SHAPE

2.2012 A MAGAZI NE FROM SCA ON TRENDS, MARKETS AND BUSI NESS
EXISTED
YOU DIDN’T KNOW
THE MAGAZINES
A HOTEL
WITH BUZZ
Beehives and fair-trade
jeans in Berlin
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The global force
you can’t deny
new
aged
The
2 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
Youtube.com/
SCAeveryday shows
commercials and videos from SCA’s
press conferences, presentations
and interviews with executives and
employees.
Facebook.com/SCA is
intended to attract talent,
engage users and provide information
in a way that complements sca.com.
Twitter.com/SCAeveryday
provides a good summary of
every thing happening at sca.com and
in SCA’s social media. The aim is to
provide various users, journalists and
bloggers with relevant information.
Slideshare.com/
SCAeveryday
is for investors and analysts, who
can download presentations from
quarterly reports and annual general
meetings.
Scribd.com/
SCAeveryday
makes some 50 publications available,
including SCA’s sustainability report,
its Hygiene Matters report and Shape
magazine.
Flickr.com/
HygieneMatters
supports the launch of the global
report Hygiene Matters with images.
Contributor
Shape is a magazine from SCA,
primarily geared toward customers,
shareholders and analysts, but also
for journalists, opinion leaders and
others interested in SCA's business
and development. Shape is
published four times a year. The
next issue is due in October 2012.
Publisher
Kersti Strandqvist
Managing Editor
Marita Sander
Editorial
Anna Gullers, Göran Lind,
Ylva Carlsson, Inger Finell
Appelberg
Design
Markus Ljungblom, Kristin Päeva
Appelberg
Printer
Sörmlands Grafiska AB.
Katrineholm
Address
SCA, Corporate Communications,
Box 200, 101 23 Stockholm,
Sweden.
Telephone +46 8 7885100
Fax +46 8 6788130
SCA Shape is published in Swedish, English,
Spanish, German, French, Dutch and Italian.
The contents are printed on GraphoCote 90
grams from SCA. Reproduction only by per-
mission of SCA Corporate Communications.
The opinions expressed herein are those of
the authors or persons interviewed and do
not necessarily reflect the views of the editors
or SCA. You can subscribe to SCA Shape or
read it as a pdf at www.sca.com.
Address changes can done at
www.sca.com/subscribe or by e-mailing
sophie.brauner@sca.com
Cover photo:
Getty Images
SCA’S SOCIAL MEDIA SITES
ESTHER SELSDON gets very excit-
ed when she tells people that she
writes for Shape. She has written
a novel, a radio play and a dozen
nonfction books, but nothing
stirs up dinner conversation quite
like personal care products. For
this issue, she has chased down
Britain’s frst female professor
of incontinence, and if more are
appointed she’ll be the frst to
fnd them.
Esther started her career as
a barrister. Five years defend-
ing the youth of Britain led to
an impulse to make up her own
stories instead of other people’s.
Several decades later, she is
now the proud winner of ‘Dutch
Women’s Book of the Month’ as
well as ‘Central American Travel
Writer of the Year’ and ‘Honor-
ary Citizen of Syria for Services
to Tourism’ (she’s not really sure
she should mention that). She is
also the Royal Literary Fellow at
the University of Westminster.
Esther lives in a fat in central
London with her husband and two
teenagers , all of whom have long
since given up being embarrassed
about being mentioned in print.
Esther Selsdon
“SHAPE FAVORS
DINNER TOPICS”
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 3
IT’S OK to giggle when
Grace Dorey talks
about incontinence.
20
...how Dutch politicians got to try what it feels like to be old? See page 15.
DID YOU KNOW...
06.A grey tsunami...
The aging population is a global challenge with enormous consequences.
12.... with business potential
S CA’s ambition is to play an important role as the
population grows older.
24. Odd magazines rule
Despite the rise of digital media, nishe magazines blossom.
26.A hotel for honeybees
Beehives on the roof suggest a different type of hotel in Berlin.
30. Latin spice in marketing
The US Latino population makes marketers rethink strategies.
34.Inanimate objects talk
Printed electronics make products smart.
36.Happy shareholders at AGM
Louise Julian and Bert Nordberg are new board members.
CHINESE TISSUE in the SCA portfolio – page 4
SHAPE UP – page 18
12 HOURS with Silvia Schirinzi – page 38
SHORT NEWS FROM SCA – pages 4–5, 16, 40–43
ALSO...
CONTENTS
4 SCA SHAPE 2
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More Chinese tissue
in the portfolio
VINDA IS ONE of the most successful tissue
producers in China, the second-largest
tissue market in the world. Currently Vinda
commands strong brand recognition in the
country and is the third-largest player in the
Chinese household paper industry in terms
of market share and production capacity.
The company has eight production facilities
with a total production capacity of 470,000
tons and is targeting 1 million tons in the
coming years.
“The market for tissue products in China
continues to grow well and continues to
consolidate, with the larger players, such as
Vinda growing at a significantly faster speed
than the market,” says Jan Johansson,
SCA’s president and CEO. “We intend to be
among the leading players in China, and for
this reason we have decided to increase our
ownership in Vinda”.
The seller in the transaction is Fu An, a
company majority-owned by Vinda Chair-
man Li Chao Wang. SCA’s share in Vinda
after the transaction will be 22.6 percent.
The transaction is subject to receiving con-
sent from some of Vinda’s lenders.
Vinda is listed on the Hong Kong Stock
Exchange.
SCA has acquired an additional 5 percent of the shares
of leading Chinese tissue company Vinda. The purchase
price is around 600 MSEK.
22.6%
...is SCA’s share
in Vinda,
China’s third-
largest household
paper supplier.

I
S
T
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K
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UPDATED
NewsfromSCA
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 5
Moving up in French value chain
SCA HAS ACQUIRED PLF, France’s largest ind-
pendent supplier of wood-based construction
products to the builders merchants sector. PLF
distributes timber products to the builders mer-
chants sector throughout France. The company
is based at two sites near Poitiers and Rochefort,
next to SCA Timber’s own terminal for solid-
wood products.
PLF processes about 70,000 cubic meters of
solid-wood products annually, including planing
and surface treatment.
“For some time now, our aim has been to
move up the value chain in France,” says Jonas
Mårtensson, president of SCA Timber. “Through
the acquisition of PLF, we will become one of the
largest direct suppliers to the builders merchants
sector in France, which is similar to the position
we already hold in the UK and Scandinavia.”
SCA HAS ACQUIRED the
remaining 50 percent
stake in the Chilean
hygiene company
PISA (Papeles Indus-
triales S.A.), and after
the transaction it will
own 100 percent of the
company. The purchase
price is approximately
520 million SEK.
The company operates
primarily in the sectors of tissue for consumers
and Away-From-Home usage, which represent
about 70 percent and 30 percent of revenue,
respectively. Revenue in 2011 was about
520 million SEK. In addition, incontinence care
products under SCA’s global brand TENA have
been introduced in Chile through PISA.
