.V., formerly Nomura
Philippines Power Funding
Company B.V.
SB Capital Investment Corp.,
the investment bank of Security
Bank Corp., arranged the
transaction for TeaM Energy.
The loan was the first that TeaM
Energy tapped in the domestic
capital market for funding
requirements.
Security Bank and
Metropolitan Bank and Trust
Co. were the major lenders for
the transaction.
“The mezzanine lenders
welcome the opportunity to
support TeaM Energy’s projects
to produce reliable and stable
energy sources. We are pleased
to be a partner in efforts to
develop a strong energy sector
which is a key driver in our
country’s economic growth,”
Security Bank president and
chief executive Alberto Villarosa
said in a joint statement.
TeaM Energy is a joint
venture between Marubeni
Corp. and Tokyo Electric Power
Co. Inc. and one of the largest
independent power producers
in the Philippines, with over
2,000 megawatts of installed
generating capacity.
CrimsonPower Holdings
Company Inc., which later
became TeaM Energy, signed
in June 2007 a mezzanine loan
facility agreement with PPF
Company B.V. to partially fund
the acquisition of a 100 percent
ownership in Mirant Asia-Pacific
Ltd., then the largest IPP holding
company, from US-based IPP
Mirant Corp.
TeaM Energy’s power
generation portfolio consists
of a 100 percent direct interest
in the 1,218 MW coal-fired
Sual power plant in Sual,
Pangasinan; a 100 percent
direct interest in the 735-MW,
coal-fired Pagbilao power plant
in Pagbilao, Quezon; and a 20
percent indirect stake in the
1,251-MW natural gas-fired,
Ilijan power plant in Ilijan,
Batangas. A significant portion
of Sual and Pagbilao’s capacity
is contracted by National Power
Corp.
Bloomberry
expansion.
Bloomberry
Resorts Corp.
is looking at
opportunities
to increase its
presence in the
gaming and
entertainment
industry in the
Philippines and in
other countries.
Bloomberry
is currently
constructing
Solaire Manila,
envisioned to be
the first premium
luxury integrated
tourism-hotel and
casino resort in
Entertainment
City. Shown
during the recent
stockholders’
meeting is
Bloomberry
Resorts chairman
Enrique Razon
(left) as he
answers questions
from journalists.
EY ACASIO
By Othel V. Campos
PHILIPPINE exporters are
looking for new markets for
carabao mangoes to make up for
the lost market in the US.
“We have stopped exporting
fresh mangoes to the US due
to prohibitive [tariff rates] but
the export of dried mangoes is
growing,” Roberto Amores,
president of the Mango Product
Exporters Confederation Inc.,
said over the weekend.
The group said mango
shipments to the US stopped
five years ago “but we’re
always looking for alternative
markets.”
Amores said producers had
to contend with expensive air
freight and inspection expenses
required by the quarantine office
of the United States Department
of Agriculture, aside from the
cost of local inputs.
Mango producers pay about
$110,000 to the US Department
of Agriculture in inspection fees
for one regular season.
“The high cost of air
freight plus the inspection
fee make Philippine mangoes
uncompetitive at $35 per
5-kilogram carton compared
with Mexico’s $10 to $12 per
carton and Peru’s $17 to $18 per
carton of fresh mangoes,” said
Amores.
Philippine mango exports,
both fresh and dried, recorded
higher export sales in recent
years despite losing the US
market.
Data from the National
Statistics Office showed the value
of mango exports increased 9.64
percent in 2011 from $16.65
million a year ago.
Last week, Philippine
Agriculture officials said the
US gave the green light on local
growers to export fresh bananas
to all US territories and the
mainland.
Agriculture Secretary
Proceso Alcala, however, said
negotiations to rationalize freight
costs had started.
The Agriculture Department
said Philippine bananas might
enter the US fresh fruit market
by the third quarter of this
year following the signing of
a bilateral agreement between
Manila and Washington.
Washington, in return, has
asked Manila to further open up
its market for potatoes and semi-
temperate vegetables.
By Alena Mae S. Flores
THE Energy Department has reduced
its oil and gas drilling target this year
to seven to nine wells as exploration
companies find it difficult to hire oil
rigs.
The government was originally
expecting that exploration companies
would be able to drill 10 to 12 wells
this year, given the level of excitement
following recent oil and gas discoveries
in the country’s territorial waters.
Energy Undersecretary Jay Lay told
reporters that while only two companies
had formally asked for extension of their
exploratory drilling program, many had
indicated a possible delay in their target
owing to difficulties of securing oil rigs.
Layug said based on records, only BHP
Billiton, operator of service contract 54
and 59 in southwest Palawan, and Blade
Petroleum, operator of Cadlao block in
service contract 6 in northern Palawan,
had asked for a one-year extension.
“The others have indicated delay but are
still targeting to drill wells by yearend. From
10 to 12 wells, we have adjusted our target
this year to 7 to 9 wells,” Layug said.
Layug earlier said hitting 10 drillings
this year was a good sign because on the
average, the Philippines was getting only
one exploratory drilling each year in the
past.
Layug said oil and gas firms might
choose to fast-track their exploration
programs due to the renewed spike in
world oil prices, government’s aggressive
efforts to assist the companies in their
projects and strong investor confidence
in the Aquino administration.
“Oil prices are high, so in an
environment that you have oil prices
higher, more exploration. They’ve also
seen that the government is serious in
implementing its exploration program
and we’re helping them resolve
administrative issues,” Layug said.
Corporate profits up 24%
COMBINED net incomes of publicly listed
companies grew 24 percent to P134.7 billion in
the first quarter from P108.6 billion a year ago,
according to the Philippine Stock Exchange.
The PSE also reported that consolidated revenues
of listed companies increased 18.9 percent to P1.02
trillion in the January-March period from P858.34
billion in the same period last year.
“The robust first-quarter results of listed
companies validate the impressive performance
our market has had so far, highlighted by the PSEi
rewriting record highs nineteen times already
this year. This also underscores the fundamental
soundness of our companies, which add to their
potential for consistent future performance,” PSE
president and chief executive Hans Sicat said.
Four out of six sectors recorded positive net
income growths in the first quarter led by the
financial sector, which surged by 73.2 percent.
On a revenue basis, five of the six sectors posted
higher revenues, with the financial sector again
leading the way with a 26.6 percent jump.
Securities trading gains were the main
proponent for the 73.2-percent collective net
income increase of firms in the financial sector.
Govt subsidies down 10%
Subsidies extended to the operations of
government-owned and -controlled corporations
declined 10 percent year-on-year in the first five
months, as financial assistance to cash-strapped
National Food Authority was reduced by nearly
half.
Latest data from Treasury showed subsidies to
GOCCs as of end-May reached P11.40 billion,
or P1.27 billion lower than the P12.67 billion
granted a year ago.
Subsidies also fell 35.9 percent to P3.52 billion
in May from P5.49 billion a year earlier.
Bulk of the fund assistance released to state-
run enterprises in the January-May period this
year was given to NFA amounting P4 billion.
Other major recipients during the five-month
period include Philippine Health Insurance
Corp. with P2.1 billion, National Electrification
Administration with P1.6 billion, National
Housing Authority with P1.2 billion, and
Philippine Coconut Authority with P656 million.
Maria Bernadette Lunas
By Bernadette Lunas
THE Finance Department issued
a directive last week requiring
life and non-life insurance
companies to raise their paid-up
capital every other year until it
reaches P1 billion in 2020.
Finance Secretary Cesar
Purisima ordered life and non-
life insurers to build their capital
to at least P400 million by 2014,
P600 million by 2016, P800
million by 2018 and P1 billion
by 2020.
“The imposition of a higher
minimum paid-up capital shall
ensure sufficient protection to
the insuring public and further
strengthen the integrity of the
insurance industry,” Purisima said.
He said insurance companies
should raise more capital in
preparation for the common
Asean market by 2015.
Life and non-life insurers this
year are required to have at least
P250 million in capitalization by
the end of June.
Reinsurers are prescribed to
have P2 billion in paid-up capital,
while companies engaged solely
in microinsurance should have at
least P500 million by 2020.
No new company under the
order will be allowed to operate
without having a minimum
capital of P1 billion, P2 billion,
or P500 million, depending on its
function.
The new capital requirements,
however, may be deferred,
depending on several conditions,
including for those companies
undergoing merger and
consolidation, or those which
will meet the risk-based capital
hurdle rate of 150 percent.
Citing World Bank data, the
Finance chief said the Philippine
insurance industry was lagging
behind other Southeast Asian
nations on the required capitalization
and premiums as a percentage of
the gross domestic product.
PSE COMPOSITE INDEX
Closing June 29, 2012
5,246.41
9.74
OIL
PRICES
TODAY
P780-P895.00
LPG/11-kg tank
P54.55-P61.02
Unleaded Gasoline
P46.10-P49.90
Diesel
P52.34-P57.85
Kerosene
P38.50-P39.20
Auto LPG
FOREI GN EXCHANGE RATE
Currency Unit US Dollar Peso
United States Dollar 1.000000 42.2830
Japan Yen 0.012587 0.5322
UK Pound 1.551600 65.6063
Hong Kong Dollar 0.128891 5.4499
Switzerland Franc 1.036269 43.8166
Canada Dollar 0.967867 40.9243
Singapore Dollar 0.781372 33.0388
Australia Dollar 1.003210 42.4187
Bahrain Dinar 2.652661 112.1625
Saudi Arabia Rial 0.266681 11.2761
Brunei Dollar 0.778331 32.9102
Indonesia Rupiah 0.000106 0.0045
Thailand Baht 0.031447 1.3297
UAE Dirham 0.272272 11.5125
Euro Euro 1.244600 52.6254
Korea Won 0.000864 0.0365
China Yuan 0.157295 6.6509
India Rupee 0.017603 0.7443
Malaysia Ringgit 0.313087 13.2383
NewZealand Dollar 0.787588 33.3016
Taiwan Dollar 0.033408 1.4126
Source: PDS Bridge
Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas
Friday, June 29, 2012
PESO-DOLLAR RATE
40
42
44
46
48
P42.120
CLOSE
Closing JUNE 29, 2012
5200
4460
3720
2980
2240
1500
1200
VOLUME 1152.780M
HIGH P42.120 LOW P42.450 AVERAGE P42.276
Business
ManilaStandardToday
extrastory2000@gmail.com
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
B2
DLSU’s BHAG
WEEKLY MOST TRADED
STOCKS VOLUME
Philodrill Corp. `A’ 4,305,810,000
Manila Mining `A’ 1,543,850,000
Oriental Pet. `A’ 871,200,000
Megaworld Corp. 830,165,000
Alcorn Gold Res. 703,700,000
Manila Mining `B’ 639,900,000
Greenergy 529,400,000
IP E-Game Ventures Inc. 431,500,000
United Paragon 318,400,000
MRC Allied Ind. 317,270,000
STOCKS VALUE
PLDT Common 4,407,309,400.00
Metrobank 1,936,786,927.50
Alliance Global Inc. 1,869,780,516.00
Megaworld Corp. 1,785,398,670.00
SM Investments Inc. 1,489,953,735.00
Bloomberry 974,851,507.00
Ayala Corp `A’ 941,852,454.00
Ayala Land `B’ 925,629,535.00
DMCI Holdings 781,371,337.00
Aboitiz Power Corp. 776,780,105.00
M
S
T
WEEKLY STOCKS REVIEW
JUNE 25-29, 2012 JUNE 18-22, 2012
STOCKS CLOSE VOLUME VALUE CLOSE VOLUME VALUE
FINANCIAL
Banco de Oro Unibank Inc. 63.40 5,107,840 322,644,487.00 63.50 14,921,470 948,314,035.50
Bank of PI 74.60 8,238,740 608,391,256.00 73.00 7,303,130 519,696,868.00
Bankard, Inc. 0.70 467,000 326,810.00 0.68 101,000 70,680.00
China Bank 491.00 47,020 23,188,182.00 490.40 129,320 66,167,723.00
BDO Leasing & Fin. Inc. 1.78 34,000 59,350.00 1.78 62,000 106,800.00
COL Financial 23.2 311,900 7,224,440.00 23 2,198,200 50,783,875.00
Eastwest Bank 18.9 7,632,800 143,821,844.00 19 3,178,700 60,297,258.00
Filipino Fund Inc. 10.50 17,900 184,107 10.00 4,700 45,213
First Abacus 0.76 100,000 76,000.00
First Metro Inv. 85 11,120 891,180.00 72 420 28,664.00
I-Remit Inc. 2.77 2,152,000 5,850,770.00 2.57 541,000 1,342,580.00
Manulife Fin. Corp. 491.80 1,430 651,552.00 450.00 200 90,000.00
Maybank ATR KE 38.35 122,500 4,689,250.00 38.3 169,100 6,408,945.00
Metrobank 92.50 20,973,160 1,936,786,927.50 89.70 13,361,770 1,201,458,384.50
Natl Reinsurance Corp. 2 2,530,000 5,031,640.00 2 1,392,000 2,779,220.00
Phil Bank of Comm 67.00 1,440 93,740.00 68.00 8,670 578,230.00
Phil. National Bank 72.30 1,660,160 118,598,445.00 71.00 2,631,900 185,403,252.50
Phil. Savings Bank 83.80 17,630 1,488,140.00 82.00 2,190 179,595.00
Philippine Trust Co. 61.00 300,000 18,300,000.00
PSE Inc. 360 20,980 7,462,142.00 351 19,570 6,850,606.00
RCBC `A’ 43.9 4,255,800.00 184,573,610.00 43.4 3,791,700.00 164,053,410.00
Security Bank 142.4 2,986,820 414,629,306.00 138.8 2,730,750 280,272,508.00
Sun Life Financial 902.00 1,480 1,341,830.00 910.00 650 587,260.00
Union Bank 100.00 758,960 75,918,909.00 100.00 1,012,370 102,031,598.00
Vantage Equities 1.83 6,049,000 11,236,420.00 1.81 2,614,000 4,687,600.00
INDUSTRIAL
Aboitiz Power Corp. 34.15 22,605,800 776,780,105.00 33.2 22,920,800 756,477,810.00
Agrinurture Inc. 8.96 123,100 1,090,004.00 8.86 208,750 1,959,539.00
Alaska Milk Corp. 16.5 121,600 1,912,532.00 18 11,300 201,900.00
Alliance Tuna Intl Inc. 1.43 1,264,000 1,773,160.00 1.38 1,507,000 2,093,860.00
Alphaland Corp. 28.6 6,400 182,420.00 28.4 8,900 253,665.00
Alsons Cons. 1.35 991,000 1,295,900.00 1.31 903,000 1,176,680.00
Asiabest Group 25.2 775,300 18,813,885.00 24.05 841,300 19,585,205.00
Bogo Medellin 61.00 1,210 69,224.00
Bloomberry 9.51 107,141,400 974,851,507.00 8.43 33,112,500 278,550,423.00
C. Azuc De Tarlac 17.50 25,800 435,530.00 13.52 5,150 612,340.00
Calapan Venture 2.4 930,000 2,381,900.00 2.8 2,849,700 11,356,060.00
Conc. Aggr. `A’ 79.50 290 22,930.00 79.00 250 19,750.00
Chemrez Technologies Inc. 2.66 1,971,950 1,265,490.00 2.65 670,000 1,740,650.00
Cirtek Holdings (Chips) 9.28 680,900 6,220,061.00 9.22 2,206,400 20,405,422.00
Energy Devt. Corp. (EDC) 6.03 76,621,900 461,511,318.00 5.97 107,356,800 648,353,120.00
EEI 6.38 7,786,200 48,667,022.00 6.20 4,988,900 31,168,570.00
Euro-Med Lab. 2.09 67,000 127,280.00 1.78 41,000 73,690.00
