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P U B D A T E 07-12-02 O P E R A T O R CCI

D A T E 07/12/02

T I M E 01:26

Ex-S.A. City Manager Jerry Henckel dies at age 78 / 1B
In trouble
Allen Iverson is to be charged
Sports/1C

JULY 12, 2002 • METRO EDITION

FRIDAY

Doggie royalty
Thousands to compete for River City dog show crown
Weekender/21H

50¢

SERVING SOUTH TEXAS SINCE 1865

FLOOD OF 2002: BROADWAY ICON’S RESURRECTION

Cats have 9 lives; lion to get 2
Planning is under way for the restoration of North Side park’s landmark statue.
D BY JOHN GUTIERREZ-MIER
EXPRESS-NEWS STAFF WRITER

■ Flood

of 2002 coverage/10-11A

A statue of a lion from Lion’s Field on Broadway remains in storage. It was broken off its base when a tree fell on it during a Fourth of July storm.

For more than 75 years, it sat majestically on a marble base near Broadway its huge mane , and cavernous jaws a familiar site for generations of San Antonians. The marble lion, which was erected in 1925 by the Lions Club, was knocked off its perch at Lion’s Field on the Fourth of July when a tree toppled over and landed on the statue, sending it crashing to the ground. Now, all that’s left of the landmark lion are its four paws. But plans already are under way to

resurrect the king of beasts. “It’s been a symbol of all Lions Clubs, and our plans are to restore the lion,” said Ron Hall, president of the Founders Lions Club, the nation’s first Lions Club established here in 1915. David Hough was at Mulberry Avenue and Broadway waiting for a traffic light to change that afternoon when he saw the tree fall. “I went over and parked and I didn’t realize at first that it had hit the lion,” said Hough, a professor of physics and astronomy at Trinity University . PHOTOS BY ROBERT MCLEROY/STAFF Like other motorists who travel along Broadway almost every Paws are all that remain of the lion day , Hough counted on statue at Lion’s Field on Broadway. The rest of the statue is in storage, awaiting repair. See LION/11A

Ashcroft points to al-Qaida ‘sleepers’
Attorney general says group is aggressively trying to infiltrate the U.S. and remains poised to strike.
D BY JOSH MEYER
AND

ERIC LICHTBLAU

Our newest patriots
Citizenship applications surge since 9-11. Hundreds sworn in at Institute of Texan Cultures.
D BY DANE SCHILLER
EXPRESS-NEWS STAFF WRITER

LOS ANGELES TIMES

The number of people applying for U.S. citizenship skyrocketed in the eight months after the Sept. 11 attacks. The federal government received 519,523 citizenship applications during that time, a 65 percent increase from the 314,971 applications received in the same period a year ago, according to the Immigration and Naturalization Service. The number of applications received by the INS in San Antonio also is up, but only slightly . Immigration officials aren’t sure whether more people are seeking citizenship out of love for the United States or a fear of immigrant backlash. But at the Institute of Texan Cultures on Thursday where 220 people were sworn , in as citizens, it appeared to be all about the red, white and blue. They came from more than 40 countries, ranging from Bangladesh to Vietnam. “I’m very proud of America and that we are fighting terrorism,” said Erach Singpurwala, an engineer from India who took the oath after living in the United States for 31 years. “I am against terrorism,” said Singpurwala, who wore a “God Bless America” pin and a T-shirt emblazoned with Old Glory under his dark blazer. The ceremony was presided over by U.S. Magistrate Judge John Primomo — himself a first-generation American.
BILLY CALZADA/STAFF

WASHINGTON — Al-Qaida maintains an aggressive network of underground “sleeper” cells in the United States and is trying to smuggle even more terrorists into the country by having them pose as ordinary visitors, Attorney General John Ashcroft said Thursday . “Today the United States is at war with a ter, rorist network operating within our borders,” Ashcroft testified before a congressional panel on homeland security . “Al-Qaida maintains a hidden but active presence in the United States waiting to strike again.” Ashcroft’s comments came as Justice Department officials disclosed that most of about 1,200 ASHCROFT people detained in the Sept. 11 dragnet have been deported on immigration violations, though some were released after being cleared of criminal involvement in the attacks. Only 73 people remained in federal custody Thursday none on charges related to terrorism. , Most face immigration violations. Even so, Ashcroft said in his testimony that the Justice Department has had many successes in rounding up suspects and thwarting future attacks in the 10 months since terrorists hijacked commercial jetliners and flew them into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. “But we are not under any illusions,” Ashcroft said. “There remain sleeper terrorists and their supporters in the United States who have not yet See ASHCROFT/8A

Bioterrorists might cook up viruses in lab
BY GARETH COOK
BOSTON GLOBE

See CITIZENSHIP/11A

Vietnamese immigrant Can Vu takes the oath of allegiance at the Institute of Texan Cultures.

Ex-couple having a lotto trouble over money
BY SONJA GARZA
EXPRESS-NEWS STAFF WRITER

OLIVER

The multimillion-dollar question being played out in a Bexar County courtroom is who bought the winning lotto ticket. The way Mary Oliver sees it, she and Terry Como were living together as man and wife the day Como and his brother went to Austin to collect the $12.5 million lottery jackpot nearly
From the San Antonio Express-News and KENS 5. Get personalized news and information.

two years ago. If the winning ticket was bought with the couple’s “community” money Oliver contends, she’s entitled , to her fair share of the lotto loot. The way Como sees it, he never was married to his ex-girlfriend. They simply lived together. And furthermore, it was his brother who bought the winning the ticket, he contends. “Terry was not the winner. It was not his money It was not his ticket,” .

said attorney Michael Black, who represents a limited partnership that Como’s brother, James Como, set up to claim the Lotto prize in November 2000. Oliver now is suing her former livein, his brother and the limited partnership called One Red Rider. The suit, filed May 6, also seeks a divorce. The pair now are separated. See EX-COUPLE/11A
1D 1F 6E Deaths Editorials Metro/State 4B 6B 1B Movies Puzzles S.A. Life 1H 8E 1E

COMO

Scientists announced Thursday they have synthesized a virus from scratch for the first time, raising the possibility that terrorists could create biological killers once thought beyond their reach. A team of researchers funded by the Pentagon was able to build a polio virus relying only on a listing of its genetic sequence, information that is publicly available. Polio is one of the simplest viruses to make because its genetic sequence is relatively short, but scientists said it’s likely more complex viruses eventually could be built. The genetic codes for many dangerous pathogens, including smallpox and Ebola, are freely accessible on the Web. And the team relied on technology that is generally available in molecular biology labs around the world. “This should really raise some red flags,” said Barry Bloom, dean of Harvard’s School of Public Health. This paper “means that more complicated viruses can be created — and that it is also possible to create viruses that do not exist in the wild.” The work, published in today’s issue of the journal Science, was funded by the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency he , said, because they felt it was important to know whether potential weapons of bioterrorism could be made in the laboratory . See SCIENTISTS/6A

Today’s Weather
Chance of storms High 93, Low 74 Full weather report, Page 10C

INDEX

Business Classifieds Comics

Sports Stocks TV listings

1C 4D 5E

D

137th year, No. 282, 158 pages. Entire contents copyright 2002, San Antonio Express-News. This newspaper is recyclable. Ç

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P A G E 1A

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P U B D A T E 07-12-02 O P E R A T O R CCI

D A T E 07/12/02

T I M E 01:26

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