“The time is ready for us to take the next step
in our expansion in Latin America, where the
PISA acquisition further strengthens our pres-
ence in this important growth market,” says
Jan Johansson, president and CEO of SCA.
STRONGER
presence in South America
SCA HAS MOVED from third to second rank
in CNN/Fortune’s list of the world’s most
admired forest and paper companies.
DID YOU KNOW THAT…
JUNE
ASIAN
ACQUISITION
CLOSED
SCA’s acquisition of
Everbeauty has been
completed. Everbeauty is
a leading Asian personal
care products company.
MAY
SEALING THE DEAL
The EU has approved
SCA’s disposal of its pack-
aging operations to DS
Smith. The Commission
has conditioned the deci-
sion to DS Smith making
some divestments after
the acquisition.
MARCH
SUSTAINABILITY
TARGET LAUNCH
SCA launched new sus-
tainability targets. Accord-
ing to a recent SCA survey,
sustainability activities are
significant for the business
operation.
6 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
FEATURE
6 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
FOCUS: AN AGING WORLD
The growing
number of old people in
the world will change most
aspects of the societies
we live in.
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 7 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 7
I
N AN OFT-QUOTED speech from
1973, then-World Bank President
Robert McNamara, the former
US defense secretary, compared
the threat from the world’s
growing population to that of a
nuclear confict.
This view, which was shared by most
demographic experts, had its roots in a
classic work from 1798 by the economist,
clergyman and demographer Thomas
Malthus, An Essay on the Principle of
Population.
A pessimistic Malthus predicted disas-
ter because population was expected
to increase at a far faster rate than food
production. Strict population control was
thus the key to prosperity, as higher pay to
working families would only lead to more
children.
Some 200 years later, the challenge is
the opposite.
“When I was studying demograph-
ics, the big question was how to keep the
population from reaching 24 billion,”
says professor Sarah Harper, head of the
Oxford Institute of Population Ageing
and one of the leading experts on this
new demographic challenge. “Today we
project the number will rise from 7 billion
now to 10 billion by mid-century.”
The annual percentage increase in the
world’s population peaked as early as
the mid-1960s and has fallen since then.
What demographers long disregarded in
their future scenarios was the dramatic
speed at which fertility fell, and the num-
ber of babies born has declined rapidly.
It is not news that fertility in Europe
and Japan has been at record low levels
for decades. Women in many developed
countries are reproducing at far below
the rate of just over two children needed
to keep the population constant, which
means a shrinking population.
China’s centrally governed one-child
policy is often cited as a recipe for popula-
tion decline, but the trend is global.
CENTENARIANS
TEXT: MATTIAS ANDERSSON PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES
The era of
After the 20th century’s record global population
increase, the world is now seeing a dramatic decline
in the number of babies being born while more
people live longer. We have entered the graying
era of centenarians. “The aging population is
a challenge without parallel that will have
sweeping global consequences,”
a UN report notes.
8 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
Shrinkingglobaldivides
FERTILITY (CHILDREN PER WOMAN)

9.0
8.0
7.0
6.0
5.0
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
0
Developed countries
Developed countries
Less developed countries*
Less developed countries*
Least developed countries
Least developed countries
1950–1955 2005–2010 2045–2050
6.62
5.92
2.82
4.39
2.46
1.64
2.41
1.93
1.80
LIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH

90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
66.0
41.7
36.4
77.1
67.7
55.9
82.8
75.9
68.5
*Excluding least developed countries. Source: United Nations Population Division, 2009.
1950–1955 2005–2010 2045–2050
FOCUS: AN AGING WORLD
“Thailand today has a lower birth rate
than Britain, and Vietnam has a lower
rate than Sweden,” Harper says.
Extremely rapid population growth
made the 20th century the century of
youth. Between 1901 and the new millen-
nium, the population rose from 1.6 billion
to just over 6 billion.
With this trend fattening and then fall-
ing, and as the Baby Boomers born after
the Second World War join the ranks of
senior citizens, the world will look dra-
matically older in the coming decades.
A century ago, the number of people
aged 65 and over was between 3 and 4 per-
cent of the world’s population. Today they
account for about 15 percent in developed
countries, a fgure that will climb to 25
percent by mid-century. The proportion
of people 65 and older will be 35 percent in
some rapidly graying countries in Europe,
and 40 percent in Japan.
This trend can be described as a tri-
umph for human well-being, since it is not
just fewer children that account for the
change. The 20th century also saw a dra-
matic increase in human lifespans.
The number of years to which a person
in the developed world can look forward
at birth has almost doubled in the past
100 years. Life expectancy was some-
where between 30 and 40 from the Stone
Age to the 19th century, largely because
of high rates of infant and maternal mor-
tality.
Today women in Germany, Japan,
Argentina and the US can look forward
to living beyond 80 (men on average
have shorter lives). No one knows exactly
where the outer limit lies when it comes
to the length of human life. In research,
considerable interest has been devoted
to people who have turned 100 and to
“supercentenarians,” who live beyond
110.
Centenarians, once notable exceptions
celebrated by kings and presidents, will
become increasingly common by 2100. In
many countries with large populations,
there will be more than a million of them
(see next page).
That is obviously good news to people
who can look forward to a longer life. For
the world, it means a variety of chal-
lenges, especially in developing countries
that follow trends in the developed world.
In 2020, 70 percent of the world’s elderly
will be living in developing countries.
“The question for these countries is
whether they will get old before they get
rich,” notes the World Bank in a troubling
report on development. Even though
those with the fewest resources will
have the hardest time, the rules of the
game for centenarians are changing in a
variety of areas.
“ The question for these
countries is whether
they will get old before
they get rich.”
10 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
FEATURE FOCUS: AN AGING WORLD
1. SHRINKING ECONOMY
An economic rule of thumb is that 20- to
40-year-olds are the ones driving eco-
nomic growth when they acquire homes,
have children and work their way up in
their careers. Even if 60 were to become
the new 40, it still remains to be seen
whether changing consumption patterns
can compensate for the shift.
2. THE END OF THE BUBBLES
For decades, housing and stock markets
have been driven by the arrival of new
and growing generations looking for
homes and investments. Many research-
ers note that the combination of fewer
young people and more old people, who
are starting to collect their pensions and
downsize their lifestyles, will cool the
temperature considerably over time.
3. THE QUEST FOR HEALTH
AND ETERNAL YOUTH
The $64,000 question for the future is
how the world will manage to keep these
growing groups of older people healthy,
vital and independent as long as pos-
sible. Yesterday’s No. 1 health problem –
smoking – was tackled through sweeping
lifestyle changes. Today the global obe-
sity epidemic poses a similar threat. The
focus will be on efficiency and global fair-
ness when the demand for healthcare,
pharmaceuticals and medical devices
skyrockets.