Federal Chemicals 10.58 11,000 114,166.00 9.80 21,800 223,050.00
First Gen Corp. 17.66 28,169,100 493,777,058.00 16.9 38,106,300 640,556,910.00
First Holdings ‘A’ 75.6 6,740,730 504,997,946.00 73.25 5,692,260 415,736,700.00
Ginebra San Miguel Inc. 20.90 48,100 988,015.00 21.00 14,000 291,650.00
Greenergy 0.0140 529,400,000 6,916,200.00 0.0140 113,100,000 1,497,300.00
Holcim Philippines Inc. 11.90 1,496,100 17,508,116.00 11.40 358,100 4,037,550.00
Integ. Micro-Electronics 4 87,000 348,000.00 4 368,000 1,459,540.00
Ionics Inc 0.780 599,000 468,890.00 0.760 932,000 711,680.00
Jollibee Foods Corp. 104.20 2,037,350 216,412,325.00 104.00 1,669,420 174,896,727.00
Liberty Flour 52.50 220 11,550.00 52.00 1,150 59,800.00
LMG Chemicals 1.61 3,925,000 6,521,600.00 1.51 1,600,000 2,367,800.00
Mabuhay Vinyl Corp. 1.47 70,000 104,850.00 1.45 26,000 37,700.00
Manchester Intl. “A” 2.6 687,000 1,631,670.00 2.2 849,000 1,880,950.00
Manchester Intl. “B” 2.55 70,000 167,320.00 2.48 57,000 128,500.00
Manila Water Co. Inc. 24.55 7,495,800 183,935,625.00 24.2 9,318,300 224,639,420.00
Mariwasa MFG. Inc. 2.63 20,000 52,600.00 2.65 4,000 10,600.00
Megawide 17.50 923,700 15,910,122.00 17.20 2,090,100 35,637,286.00
Mla. Elect. Co `A’ 253.40 2,522,980 629,467,382.00 241.00 2,613,020 665,018,998.00
Panasonic Mfg Phil. Corp. 4.55 5,000 22,750.00
Pancake House Inc. 10 1,100 11,000.00 10.5 300 3,050.00
Pepsi-Cola Products Phil. 2.77 4,491,000 12,398,030.00 2.77 4,063,000 11,198,080.00
Petron Corporation 10.00 10,870,600 109,474,345.00 10.14 9,720,300 98,779,954.00
Phinma Corporation 10.30 15,300 157,034.00 10.30 28,300 293,808.00
Phoenix Petroleum Phils. 8.40 720,600 5,855,291.00 8.20 389,600 3,169,746.00
Republic Cement `A’ 8.40 469,700 3,947,306.00 8.20 181,900 1,411,283.00
RFM Corporation 3.58 34,372,000 111,076,010.00 2.92 7,567,000 22,093,420.00
Roxas and Co. 2.25 46,000 102,000.00
Roxas Holdings 2.5 31,000 77,450.00 2.52 7,000 17,660.00
Salcon Power Corp. 6.51 1,191,700 7,969,859.00 4.7 8,000 37,250.00
San Miguel Brewery Inc. 29.00 7,500 216,760.00 29.00 21,400 618,780.00
San Miguel Corp `A’ 114.00 1,930,510 222,151,939.00 115.60 1,584,590 182,331,794.00
Seacem 1.76 61,249,000 106,015,780.00 1.77 4,855,000 8,613,200.00
Splash Corporation 1.88 155,000 291,360.00 1.86 682,000 1,243,200.00
Swift Foods, Inc. 0.128 13,720,000 1,800,760.00 0.128 5,410,000 681,540.00
Tanduay Holdings 4.50 15,694,000 70,951,520.00 4.41 27,248,000 119,295,720.00
TKC Steel Corp. 2.16 13,000 28,050.00 2.10 277,000 580,280.00
Trans-Asia Oil 1.22 2,533,000 3,074,420.00 1.21 3,233,000 3,934,510.00
Universal Robina 62.95 9,845,120 608,772,839.50 61.00 16,932,050 1,042,332,742.00
Victorias Milling 1.41 18,233,000 26,497,470.00 1.49 22,927,000 34,633,940.00
Vitarich Corp. 0.630 9,225,000 6,008,880.00 0.690 3,514,000 2,470,240.00
Vivant Corp. 12.10 50,900 625,628.00 12.38 190,700 2,273,300.00
Vulcan Ind’l. 0.93 735,000 705,150.00 0.97 654,000 617,640.00
HOLDING FIRMS
Abacus Cons. `A’ 0.72 8,040,000 5,769,060.00 0.70 3,361,000 2,287,210.00
Aboitiz Equity 48.95 12,473,900 591,986,425.00 47.50 11,254,800 537,200,925.00
Alcorn Gold Res. 0.0160 703,700,000 11,809,100.00 0.0150 24,200,000 364,000.00
Alliance Global Inc. 11.54 159,458,300 1,869,780,516.00 11.92 121,641,700 1,438,936,330.00
Anglo Holdings A 2.00 1,295,000 2,590,290.00 2.00 692,000 1,384,760.00
Anscor `A’ 4.49 151,000 687,980.00 4.57 416,000 1,922,790.00
Asia Amalgamated A 5.15 486,700 2,512,417.00 5.26 2,597,000 14,074,212.00
ATN Holdings A 2.44 3,778,000 9,115,160.00 1.87 16,000 29,160.00
ATN Holdings B 2.67 560,000 1,483,730.00
Ayala Corp `A’ 469.2 2,002,160 941,852,454.00 470 1,688,330 789,162,962.00
DMCI Holdings 56.90 13,761,810 781,371,337.00 55.00 11,735,210 644,832,841.00
F&J Prince ‘A’ 2.74 72,000 178,840.00 2.48 100,000 249,000.00
Filinvest Dev. Corp. 3.90 1,363,000 5,327,110.00 3.95 2,660,000 10,495,150.00
Forum Pacific 0.200 270,000 57,750.00 0.200 1,090,000 221,770.00
GT Capital 505 929,080 464,764,845.00 490 1,139,480 561,969,990.00
House of Inv. 4.50 271,000 1,184,240.00 4.26 350,000 1,506,500.00
JG Summit Holdings 34.90 7,917,000 276,057,730.00 33.55 10,094,100 338,955,325.00
Jolliville Holdings 2.95 6,000 15,450.00 2.98 58,000 159,790.00
Keppel Holdings `A’ 3.8 3,000 11,400.00
Lopez Holdings Corp. 5.95 26,729,900 158,188,121.00 5.77 14,705,700 85,913,411.00
Lodestar Invt. Holdg.Corp. 1.28 46,191,000 56,846,890.00 1.1 2,439,000 2,670,070.00
Mabuhay Holdings `A’ 0.450 1,160,000 512,300.00 0.420 910,000 359,400.00
Marcventures Hldgs., Inc. 2.56 6,534,000 16,529,940.00 2.57 19,026,000 49,049,940.00
Metro Pacific Inv. Corp. 4.17 101,722,000 424,415,130.00 4.15 48,357,000 199,354,100.00
Minerales Industrias Corp. 5.31 1,927,000 9,894,079.00 4.88 196,000 944,430.00
MJCI Investments Inc. 6.3 907,500 6,042,382.00 5 27,000 129,900.00
Pacifica `A’ 0.0570 82,460,000 4,629,320.00 0.0510 5,100,000 244,500.00
Prime Media Hldg 1.500 321,000 455,570.00 1.380 130,000 181,890.00
Prime Orion 0.460 400,000 182,150.00 0.430 900,000 382,500.00
Republic Glass ‘A’ 2.2 18,000 38,610.00 2.1 618,000 1,297,800.00
Seafront `A’ 1.33 52,000 69,370.00 1.64 4,000 6,500.00
Sinophil Corp. 0.345 3,470,000 1,160,250.00 0.320 4,840,000 1,507,650.00
SM Investments Inc. 730.00 2,061,670 1,489,953,735.00 702.00 1,507,050 1,060,773,430.00
Solid Group Inc. 1.40 8,348,000 12,046,350.00 1.37 733,000 993,840.00
South China Res. Inc. 1.20 170,000 203,900.00 1.18 439,000 516,880.00
Transgrid 425.00 170 74,750.00 490.00 20 9,800.00
Unioil Res. & Hldgs 0.2150 1,210,000 263,480.00 0.2200 970,000 208,300.00
Wellex Industries 0.3450 12,710,000 4,385,000.00 0.3500 7,330,000 2,545,800.00
Zeus Holdings 0.510 4,943,000 2,569,460.00 0.510 2,902,000 1,523,070.00
P R O P E R T Y
Anchor Land Holdings Inc. 22.00 44,400 1,045,035.00 40.00 98,500 3,911,815.00
A. Brown Co., Inc. 2.83 4,317,000 12,729,380.00 2.60 12,000 32,300.00
Araneta Prop `A’ 0.670 305,000 205,120.00 0.650 11,000 7,150.00
Arthaland Corp. 0.171 4,460,000 768,540.00 0.168 1,050,000 174,660.00
Ayala Land `B’ 21.60 43,082,800 925,629,535.00 21.50 40,462,900 892,808,635.00
Belle Corp. `A’ 5.25 122,168,700 627,846,295.00 4.77 2,908,000 13,714,490.00
Cebu Holdings 5.55 1,174,800 6,990,021.00 5.81 1,555,800 8,894,865.00
Cebu Prop. `A’ 5 100,000 1,930,850.00 4.86 110,000 538,200.00
Centennial City 1.45 8,469,000 12,324,780.00 1.44 4,776,000 6,865,610.00
City & Land Dev. 2.40 180,000 431,640.00 2.40 625,000 1,522,380.00
Cityland Dev. `A’ 1.19 52,000 61,800.00 1.22 13,000 15,860.00
Crown Equities Inc. 0.077 6,830,000 518,870.00 0.076 3,500,000 265,200.00
Cyber Bay Corp. 0.83 1,817,000 1,468,450.00 0.79 1,768,000 1,384,140.00
Empire East Land 0.760 46,306,000 35,060,060.00 0.750 70,356,000 53,113,190.00
Ever Gotesco 0.175 1,820,000 315,020.00 0.170 160,000 26,300.00
Global-Estate 1.80 20,570,000 36,643,520.00 1.73 11,434,000 19,722,390.00
Filinvest Land,Inc. 1.28 63,286,000 80,015,760.00 1.23 79,426,000 98,363,090.00
Highlands Prime 2.07 856,000 1,756,360.00 1.82 50,000 87,670.00
Interport `A’ 1.16 1,490,000 1,715,810.00 1.15 723,000 785,240.00
Keppel Properties 1.92 6,000 11,750.00 2.10 39,000 80,180.00
Megaworld Corp. 2.19 830,165,000 1,785,398,670.00 2.1 492,912,000 1,025,632,720.00
MRC Allied Ind. 0.1950 317,270,000 62,410,940.00 0.1850 4,340,000 804,750.00
Phil. Estates Corp. 0.6900 172,549,800 14,107,010.00 0.6800 13,550,000 9,188,280.00
Phil. Realty `A’ 0.450 250,000 114,650.00
Polar Property Holdings 4.45 4,130,000 17,945,090.00 4.15 1,658,000 6,733,250.00
Primex Corp. 3.00 158,000 465,680.00
Robinson’s Land `B’ 17.42 5,954,800 102,577,682.00 16.96 12,363,600 210,146,628.00
Rockwell 3.1 1,108,000 3,445,910.00 3.08 1,216,000 3,764,400.00
Shang Properties Inc. 2.54 270,000 675,740.00 2.55 5,324,000 13,064,490.00
SM Development `A’ 6.15 7,219,600 43,885,469.00 6.12 8,271,100 50,830,122.00
SM Prime Holdings 13.02 37,579,400 486,152,888.00 13.00 38,693,000 505,478,670.00
Sta. Lucia Land Inc. 0.7 5,010,000 3,594,890.00 0.67 3,221,000 2,146,400.00
Suntrust Home Dev. Inc. 0.550 1,044,000 554,690.00 0.520 162,000 85,930.00
Vista Land & Lifescapes 4.200 24,222,000 99,861,870.00 4.110 23,019,500 119,464,620.00
S E R V I C E S
2GO Group 1.94 57,000 100,700.00 1.78 5,000 8,980.00
ABS-CBN 34.8 78,900 2,744,775.00 35 13,000 457,700.00
Acesite Hotel 4.08 1,462,000 6,281,430.00 4.85 5,230,700 35,271,715.00
APC Group, Inc. 0.700 4,549,000 3,064,560.00 0.680 507,000 328,580.00
Asian Terminals Inc. 9 210,400 2,023,737.00 8.6 33,100 285,080.00
Berjaya Phils. Inc. 27 6,900 180,500.00
Boulevard Holdings 0.1390 68,450,000 9,559,250.00 0.1400 73,760,000 10,520,350.00
Calata Corp. 9 10,141,500 92,232,611.00 9.08 63,894,000 722,658,858.00
Cebu Air Inc. (5J) 68.90 5,361,760 367,829,454.00 67.95 2,744,960 177,475,551.50
Centro Esc. Univ. 10.4 7,800 81,120.00 10 3,140 314,000.00
DFNN Inc. 6.04 452,600 2,754,993.00 6.12 1,537,800 10,185,719.00
Easy Call “Common” 3.20 10,000 32,000.00 3.80 24,000 87,210.00
FEUI 975 70 68,250.00 975 220 214,500.00
Globalports 22 200 4,400.00
Globe Telecom 1115.00 402,365 443,692,775.00 1060.00 233,840 244,108,525.00
GMA Network Inc. 10.58 11,002,200 115,907,140.00 10.10 2,357,700 23,830,244.00
I.C.T.S.I. 73.5 9,717,660 701,613,900.00 72.1 6,910,680 508,632,163.50
Information Capital Tech. 0.415 890,000 367,650.00 0.410 1,540,000 666,300.00
IPeople Inc. `A’ 6 51,700 311,210.00 5.6 45,100 249,445.00
IP Converge 2.33 4,228,000 9,536,270.00 2.7 18,914,000 59,979,610.00
IP E-Game Ventures Inc. 0.041 431,500,000 17,079,800.00 0.039 1,283,000,000 53,569,000.00
IPVG Corp. 1.03 3,205,000 3,339,750.00 1.05 772,000 817,350.00
Island Info 0.0530 15,230,000 780,460.00 0.0530 5,240,000 277,470.00
ISM Communications 3.0700 804,000 2,335,640.00 2.5900 110,100 357,850.00
JTH Davies Holdings Inc. 2.65 20,291,000 50,770,830.00 2.5 22,756,000 57,643,500.00
Leisure & Resorts 8.26 54,069,700 416,489,473.00 6.65 763,100 5,020,240.00
Liberty Telecom 2.75 557,000 1,572,900.00 2.78 289,000 789,380.00
Macroasia Corp. 2.85 235,000 664,450.00 2.85 312,000 884,600.00
Manila Bulletin 0.68 223,000 150,540.00 0.67 249,000 169,770.00
Manila Jockey 2.45 8,004,000 19,893,840.00 2.24 3,449,000 7,424,270.00
Metro Pacific Tollways 6.51 1,100 7,161.00 7.30 600 4,350.00
Pacific Online Sys. Corp. 14.58 640,300 13,518,322.00 21.3 263,600 5,543,125.00
PAL Holdings Inc. 7.37 384,800 2,830,946 7.22 230,700 1,659,120
Paxys Inc. 2.94 17,215,000 52,411,450.00 2.88 3,704,000 10,413,480.00
Phil. Racing Club 9.5 1,081,400 10,269,364.00 9.2 18,040,000 171,372,000.00
Phil. Seven Corp. 48.80 1,744,200 77,216,310.00 42.50 2,560,000 108,507,350.00
Philweb.Com Inc. 12.70 661,300 8,548,546.00 13.40 1,140,800 16,252,596.00
PLDT Common 2650.00 1,649,755 4,407,309,400.00 2502.00 759,500 1,854,926,110.00
PremiereHorizon 0.315 4,050,000 1,311,100.00 0.310 7,370,000 2,351,750.00
Puregold 27.15 7,919,000 216,220,760.00 26.70 9,141,800 240,063,220.00
Touch Solutions 3.77 21,000 75,320.00 3.57 40,000 142,850.00
Transpacific Broadcast 2.69 53,000 134,340.00 2.6 218,000 549,490.00
Waterfront Phils. 0.440 1,320,000 565,300.00 0.450 3,240,000 1,422,000.00
MINING & OIL
Abra Mining 0.0041 314,000,000 1,317,400.00 0.0043 411,000,000 1,670,700.00
Apex `A’ 5.15 282,300 1,457,771.00 5.25 1,708,000 8,759,260.00
Apex `B’ 5.05 197,000 1,013,900.00 5.22 471,300 2,526,349.00
Atlas Cons. `A’ 17.98 4,995,100 90,675,672.00 17.64 6,154,600 108,467,550.00
Atok-Big Wedge `A’ 29.80 25,600 759,775.00 30.00 20,200 603,745.00
Basic Energy Corp. 0.265 84,010,000 23,746,850.00 0.275 26,280,000 7,228,850.00
Benguet Corp `A’ 25.5 401,900 9,612,025.00 23.3 111,400 2,572,950.00
Benguet Corp `B’ 24.95 25,000 582,060.00 23.05 43,700 674,320.00
Century Peak Metals Hldgs 1.35 3,065,000 4,268,790.00 1.54 800,000 1,125,580.00
Dizon 33.00 8,466,900 304,215,065.00 37.50 4,528,500 160,496,800.00
Geograce Res. Phil. Inc. 0.7 10,119,000 7,102,620.00 0.73 29,194,000 20,766,870.00
Lepanto `A’ 1.390 67,271,000 92,877,200.00 1.380 157,161,000 219,865,470.00
Lepanto `B’ 1.480 46,765,000 68,952,120.00 1.450 94,088,000 138,478,040.00
Manila Mining `A’ 0.0700 1,543,850,000 107,437,610.00 0.0650 600,490,000 40,204,920.00
Manila Mining `B’ 0.0710 639,900,000 45,070,080.00 0.0660 179,340,000 12,029,770.00
Nickelasia 29.9 3,988,200 120,785,585.00 31 1,776,600 56,167,555.00
Nihao Mineral Resources 9.09 19,260,500 171,500,113.00 8.88 7,567,400 65,190,435.00
Omico 0.7000 1,624,000 1,133,150.00 0.7100 358,000 255,910.00
Oriental Peninsula Res. 5.450 11,941,800 63,440,050.00 5.350 14,347,200 75,670,116.00
Oriental Pet. `A’ 0.0180 871,200,000 15,513,400.00 0.0180 2,933,400,000 54,007,800.00
Oriental Pet. `B’ 0.0190 133,800,000 2,613,400.00 0.0190 353,100,000 6,847,900.00
Petroenergy Res. Corp. 6.00 85,400 509,140.00 6.00 90,000 542,805.00
Philex `A’ 23.85 17,591,800 423,310,190.00 23.75 10,041,800 238,788,410.00
PhilexPetroleum 46.15 10,896,800 487,411,570.00 39.25 5,728,100 227,518,070.00
Philodrill Corp. `A’ 0.048 4,305,810,000 207,321,760.00 0.051 6,698,730,000 327,869,850.00
Semirara Corp. 218.20 1,315,410 286,667,126.00 211.00 1,037,740 221,770,342.00
United Paragon 0.0200 318,400,000 6,159,600.00 0.0190 263,800,000 4,948,900.00
PREFERRED
2GO Group P 2.12 6000 12750
ABS-CBN Holdings Corp. 37 154,700 5,335,715.00 33 1,299,600 41,708,900.00
First Gen G 101 241,160 24,624,626.00 102.1 165,270 16,909,490.00
First Phil. Hldgs.-Pref. 104.50 111,660 11,622,414.00 105.00 100,000 10,499,500.00
GMA Holdings Inc. 10.5 20,170,400 209,677,756.00 10.02 7,725,100 77,207,243.00
PCOR-Preferred 110 385,190 42,371,730.00 110.5 54,850 6,042,210.00
SMC Preferred 1 74.5 1,040 78,830.00 75.65 37,400 2,851,608.00
SMPFC Preferred 1019 39,205 39,924,175.00 1020 6,396,650 18,415,080.00
Swift Pref 1.05 154,000 161,700.00 1.07 177,000 196,360.00
WARRANTS & BONDS
Megaworld Corp. Warrants 1.18 4,230,000 4,809,910.00 1.14 1,109,000 1,174,150.00
Megaworld Corp. Warrants2 1.2 4,000 4,800.00 1.2 400,007,000 440,007,140.00
Omico Corp. Warrant 0.0670 110,000 7,370.00 0.0650 10,000 650.00
Stocks to retest
5,300-point level
Pangilinan: Modern farming fuels economy
AS ONE of the activities to close its centennial
year, De La Salle University formally launched
its new mission and vision statement: A leading
learner-centered research university, bridging faith
and scholarship in the service of society, especially
the poor. A succinct and ambitious statement, it
embodies the university’s aspirations for the future.
From a strategic management perspective, it follows
Collins and Porras’ Big, Hairy, Audacious Goals or
BHAG model. It is “clear and compelling, serves
as unifying focal point of effort, and acts as a clear
catalyst for team spirit.” Underlying this mission
and vision statement are DLSU’s core values of
faith, zeal for service, and communion in mission.
Operationalizing the BHAG
Thus, the various units of the university have
been tasked to operationalize this BHAG. As the
heart and soul of the Ramon V. del Rosario College
of Business, the Management and Organizational
Department chose to live out this mandate by
bridging faith and management practice.
One of the changes made to align our teaching
and research activities to this new vision is
to transform the way we approached basic
management education. Traditionally, students
were taught mainstream management, with the end
goal of “maximizing productivity and profitability
for shareholders.” Starting this academic year,
management freshmen, about 830 students, are
being exposed to “multi-stream management,
which seeks to achieve a balance among multiple
forms of well-being (including financial, social,
ecological, spiritual, physical, aesthetic) for multiple
stakeholders (including owners, employees,
customers, suppliers, competitors, neighbors,
future generations).”
From July 3 to 13, one of the leading proponents
of multi-stream management, Dr. Bruno Dyck
of the University of Manitoba, Canada, will be a
MOD visiting professor. He is the co-author, along
with Mitchell Neubert, of Management: Current
Practices and New Directions, the textbook MOD
adopted for both its undergraduate and graduate
management course.
In the recent International Symposium on Catholic
Social Thought and Management Education, Dr.
Dyck’s presentation focused on the proposition
that multi-stream management is consistent with
Catholic Social Teaching, including respect for
human dignity, and pursuit of the common good.
He compared the impact of the two approaches
on the four functions of management--planning,
organizing, leading, and controlling. Mainstream
management teaches values of centralization in
organizing and personal power in leading. On the
other hand, multi-stream management instills the
values of dignification in organizing and socialized
power in leading. He concluded that when
students are taught multi-stream management, they
become more holistic, i.e., less materialistic and
individualistic, and become enhanced critical and
ethical thinkers.
It’s more fun in the Philippines
During his two-week visit, Dr. Dyck will have
the opportunity to interact with our undergraduate,
masteral, and doctoral students, faculty,
administrators, and even the general public. It
will be a rare treat for our undergrad students to
be able to meet and interact with the author of
their textbook. For our more advanced students,
he will be presenting his latest research work and
encouraging them to pursue aligned studies.
He will be the inaugural speaker for the Br. Rafael
Donato FSC Memoral Lecture series on Thursday,
July 12, 6:00 p.m. at the Ariston Estrada Room,
St. La Salle Hall, DLSU, Taft Avenue, Manila.
For this talk, he will introduce his new book on
Management and The Gospel: Luke’s Radical
Message for the First & Twenty-First Centuries.
It is a thought-provoking analysis of the Gospel of
Luke from the point of view of management theory.
This event is free and open to the public.
Welcome, Dr. Dyck! We look forward to two
weeks of learning and sharing. Hopefully, your
visit will indeed forward the university’s mission
and vision of bridging faith and scholarship, and
inspire our students to be competent, humanistic,
nationalistic, and socially responsible business
leaders, professionals and entrepreneurs who will
serve as change agents in society.
Your research and advocacy on management
theory and practices based on CST will contribute
the quest of educating future business leaders to
live out their true vocation, part of which is for
businesses to produce goods which are truly good
and services which truly serve the common good.
The writer teaches Corporate Social
Responsiveness and Lasallian Business
Leadership at the Ramon V. del Rosario College
of Business of De La Salle University. She can be
reached at pia.manalastas@dlsu.edu.ph.
The views expressed above are the author’s and do
not necessarily reflect the official position of De La
Salle University, its faculty, and its administrators.
PIA T.
MANALASTAS
GREEN LIGHT
By Julito G. Rada
THE stock market may re-test the
5,300-point level this week after latest
developments in the United States and
Europe provided encouraging signs for the
global economy.
“Europe and the US, while still
at the core of financial markets’
risk profile, provided some
encouraging spin adding to the
constant positive input from the
domestic front,” Justino Calaycay
Jr. of Accord Capital Equities
Corp., told Manila Standard in
an e-mailed statement over the
weekend.
“Past the half-way mark of
the year, the market continues
to show strength, despite heavy
headwinds from external
sources,” he said. He said the
strong market rally in the US
over the weekend had boosted
the confidence of domestic
investors on the local front.
“Barring unforeseen
reversal of sentiments in
Europe’s progress following
a series of good news such as
Greece’s election, EU leaders’
commitment to provide aid
to troubled members and
expanding funding, investors are
expected to increase exposure
to risk-assets,” Calaycay said.
He said the 277-point rally in
US stocks last Friday bolstered
the rosy outlook of investors.
Astro del Castillo, managing
director of First Grade Finance
Inc., said he expects the stock
market to re-test the 5,300-point
level this week to reflect positive
developments overseas.
“We are not seeing it through
a crystal ball but it could be
possible due to these latest
developments,” del Castillo said.
He said all subsectors could
post gains this week. “It could be
across the board,” he said.
The local composite index on
Friday lost 9.74 points to close
the week at 5,246.410. Most
of the subsectors, except for
financial and services, ended the
week in the green.
Gainers beat losers, 111 to 60,
while 34 stocks were unchanged.
About 3.033 billion shares worth
P43.9 billion changed hands.
SENATOR Francis Pangilinan
said the closure of the Ford
assembly plant in the Philippines
is a wake-up call and highlights
the crucial role that rural folk
play in generating demand for the
manufacturing sector.
“It is lamentable that in a
country with a population of
over 90 million, there just isn’t
enough business for local car
manufacturing,” Pangilinan said.
“This is in sharp contrast to
a country like Thailand, with a
population of only 60 million, but
which has the biggest demand for
4X4 vehicles worldwide attributed
to the sharp increase in farmers’
incomes. The 4X4 is the vehicle of
choice of the Thai farmer,” he said.
Pangilinan, the chairman of
Senate committee on agriculture,
earlier called on the government to
focus on modernizing the country’s
agriculture and fisheries sector and
at least doubling the incomes of
farmers and fisherfolk. He says
doing so would have a multiplier
effect on the country’s economy.
“Without increased incomes in
the agriculture sector we cannot
hope to squarely address poverty,
and unless poverty is addressed
the rural population’s purchasing
power will remain weak,” he said.
“Only by strengthening the
purchasing power of our rural folk
can we hope to have significant
increases in the demands of the
manufacturing sector. Greater
incomes of our farmers and
fisherfolk will mean greater
demand for goods and services,”
he said.
Pangilinan cited a farmer in
Thailand earns three times more
than Filipinos, while the Chinese
earn twice their local counterparts.
“Filipino farmers earn, on
average, a measly P23,000
annually. Our farmers earn less
than P2,000 per month. That’s
not even enough for them to meet
their daily needs. If we are able
to increase their income, and they
comprise half of our country’s
workforce, then their purchasing
power would result in increased
demand for goods and services,”
he said.
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
B4
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
Manila Standard TODAY
Provinces
Edited by Leo A. Estonilo www.manilastandardtoday.com•leoestonilo@gmail.com
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
(MST-July 2, 2012) (MST-July 2, 2012)
Pursuant to Executive Order No. 68, Series of 2012, providing for the establishment of the Value-
Added Tax (VAT) Tax Credit Certifcate (TCC) Monetization Program ("Program¨) in relation to the
special provisions of Republic Act No. 10155 or the General Appropriations Act of 2012, the following
implementing guidelines are hereby prescribed:
Section 1. Coverage. These guidelines shall cover the following:
A. TCCs
1. Issued solely by the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR) pursuant to the provisions of
Section 112 of the National Internal Revenue Code of 1997 (NIRC), as amended; and
2. Issued jointly by the BIR and the One-Stop Shop Inter-Agency Tax Credit and
Duty Drawback Center (OSS Center) pursuant to the provisions of Section 112
of the NIRC, as amended.
Only valid and unexpired TCCs shall be eligible for enrollment in this Program.
B. TCC HOLDERS
Holders of the above-enumerated TCCs, whether as original grantees or
transferees, may apply for monetization, notwithstanding Section 4 (iii) of Revenue
Regulations No. 5-2000 and other administrative issuances, which prohibit cash
conversion of transferred TCCs.
Section 2. Responsibilities.
A. Department of Finance (DOF). The DOF shall:
1. Direct the BIR to verify the outstanding VAT TCCs, subject to existing laws, rules
and regulations;
2. Provide the confrmation letter of the National Government to acknowledge that the
outstanding VAT TCCs constitute an obligation of the Republic of the Philippines;
3. Favorably endorse to the National Government Agency concerned or to the Bangko
Sentral ng Pilipinas, as the case may be, the application to secure the necessary
fnancial features required in the issuance of investment certifcates to improve
the net proceeds of the benefciaries;
4. Make arrangements with trustee bank on the requirements for the opening of a
special account; and
5. Make available the facilities of the Bureau of Treasury including, but not limited
to, the Registry of Scripless Securities, the Automated Debt Auction Processing
System, and such other facilities as may be required for the auctioning process
in the implementation of the Program.
B. Department of Budget and Management (DBM).
Ensure that the funding requirements for the monetization Program of outstanding VAT
TCCs is included in the National Expenditure Program (NEP) from 2012 to 2016 based
on the requests of the BÌR and the Bureau of Customs (BOC) through:
1. Budget Preparation
i. For 2013, the funding requirements for the monetization of outstanding TCCs
originally issued in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 based on the certifcation
of the DOF shall be included in the NEP to cover the necessary appropriations
for the Program; and
ii. Starting 2014 to 2016, the annual funding requirements, which the DBM will
include in the NEP for the said years, shall be based on the total value of
outstanding TCCs that have been issued from 2009 to April 11, 2012 and that
are covered by Notices of Payment Schedule (NPSs) issued to enrollees of
the Program.
2. Budget Execution
i. For 2012, the release of the Special Allotment Release Order (SARO) and
Notice of Cash Allocation (NCA) for the Program shall be subject to the special
budget request of the BÌR, as endorsed by the DOF based on the master list of
NPS issued indicating the name of the taxpayer, refundable amount, maturity
date of the TCC, and such other necessary information; and
ii. For succeeding years (2013-2016), the release of SAROs and NCAs for the
Program shall also be subject to the special budget requests of the BÌR, as
endorsed by the OOF based on the master list of NPS.
C. Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR).
The BÌR shall submit its yearly budget accountability report as required under existing guidelines
including a report on the redemptions made on NPS issued pursuant to the Program vis-a-vis
the master list of NPS submitted for budget preparation/execution purposes.
Section 3. When and Where to File Application for Enrollment in the Program.Applications for
enrollment must be received by the following TCC-issuing offces within three (3) months from the
effectivity of this Circular:
Type of TCC TCC-Issuing Ofñce
A. VAT TCCs solely issued by the Bureau
of Internal Revenue BIR
B. VAT TCCs jointly issued by the DOF-
OSS Center and the BIR DOF-OSS Center
Section 4. TCC Verihcation.
A. All TCC holders who intend to enroll in the Program shall surrender the original
copies of their TCCs to the concerned TCC-issuing offce enumerated in Section 3
above Within three (3) months from the effectivity of this Joint Circular.
B. Any covered TCC submitted for verifcation for the purpose of monetization shall no
longer be allowed to be used as payment for the TCC holder’s tax liabilities.
C. For TCCs expiring in 2012, an application for verifcation pursuant to this Joint Circular
shall likewise be considered an application for revalidation pursuant to Section 230(B)
of the NIRC, as implemented by Revenue Regulations No. 5-2000.
D. TCCs jointly issued by the DOF-OSS Center and the BIR shall be subject to
pre-validation by the former on the authenticity, accuracy and validity thereof, in
accordance with its established procedures.
The mechanics for the verifcation of TCCs shall be covered by a separate Revenue Memorandum
Order to be issued by the BIR.
Section 5. Issuance of the Notice of Payment Schedule (NPS).The BIR shall issue to the TCC
owner of the verifed TCC an NPS confrming the details of his/her entitlement to monetization,
the refundable amount, the date of monetization and such other necessary information. Only the
duly issued NPS for monetization of covered TCCs shall be accepted by the BÌR or the GFÌ, as
the case may be.
Section 6. Schedule and Manner of Giving Refund.
A. Holders of NPS may opt to:
1. Sell the outstanding amounts at a discount to government fnancial institutions
(GFls) for monetization in accordance with rates to be determined by the
Secretary of Finance and the GFls, or
2. Hold the NPS until its maturity date and be paid by the BIR the full cash value
of the TCC in accordance with the following schedule:
TCCs originally issued in 2003 or earlier 2012
TCCs originally issued in 2008 and prior years 2013
TCCs originally issued in 2009 2014
TCCs originally issued in 2010 2015
TCCs originally issued in 2011 and 2012 2016
B. For TCCs scheduled for monetization in 2012, the refund shall be made upon
checks drawn by the Commissioner of Ìnternal Revenue or by his duly authorized
representative.