4. THE TALENT WAR
Even though the unemployment rate
among youths today ranks high on the
Amillion
centenarians
The increase in population growth and especially life
expectancy will turn 100th birthdays into everyday
events. By 2100 there will be over a million centenar-
ians in a number of countries. The figures on the map
show what year the countries are expected to have
one million centenarians.
2100
BRAZIL
US
2073
“GREY TSUNAMI” TURNS THE WORLD AROUND
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 11
FEATURE
political agenda, it is less of a problem
over the long term. Tomorrow’s young
people will be in great demand when the
labour shortage becomes a global dilem-
ma. China, which is facing what analysts
call a “gray tsunami,” is projected to be
the world’s largest recruiter and after
2030 will probably import labour from
Latin America and Africa on a large scale.
5. THE PENSION BOMB
“If member states do not seriously try
to disarm this pension time bomb, it
will explode in the hands of our children
and grandchildren, placing on them an
impossible burden,” Joaquín Almunia,
a former European Commissioner for
Economic and Monetary Policy, said a
few years before the debt crisis seized
Europe’s economies by the throat.
For decades, especially in Europe,
elections have been won on the promise
that people could retire by age 50. Politi-
cians now have a tough job ahead back-
ing down from these promises.
6. A NEW LIFE PLAN
With people’s sights set on living beyond
100, their perspective on life changes.
In many countries today, women have
put off having children to an age that
many women could only hope to see
200 years ago. The typical age at which
people inherit from their parents may be
postponed into their 80s. Meanwhile, the
span of people’s active, productive years
has lengthened steadily. The dream of
early retirement will soon be out of reach
for most people.
SOURCE: UN POPULATI ON PROSPECTS, 2010 REVI SI ON, THE ECONOMI ST
JAPAN
INDIA
2075
2069
2084
CHINA
China is projected to be
the world’s largest talent
recruiter, drafting people
from Latin America
and Africa.
Alldue
respect
With a discerning focus on individual dignity and
innovation, SCA benefits from an abundance of
opportunities in this ever-aging world.
12 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
FOCUS: AN AGING WORLD
SCA has the
knowledge and ambition
to be a player in a market
with an ever-growing
elderly population.
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 13
where we today have a high market share, due to
low penetration of the category. In general terms
you can say that the penetration of the potential
market in developed countries is around 20 per-
cent, and in developing countries below 5 percent,”
Parvaiz says.
But incontinence is a sensitive subject and still
something of a taboo in most parts of the world.
TENA is committed to building awareness and
knowledge about the critical issue of management
of incontinence with family members and health-
care professionals.
“It mustn’t be shameful to ask for
help or use incontinence products
– just like any other medical condi-
tion, there are dignifed solutions that
exist to improve the quality of life,”
Parvaiz says, pointing to a number
of activities to decrease the shame
factor.
“TENA is working with break-
ing the taboo through media such as
TV and print ads. We are also doing
it through lobbying in the political
arena and through events like GFI, the Global
Forum on Incontinence, where experts from all
over the globe participate to share their learning
and knowledge.
IF THERE IS A considerable amount of secrecy
around women sufering from incontinence, it
is a real taboo when it comes to men. Only about
20 percent of all men with incontinence problems
use any of the products on the market for pro-
tection. Many are not even aware that there are
products available. They try to solve the problem
in other ways.
When it comes to tomorrow’s elderly, who are
going to be a lot more active and healthy, the right
tone is needed – one far removed from a conde-
scending pat on the head.
“Today’s new seniors, the baby boomer genera-
tion, don’t see retirement as a slowdown phase,”
says Liselotte Andersson, SCA’s global director of
consumer and customer research and understand-
ing. “On the contrary, most of them want to con-
tinue their socially stimulating life and fll it with
meaningful experiences as long as their health
allows. They want products that can make them
maintain their ways of life.”
I
N HUMAN HISTORY there have never been as
many elderly people on our planet as there
are today. In fact, the current global popula-
tion of those 65 and older outnumbers the
number of children in the world 5 to 1.
Mansoor Parvaiz, vice president of inconti-
nence care at SCA, says the demographic trend of
a large aging population will have an economic,
social and political impact on the world in the near
future.
“Political leaders in many developed countries
already face incredibly dif cult challenges today
and will be forced to fnd solutions for
how to care for the growing number
of elderly with limited resources in
the future,” Parvaiz says.
He notes that older people and
their families will be an increasingly
important force in politics. The elder-
ly want to have a dignifed life, he
says, while at the same time health-
care must be cost ef cient .
S CA HAS THE knowledge and ambi-
tion to be a player in a market with an ever-grow-
ing elderly population. In China SCA already has a
program for professional family nursing. Another
example is solutions for incontinence – one of the
most common problems that older people face,
and often a factor in the decision to move from
one’s own home into institutional care. TENA is
SCA’s brand for incontinence products and plays a
key role in the work to develop increasingly inno-
vative products and services.
“The potential of TENA is huge, even in markets
“ The potential of
TENA is huge.”
Mansoor Parvaiz
FOCUS: AN AGING WORLD
A quick round-trip visit
to old age: participants
gave it a try when
SCA arranged a work-
shop that included
Dutch politicians.
Oldfor
aday
SCA SHAPE 2

2012 15
  I
felt extremely limited, awkward and clum-
sy,” says Jan van Ginneken, senior policy
advisor at Ministry of health, welfare and
sports in the Netherlands. “It was a real eye-
opener for me. It’s good to be aware of the
problems that older people face.”
Together with participants from politics, the
media and patient organizations, the minister
had a chance for a few hours to experience what
aging can feel like – weak vision, poor hearing and
reduced mobility. The illusion was created using a
special “aging suit.” The experience was arranged
by TENA’s Public Service Department in the
Netherlands.
“We wanted to give workshop participants their
frst experience of what it feels like to be old,”
explains Wilma Venes, who is in charge of the
project, which was carried out at a nursing home
in The Hague.
THE PROJECT IS one of many examples of how
SCA is actively working on social matters related
to issues of aging. The TENA brand, which pro-
vides solutions for incontinence protection, is key
in this context.
“We have a dialogue with national governments
in most of our markets about reimbursement
issues involving incontinence protection,” says
Benjamin Gannon, vice president of public afairs
for SCA. “In many European countries, inconti-
nence protection is classifed as a pharmaceutical
product, which entitles people to reimbursement
through their insurance systems.”
SCA is working on several levels, national as
well as EU, to strengthen relations with politi-
cians, government agencies and supranational
organizations.
“The goal is to be a serious partner on an issue
that afects almost every country – the aging popu-
lation,” Gannon says. “The driver is being able to
provide more opportunities to live with dignity.”
And perhaps the Dutch aging suits could be a step
along the road to greater understanding of the con-
dition of the growing numbers of older people.
What does it feel like to be old?