C. For TCCs scheduled for monetization from 2013 to 2016, the BÌR shall issue an NPS
confrming the details of a taxpayer's entitlement to monetization, the refundable amount
net of outstanding tax liabilities (except for withholding tax), and maturity date.
D. Checks which remain unclaimed or uncashed within fve (5) years from the date of
the issuance of said checks shall be forfeited in favor of the government and the
amounts thereof shall revert to the general fund; Provided, that in no case, the life
of the refund check to be issued under this Program goes beyond the statutory life
of fve (5) or ten (10) years, if the TCC is revalidated, counted from the date of the
original issuance of the covering TCC.
For purposes of the Program, the maturity date corresponds to the expiry date of the
VAT TCC, unless revalidated pursuant to Section 230(B) of the NIRC, as amended.
Section 7. Payment by SIR to NPS Holder. The NPS must be presented for payment by BIR within
thirty (30) calendar days before the maturity date. To this end, the NPS shall contain the following
statement: “This NPS must be presented for payment within thirty (30) calendar days before the
date of maturity; otherwise, the NPS shall be cancelled and the same shall be forfeited in favor of
the government.”
If the last day for the presentation of the NPS falls on a Saturday, Sunday, holiday (regular or
special) or a declared non-working day due to force majeure, the NPS shall be presented on the
next succeeding business day.
Section 8. Monetization by GFls. Where a taxpayer opts to monetize before the maturity date, he
shall surrender the NPS to the GFls. The GFls shall give the equivalent of the refundable amount less
the applicable discount. The GFls shall provide the BIR a list of actual availments under the Program.
Section 9. Rights of TCC Holder Who Fails to Enroll in the Program. Any holder of a covered
TCC who fails or does not intend to enroll in the Program shall retain the right to:
A. Credit his TCCs against tax liabilities in accordance with existing rules on TCC
utilization; or
B. Apply, subject to conditions of law and pertinent rules and regulations, for TCC
revalidation under Section 230(B) of the NIRC and/or tax refund (cash conversion)
under Section 204(C) of the same Code.
Section 10. Transitory Provision. For the smooth implementation of the Program, all requests for
cash conversion of VAT TCCs that are already in the possession of the BIR as of the effectivity of
Executive Order No. 68 may still be processed pursuant to the provision of Section 5(b) of Revenue
Regulations No. 5-2000 regardless of the issuance dates of the covering TCCs, subject to the
availability of funds.
Section 11. Separability. In case any provision of this Joint Circular is declared unconstitutional
or contrary to law, other provisions which are not affected thereby shall continue to be in force and
in effect.
Section 12. Effectivity. This Joint Circular shall take effect ffteen (15) days from its publication in
the Offcial Gazette and in at least two newspapers of general circulation.
CESAR V. PURISIMA FLORENCIO B. ABAD
Secretary Secretary
Department of Finance Department of Budget and Management
KIM S. JACINTO HENARES
Commissioner
Bureau of Internal Revenue
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
DEPARTMENT OF BUDGET & MANAGEMENT
BUREAU OF INTERNAL REVENUE
JOINT CIRCULAR NO. 2-2012
May 31, 2012
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
DEPARTMENT OF BUDGET & MANAGEMENT
BUREAU OF CUSTOMS
JOINT CIRCULAR NO. 3-2012
May 31, 2012
Pursuant to Executive Order No. 68, Series of 2012, providing for the establishment of the
Value-Added Tax (VAT) Tax Credit Certificate (TCC) Monetization Program ("Program¨) in rela-
tion to the special provisions of Republic Act No. 10155 or the General Appropriations Act of
2012, the following implementing guidelines are hereby prescribed:
Section 1. Coverage. These guidelines shall cover the following:
A. Import VAT portion of TCCs issued jointly by the Bureau of Customs (BOC) and the
One-Stop Shop Inter-Agency Tax Credit and Duty Drawback Center (DOF-OSS Center)
for duty drawbacks pursuant to Section 106 of the Tariff and Customs Code of the
Philippines, as amended (TCCP), and those solely issued by the Bureau of Customs
(BOC) pursuant to Section 112(A) of the National Internal Revenue Code of 1997,
as amended (NIRC).
B. Holders of covered TCCs, whether as original grantees or transferees.
Section 2. Responsibilities.
A. Department of Finance (DOF). The DOF shall direct the BOC to verify the outstanding
VAT TCCs and, subject to existing laws, rules and regulations perform the following
functions:
1. Provide the confirmation letter of the National Government to acknowledge that
the outstanding VAT TCCs constitute an obligation of the Republic of the Philip-
pines;
2. Favorably endorse to the National Government Agency concerned or to the
Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, as the case may be, the application to secure the
necessary financial features required in the issuance of investment certificates
to improve the net proceeds of the beneficiaries;
3. Make arrangements with trustee bank on the requirements for the opening of a
special account; and
4. Make available the facilities of the Bureau of Treasury including, but not limited
to, the Registry of Scripless Securities, the Automated Debt Auction Processing
System, and such other facilities as may be required for the auctioning process
in the implementation of the Program.
B. Department of Budget and Management (DBM). The DBM shall ensure that the funding
requirements for the monetization program are included in the National Expenditure
Program (NEP) from 2012 to 2016 based on the requests of the BOC through:
1. Budget Preparation
i. For 2013, the funding requirements for the monetization of TCCs originally
issued in 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 shall be included in the NEP to
cover the necessary appropriations for the Program based on the certifica-
tion by the DOF in the case of TCCs jointly issued by the BOC & DOF-OSS
Center pursuant to Section 106 of the TCCP and the certification by the
Financial Management Office of the BOC, in the case of TCCs issued solely
by the BOC pursuant to Section 112(A) of the Tax Code of 1997.
ii. Starting 2014 to 2016, the annual funding requirements, which the DBM
will include in the NEP for the said years, shall be based on the total value
of outstanding TCCs that have been issued from 2009 to April 11 , 2012
and are covered by the Notice of Payment Schedule (NPS) issued to the
enrollees of the Program.
2. Budget Execution
i. For 2012, the release of the Special Allotment Release Order (SARO) and
Notice of Cash Allocation (NCA) for the Program shall be subject to the
special budget request of the BOC, as endorsed by the DOF based on the
Master List of NPS issued indicating the name of the taxpayer, refundable
amount, maturity date of the TCC, and such other necessary information.
ii. The release of SAROs and NCAs for the Program for the succeeding years
shall also be subject to the special budget requests of the BOC, as endorsed
by the DOF based on the Master List of issued NPS.
3. Accountability Report
The BOC shall submit its yearly budget accountability report as required under
existing guidelines, including a report on the redemption made on
NPS issued pursuant to the Program vis-a-vis the Master List of NPS submitted
for budget preparation/execution purposes.
Section 3. Verification and Validation of TCCs. Holders of TCCs who intend to enroll in the
Program shall submit their TCCs for verification and validation by the BOC or the DOF-OSS
Center, as the case may be, prior to the monetization thereof. TCCs submitted for verification
and validation pursuant to these guidelines shall no longer be allowed to be utilized as payment
for duty and/or tax liabilities.
The mechanics for the verification and validation of TCCs shall be governed by a
BOC Customs Memorandum Order.
Section 4. When and Where to File Application for Enrolment. Applications for enrolment
in the Program must be received by the following TCC-issuing offices within three (3) months
from the effectivity of this Joint Circular, to wit:
Type of TCC Where to File
1. TCCs solely issued by the BOC pursuant to Sec.112(A) of the
Tax Code of 1997
BOC
2. TCCs jointly issued by the BOC and the DOF-OSS Center
pursuant to Sec. 106 of the TCCP, as amended.
DOF OSS-Center
Section 5. Issuance of Notice of Payment Schedule (NPS). TCCs verified and validated shall
be issued an NPS which shall be proof of the TCC’s authenticity and validity as verified by the
BOC or the DOF-OSS Center, as provided in Sections 3 and 4. The NPS shall indicate the details
of the taxpayer's entitlement to monetization, the refundable amount and the maturity date.
Section 6. Schedule and Manner of Giving Refund.
A. Holders of the NPS may opt to:
1. Sell the outstanding amounts at a discount to government financial institutions
(GFls) for monetization in accordance with the rates to be determined by the
Secretary of Finance and the GFls, or
2. Hold the NPS until its maturity date and be paid by the BOC the full cash value
of the TCC in accordance with the following schedule:
TCCs originally issued in from 2004 to 2007 2012
TCCs originally issued in 2008 2013
TCCs originally issued in 2009 2014
TCCs originally issued in 2010 2015
TCCs originally issued in 2011 and 2012 2016
B. For TCCs scheduled for monetization in 2012, the refund shall be made upon checks
drawn by the Commissioner of Customs or by his duly authorized representative.
C. For TCCs scheduled for monetization in 2013 to 2016, the BOC shall issue an NPS
confirming the details of the taxpayer’s entitlement to monetization, the refundable
amount net of outstanding tax liabilities (except for withholding tax) and the maturity
date.
D. Checks which remain unclaimed or uncashed within five (5) years from the date of
the issuance of said checks shall be forfeited in favor of the government and the
amounts thereof shall revert to the general fund; Provided, that in no case shall the
life of the refund check to be issued under this Program be beyond the statutory life
of five (5) years, or ten (10) years, if the TCC is revalidated, counted from the date
of the original issuance of the covering TCC.
For purposes of the Program, the maturity date corresponds to the expiry date of the VAT
TCC, unless revalidated pursuant to existing rules and regulations issued by the BOC, in
relation to Sec. 230(B) of the NIRC, as amended.
Section 7. When to Present NPS for Monetization. The NPS must be presented to the BOC
for monetization within thirty (30) calendar days before its maturity date. To this end, the NPS
shall contain the following statement: “This NPS must be presented for payment within thirty
(30) calendar days before [maturity date]; otherwise, the NPS shall be cancelled in favor of
the government.”
If the last day for the presentation of the NPS falls on a Saturday, Sunday, holiday (regular or
special) or a declared non-working day due to force majeure, the NPS shall be presented on
the next succeeding business day.
Section 8. Monetization by GFls. Where a taxpayer opts to monetize his TCC before its
maturity date, he shall surrender the NPS to the GFls. The GFls shall give the equivalent of
the refundable amount less the applicable discount. The GFls shall provide the BOC a list of
actual availments under the program.
Section 9. Rights of TCC Holder Who Will Not Enroll in the Program. Any holder of a covered
TCC who opts not to enroll in the Program shall retain the right to credit the TCCs against tax
liabilities in accordance with existing rules on TCC utilization.
Section 10. Treatment of Pending Claims. Applications for drawback claims that are pending
before the DOF-OSS Center and the BOC prior to the effectivity of this Joint Circular shall be
given the option to select the preferred scheme for the recovery of the creditable input VAT
under Sec. 106 of the TCCP, as amended.
Within three (3) months from the effectivity of this Order, claimant with pending applications
for drawback must notify the DOF-OSS Center, in writing, of their preference for TCCs instead
of cash refund.
Once the said option has been exercised by the claimant, the same shall be considered as
irrevocable, and shall be construed as a waiver for the conversion of the claim from tax credit
to cash refund.
Section 11. Transitory Provision. For the smooth implementation of the Program, TCCs with
VAT component jointly issued by the BOC and the DOF-OSS Center prior to the effectivity of
this Joint Circular, with outstanding balance as verified and validated by the DOF-OSS Center
and the BOC shall be automatically qualified for this Program.
Section 12. Separability. In case any provision of this Joint Circular is declared unconstitu-
tional or contrary to law, other provisions which are not affected thereby shall continue to be
in force and in effect.
Section 13. Effectivity. This Joint Circular shall take effect fifteen (15) days from its publication
in the Official Gazette and in at least -two newspapers of general circulation.
CESAR V. PURISIMA FLORENCIO B. ABAD
Secretary Secretary
Department of Finance Department of Budget and Management
ROZZANO RUFINO B. BIAZON
Commissioner
Bureau of Internal Revenue
Hog-raisers laud
Alcala’s support
Health covers .5m
families in Bicol
Requiem to fallen trees. A Palawan tribesman shows the stump
of one of at least 45 old trees cut down for the ecotourism project of
ABS-CBN Foundation-Bantay Kalikasan within 10 feet of the Sabsaban
bank when it illegally occupied the premises on March 25, 2012. The
Strategic Environmental Plan for Palawan Act requires a SEP clearance
before even one dead and decaying tree is cut. The Palawan Council for
Sustainable Development has ordered activities stopped until a SEP
clearance is secured.
By Joyce Pangco Pañares
PRESIDENT Benigno Aquino III has
approved a P1.16 billion power subsidy
for economic zones in a bid to attact more
foreign investments.
Budget Secretary Florencio
Abad said the funding
was released to the Power
Sector Assets and Liabilities
Managament for the extension
of its memorandum of
agreement with the Manila
Electric Company.
The fund will cover export
manufacturing companies under
the Philippine Economic Zone
Authority.
“By extending this assistance,
the administration will not
only help key PEZA industries
that are already established
in the country,” Abad said
yesterday. “The energy subsidy
will likewise encourage the
influx of foreign investments
and boost the Philippines’
competitiveness vis-a-vis its
neighbors.”
Mr. Aquino has approved
the extension of the agreement
between PSALM and Meralco
until December 25 this year,
or until the implementation of
open access in the energy sector,
whichever comes first.
From January to April this
year, the funding requirement for
the power subsidy in ecozones
has reached P453.7 million.
The subsidy will be charged
against the Department of
Energy’s share in revenues from
the Malampaya natural gas
operation in Palawan.
“Through these measures, the
Aquino administration intends
to usher in more investment
activity into the country,” Abad
said. “Electricity rates in the
Philippines are already the
highest in Asia, and we want
to mitigate the cost of doing
business here so that the country
becomes more attractive to
foreign investors.”
With more businesses setting
up shop in the Philippines,
the government will be better-
positioned to open up more
employment opportunities
for Filipinos and, ultimately,
stimulate long-term economic
growth, he said.
Since Mr. Aquino took office
in 2010, PEZA has generated
some P465 billion in registered
investments across the country’s
258 economic zones as of
April.
PEZA aims to post a 12
percent increases in investments,
exports and employment this
year following last year’s P288
billion in total investments, a 41
percent increase from the P204
billion generated in 2010.
THE National Federation of
Hog Farmers Inc. lauded the
Department of Agriculture
backing the fight against
smuggling of meat.
In a statement, NFHFI
chairman Daniel Javellana Jr.,
thanked Secretary Proceso Alcala
for championing their cause.
“We are happy with Secretary
Alcala’s immediate action,” he
said, noting that a “meat holiday”
was no longer needed.
The department and Customs
bureau earlier met to curb the
arrival of illegal meat.
“We want to give fair play
to our local producers,” Alcala
said. “If smuggled goods
continue to enter our country
without paying taxes and other
government dues then our
producers will suffer.”
Meanwhile, he has
ordered National Irrigation
Administration Administrator
Antonio Nangel to mind the
irrigation systems, dams and the
forthcoming mini hydro power
plants.
“They can produce electricity
by December and the public will
benefit from it,” he said.
Gigi Muñoz David
LEGAZPI CITY – Around 500,000 families in Bicol are now covered
by the Philippine Health Insurance Corp., said Dr. Eduardo Banzon,
president and chief executive.
“Universal healthcare is the dream not only of the Philippines
but also of its neighboring countries in Southeast Asia,” he said at
the renewwal of partnership with the local governments recently at
Oriental Hotel here.
Albay Gov. Joey Sarte Salceda commended the increase of benefits
before adjusting premium payments.
“What we are about to witness is possibly the biggest increase
in health expenditure by the government in the entire history of
the Philippines from only P 20 billion before to triple this year to
P60,000 billion,” he said, noting that benefit payments average
P4 billion a month.
“Let’s support the so-called Sin Tax Bill (on tobacco and liquor) to
raise P 24 billion of which 85 per cent will be used for the healthcare
program.”
Orlando Iñigo, PhilHealth regional vice president for Bicol,
delivered the welcome remarks.
Gov. Joseph Cua of Catanduanes, Gov. Eduardo Tallado of
Camarines Norte and Luis Raymund Villafuerte Jr. of Camarines
Sur were represented by vice governors Jonah Pedro Pimentel
and Fortunato Peña, respectively joined by Legazpi City Mayor
Geraldine Rosal, Tabaco City Mayor Krisel Lagman Luistro and
Masbate City Mayor Socrates Tuason.
PhilHealth gave Center of Excellence awards to Mother Seton
Hospital operated by the University of Santa Isabel, in Naga City,
and the Juan M. Alberto Memorial District Hospital in San Andres,
Catanduanes. Florencio P. Narito
Abad
Aquino signs P1-b power subsidy
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Gianna Maniego, Editor
Dinna Chan Vasquez, Assistant Editor
STRUT INTO STYLE
For fashion-loving young persons,
being required to wear uniforms
can be quite restricting. But ELLE
Kids’ trendy shoe options for
young boys and girls allows them
to stand out in class and strut the
school halls in style.
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
C1
MASSIVE
COLLECTION
MAC finally has a
permanent Nail
Lacquer collection
that features 31
colors and three
finishes.
LOVE LUSH
Lush specializes in eco-
friendly soaps and bath
products, and features fun
—but minimal—packaging
and quirky names like Demon
in the Dark soap and You Snap
the Whip body butter.
Michael
Bernstein
MY MOTHER warned me that
if I continued to wash my hair
every day, I would be bald before
I reached the age of 60.
“You wash your face every day, don’t you? Then
you can certainly wash your hair every day,” says
Michael Bernstein, chief trichologist for Svenson.
Trichology being the science surrounding hair
and scalp issues, a trichologist is an expert on these
matters.
“In our role as trichologists, we occupy a unique
position in the sphere of alternative therapy. We
do not profess to be doctors, nor do we have the
jurisdiction to prescribe drugs. What we do have
is knowledge, and the ability to recommend the
client to seek medical advice from the appropriate
source, e.g. dermatologist, endocrinologist, etc. if
we are unable to help or feel the problem is beyond
our capabilities. The uniqueness of our profession
is that I sincerely believe we are more educated in
the field of hair and scalp than the majority of both
doctors or dermatologists,” explains Bernstein.
According to Bernstein, a person, on the
average, loses about 78 strands of hair a day but a
surge of stress, a serious illness and even pregnancy
can result in more loss.
Male pattern baldness is the most common type
of hairloss, which affects the majority of males
between the ages 15 and into their 70s. This is
largely due to high levels of testosterone. These
hormones, when interacted with a certain enzyme,
make hair follicles shrink and unable to replace
lost hair. First, men develop a receding hairline,
then gradually the hair on top of the head also
begins to thin out.
“It is not testosterone on its own, which is the
culprit but its interaction with an enzyme called
5-alpha reductase resulting in a powerful androgen
called dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT binds to the
genetic receptors within the follicle and starts the
miniaturization of the follicle by reducing the anagen
(growth period) of the hair cycle. This can be further
exacerbated by stress, illness drugs, smoking and of
course by hereditary issues,” says Bernstein.
It’s not just men who suffer from hairloss.
Female pattern hairloss has been steadily increasing
over the past 20 years. Here’s why.
Female pattern hairloss usually manifests as
a diffuse thinning in the scalp’s frontal, crown or
temporal area. Many experts believe that women’s
exposure to extreme stress and pressure nowadays
is one of its major reasons. According to Bernstein,
when you’re stressed, your body overproduces
testosterone, which leads to intense or abnormal
shedding. Your body steals the oxygen and nutrients
from the hair follicles to sustain the health of the
life-supporting vessels in your body. This often
results in hair fall or dryness in the scalp.
“Nowadays, women are under much more
pressure than in the past. They now compete on
equal terms with men in the corporate world.
In addition, still expected to become mothers,
be homemakers, and then look glamorous and
be sexy in the evening for their husbands. This
competitiveness can activate their testosterone
(aggressive) hormone level. Stress has been shown
to inhibit the production of estrogen (female
hormones) resulting in fatigue and depression... It’s
no wonder women now suffer from more hairloss,”
explains Bernstein.
On the contrary, the trichologist says female
pattern hairloss is not caused by too much use of
hair dyes.
Svenson offers a number of solutions for people
faced with hair loss. These include:
The Hair Repair Program is specially formulated
to replenish and strengthen hair from the inside. It
repairs breakage by deeply nourishing each strand
to make it stronger and healthier. It helps recover
hair’s original volume and vitality and stops severe
hairloss. Hair becomes fuller, shinier and more
manageable.
The Hair Restoration Program fights
dihydrotestosterone or DHT, controls a receding
hairline and other balding spots and boosts hair
growth and production.
The Hair Reconstruct Program is a non-surgical
hair replacement procedure ideal for advanced
baldness. A super-fine synthetic skin with hair
bonded to it is applied to your scalp—giving you a
full head of hair quickly, undetectably. It’s painless,
easy and looks natural.
The Hair Recreate Program is the ideal solution
to have fuller, thicker and even longer hair, for
good. It’s a non-surgical hair integration process
that interweaves natural hair to your own hair
strands.
The Anti-Hairloss Retain Program deep-cleans
the scalp for a healthier environment for growth,
stops hair fall and helps maintain your hair’s
thickness, lushness and softness.
Mike Enriquez
RJ Ledesma
THE Asian Hospital and Medical Center (AHMC) marked its
10th anniversary with a week-long event to thank its officers,
doctors, employees and partners who have supported the
hospital for the past decade. Under the new management of
Metro Pacific Investments Corporation, AHMC envisions to be
the foremost patient-centered healthcare provider in the country
through the leadership of its first Filipino president and chief
executive Andres Licaros Jr. Present are AHMC founding
chairman Dr. Jorge Garcia flanked by Dermatology Department
chairman Dr. Evangeline Handog (left) and Department
of Occupational and Family Medicine chairman Maria
Antonia Yamamoto, (back row, from left) Neuroscience
Department chairman Dr. Eusebio Debuque, Radiology
Department chairman Dr. Vicente Romano Jr., Pediatrics
Department chairman Dr. Benjamin Co, Emergency
Medicine Department chairman Dr. Steve Almeda, Surgery
Department chairman Dr. Orlando Diomampo, Licaros and
chief medical officer Dr. Juan Rosas.
Celebrating 10 years
of quality patient care
By Dinna Chan Vasquez
Hair
TODAY,
gone
TOMORROW
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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
HOW many times have we heard the adage "health is
wealth?" And how much do we have to prove that?
Cathy Turvill, owner of Nurture Spa Village in Si-
lang Cavite examines and shares with everyone what
she knows about health and the "choices" we have to
enjoy a longer, healthier and happier life.
An air of calm and relaxation settles on visitors to
Nurture Spa as soon as they set foot on the center.
Turvill showed us around the center and introduced
their services, which according to her, incudes unique
ways to destress,loss weight and prevent as well as
treat chronic diseases such as kidney failure and even
cancer. Turvill recently launched her book, entitled
"Choices," which introduces useful information from
her years of experience as one of the spa experts in the
Philippines as well as her training at the Living Foods
Institute of Atlanta and Harvard Medical School in
Boston, USA.
"I call this place a 'center for ecotherapy,' because
we offer wellness therapy through communion with
nature. One of our 'patients' right now is my friend
who flew in from L.A. a few days after he suddenly
collapsed due to kidney failure. The doctor advised
him to take several medicines, which cost a lot. He
decided to come here and undergo in one of our
cleansing and detoxifying programs. When he came
here, he could barely walk and he really looked sick.
A week since undergoing the program, the doctor said
that his condition has stabilized," she shares.
Nurture Spa Village was named one of the 28 Most
Relaxing Spas in Asia by CNN Go in June 2010 and
one of the Top Seven Spas of the Philippines by Hong
Kong-based publication Asia Spa Magazine in its
May-June 2010 issue.
"All the vegetables and herbs we serve are organ-
ic and fresh from our garden. Nurture Spa Village,
which is now on its 10th year, is a member of Zero
Carbon Community. The air we breathe right now is
the cleanest and freshest you can get in the area, as if
we are in a tropical forest ."
The services
Nurture Spa's new activity package, "Glamping,"
is perfect for families and groups who seek well-
ness, relaxation and fun minus the frills and hassles
of 'real camping'. Neat and cozy tents are mounted at
the garden area of Nurture Spa. For hassle-free camp-
ing, each tent is provided with comfortable cushioned
beds, pillows, lamp shades and toiletry set. Should
one needs to use the comfort room, a clean concrete
bathroom complete with facilities one may need is
just a few steps away from the camp site.
"What makes Nurture Spa different from other spa
and wellness salons is that all our treatments, prod-
ucts and even themes for the cottages are distinctly
Filipino and we're very proud of that. We've been pro-
moting Filipino products and services for a decade
and it's something that I love doing," says Turvill,
whose husband Mike Turvill helped her achieve her
dream of putting up this unique wellness center.
Among its must-try massage services are Nilaib,
Aruga, Hilot Kagalingan, the Hele Foot Spa abd the
Mutya Facial, all of which uses organic aromatic oils
exclusive to Nurture Spa. Nurture Spa's top quality
therapeutic essential oils are all developed by Mike
who studied aromatherapy and holds a Doctorate in
Organic Chemistry from the UK.
The Nilaib Massage is Nurture's signature treat-
ment, nominated at the 2010 Asia Spa Baccarat
Awards for the Best Holistic Spa Treatment. An origi-
nal concept , it is exclusively-offered at Nurture. The
treatment uses steamed herbal pouch wrapped in ba-
nana leaves to provide powerful healing and relax-
ing experience. Aruga massage, another signature full
body therapy that relaxes the mind and body and re-
lieves anxiety, uses Tranquility Massage Oil, which
come from blends of benzoin, cedar wood and grap-
fruit essential oils. Hilot Kagalingan, on the other
hand, is based on the traditional Filipino massage
plus a fusiion of Asian trherapies. It helps prevent or
relieve colds, sprain, fever and fatigue with special
herbs and massage techniques applied for this service.
Aside from massage services, Nurture Spa also of-
fers exquisite facial and body treatments from Bio-
droga of Germany and Algotherm from France, brands
which are found in five star spas around the world.
"What we like to focus on right now, aside from
our facial and body treatments, are our natural healing
packages for weight loss, stress relief, diabetes, high
blood pressure, cholesterol reduction, cancer relief
and prevention, kidney and liver malfunction using a
combination of laternative medicines and treatments
including detoxification, breathing exercises, nutri-
tional counseling, acupuncture and herbal medicine,"
Cathy said. "These programs are overseen by Dr. Sam
Dizon, he's the medical director of the Institute of
natural Health."
Cathy also conducts a series of seminar aptly called
"Choices," which are based from her book of the same
title. Turvill is also the president of PhilWell, the spa
association of the Philippines.
For more information on Nurture Spa's services
and treatments, visit www.nurture.com.ph.
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON NATURALIZATION
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
SCN CASE NO. ___________
to be naturalized as Filipino citizen pursuant
to Republic Act No. 9139.
x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x
PETITION
Pursuant to the provisions of Republic Act No. 9139,
petitioner hereby submits a petition for naturalization to
become a citizen of the Republic of the Philippines and
respectfully declares:
1. My full name is SONIARAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI but
I have also been known since childhood as _____N/A_____
, or I have been judicially authorized to use the alias name(s)
______N/A______.
2. My present place of residence is 2205-B F. Zobel St.,
San Miguel Village, City/Municipality of Makati, Province of
Manila, and all my former places of residence are (please
indicate periods of residence):
252 Sen. Gil Puyat Ave., West of Ayala Condominium,
Makati (2003-2009)_________________________
1129 Concepcion St., Gotesco Tower-A Ermita ____
Manila (1999-2003)_________________________
3340-A Ibarra St., Palanan, Makati (1996-1999)____
1580 F.T. Benitez St., Paco, Manila (1987-1996)____
1851 Maria Orosa St., Malate, Manila (1982-1987)__
3. I was born on Sept. 17, 1982, in Manila, , I have been
a resident of the Philippines since birth. At present, I am a
citizen or subject of India.
4. My father's name is RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
and he was born on April 5, 1939, in India. He is a citizen or
subject of India My mother's name is Maya Chandiramani
and she was born on Sept. 21, 1949, in India. She is a citizen
or subject of India.
5. My trade, business, profession or lawful occupation
is _TUTORIAL_ and from which I derive an average annual
income of P 120,000.00_, inclusive of bonuses, commissions
and allowances. My wife's/husband's trade, business,
profession or lawful occupation is N/A and from which she
derives an average annual income of P _N/A_.
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
(Where the above does not apply): I am exempt from
the requirement of lucrative trade or occupation and from
submitting income tax returns for the past three (3) years
because I am a college degree holder [please state (1)
degree obtained: _N/A_, (2) name of school:_N/A_ and (3)
years graduated:_N/A_] who cannot practice my profession
(the practice of which requires a government licensure
examination) by reason of my citizenship.
6. My civil status is Single. I was married on N/A in N/A.
My wife's/husband's name is N/A and she/he was born on
N/A in N/A. She/he is a citizen or subject of N/A and presently
resides N/A.
7. I am legally separated from my spouse; my marriage
was annulled, per decree of legal separation/annulment
dated N/A granted by N/A. (please indicate the particular
court which granted the same). I am a widower/widow and
my spouse died on N/A in N/A.
8. I have N/A child/children, whose names, dates and
places of birth and residences are as follows:
Name Date of Birth Place of Birth Residence
N/A N/A N/A N/A
9. I received my primary and secondary education from
the following public schools or private educational institutions
duly recognized by the Department of Education, Culture
and Sports (DECS), where Philippine history, government
and civics are taught and prescribed as part of the school
curriculum and where enrollment is not limited to any race
or nationality:
Name of School Place of
School
Dates of
Study
Highest
Grade
Completed
St. Scholastics College Manila 1988-1994 Grade 5
St. Mary's of the Woods School Makati 1994-1995 Elementary
St. Mary's of the Woods School Makati 1995-1999 High School
Assumption College Makati 2001-2004 Bachelors
Degree
10. I am able to read, write and speak Filipino and/or any
of the following dialects of the Philippines: Tagalog.
11. I have enrolled my minor children of school age in the
following public schools or private educational institutions
duly recognized by the Department of Education, Culture
and Sports (DECS), where Philipine History, government
and civics are taught and prescribed as part of the school
curriculum and where enrollment is not limited to any race
or nationality:
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
Name of Child Name and Place of
School
Date of
Enrollment
N/A N/A N/A
12. I shall never be a public charge. I am of good
moral character. I believe in the principles underlying
the Philippine Constitution. I have conducted myself in a
proper and irreproachable manner during the entire period
of my residence in the Philippines in my relations with the
constituted government as well as with the community in
which I am living. I mingled socially with Filipinos and have
evinced a sincere desire to learn and embrace the customs,
traditions and ideals of the Filipino people. I have all the
qualifcations and none of the disqualifcations under Republic
Act No. 9139.
I am not opposed to organized government or affliated
with any association or group of persons who uphold and
teach doctrines opposing all organized governments. I
am not defending or teaching the necessity or propriety
of violence, personal assault or assassination for the
success and predominance of one's ideas. I am not a
polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy.
I have not been convicted of any crime involving moral
turpitude. I am not suffering from mental alienation or from
any incurable contagious disease. The country of which
I am a citizen or subject is not at war with the Philippines
and grants to Filipinos the right to be naturalized citizens
or subjects thereof.
13. It is my true and honest intention to become a citizen
of the Philippines and to renounce absolutely and forever
all allegiance and fdelity to any foreign prince, potentate,
state or sovereignty, and, particularly, to India of which at
this time I am a citizen or subject. I will reside continuously
in the Philippines from the date of the fling of this petition
up to the time of my admission to Philippine citizenship.
14. My character wi tnesses are BERNARDINA
ESPARAGOZA and NARCISA V. MARZAN both Filipino
citizens, of legal age, and residing at 1465 D. Oliman St.,
San Miguel Village, Makati and 1049 Dagupan St., Tondo,
Manila respectively, who have executed sworn statements
attached hereto in support of my instant petition, together
with: (a) brief biographical data about themselves; (b)
detailed statements on the dates they frst came to know
me, the circumstances of our initial acquaintance and the
reasons and extent of our continuing familiarity; and (c) the
number of times they have acted as character witnesses
in other petitions for naturalization.
15. Attached hereto as annexes and made part of this
petition are the duplicate originals or certifed photocopies
of the following documents (please check the appropriate
box):
[ / ] a. Petitioner's birth certifcate
[ / ] b. Petitioner's alien certifcate of registration (ACR)
[ / ] c. Petitioner's native-born certifcate of residence
(NBCR)
[ ] d. Petitioner's marriage certifcate, if married
[ ] e. Death certifcate of his/her spouse, if widowed
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
[ ] f. Court decree annulling his/her marriage or
granting legal separation, if such was the fact
[ ] g. Birth certifcates of petitioner's minor children
[ ] h. ACRs of petitioner's minor children
[ ] i. NBCRs of petitioner's minor children
[ / ] j. Affdavits of fnancial capacity by the petitioner,
dul y support ed by bank cert i f i cat i ons,
passbooks, stock certificates, or proof of
ownership of other properties
[ / ] k. Affdavits of at least two (2) credible witnesses
who must be Filipino citizens of good reputation
in petitioner's place of residence
[ / ] l. Medical certifcate from a government hospital
stating that petitioner is not suffering from
mental alienation or a user of prohibited drugs
or otherwise a drug dependent and that he/she
is not afficted with acquired immune defciency
syndrome (AIDS), or any incurable contagious
disease.