Do as the Dutch politicians did –
try an aging suit.
Simple, effective hand hygiene
is a key to fighting infection in
everything from childcare centers
to nursing homes. Nonetheless,
children, the elderly and people
with weak hands often have dif-
ficulty washing their hands.
That’s because a certain
amount of strength is often need-
ed to get soap out of a dispenser.
So Tork has now developed a
soap dispenser specially adapted
for people without full strength in
their hands, such as people with
rheumatoid arthritis or children.
The development work was
carried out in partnership with
Unicum, a knowledge center that
helps companies and govern-
ment authorities design products
and services that are available to
everyone.
Product testing was conduct-
ed with the collaboration of the
Swedish Rheumatism Associa-
tion (SRA) and a group of people
with reduced hand function.
The test scale ranged from 1
(extremely difficult) to 9 (extreme-
ly easy). Grades for the new Tork
were between 6.4 and 7.
“We evaluated every aspect
of the dispenser and found that
it worked really well,” notes
Lena Lorentzen, the founder of
Unicum. “Anything over five is
approved by the SRA, but a grade
of six or more is very good.” The
dispenser has received the SRA
accreditation “Easy to use” and is
ADA (Americans with Disabilities
Act) compliant.
CLEAN HANDS
FOR EVERYONE
“ It was a real
eye-opener for
me. It’s good
to be aware of
the problems
that older
people face.”
16 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
SCA INSIDE
NewsfromSCA
THE BOLLSTA SAWMILL in Bollstabruk,
Sweden, has increased its capacity for the
production of bioenergy, limiting its need of
fossil fuels. The old boiler on site has been
replaced by two new ones that use bark and
other residue from the production of wood-
based fuel products. Through this invest-
ment the use of oil at Bollsta sawmill has
been reduced from 3,400 cubic metres per
annum to practically zero.
PROBLEMS WITH HAY FEVER? Well, if you live in Ger-
many, Austria or Switzerland you can download
a pollen app on your smartphone. SCA’s tissue
brand Tempo has a new app that forecasts expo-
sure to pollen. The tool details pollen over a period
of six days and sends a warning if unusually high
amounts are expected.
The app is a cooperation between Tempo and
pharmaceutical company Novartis, the pro-
ducer of Otriven nasal spray.
A website run by the two companies, www.
heuschnupfenhilfe.de, has information about
hay fever. Consumers who suffer from hay fe-
ver or similar allergies can download an online tool
to receive personalized pollen forecasts that help
them prepare for running noses.
App for running
NOSES
Good
impact
AS PART OF THE “Small Steps,
Big Impact” recognition of
Earth Day 2012, SCA contin-
ues its tradition of provid-
ing grants that encourage
teachers and students to
become involved in un-
derstanding and meeting
the planet’s ecological chal-
lenges. This year SCA will award a total
of 25,000 USD in Environmental Educa-
tion Grants to schools where it has US
manufacturing operations, including
Alabama, Arizona, Kentucky, New York
and Wisconsin.
1
TENA protective
underwear is “Product
of the Year 2012” in
Germany.
Complete
care for
tropical
babies
IN A HOT AND HUMID CLIMATE, keeping a baby’s
skin comfortable is an important concern. That’s
why SCA’s diaper brand Drypers has recently
launched baby care products in Malaysia, Thai-
land and Cambodia.
Drypers offers complete care for babies, with
a full range of baby diapers, as well as this new
assortment of baby care toiletries that in-
cludes shampoo, head-to-toe wash, talcum
and wipes. All liquid products are free from
color additives. Drypers is the No.1 baby
diaper brand in Malaysia and Singapore.
SINCE MAY LAST YEAR, SCA has an account on the
online social networking service Twitter. Today
SCA has 1,200 followers, such as business to
business (B2B) customers, journalists, decision
makers, young professionals and the general
public, who keep track of what’s happening in the
company on Twitter.com/SCAeveryday. On top of
that SCA’s brands have another 16,000 followers.
Following the tweets
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and in the right condition. That increases the value of
your products.
WE SHARPEN YOUR COMPETITIVE EDGE
scatransforest.com info@scatransforest.com
I NTERFOREST TERMI NALS
INTERFOREST TERMINALS
18 SCA SHAPE 2
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Brown liquor
provides
sustainable
electricity
Huge potential
for tissue
companies.
Kg/Capita
Consumption of tissue per capita by world region:
20
25
10
15
0
Source: United Nations Population Division, 2009.
5
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SHAPE UP
Japanese mulberry paper
and the gilded edges of
old books. Together the
tissue sculptures the
fantastic landscape of an
anatomical cross- section
of the human head.
By a technique of roll-
ing and shaping narrow
strips of paper called
quilling artist Lisa Nilsson
has put together a series
of anatomical cross-
section of the human
body – all in paper.
Quilling was first prac-
ticed by Renaissance
nuns and monks who are
said to have made artistic
use of the gilded edges
of worn out bibles, and
later by 18th century
ladies who made artistic
use of lots of free time.
Lisa Nilsson rolls the
paper on almost anything
small and cylindrical
including pins, needles,
dowels and drill bits.
“I find quilling
exquisitely satisfying for
rendering the densely
squished and lovely
internal landscape of
the human body in cross
section”, Lisa Nilsson
writes on her  website
www.lisanilssonart.com.
Paper head
BROWN LIQUOR, a by-product from the
manufacture of paper pulp, could become
an important ingredient in environmentally
sound batteries in the future. Scientists
from University of Linköping, Sweden,
have processed material from brown
liquor with the abilility to store protons
and electrons. The brown liquor is largely
composed of lignin, a biological polymer
in the plant cell walls. The team devised
a thin film from a mixture of pyrrole and
lignin used as a cathode in the battery.
ONE TREE produces
about 45 kg of toilet paper.
DID YOU KNOW THAT…
45 kg
P
H
O
T
O
:

J
O
H
N

P
O
L
A
K
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 19
Pollen key to
new mahogany
Growing new mahogany trees
has proven a major chal-
lenge in the past. To better
understand how a threatened
species can be brought back
from the brink of extinction,
scientists from the University
of Adelaide’s Environment In-
stitute have studied the trees’
pollen. The extensive exploi-
tation of mahogany forests
has had a major impact on the
diversity and availability of the
trees’ pollen. This in turn limits
the ability of individual trees
to grow and provide cross-
fertilization and the seedlings
become less competitive. To
restore forests would require
replanting key species and
finding good-quality seeds
from healthy trees.
Mahogany tree nursery in Brazil.
“72 percent of
people suffering
from inconti-
nence keep
it secret from
their partner.”
Source: Sinoba
GOTHENBURG in Sweden aims to become the most sustain-
able hotel city in the world. More than 80 percent of the hotels
in Gothenburg are already environmentally certified. The
initiative is part of the project Sustainable Gothenburg, whose
goal is to provide transportation, hotels, meeting facilities and
arenas with the most environmental solutions.