[ / ] m. School diploma and transcript of records of the
petitioner from the school/s he or she attended
in the Philippines
[ ] n. Certifications stating that petitioner's minor
children are enrolled in public schools or private
educational institutions duly recognized by the
DECS, where Philippine history, government
and civics are taught and prescribed as part of
the school curriculum and where enrollment is
not limited to any race or nationality
[ / ] o. Petitioner's income tax returns for the past three
years
[ / ] p. Petitioner's receipts of payment of income tax
for the past three years
16. Other documents submitted by the petitioner in
support of his/her petition:
NBI CLEARANCE, BARANGAY CLEARANCE
POLICE CLEARANCE, COURT CLEARANCE
PRAYER
WHEREFORE, it is respectfully prayed that petitioner be
conferred Philippine citizenship pursuant to the provisions
of Republic Act No, 9139.
Dated at Makati City, Metro Manila, this 2nd day of
May, 2012.
SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
Name and Signature of Petitioner
Address: 2205-B F-ZOBEL ST.
SAN MIGUEL VILLAGE, MAKATI
Telephone Number: 0917-9900742/
8368071
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES)
CITY/MUNICIPAL OF MAKATI) S.S.
I, SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI, of legal age
and a resident of 2205-B F. Zobel St. San Miguel Vill.
Makati, after being duly sworn, depose and say that I am
the petitioner herein, that I have read the foregoing petition
and know the foregoing petition and known the contents
thereof, and that the same is true of my own knowledge.
SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
Name and Signature of Petitioner
SUBCRIBED AND SWORN to before me at CITY OF
MAKATI this 2
nd
day of May, 2012.
SCN FORM NO. 1
(R.A. NO. 9139)
(MST-June 25, July 2 & 9, 2012)
Right Thumbmark
of Petitioner
#lovemy
standardlifestyle@gmail.com
fashion beauty health wellness
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY C3
MONDAY
C2
ANSWER TOMORROW
60 Team on a farm
61 Alphabet ender
62 Animals for 5-Across
63 Call to a queue
Down
1 BoatÕs bottom
2 “Peek-__!”
3 Siamese sound
4 Longtime logo with a
top hat and monocle
5 Exactly right
6 Suspicious of
7 Defense gp. with
pilots
8 Mailed
9 Gadget measuring
rpm
10 Church high point
11 Hairline’s midpoint,
perhaps
12 Swear
13 Change the color of,
as hair
21 “Smooth Operator”
singer
22 Lav in Leeds
25 Word before pad or
tender
26 Common man with a
ANSWER
TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
Across
1 Jon of “Mad Men”
5 Knight fights
11 Roll of dough
14 Slangy prefix
meaning “super”
15 Oust from office
16 Ornamental climbing
plant
17 Roller coaster
feature
18 Batter’s position
LOS ANGELES
TIMES
CROSSWORD
19 Anonymous John
20 One completely
lacking morals
23 Small batteries
24 Sound preceding
“Oof!”
25 2009 Will Ferrell
dinosaur movie
32 Vaudeville show
33 LandlordÕs contract
34 Paid athlete
36 “__ it now”:
“Understood”
37 Writer H.H. or Alice
38 Security breach
39 Place for pickups
40 They may be cracked
using stethoscopes
41 Abacus pieces
42 Woman with varying
roles in Arthurian legend
45 __ guzzler
46 Indian bread
47 What exacting judges
follow
55 __ Mahal
56 Political fugitive
57 Delude
58 Big fuss
59 Singer Bette
six-pack?
27 Plump (up)
28 Basic principle
29 Severe
30 That, in Tijuana
31 Swap
32 You might brush
barbecue sauce on one
35 Approves
37 “Little Red Book”
writer
38 Used for support
40 Gamblers’ methods
41 Dull
43 “Who __?”: New
Orleans Saints’ fans
chant
44 Keys in
47 Stow below
48 Give off
49 Disney World’s
Space Mountain, e.g.
50 Leer at
51 Wilma Flintstone’s
guy
52 Opulence
53 Highest point
54 “What __ wrong?”
55 Looney Tunes devil,
casually
JULY 2, 2012
Gianna Maniego, Editor
Dinna Chan Vasquez, Assistant Editor
ManilaStandardToday
Lush's celebrity fans include Angelina Jolie, Gwyneth Paltrow, Julia
Roberts, Kylie Minogue and Helena Christensen.
Lush celebrates the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth with Rose
Queen bath ballistics, a rose tinted spectacles bath, for times when all you
want to see is the rosier side of life. Drop into a warm ready run bath,
lay back and imagine you’re running through a rose garden, with your
hands brushing the tops of the bushes. The scent of this one is a light
floral rosy accord, of rose absolute and geranium, with amber notes of
rock rose. The bathwater gets a rosy pink glow
with a sprinkling of tiger lily, apple
blossom and larkspur petals adrift
on the surface.
Rose Queen Inventor and Lush
co-founder, Mo Constantine
OBE, says this is a return to old
style ballistics - for times when
you want nothing but an escape to
simpler times of flowers, nature and
innocent simplicity.
Ro’s Argan Body Conditioner is
a beautiful, rose jam scented body
conditioner that’s full of the most
emollient, moisturizing ingredients
possible to feed and nourish the skin.
There’s cypress oil, capuacu butter,
Brazil nut oil, cocoa butter, shea butter
and super softening almond oil, along
with Argan oil of course, which is rich
in vitamin E and incredibly moisturizing
and soothing on the skin.
This was invented by Lush co-founder
Rowena Bird, who wanted a product that
was both a conditioner to use after show-
ering and something containing argan oil. Since its
launch in 2011, Ro’s Argan Body Conditioner has been selling out in
Lush shops worldwide.
British Nanny is the natural way to rescue fair skin from wrinkles. Only
available from Lush's UK shops, this cream will shield and protect you
from harm with SPF30 to give some protection from the sun. Almond and
hisbiscus oils give vitamins C and E and an array of lovely ingredients
moisturize and hydrate; Shea Butter, Almond Oil, Coconut Oil, Jojoba Oil,
Starflower Oil, Hibiscus Seed Oil and Candelilla Wax.
Buffy Body Butter was inspired by Brazilian bathing beau-
ties using wet sand to keep their cellulite in check. Best
used in the shower, rub in circular motions
on problems areas and the shea butter will
melt over skin, while the ground aduki
beans, rice and almonds will scrub and polish.
Twilight Bath Ballistic is one of Lush’s patent pending inventions – a bal-
listic and bubble bar mix. Pop one of these into the tub and marvel as it
d i s - solves to create a growing sunset that gradually gets
darker until you are finally left with the
glimmer of stars. With lavender and
tonka oils at the heart, there are
also notes of caramel and malt
to enhance a sense of com-
fort and reassurance.
Seanik Solid Sham-
poo Bar is an ocean-
inspired bar is made
with Irish moss
and nori seaweed,
which give a
lovely mineral
rich gel that
softens the hair.
Sea salt adds
body and bounce
and lemon oil adds
shine. A tropical is-
land fragrance of mimosa
absolute, orange flower abso-
lute and jasmine absolute is
fabulous for leaving your
hair with a light fresh feel-
ing.
Lush’s solid shampoo
bars give up to 80 washes
from one 55g shampoo bar,
whereas you’d get around
40 washes from a 250g
bottle of liquid shampoo.
So for every shampoo bar
you use, you’re saving two
bottles that would be head-
ing for landfill. They are
small, convenient, easy to
carry and easy to use. Each
contains certain essential oils
that are suitable for particular hair/scalp types.
In the Philippines, Lush is exclusively distributed by Stores Special-
ists, Inc. (SSI) and is located at Glorietta 4, Power Plant Mall, Shangri-
La Mall, Greenbelt 3, Mall of Asia, and Bonifacio High Street.
Dinna Chan Vasquez
FOR fashion-loving young persons, being required to wear uniforms can be quite
restricting. But Elle Kids’ trendy shoe options for young boys and girls allows
them to stand out in class and strut the school halls in style.
Elle Kids’ wide range of styles—Mary Janes and ballet flats adorned with
dainty bows and studded ruffles—give your daily looks a unique edge. Boys'
shoes give navy blue and khaki uniforms a structured finish with leather slip-
ons and monk shoes.
Gear up for gym class, with Elle Kids’ lace-up sneakers, rubber shoes with
Velcro straps, and hi-cut sports shoes, each sporting cool, playful designs for
boys and girls.
Finally, for highly anticipated field trips and family fun days, girls can get styl-
ish in patent ballet flats in red and white, open toed flats with ribbon and bow
appliqués; while the boys can get comfy in casual sneakers in classic red, blue,
and white.
Elle Kids Shoes and Apparel are available at all leading department stores
nationwide and at Elle Kids Lucky China Town Mall.
APPLY for a Citibank Credit Card from and get a
gift from Rudy Porject once your application is ap-
proved, you will receive a welcome gift from Rudy
Project, a Viaggatore luggage worth P8,500.
This offer is good with Citibank Visa/ Mastercard,
Citibank PremierMiles Card, Cebu Pacific Citibank
Card or Rustan's Citibank Card while you get a Rudy
Project Tachymeter Watch worth P2,500 with your
new Citibank Cash Back Card, Mercury Drug Ci-
tibank Card or Shell Citibank Card.
Simply make P5,000 worth of purchases with your
new Citibank credit card 60 days from approval to
avail of these offers. You will then receive a text
message instructing you how to claim your exclusive
Rudy Project merchandise.
For information, call
423-3000 or visit Citibank
Online (www.citibank.
com.ph). You can also
apply via SMS by send-
ing CITI <space>CARD
<space>Name/Phone to
2600.
Love
LUSH
Step into
style this
school year
Get a card,
receive a gift
By Ed Biado
SOME people still believe that you can catch
HIV by being in the same room as someone
who has the virus. Some think that HIV and
AIDS are the same thing. Some are certain
that, once you have it, you’ll fall extremely
ill and die within a few months. These just a
few of the many misconceptions about HIV
and AIDS.
For some reason, people find it hard to
talk about it. Probably some remember that
one guilt-ridden unprotected encounter
years ago (or the time they got a tattoo at
someplace shady) and they still can’t get
over the thought that they could actually
be infected. That’s also why a lot of
individuals don’t want to get tested, or at
least, be educated about the virus and the
medical conditions associated with it.
But why suffer inside not knowing the
truth about your own
body when you can get
it over with right now?
The Love Yourself
Project can help you
do that. The flagship
initiative of nonprofit
organization Love
Yourself Inc. “aims to
prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among the
youth and key affected population through
awareness, counseling and education.” The
group offers HIV Confidential Counseling
and Testing and organizes awareness
campaigns, as well as coordinates with
other government and private organizations
to control the rise of HIV/AIDS cases in the
country.
Although their advocacy is primarily
for the welfare of LGBT individuals, their
services are available to everyone. In fact, the
organization is supported by a lot of public
personalities of different sexual orientations,
including Boy Abunda, Paulo Avelino,
Rocco Nacino, Rissa Hontiveros, Frederick
Peralta and Manny Calayan—all of whom
took part in a charity photo shoot last year
for the benefit of the project’s counseling
activities.
Through fundraisers and the generous
contributions of their donors and volunteers,
Love Yourself Inc. was able to build a
resource hub in Manila, which will be
launched on July 8. It will be marked with a
fund-raising nude photo exhibit by up-and-
coming photographer Ian Felix Alquiros.
To know more about the event and the
project, go to theloveyourselfproject.
blogspot.com. There, you’ll also find a
list of institutions all over the Philippines
that offer HIV testing, details on how to
volunteer or contribute to the cause and,
of course, information on how to seek help
and counseling.
A project
of love
INSIDE a mall, you know when you are near a Lush store when you can smell it. Lush specializes in
eco-friendly soaps and bath products, and features fun—but minimal—packaging and quirky names
like Demon in the Dark soap and You Snap the Whip body butter.
Rose Queen
Buffy
STUDIES have showed that heart
disease is the leading cause of death
in the country in the last 10 years,
according to a data from the Na-
tional Statistics Office.
The NSO said almost 300 Filipi-
nos die of heart disease every day
based on a 2009 study. This num-
ber of deaths from heart ailments
represents a high 21 percent of the
total annual registered deaths in the
country.
“What makes it heartbreaking is
the fact that the prevalence rate is on
the rise,” said the National Statistics
Coordination Board (NSCB) in a
statement.
The NSCB said from 77,060
deaths from heart disease in 2005,
the number rose to 100,908 in 2009,
or an increase of 31 percent increase
in just span of four years.
Health authorities said about 90
percent of the Filipinos are exposed
to one or more risk factors that trig-
ger the progression of heart disease
prompting health advocates to rec-
ommend a balanced and active life-
style to mitigate risks of heart dis-
eases. One of the ways to keep one’s
heart healthy is to eat food rich in
Omega-3, which is naturally-found
in tuna.
Studies have showed Omega 3
contributes to having a healthy heart
as it lowers cholesterol and blood
pressure, and reduces risks of heart
attack and other cardio-vascular dis-
eases.
One product that contains lots
of Omega-3 is San Marino Corned
Tuna. Every 180-gram can of San
Marino Corned Tuna has 1,125 mg
of Omega-3.
Fight heart disease, the
leading cause of death
MAC finally has a per-
manent Nail Lacquer
collection that features
31 colours and three fin-
ishes. The shades include
Impassioned, an orange-
coral with a cream finish;
Mean & Green, a dark
olive green base with a
duochrome of rosy plum
to golden olive green;
and Saint Germain, a
light-medium pink with
blue undertones.
I am not sure if the
collection will be avail-
able in the Philippines
but I do think that MAC
should bring it in because
the brand has a lot of fans
here.
The nail lacquer col-
lection will launch at
Nordstrom and MAC
stores on July 5, then
hit more globally and
online on August 2, for
$16 each. Here are all
the polishes that will be
available:
Faint of Heart
Skin
Soirée
Fiestaware, Morange
Impassioned
Shirelle
Sparks OnScreen
Flamint Rose
Rougemarie
Vintage Vamp
Mean & Green
Formidable!
Midnight Tryst
Deep Sea
Delicate
Snob
Girl Trouble
Saint Germain
Steamy
Girl About Town
Screaming Bright
Quiet Time
Coffee Break
Anti-Fashion
Dark Angel
Spirit of Truth
Discothéque
Nightfall
Nocturnelle
Overlacquer
MAC launches
massive
nail lacquer
collection
beauty
memo
beauty
memo
By Dinna Chan Vasquez
Celebrating
A DECADE OF WELLNESS
By Joba Botana
Ro's Argan
Seanik
C
Y
A
N

M
A
G
E
N
T
A

Y
E
L
L
O
W
B
L
A
C
K
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOWBLACK
HOW many times have we heard the adage "health is
wealth?" And how much do we have to prove that?
Cathy Turvill, owner of Nurture Spa Village in Si-
lang Cavite examines and shares with everyone what
she knows about health and the "choices" we have to
enjoy a longer, healthier and happier life.
An air of calm and relaxation settles on visitors to
Nurture Spa as soon as they set foot on the center.
Turvill showed us around the center and introduced
their services, which according to her, incudes unique
ways to destress,loss weight and prevent as well as
treat chronic diseases such as kidney failure and even
cancer. Turvill recently launched her book, entitled
"Choices," which introduces useful information from
her years of experience as one of the spa experts in the
Philippines as well as her training at the Living Foods
Institute of Atlanta and Harvard Medical School in
Boston, USA.
"I call this place a 'center for ecotherapy,' because
we offer wellness therapy through communion with
nature. One of our 'patients' right now is my friend
who flew in from L.A. a few days after he suddenly
collapsed due to kidney failure. The doctor advised
him to take several medicines, which cost a lot. He
decided to come here and undergo in one of our
cleansing and detoxifying programs. When he came
here, he could barely walk and he really looked sick.
A week since undergoing the program, the doctor said
that his condition has stabilized," she shares.
Nurture Spa Village was named one of the 28 Most
Relaxing Spas in Asia by CNN Go in June 2010 and
one of the Top Seven Spas of the Philippines by Hong
Kong-based publication Asia Spa Magazine in its
May-June 2010 issue.