GOTHENBURG GOES GREEN
THE UN LED collaborative
programme on reducing
emissions from deforestation
(called REDD+) offers incen-
tives for developing countries
to reduce emissions from
forested lands and invest in
low-carbon paths to sustain-
able development.
In order for REDD+ to work
in practice, it’s important to
develop efficient systems for
measuring the carbon in the
forests, something that’s be-
ing done by a team of Swed-
ish scientists investigating the
forests in Sri Lanka.
Their work shows that
deforestation is responsible
for nearly half of the green-
house gas emissions that
originate from human
activity in Sri Lanka.
The results are impor-
tant for work to reduce
defor estation of tropical
countries, and for interna-
tional nego tiations in climate
policy relating to a new
climate agreement.
Carbon research
slows down deforestation
SKIP HANDSHAKES
British Olympic Associa-
tion’s chief medical officer
has advised British athletes
to avoid shaking hands
at this summer’s Olympic
games. The reason is that
unwelcome germs could
cost Olympic gold medals.
PHOTOS GETTYIMAGES, ISTOCKPHOTO
Read more:
www.un-redd.org
20 SCA SHAPE 1
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2012 20 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
Professor Grace Dorey is one of the
world’s leading experts on incontinence.
Her work on the subject has produced
self-help manuals, down-to-earth
cartoon books, countless lectures and,
most recently, a prestigious award from
Britain’s Queen Elizabeth. She took a
few moments out of her hectic schedule
to answer some questions from Shape.
TEXT ESTHER SELSDON PHOTO PAUL TATE
Grace Dorey at her cottage
on an old farm near the town
of Barnstaple in England.
10 QUESTIONS
SCA SHAPE 1
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2012 21 SCA SHAPE 1
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2012 21 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 21
H
ow did you get involved in
the area of incontinence?
“I was the physiotherapy
manager at a Hospital in
England and I volunteered
to attend an incontinence
training course in Bradford on behalf of my
team because I was the oldest and had already
experienced childbirth. I soon discovered that
while there was some advice about pelvic foor
exercises available to women, there was almost
nothing available for men. This prompted me
to gain a doctorate in male incontinence and
erectile dysfunction, which rapidly led to a
professorship in incontinence at the University
of the West of England. I’m currently working
as a consultant physiotherapist where I treat
individual patients of both sexes as well as run
regular workshops and study days.”
CAN YOU
HOLD,
PLEASE?
22 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
Why is incontinence such a taboo subject?
“I think it used to be a taboo subject because no
help was available. Nowadays men and women
come forward for treatment because they know
that specialist physiotherapy can help them.
Consultants and doctors are conversant with the
help that we can give, so they are happy to refer
their patients to us.”
Are people in the UK particularly embar-
rassed compared with other countries?
“I think that people in the UK and also the
Western world are not so embarrassed because
they understand that they have a medical problem
which can be helped with the right treatment and
advice.”
Are there any strategies that would work
particularly well in breaking down the
remaining taboos?
“I have written six self-help books and two
cartoon books which give advice in a down-to-
earth and often humorous way. They have funny
titles like ‘Clench It or Drench It’ and ‘Use It or
Lose It,’ which make people laugh, and each of my
patients goes home with the relevant book for their
problem. It’s very important to address each pa-
tient’s individual needs in a way that makes them
feel comfortable and happy.”
Do you have personal experience of the
problem?
“For a spell I sufered from urgency, which was
cured by urge-suppression techniques.”
How’s lecturing on the treatment of inconti-
nence and sexual dysfunction?
“I enjoy it. Each lecture is diferent, depending
on the target audience, whether they are profes-
sionals or the general public, at home or abroad.
I try to make my lectures entertaining with lots of
diagrams and cartoons. This helps to dispel any
potential embarrassment that may be felt when
talking about delicate and often personal matters.
I love it when the delegates giggle, as I feel they are
listening and are on the same wavelength.”
Grace thinks that incontinence is a taboo subject because no help used to be available.
“ If only we could get an
advertisement on TV
that would let men and
women know that they
can get help.”
Title: Professor Grace Dorey,
MBE, FCSP, PhD, consultant
physiotherapist
Age: Knocking on a bit 
Family: Daughter, son and
two wonderful granddaugh-
ters
Lives: In a 16th century cot-
tage in Devon
Education: MSc, male
incontinence (University of
East London). PhD, research-
ing pelvic floor exercises
for erectile dysfunction and
post-micturition dribble
(University of West of
England, Bristol)
Claims to fame: Profes-
sorship in incontinence at
the University of the West
of England, a series of
humorous self-help books,
a host of prestigious awards
and, in January 2012, an
MBE (Member of the Order
of the British Empire) from
the Queen.
Hobbies: Indoor tennis and
walking a willful retriever
named William.
Grace Dorey
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 23
10 QUESTIONS
Grace Dorey’s self-help
books give practical advice
in a down-to-earth and often
humorous way.
What can you do to raise awareness and
enhance solutions?
“If only we could get an advertisement on TV
that would let men and women know that they can
get help from specialist continence physiothera-
pists. If only my self-help books were available
from all leading stores....”
What would you like the rest of us to do?
“It would be wonderful to share a TV ad with an
incontinence care company explaining that while
pads help to protect men and women from the
embarrassment and smell of urinary leakage,
they cannot cure the problem. Additional help
is available from specialist continence physi-
otherapists and continence nurse specialists. This
help may be in the form of an assessment of each
patient’s needs and a treatment plan for each
individual which might include pelvic foor ex-
ercises, urge-suppression techniques, fuid and
lifestyle advice.”
How was it receiving an MBE from the Queen?
It must be a party topic.
“I received a letter marked ‘On Her Majesty’s
Service – Cabinet Ofce’ and thought that it looked
like a large tax demand. When I tore open the
envelope, I read that the Cabinet Secretary was
recommending that Her Majesty ‘may be gracious-
ly pleased to approve her appointment as a Member
of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the
New Year 2012 Honours List.’ Naturally I replied
by return that I was absolutely delighted to accept
this prestigious honor and that I would accept it on
behalf of all the physiotherapists who work tire-
lessly to improve the quality of life of their male
and female patients in the feld of incontinence. My
son and daughter are very proud of their mum and
are already planning new outfts for their invitation
to Buckingham Palace . I’m also thrilled, of course,
and have already bought my matching dress,
jacket, shoes and hat!”
Tell us your best incontinence joke.
“Have you heard the one about the woman who
rang the incontinence hotline and the receptionist
asked, ‘Can you hold, please?’”
Grace’s home is full of intruiging details.
MARKET
IPads and smartphones are creating
a major shift in people’s reading habits.
But even with the rise of digital media,
worldwide sales of print magazines
are holding their own.
TEXT NANCY PICK PHOTO GETTY IMAGES, ISTOCKPHOTO
MAGAZINES:
Theodder
thebetter
24 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 25
  T
HE PRINT MAGAZINE landscape reveals
a number of success stories, and there’s
even a new lifestyle magazine poised
to launch in 2012 for an elite audience
– people with a net worth of at least 5
million US dollars.
In the United States, 2011 saw the meteoric rise
of Game Informer, a print magazine for video game
fans. Paid circulation skyrocketed by an incred-
ible 48 percent to more than 7 million subscribers,
most of them youthful. The magazine, published
out of Minneapolis, now ranks as fourth largest in
the world.
What’s number one? AARP The Magazine still
wears the crown, targeting a somewhat more
mature crowd, people aged 50 and up. Members
of AARP, the organization for people in that age
bracket, receive the magazine automatically, giv-
ing the publication an advantage over magazines
that depend on ordinary subscriptions. At the close
of 2011, circulation stood at some 22 million.
THE WORLD’S third-largest magazine, Better Homes
and Gardens, saw its circulation fgures hold steady
in 2011. The New Yorker had even more to cheer
about, with its paid circulation rising 2.2 percent in
the second half of 2011, to slightly over 1 million.
Not far behind was GQ, whose circulation rose
4.5 percent during the same period, to just under 1
million.
Another encouraging trend comes from China,
where sales of women’s magazines have been ris-
ing sharply in recent years. Elle opened the door by
launching a Chinese edition in 1988, and now more
than a dozen international women’s magazines are
published in Mandarin, including Vogue, Cosmopoli-
tan and Marie Claire. Vogue China, launched in 2005,
boasts a circulation of some 650,000 and has been
a highly proftable venture.
COSMOPOLITAN SELLS even more copies in China,
with a circulation of some 1.2 million. The maga-
zine’s cover bears two names, the word Cosmopoli-
tan in English, along with the Chinese characters
that mean “Trends Lady.” And Cosmo isn’t just
popular in Beijing. The magazine now comes out
in some 100 countries and 35 languages, including
Turkish and Estonian.
What about sustainability? In recent years,
magazines have trimmed down page dimensions, in
part to be greener and conserve paper. Rolling Stone,
the music magazine, had an oversized format for
four decades. In 2008, the publishers decided to
pare it down to the same standard size as other
magazines, in order to ft display racks without
being bent or folded. In 2009, the size of The New
York Times Magazine was reduced by 9 percent to
eliminate waste.
As for that new upscale magazine, it’s called Du
Jour. Slated to begin publication in the fall of 2012,
the quarterly lifestyle magazine will be aimed at
shoppers for ultra-posh goods in New York, Los An-
geles, Chicago, Miami, Dallas, Las Vegas and San
Francisco, where US sales of luxury products and
services are concentrated.
NEW WAYS
TO READ
Supplementing tra-
ditional reading av-
enues with techno-
logical alternatives
is nothing new, but it
is on the rise. More
and more people
are turning to their
laptops, tablets and
smartphones for
their reading needs:
$
This year Apple
expects to sell
more than 50 mil-
lion
iPads worldwide.
$
In Europe’s major
markets, 74 per-
cent more people
began reading
news on their
smartphones dur-
ing 2011*.
$
In the US, people
are going multi-
gadget. With 44
percent of adults
now owning
smartphones, a
growing number
read news on all
their digital de-
vices—computer,
tablet and phone.
$
Some 23 percent
of US adults get
news from at least
two electronic
sources.
* Source: comScore,
an Internet marketing
researcher
FIVE (VERY) NICHE
MAGAZINES
Although some general-interest print
magazines have been struggling to keep their
figures up, the sales of niche magazines remain
robust. The following magazines target truly
specialized readerships:
GARDEN AND GUN
For those who like shooting and eating.
PAINKILLER
For heavy metal music fans in China.
MINIATURE DONKEY TALK
For owners of donkeys, all sizes.
BACON BUSTERS
For pig hunters in Australia.
MAKE
For do-it-yourselfers with
a high-tech twist.
Miniature Donkey Talk Page 1
Issue Number 138
Jul/Aug/Sep
2010
Miniature
Talk
The TALK of the donkey world
Donkey
FSC PAPER WANTED
Sustainability is increasingly important to
customers and the demand for FSC (Forest
Stewardship Council) and PEFC (Programme
for the Endorsement of Forest Certification)
certified products has been steadily increas-
ing. SCA is one of the world’s largest suppliers
of FSC  certified products and in 2011, the
company’s sales of FSC-certified publication
papers rose by 35 percent.
Common
sense
inluxurypackaging
Scandic Berlin Potsdamer Platz has
no hotel star rating, but it does have
beehives on its roof, self-service
breakfast tables and staff clad in
fair-trade jeans.
  T
HIS SUPER-MODERN hotel in the
Scandinavian style, in the heart of
Berlin’s most vibrant shopping and
tourist area, opened its doors on
October 1, 2010, and is now the frst in
Germany to be awarded the EU Ecolabel, previ-
ously known as the EU fower. Scandic Berlin Pots-
damer Platz was also built in compliance with
the German organization DGNB’s require-
ments for certifying, promoting and re-
warding sustainable construction. The
organization places great emphasis
on the life cycle of the building
and ensuring that everything
in the building – from foor
to ceiling – is meticu-
lously chosen with the
environment
in mind.
26 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
MARKET
Scandic Berlin Pots-
damer Platz – a building
full of ecological ideas.
TEXT ELISABET TAPIO-NEUWIRTH PHOTOS THOMAS MÜLLER
“If someone decides one day to demolish the hotel
or convert it into a residential apartment building,
80 percent of the carefully selected materials, such
as glass, stone, real parquet fooring and bamboo
fooring, can be reused and have a new life,” says
Robert Schmiel, the hotel’s manager.
He explains how the hotel is full of intelligent
environmental solutions. One hundred percent
renewable energy from Norwegian hydroelectric
power stations is used along with district heating
and cooling. UV light technology is used in the
ventilation system to clean the exhaust air and
then recycle it. All rooms are equipped with low-
energy bulbs and motion-detector lighting.
“After a conference, it’s easy to forget to turn the
lights of when you leave, but now it’s taken care of
this way,” Schmiel says. “We care for the environ-
ment and save money at the same time – that’s
usually the equation when you work environmen-
tally. Ecological and economical go hand in hand.”
THE HOTEL FACADE, sheathed in windows, has
integrated blinds that provide a uniform climate in
all the rooms, designed for the four seasons. There
are low-fow toilets, and the drinking water on
ofer is Berlin’s regular tap water, fltered one more
time. If anyone wants sparkling water, the water
can be carbonated right in the hotel, so people
don’t need to buy bottled water.
In the kitchen, energy-ef cient induction ovens
are used, and 120 diferent kinds of food items
are served at the breakfast bufet, with at least a
quarter of them organic. There is also an efort to
provide locally sourced food, and the honey that is
served comes straight from three beehives set up
on the hotel roof.