"All the vegetables and herbs we serve are organ-
ic and fresh from our garden. Nurture Spa Village,
which is now on its 10th year, is a member of Zero
Carbon Community. The air we breathe right now is
the cleanest and freshest you can get in the area, as if
we are in a tropical forest ."
The services
Nurture Spa's new activity package, "Glamping,"
is perfect for families and groups who seek well-
ness, relaxation and fun minus the frills and hassles
of 'real camping'. Neat and cozy tents are mounted at
the garden area of Nurture Spa. For hassle-free camp-
ing, each tent is provided with comfortable cushioned
beds, pillows, lamp shades and toiletry set. Should
one needs to use the comfort room, a clean concrete
bathroom complete with facilities one may need is
just a few steps away from the camp site.
"What makes Nurture Spa different from other spa
and wellness salons is that all our treatments, prod-
ucts and even themes for the cottages are distinctly
Filipino and we're very proud of that. We've been pro-
moting Filipino products and services for a decade
and it's something that I love doing," says Turvill,
whose husband Mike Turvill helped her achieve her
dream of putting up this unique wellness center.
Among its must-try massage services are Nilaib,
Aruga, Hilot Kagalingan, the Hele Foot Spa abd the
Mutya Facial, all of which uses organic aromatic oils
exclusive to Nurture Spa. Nurture Spa's top quality
therapeutic essential oils are all developed by Mike
who studied aromatherapy and holds a Doctorate in
Organic Chemistry from the UK.
The Nilaib Massage is Nurture's signature treat-
ment, nominated at the 2010 Asia Spa Baccarat
Awards for the Best Holistic Spa Treatment. An origi-
nal concept , it is exclusively-offered at Nurture. The
treatment uses steamed herbal pouch wrapped in ba-
nana leaves to provide powerful healing and relax-
ing experience. Aruga massage, another signature full
body therapy that relaxes the mind and body and re-
lieves anxiety, uses Tranquility Massage Oil, which
come from blends of benzoin, cedar wood and grap-
fruit essential oils. Hilot Kagalingan, on the other
hand, is based on the traditional Filipino massage
plus a fusiion of Asian trherapies. It helps prevent or
relieve colds, sprain, fever and fatigue with special
herbs and massage techniques applied for this service.
Aside from massage services, Nurture Spa also of-
fers exquisite facial and body treatments from Bio-
droga of Germany and Algotherm from France, brands
which are found in five star spas around the world.
"What we like to focus on right now, aside from
our facial and body treatments, are our natural healing
packages for weight loss, stress relief, diabetes, high
blood pressure, cholesterol reduction, cancer relief
and prevention, kidney and liver malfunction using a
combination of laternative medicines and treatments
including detoxification, breathing exercises, nutri-
tional counseling, acupuncture and herbal medicine,"
Cathy said. "These programs are overseen by Dr. Sam
Dizon, he's the medical director of the Institute of
natural Health."
Cathy also conducts a series of seminar aptly called
"Choices," which are based from her book of the same
title. Turvill is also the president of PhilWell, the spa
association of the Philippines.
For more information on Nurture Spa's services
and treatments, visit www.nurture.com.ph.
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES
SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON NATURALIZATION
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF
SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
SCN CASE NO. ___________
to be naturalized as Filipino citizen pursuant
to Republic Act No. 9139.
x - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - x
PETITION
Pursuant to the provisions of Republic Act No. 9139,
petitioner hereby submits a petition for naturalization to
become a citizen of the Republic of the Philippines and
respectfully declares:
1. My full name is SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI but
I have also been known since childhood as _____N/A_____
, or I have been judicially authorized to use the alias name(s)
______N/A______.
2. My present place of residence is 2205-B F. Zobel St.,
San Miguel Village, City/Municipality of Makati, Province of
Manila, and all my former places of residence are (please
indicate periods of residence):
252 Sen. Gil Puyat Ave., West of Ayala Condominium,
Makati (2003-2009)_________________________
1129 Concepcion St., Gotesco Tower-A Ermita ____
Manila (1999-2003)_________________________
3340-A Ibarra St., Palanan, Makati (1996-1999)____
1580 F.T. Benitez St., Paco, Manila (1987-1996)____
1851 Maria Orosa St., Malate, Manila (1982-1987)__
3. I was born on Sept. 17, 1982, in Manila, , I have been
a resident of the Philippines since birth. At present, I am a
citizen or subject of India.
4. My father's name is RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
and he was born on April 5, 1939, in India. He is a citizen or
subject of India My mother's name is Maya Chandiramani
and she was born on Sept. 21, 1949, in India. She is a citizen
or subject of India.
5. My trade, business, profession or lawful occupation
is _TUTORIAL_ and from which I derive an average annual
income of P 120,000.00_, inclusive of bonuses, commissions
and allowances. My wife's/husband's trade, business,
profession or lawful occupation is N/A and from which she
derives an average annual income of P _N/A_.
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
(Where the above does not apply): I am exempt from
the requirement of lucrative trade or occupation and from
submitting income tax returns for the past three (3) years
because I am a college degree holder [please state (1)
degree obtained: _N/A_, (2) name of school:_N/A_ and (3)
years graduated:_N/A_] who cannot practice my profession
(the practice of which requires a government licensure
examination) by reason of my citizenship.
6. My civil status is Single. I was married on N/A in N/A.
My wife's/husband's name is N/A and she/he was born on
N/A in N/A. She/he is a citizen or subject of N/A and presently
resides N/A.
7. I am legally separated from my spouse; my marriage
was annulled, per decree of legal separation/annulment
dated N/A granted by N/A. (please indicate the particular
court which granted the same). I am a widower/widow and
my spouse died on N/A in N/A.
8. I have N/A child/children, whose names, dates and
places of birth and residences are as follows:
Name Date of Birth Place of Birth Residence
N/A N/A N/A N/A
9. I received my primary and secondary education from
the following public schools or private educational institutions
duly recognized by the Department of Education, Culture
and Sports (DECS), where Philippine history, government
and civics are taught and prescribed as part of the school
curriculum and where enrollment is not limited to any race
or nationality:
Name of School Place of
School
Dates of
Study
Highest
Grade
Completed
St. Scholastics College Manila 1988-1994 Grade 5
St. Mary's of the Woods School Makati 1994-1995 Elementary
St. Mary's of the Woods School Makati 1995-1999 High School
Assumption College Makati 2001-2004 Bachelors
Degree
10. I am able to read, write and speak Filipino and/or any
of the following dialects of the Philippines: Tagalog.
11. I have enrolled my minor children of school age in the
following public schools or private educational institutions
duly recognized by the Department of Education, Culture
and Sports (DECS), where Philipine History, government
and civics are taught and prescribed as part of the school
curriculum and where enrollment is not limited to any race
or nationality:
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
Name of Child Name and Place of
School
Date of
Enrollment
N/A N/A N/A
12. I shall never be a public charge. I am of good
moral character. I believe in the principles underlying
the Philippine Constitution. I have conducted myself in a
proper and irreproachable manner during the entire period
of my residence in the Philippines in my relations with the
constituted government as well as with the community in
which I am living. I mingled socially with Filipinos and have
evinced a sincere desire to learn and embrace the customs,
traditions and ideals of the Filipino people. I have all the
qualifcations and none of the disqualifcations under Republic
Act No. 9139.
I am not opposed to organized government or affliated
with any association or group of persons who uphold and
teach doctrines opposing all organized governments. I
am not defending or teaching the necessity or propriety
of violence, personal assault or assassination for the
success and predominance of one's ideas. I am not a
polygamist nor a believer in the practice of polygamy.
I have not been convicted of any crime involving moral
turpitude. I am not suffering from mental alienation or from
any incurable contagious disease. The country of which
I am a citizen or subject is not at war with the Philippines
and grants to Filipinos the right to be naturalized citizens
or subjects thereof.
13. It is my true and honest intention to become a citizen
of the Philippines and to renounce absolutely and forever
all allegiance and fdelity to any foreign prince, potentate,
state or sovereignty, and, particularly, to India of which at
this time I am a citizen or subject. I will reside continuously
in the Philippines from the date of the fling of this petition
up to the time of my admission to Philippine citizenship.
14. My character wi tnesses are BERNARDINA
ESPARAGOZA and NARCISA V. MARZAN both Filipino
citizens, of legal age, and residing at 1465 D. Oliman St.,
San Miguel Village, Makati and 1049 Dagupan St., Tondo,
Manila respectively, who have executed sworn statements
attached hereto in support of my instant petition, together
with: (a) brief biographical data about themselves; (b)
detailed statements on the dates they frst came to know
me, the circumstances of our initial acquaintance and the
reasons and extent of our continuing familiarity; and (c) the
number of times they have acted as character witnesses
in other petitions for naturalization.
15. Attached hereto as annexes and made part of this
petition are the duplicate originals or certifed photocopies
of the following documents (please check the appropriate
box):
[ / ] a. Petitioner's birth certifcate
[ / ] b. Petitioner's alien certifcate of registration (ACR)
[ / ] c. Petitioner's native-born certifcate of residence
(NBCR)
[ ] d. Petitioner's marriage certifcate, if married
[ ] e. Death certifcate of his/her spouse, if widowed
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
[ ] f. Court decree annulling his/her marriage or
granting legal separation, if such was the fact
[ ] g. Birth certifcates of petitioner's minor children
[ ] h. ACRs of petitioner's minor children
[ ] i. NBCRs of petitioner's minor children
[ / ] j. Affdavits of fnancial capacity by the petitioner,
dul y support ed by bank cert i f i cat i ons,
passbooks, stock certificates, or proof of
ownership of other properties
[ / ] k. Affdavits of at least two (2) credible witnesses
who must be Filipino citizens of good reputation
in petitioner's place of residence
[ / ] l. Medical certifcate from a government hospital
stating that petitioner is not suffering from
mental alienation or a user of prohibited drugs
or otherwise a drug dependent and that he/she
is not afficted with acquired immune defciency
syndrome (AIDS), or any incurable contagious
disease.
[ / ] m. School diploma and transcript of records of the
petitioner from the school/s he or she attended
in the Philippines
[ ] n. Certifications stating that petitioner's minor
children are enrolled in public schools or private
educational institutions duly recognized by the
DECS, where Philippine history, government
and civics are taught and prescribed as part of
the school curriculum and where enrollment is
not limited to any race or nationality
[ / ] o. Petitioner's income tax returns for the past three
years
[ / ] p. Petitioner's receipts of payment of income tax
for the past three years
16. Other documents submitted by the petitioner in
support of his/her petition:
NBI CLEARANCE, BARANGAY CLEARANCE
POLICE CLEARANCE, COURT CLEARANCE
PRAYER
WHEREFORE, it is respectfully prayed that petitioner be
conferred Philippine citizenship pursuant to the provisions
of Republic Act No, 9139.
Dated at Makati City, Metro Manila, this 2nd day of
May, 2012.
SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
Name and Signature of Petitioner
Address: 2205-B F-ZOBEL ST.
SAN MIGUEL VILLAGE, MAKATI
Telephone Number: 0917-9900742/
8368071
Petitioner's signature and right thumbmark
REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES)
CITY/MUNICIPAL OF MAKATI) S.S.
I, SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI, of legal age
and a resident of 2205-B F. Zobel St. San Miguel Vill.
Makati, after being duly sworn, depose and say that I am
the petitioner herein, that I have read the foregoing petition
and know the foregoing petition and known the contents
thereof, and that the same is true of my own knowledge.
SONIA RAMCHAND CHANDIRAMANI
Name and Signature of Petitioner
SUBCRIBED AND SWORN to before me at CITY OF
MAKATI this 2
nd
day of May, 2012.
SCN FORM NO. 1
(R.A. NO. 9139)
(MST-June 25, July 2 & 9, 2012)
Right Thumbmark
of Petitioner
#lovemy
standardlifestyle@gmail.com
fashion beauty health wellness
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY C3
MONDAY
C2
ANSWER TOMORROW
60 Team on a farm
61 Alphabet ender
62 Animals for 5-Across
63 Call to a queue
Down
1 BoatÕs bottom
2 “Peek-__!”
3 Siamese sound
4 Longtime logo with a
top hat and monocle
5 Exactly right
6 Suspicious of
7 Defense gp. with
pilots
8 Mailed
9 Gadget measuring
rpm
10 Church high point
11 Hairline’s midpoint,
perhaps
12 Swear
13 Change the color of,
as hair
21 “Smooth Operator”
singer
22 Lav in Leeds
25 Word before pad or
tender
26 Common man with a
ANSWER
TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
Across
1 Jon of “Mad Men”
5 Knight fights
11 Roll of dough
14 Slangy prefix
meaning “super”
15 Oust from office
16 Ornamental climbing
plant
17 Roller coaster
feature
18 Batter’s position
LOS ANGELES
TIMES
CROSSWORD
19 Anonymous John
20 One completely
lacking morals
23 Small batteries
24 Sound preceding
“Oof!”
25 2009 Will Ferrell
dinosaur movie
32 Vaudeville show
33 LandlordÕs contract
34 Paid athlete
36 “__ it now”:
“Understood”
37 Writer H.H. or Alice
38 Security breach
39 Place for pickups
40 They may be cracked
using stethoscopes
41 Abacus pieces
42 Woman with varying
roles in Arthurian legend
45 __ guzzler
46 Indian bread
47 What exacting judges
follow
55 __ Mahal
56 Political fugitive
57 Delude
58 Big fuss
59 Singer Bette
six-pack?
27 Plump (up)
28 Basic principle
29 Severe
30 That, in Tijuana
31 Swap
32 You might brush
barbecue sauce on one
35 Approves
37 “Little Red Book”
writer
38 Used for support
40 Gamblers’ methods
41 Dull
43 “Who __?”: New
Orleans Saints’ fans
chant
44 Keys in
47 Stow below
48 Give off
49 Disney World’s
Space Mountain, e.g.
50 Leer at
51 Wilma Flintstone’s
guy
52 Opulence
53 Highest point
54 “What __ wrong?”
55 Looney Tunes devil,
casually
JULY 2, 2012
Gianna Maniego, Editor
Dinna Chan Vasquez, Assistant Editor
ManilaStandardToday
Lush's celebrity fans include Angelina Jolie, Gwyneth Paltrow, Julia
Roberts, Kylie Minogue and Helena Christensen.
Lush celebrates the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth with Rose
Queen bath ballistics, a rose tinted spectacles bath, for times when all you
want to see is the rosier side of life. Drop into a warm ready run bath,
lay back and imagine you’re running through a rose garden, with your
hands brushing the tops of the bushes. The scent of this one is a light
floral rosy accord, of rose absolute and geranium, with amber notes of
rock rose. The bathwater gets a rosy pink glow
with a sprinkling of tiger lily, apple
blossom and larkspur petals adrift
on the surface.
Rose Queen Inventor and Lush
co-founder, Mo Constantine
OBE, says this is a return to old
style ballistics - for times when
you want nothing but an escape to
simpler times of flowers, nature and
innocent simplicity.
Ro’s Argan Body Conditioner is
a beautiful, rose jam scented body
conditioner that’s full of the most
emollient, moisturizing ingredients
possible to feed and nourish the skin.
There’s cypress oil, capuacu butter,
Brazil nut oil, cocoa butter, shea butter
and super softening almond oil, along
with Argan oil of course, which is rich
in vitamin E and incredibly moisturizing
and soothing on the skin.
This was invented by Lush co-founder
Rowena Bird, who wanted a product that
was both a conditioner to use after show-
ering and something containing argan oil. Since its
launch in 2011, Ro’s Argan Body Conditioner has been selling out in
Lush shops worldwide.
British Nanny is the natural way to rescue fair skin from wrinkles. Only
available from Lush's UK shops, this cream will shield and protect you
from harm with SPF30 to give some protection from the sun. Almond and
hisbiscus oils give vitamins C and E and an array of lovely ingredients
moisturize and hydrate; Shea Butter, Almond Oil, Coconut Oil, Jojoba Oil,
Starflower Oil, Hibiscus Seed Oil and Candelilla Wax.
Buffy Body Butter was inspired by Brazilian bathing beau-
ties using wet sand to keep their cellulite in check. Best
used in the shower, rub in circular motions
on problems areas and the shea butter will
melt over skin, while the ground aduki
beans, rice and almonds will scrub and polish.
Twilight Bath Ballistic is one of Lush’s patent pending inventions – a bal-
listic and bubble bar mix. Pop one of these into the tub and marvel as it
d i s - solves to create a growing sunset that gradually gets
darker until you are finally left with the
glimmer of stars. With lavender and
tonka oils at the heart, there are
also notes of caramel and malt
to enhance a sense of com-
fort and reassurance.