“We put great efort into providing regional
products and make sure they are delivered to us
using the most environmentally ef cient vehicles
now on the market,” Schmiel says. “But the honey
we serve at breakfast takes the prize – you can’t get
more locally sourced than that.”
Environmental thinking also extends beyond
the hotel to a park where some of the hotel’s
100,000 bees collect nectar from horse chestnuts,
linden trees and fowers in bloom. The honey is
unique, with an exotic favor of lychee, and what-
ever the guests don’t consume is sold in jars in the
hotel shop.
Tables are not set for breakfast – guests get their
own plate, utensils and paper napkin and then serve
themselves. That’s something the hotel’s younger
guests are not opposed to, although the older gen-
erations may question the concept.
ROBERT SCHMIEL,
hotel manager.
Beehives on the
hotel roof the
breakfast buffet
with honey.
80 percent
of the
building’s
materials,
can be
reused
and have
a new life.”
28 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
MARKET
“As with everything else at our hotel, we have
made a conscious choice,” Schmiel says. “Table-
cloths and napkins made of fabric have to be
washed, so this way we care for the environment
by reducing the amount of laundry, with all the
detergent and water that would otherwise be used.
Now we just need to wipe of the tables when the
guests are fnished.”
The tea and cofee served are fair trade. “The
cost of hot beverages is obviously a bit higher for
us, but since we’re looking to contribute to a better
world, that’s another choice we’ve made,” Schmiel
says. “Our guests appreciate the gesture.”
THE HOTEL GUESTS are mainly business travel-
ers who think nothing of sorting their own waste
and who appreciate the common-sense packag-
ing ofered by Germany’s most environmentally
focused hotel in the form of accommodations,
food and facilities for conferences and other
events.
The staf members are like the building they
work in – eco-conscious and up to date on the
smallest detail, ready to explain their way of think-
ing and answer all sorts of questions, such as why
they wear jeans.
“We’re modern and environmentally aware,”
Schmiel says. “You won’t fnd materials like velvet,
plush or copper, and we don’t have traditional
hotel uniforms. Staf instead wear ecological,
fair-trade Good Society brand jeans. We want to
convey a feeling that what we ofer is everyday,
normal – something that we see is also catching on
at hotels nearby. So we don’t talk about compet-
ing with other hotels either. Instead, we lead and
inspire them to be environmentally aware. That
feels good.”
SCANDIC BERLIN has scrutinized and negoti-
ated with its suppliers down to the small-
est detail. The EU Ecolabel has stringent
requirements for compliance. When it came
to choosing paper products for personal
hygiene and cleaning, SCA and its Tork
products won out.
“We had our first preliminary talks in July
2010, and during the construction phase we
supplied, among other things, toilet paper to
the employee lavatories and paper towels to
the staff rooms,” recalls Katrin Wenzel, man-
ager for products and sales, SCA Hygiene
Products GmbH.
The selection has now been expanded to
include boxes of facial tissues, paper towels
and toilet paper from the Tork series in the
hotel rooms. The restaurant offers dispenser
and conventional napkins, and kitchen
employees use Tork’s kitchen rolls.
The reason the choice fell to Tork is that
the products are effective and of high quality
and have a smart dispenser design, which
means less consumption of paper overall.
“Another reason, naturally, is that some of
the products are ecolabeled,” Wenzel adds.
TORK REDUCES
PAPER
CONSUMPTION
Organic and local are key
words, and breakfasts
are served in a nontradi-
tional way.
“ We don’t
have tra-
ditional
hotel
uniforms.
Staff
instead
wear eco-
logical,
fair-trade
jeans.”
Ecolabeled tissue in the bathrooms.
The Mid-Sweden University Fibre Research Centre has quickly established itself
in a world-class position in forest industry research.
SCA is concentrating its resources and competence in the field in a new unit
known as SCA R&D Centre. This research centre will support SCA Packaging
as well as SCA Forest Products with advanced R&D.
A skywalk builds a bridge linking shared office space, labs and other resources.
This is unique cooperation between a company’s research and development
undertakings and the academic world. Merging basic research with product and
process development for mutual benefit.
In this environment knowledge and competence
will grow and new ideas sprout.
Cross-fertilization.
SCA R&D Centre
Box 716
SE-851 21 SUNDSVALL
Telephone +46 60 19 38 00
www.sca.com
MARKET
30 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
In the United States, more than 50 million people – one-sixth of the population
– trace their origins to the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America. As
the country takes on an ever-stronger Latin flavor, marketers are rethinking
their approach to communicating with this growing market.
LATINOS
CHALLENGE
US marketers
  T
HE UNITED STATES is often described
as a melting pot of cultures, but these
days it has an increasingly Latin fa-
vor. According to the latest census
fgures, one in six Americans is
now Hispanic. While the majority identify
themselves as Mexican, the more than 50
million Hispanics living in the US are a
diverse group with their own tastes and
cultural diferences.
The catch is that while this is a large
segment of the population, it’s varied.
So what works when marketing to a
Mexican mom, for example, may not
be efective when trying to engage a
newlywed man from Puerto Rico or
a single woman from Ecuador.
“Corporations are now real-
izing that they must incorporate
Hispanic cultural values into
their products, services and
communications,” says Dr.
Felipe Korzenny, director
of the Center for His-
panic Marketing
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 31
TEXT THETA PAVIS PHOTO GETTYIMAGES
32 SCA SHAPE 2
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2012
MARKET
Communication at Florida State University
and co-author of the book Hispanic Marketing:
Connecting with the New Latino Consumer.
It’s a trend that can only continue: Hispanics are
the fastest-growing demographic in the country,
and experts predict that by 2050 they’ll account for
30 percent of the US population. The buying power
of Hispanics is also expected to rise. In 2010 it was
estimated at US $1 trillion, and by 2015 it could hit
US $1.5 trillion – more than 10 percent of the na-
tion’s total buying power.
The Pew Hispanic Center, a nonproft research
group in Washington, DC, says that while nearly
two-thirds of Hispanics in the US identify as
Mexican, “nine of the other ten largest Hispanic
origin groups – Puerto Rican, Cuban, Salvadoran,
Dominican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Hondu-
ran, Ecuadorian and Peruvian – account for about
a quarter of the US Hispanic population.” These
groups difer widely in such areas as language
skills and the percentage of those who are foreign
nationals versus US citizens, whether by birth or
naturalization.
To tap Hispanic consumers, many marketers
assume their outreach needs to be done in Spanish.
However, Korzenny points out that many Hispan-
ics speak English well – especially the US-born chil-
dren of immigrants, who are fueling the increase in
the population.