Seanik Solid Sham-
poo Bar is an ocean-
inspired bar is made
with Irish moss
and nori seaweed,
which give a
lovely mineral
rich gel that
softens the hair.
Sea salt adds
body and bounce
and lemon oil adds
shine. A tropical is-
land fragrance of mimosa
absolute, orange flower abso-
lute and jasmine absolute is
fabulous for leaving your
hair with a light fresh feel-
ing.
Lush’s solid shampoo
bars give up to 80 washes
from one 55g shampoo bar,
whereas you’d get around
40 washes from a 250g
bottle of liquid shampoo.
So for every shampoo bar
you use, you’re saving two
bottles that would be head-
ing for landfill. They are
small, convenient, easy to
carry and easy to use. Each
contains certain essential oils
that are suitable for particular hair/scalp types.
In the Philippines, Lush is exclusively distributed by Stores Special-
ists, Inc. (SSI) and is located at Glorietta 4, Power Plant Mall, Shangri-
La Mall, Greenbelt 3, Mall of Asia, and Bonifacio High Street.
Dinna Chan Vasquez
FOR fashion-loving young persons, being required to wear uniforms can be quite
restricting. But Elle Kids’ trendy shoe options for young boys and girls allows
them to stand out in class and strut the school halls in style.
Elle Kids’ wide range of styles—Mary Janes and ballet flats adorned with
dainty bows and studded ruffles—give your daily looks a unique edge. Boys'
shoes give navy blue and khaki uniforms a structured finish with leather slip-
ons and monk shoes.
Gear up for gym class, with Elle Kids’ lace-up sneakers, rubber shoes with
Velcro straps, and hi-cut sports shoes, each sporting cool, playful designs for
boys and girls.
Finally, for highly anticipated field trips and family fun days, girls can get styl-
ish in patent ballet flats in red and white, open toed flats with ribbon and bow
appliqués; while the boys can get comfy in casual sneakers in classic red, blue,
and white.
Elle Kids Shoes and Apparel are available at all leading department stores
nationwide and at Elle Kids Lucky China Town Mall.
APPLY for a Citibank Credit Card from and get a
gift from Rudy Porject once your application is ap-
proved, you will receive a welcome gift from Rudy
Project, a Viaggatore luggage worth P8,500.
This offer is good with Citibank Visa/ Mastercard,
Citibank PremierMiles Card, Cebu Pacific Citibank
Card or Rustan's Citibank Card while you get a Rudy
Project Tachymeter Watch worth P2,500 with your
new Citibank Cash Back Card, Mercury Drug Ci-
tibank Card or Shell Citibank Card.
Simply make P5,000 worth of purchases with your
new Citibank credit card 60 days from approval to
avail of these offers. You will then receive a text
message instructing you how to claim your exclusive
Rudy Project merchandise.
For information, call
423-3000 or visit Citibank
Online (www.citibank.
com.ph). You can also
apply via SMS by send-
ing CITI <space>CARD
<space>Name/Phone to
2600.
Love
LUSH
Step into
style this
school year
Get a card,
receive a gift
By Ed Biado
SOME people still believe that you can catch
HIV by being in the same room as someone
who has the virus. Some think that HIV and
AIDS are the same thing. Some are certain
that, once you have it, you’ll fall extremely
ill and die within a few months. These just a
few of the many misconceptions about HIV
and AIDS.
For some reason, people find it hard to
talk about it. Probably some remember that
one guilt-ridden unprotected encounter
years ago (or the time they got a tattoo at
someplace shady) and they still can’t get
over the thought that they could actually
be infected. That’s also why a lot of
individuals don’t want to get tested, or at
least, be educated about the virus and the
medical conditions associated with it.
But why suffer inside not knowing the
truth about your own
body when you can get
it over with right now?
The Love Yourself
Project can help you
do that. The flagship
initiative of nonprofit
organization Love
Yourself Inc. “aims to
prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among the
youth and key affected population through
awareness, counseling and education.” The
group offers HIV Confidential Counseling
and Testing and organizes awareness
campaigns, as well as coordinates with
other government and private organizations
to control the rise of HIV/AIDS cases in the
country.
Although their advocacy is primarily
for the welfare of LGBT individuals, their
services are available to everyone. In fact, the
organization is supported by a lot of public
personalities of different sexual orientations,
including Boy Abunda, Paulo Avelino,
Rocco Nacino, Rissa Hontiveros, Frederick
Peralta and Manny Calayan—all of whom
took part in a charity photo shoot last year
for the benefit of the project’s counseling
activities.
Through fundraisers and the generous
contributions of their donors and volunteers,
Love Yourself Inc. was able to build a
resource hub in Manila, which will be
launched on July 8. It will be marked with a
fund-raising nude photo exhibit by up-and-
coming photographer Ian Felix Alquiros.
To know more about the event and the
project, go to theloveyourselfproject.
blogspot.com. There, you’ll also find a
list of institutions all over the Philippines
that offer HIV testing, details on how to
volunteer or contribute to the cause and,
of course, information on how to seek help
and counseling.
A project
of love
INSIDE a mall, you know when you are near a Lush store when you can smell it. Lush specializes in
eco-friendly soaps and bath products, and features fun—but minimal—packaging and quirky names
like Demon in the Dark soap and You Snap the Whip body butter.
Rose Queen
Buffy
STUDIES have showed that heart
disease is the leading cause of death
in the country in the last 10 years,
according to a data from the Na-
tional Statistics Office.
The NSO said almost 300 Filipi-
nos die of heart disease every day
based on a 2009 study. This num-
ber of deaths from heart ailments
represents a high 21 percent of the
total annual registered deaths in the
country.
“What makes it heartbreaking is
the fact that the prevalence rate is on
the rise,” said the National Statistics
Coordination Board (NSCB) in a
statement.
The NSCB said from 77,060
deaths from heart disease in 2005,
the number rose to 100,908 in 2009,
or an increase of 31 percent increase
in just span of four years.
Health authorities said about 90
percent of the Filipinos are exposed
to one or more risk factors that trig-
ger the progression of heart disease
prompting health advocates to rec-
ommend a balanced and active life-
style to mitigate risks of heart dis-
eases. One of the ways to keep one’s
heart healthy is to eat food rich in
Omega-3, which is naturally-found
in tuna.
Studies have showed Omega 3
contributes to having a healthy heart
as it lowers cholesterol and blood
pressure, and reduces risks of heart
attack and other cardio-vascular dis-
eases.
One product that contains lots
of Omega-3 is San Marino Corned
Tuna. Every 180-gram can of San
Marino Corned Tuna has 1,125 mg
of Omega-3.
Fight heart disease, the
leading cause of death
MAC finally has a per-
manent Nail Lacquer
collection that features
31 colours and three fin-
ishes. The shades include
Impassioned, an orange-
coral with a cream finish;
Mean & Green, a dark
olive green base with a
duochrome of rosy plum
to golden olive green;
and Saint Germain, a
light-medium pink with
blue undertones.
I am not sure if the
collection will be avail-
able in the Philippines
but I do think that MAC
should bring it in because
the brand has a lot of fans
here.
The nail lacquer col-
lection will launch at
Nordstrom and MAC
stores on July 5, then
hit more globally and
online on August 2, for
$16 each. Here are all
the polishes that will be
available:
Faint of Heart
Skin
Soirée
Fiestaware, Morange
Impassioned
Shirelle
Sparks OnScreen
Flamint Rose
Rougemarie
Vintage Vamp
Mean & Green
Formidable!
Midnight Tryst
Deep Sea
Delicate
Snob
Girl Trouble
Saint Germain
Steamy
Girl About Town
Screaming Bright
Quiet Time
Coffee Break
Anti-Fashion
Dark Angel
Spirit of Truth
Discothéque
Nightfall
Nocturnelle
Overlacquer
MAC launches
massive
nail lacquer
collection
beauty
memo
beauty
memo
By Dinna Chan Vasquez
Celebrating
A DECADE OF WELLNESS
By Joba Botana
Ro's Argan
Seanik
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK
JULY 2, 2012 MONDAY
C4
Isah V. Red, Editor standard.showbiz@gmail.com
showbitz
Manila Standard TODAY
ISAH V.
RED
SIMPLY RED
Mentors (from top left): Roderick Paulate, Phillip Salvador and (below) Gina
Alajar, Jolina Magdangal and Ricky Davao.
JOSEPH
PETER GONZALES
SHTICKS
THE ultimate
search for the next
big Kapuso stars is
now in full swing
as GMA Network’s
Protégé: The Battle
For The Big Artista
Break wrapped up its
nationwide auditions.
An overwhelming number of
Pinoy hopefuls all over the country
came to the auditions.
Protégé’s five celebrity mentors—
Ricky Davao (North Luzon), Gina
Alajar (South Luzon), Phillip Sal-
vador (Mindanao), Jolina Magdan-
gal (Visayas), and Roderick Paulate
(NCR)—were like headhunters, on
the look out for someone who could
become the network’s fast-rising and
bankable star.
As mentors, they will not only
give professional guidance to their
protégés but also invest on their
looks, and over-all packaging and
showmanship.
Only 20 protégés will make the
cut and move on to become the
mentor’s four (two boys and two
girls) potential protégés.
Helping the celebrity mentors
in their selection throughout the
extensive search in over 15 cities
around the country are the highly-
respected audition directors—
GMA Artist Center Head for Talent
Management Arsi Baltasar and
talent manager Joji Dingcong.
Two winners will be proclaimed
at the finals night—one male
protégé and one female protégé. At
stake are P12 million worth of cash
prizes and a management contract
with GMA-7.
Protégé’s high profile judges are
Bert de Leon, Cherie Gil and Joey
de Leon.
Hosting the reality show are
Dingdong Dantes (Gala Presentor)
and Carla Abellana (Journey Host.)
Bea misses fun
on ‘Alice’ set
WHAT are the things that Bea Binene
misses most in Alice Bungisngis?
“The fun we have on the set! There
are no dull moments. You will always
look forward to taping days because the
atmosphere is very light, as if you’re not
working at all. We’re like one big happy
family,” she says
Alice Bungisngis will be the last team-
up between her and Jake Vargas.
She will soon appear in Luna Blanca.
Although Luna Blanca is on prime
time, many wonder if it’s okay with her
that she’s not the solo female lead here.
“Honestly, I’ve no problem with that.
Whatever assignment GMA gives me,
I’ll accept. It doesn’t mat-
ter if I’m the lead or not. I
owe my mother network a
lot, for what they’ve done
to my career. What’s im-
portant is I have work, right?”
Bea has just moved in to her newly-
bought condo.
“It’s somewhere in Greenhills. I’m
proud because it’s my first huge in-
vestment. I was able to buy it for P 4.6
million. At least, all my efforts were
rewarded.”
With her success, the famous tween
star has just one appeal to her loyal sup-
porters.
“I hope they’ll continue to support
my projects even without Jake and vice-
versa. As I’ve stated earlier, we can’t be
a love team forever. It’s one way of pro-
longing our stay in the ‘biz,” ends Bea.
Marian and Coco
Marian Rivera couldn’t
contain her excitement
over the movie opposite
Coco Martin for Regal
Entertainment.
“It’s an honor to work with Coco,
who’s regarded as one of the best actors
of this generation. This motivates me to
do my best especially that it will be the
first time that I’ll be paired with a non-
Kapuso actor. Add to that the fact that
my last soap with Dingdong (Dantes)
head on with his at the rival network. I
consider it as a milestone in my career.”
“Maryo J. delos Reyes is directing
it. This early, I know that I will learn a
lot from him,” says Marian.
In preparation for the movie, her man-
ager (Popoy Caritativo) has given her a
copy of the Nora Aunor classic, Bona.
FOR parents looking for ways to
encourage the talents of their kids,
they can tune in to ABS-CBN every
Saturday morning, as the Promil Pre-
School i-Shine Talent Camp helps 12
talented pre-school kids hone their
potentials through fun workshops and
mentoring by Kapamilya stars.
Done in partnership with ABS-CBN,
the Promil Pre-School i-Shine Talent
Camp is a TV reality show that aims
to encourage parents to develop and
support their child’s talent. Among the
prizes that await the winner is a talent
contract from Star Magic and Promil
Pre-School, plus P500,000 in cash.
Hosted by Dimples Romana,
Matteo Guidicelli and Xian Lim,
the program showcases the top 12 i-
Shiners working with celebrity men-
tors like John Prats, Karylle and
Luis Manzano, with their parents by
their side to encourage them in all the
activities.
All three i-Shine Talent Camp
hosts agreed that the support of their
family, especially their parents during
childhood played a crucial role in de-
veloping their talents.
Witness the journey of the 12 i-
Shiners: Lukas, the “Acoustic Kid of
Cebu,” Ayeisiah, the “Kiddie Diva of
Olongapo,” Prince, the “Dance Floor
Ace of Manila,” Althea, the “Born
Kiddie Performer of Manila,” Gabby,
the “Bibo Dancer of Paranaque,” Ella,
the “Singing Idol of Davao,” Charls,
the “Prince of Acting of Caloocan,”
Icon, the “Dancing Icon of Marikina,”
Patricia, the “Dancing Charmer of An-
tipole,” JC, the “Acting Gem of Tagu-
ig,” Jake, the “Total Kid Performer of
Makati,” and Justine, the “Dance Floor
Prince of Laguna” towards stardom.
Awesome
‘Protégé’
Nurture kids’ talents
nationwide
auditions
Dingdong will host the live Sun-
day gala night while Carla will do the
backstage drama commen-
taries while underscoring
the emotional highs and
lows in the life of every
aspirant.
Jennylyn Mercado
returns as the host of
Inside Protégé—
10-minute up-
dates on the
a s p i r a n t s
quest for
s t a r d o m
beginning
July 23,
w h i l e
Maxene
Ma g a -
lona is the Web Jock for the daily up-
dates in Protégé Webisodes.
Until July 13, those who missed
auditions, there will be online auditions.
Interested applicants can visit the
website www.gmanetwork.com/protégé
for more information.
Undying love
One True Love features Alden Rich-
ards as Tisoy together with Louise de-
los Reyes as Elize.
This is Alden and Louise’s biggest
roles to date.
The question that the series hopes
to answer is: How long can Tisoy and
Elize weather the odds of their forbid-
den romance? With Carlos and Ellen
threatening to tear them apart, can the
star-crossed lovers fulfill their destiny to
once and for all be together even in the
next lifetime? What will happen to Leila
if her secret is finally revealed? What
will be Carlos’ reaction if he finds out
the truth about the real identity of Tisoy?
Will Ellen continue with her scheme
to separate Tisoy and Elize if the truth
about their identities is exposed?
One True Love is now captivating au-
diences every night on GMA Telebabad.
Love, treachery
and revenge
Faithfully brings to afternoon viewers
the tremendous dramatic talents of sev-
en of the network’s most promising and
talented actors and actresses—Maxene
Magalona as Stella Quillamor, Isabel Oli
as Megan Briones, Vaness del Moral as
Dina Carvajal, and Michelle Madrigal as
Luchie Trajano, introducing Isabella
Daza as Misha Vilfar with Marc Aba-
ya as Kevin Quillamor and Mike Tan
as Perry Escano—as they headline
the newest Kapuso drama about love,
treachery, sacrifice, and vengeance.
The series is premised on friend-
ship, loyalty and betrayal.
With her perfect world turned into
a nightmare, how will Stella face the
shocking revelation of Kevin? Who
is the new woman in Kevin’s life?
What will be the fate of Stella’s re-
lationship with Kevin? What will be
Stella’s reaction if she finds out the
identity of the woman who betrayed
her?
Faithfully airs right after
Kasalanan Bang Ibigin Ka? on GMA
Afternoon Prime.

Newest Sunday
noontime fare
TV5 has a new Sunday noontime
offering, Game ‘N Go.
The show combines the elements
of a variety show, the excitement of
a game show, and the fun factor of a
comedy sketch show.
The audience can surely look for-
ward to wacky antics of the show’s
prime ‘game makers’ Joey de Leon
and Edu Manzano and ‘game keep-
er ’ Arnell Ignacio.
Joey, Edu, and Arnell are three
of the country’s most seasoned
game show hosts. While Joey and
Arnell have worked many times
before, Game ‘N Go marks many
firsts in TV5 history. The show is
Edu’s first project with the Kapatid
network and the first to showcase
his team up with Joey de Leon.
The program airs every Sunday,
12 noon on TV5.
An aspirant from Visayas
Aspirants from NCR wait for their turn on stage
Game N’ Go
hosts Joey
de Leon and
Edu Manzano

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