“Some companies have started to advertise on
both Spanish and English TV, but the biggest cross-
over comes from actual exposure to products and
brands that Americans didn’t know about before,”
he says. When Americans see products they aren’t
familiar with, companies may be able to capture
those consumers as well. One example is Coca-
Corporations
are now real-
izing that they
must incorpo-
rate Hispanic
cultural val-
ues into their
products,
services and
communica-
tions.”
Dr. Felipe Korzenny,
director of the Center for
Hispanic Marketing Com-
munication at Florida
State University.
SCA SHAPE 2
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2012 33
FEATURE
Cola imported from Mexico, which uses sugarcane
instead of the synthetic fructose used to sweeten
American-manufactured Coke. The Mexican-im-
ported Cola, says Korzenny, has become popular
with a cross section of Americans who prefer its
taste.
On the other hand, “Using cultural insights to
connect with Hispanics may be even more impor-
tant than language,” says Korzenny, who him-
self came to the US from Mexico City. Some may
identify with Latino culture even if they speak no
Spanish.
SO HOW DO YOU factor in cultural diferences?
Korzenny stresses that there are no absolutes, and
in many cases marketers need to look for nuances
or tendencies. He cites the case of Nature Valley,
a brand of protein and granola bars. The company
ran two diference campaigns in the US for their
protein bars – one for Hispanics and one for non-
Hispanics. The diferent approaches were warrant-
ed, he says, since Hispanics “are more inclined to
see nature as something they’re in harmony with,
whereas Anglo-Saxons see it as something they
need to control and dominate.”
Another area of cultural signifcance is taboos.
In the case of feminine care products, for example,
Korzenny points out that many Spanish-speaking
Catholic women tend to believe that trying to
control the natural course of your bodily functions
is wrong. “Some Hispanics are very skittish, for
example, about using tampons,” he says.
Gisela Girard, president of Creative Civilization,
a leading Hispanic advertising agency in Texas,
agrees, but like Korzenny she says marketers need
to be aware of how taboos are changing. Girard
says when she was growing up her Latino mother
thought – as did many of her peers – that “if you
used a tampon you were probably not a virgin.”
Girard, says that’s changed, and most Hispanic
girls today consider tampons convenient and easy
to use. Hispanic women often trust endorsements,
especially those from celebrities.
“They are generally open minded to new
products if there are some testimonials or word
of mouth that this brand is better than another
brand,” Girard says.
HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS bring their brand prefer-
ences to their new country. This gives compa-
nies an opening to introduce brands into new
markets.
The SCA brand Saba has been making femi-
nine care products for more than 30 years.
While it’s a leading brand in Mexico and Cen-
tral America, it will soon be available for the
first time at select stores in the United States.
“We’re launching a line of feminine pro-
tection pads with a chamomile scent,” says
Lauren Entrekin, Brand Director for Saba in
the US. “We know that Mexican women prefer
an emotional, feminine approach to marketing
and packaging. We are using the same pro-
motional materials as those used in Mexico to
ensure consumers immediately recognize and
respond to this strong brand.”
Bruno Zepeda, Vice President of Sales
and Marketing for SCA Personal Care, North
America, adds, “We will focus in selected cit-
ies of the southwestern US where there is a
high concentration of target consumers with
Mexican heritage. Our research shows that
Saba already has brand awareness with our
target consumers. This. coupled with brand
activation of traditional and social media and
event marketing, sets the stage for a success-
ful expansion of this brand into the US.”
Sales in 2011 for SCA in the United States
totaled USD 1.3bn. SCA’s brand lineup in the
United States currently includes the TENA line
of incontinence care products and Tork brand
napkins, paper towels, bath tissue and wipes.
Hispanics are the fastest
growing demographic in the
US and they bring their brand
preferences to their new
country.
ESTABLISHED
BRANDS HIT
NEW MARKETS
“ Using cultural insights to
connect with Hispanics
may be even more impor-
tant than language.”
Felipe Korzenny
TV personality Bárbara Mori is a Mexican icon and well known
among Mexican-American women. In the ads, she gives
women a clear call to action: “Give Saba just one of your days.”
34 SCA SHAPE 2

2012
TECHNOLOGY
TEXT SUSANNA LINDGREN ILLUSTRATION LADISLAV KOSA
Imagine a paper ribbon around a
tree that sends alerts in case of a
forest fire. Or picture a sound system
hidden in your wallpaper, activated
by your music device when you move
into the room. Printed electronics
create numerous opportunities for
mass production at low cost.
PRINTED ELECTRONICS may sound futuristic, but
in fact they’re already available. The technique is
used on smart packaging, such as in displays or
for dating goods. Printed batteries or antennas
for wireless communication between a label and
a reader are also in production. Now, even more
advanced products are under development. The
ability to print electronic devices in large quanti-
ties straight onto paper or other material has cre-
ated huge research interest. One big challenge is to
reach the quality standards required for a large-
scale printed electronics process.
“By printing circuit boards or other electronic
components, you get several interesting electronic
functions that quickly can be applied to large
surfaces,” says Hans-Erik Nilsson, a professor of
electronic design at the Mid Sweden University in
Sundsvall. “This is an easy way to create function-
ality and also to create possibilities for large sur-
faces to provide interaction and communication
through electronic devices.”
PRINTING A
SCA SHAPE 2

2012 35
Printing of electronic media, such as electrical
conductors and semiconductors, is made possible
by electronic ink using functional polymers and
nanoparticles. The ink can be applied to substrates
like paper through a standard printing process, via
an inkjet printer or a printing press.
Nilsson sees several possibilities for the tech-
nique. Printed electronics may make a picture
talk after you touch it with your fnger. A seamless
machine-to-machine interaction with the wireless
devices in your home may turn on hidden speak-
ers printed on the wall. A forest fre could activate
a radio-communicating sensor assembled using
printed components and placed in a tree, as high
temperatures make the tiny radio transmit warn-
ing signals.
“This particular example of printed electron-
ics in a forest fre sensor alarm system has already
been demonstrated and has attracted huge inter-
est from countries such as Greece, Austria and the
United States that want to protect old forests with a
high cultural value,” Nilsson says.
Printed speakers have also been tested, but so
far it has not been possible to print every electronic
component.
“We need a super magnet connected to our
solution, but one that is thin and fexible,” Nilsson
says. “It’s the paper itself that works as a mem-
brane. The trick is to print in a special pattern and
to limit the losses to make the circuit stay intact.
High losses generate heat that can create local
damage to both circuit and paper.”
Other areas where printed electronics are on the
verge of a breakthrough are smart packaging and
personal care products.
“Packaging is growing in importance in the feld
of marketing and media,” Nilsson says. “The pack-
aging doesn’t merely have to protect. It can also
activate an event and start a communication.”
Take the purchase of a new tool, such as a
machine saw. The packaging can pinpoint the
location of the purchase and inform the customer
NEW WORLD
36 SCA SHAPE 2

2012
Time to change? Soon the diaper might tell you.
TECHNOLOGY
of other ofers available nearby, such as at a local
building supplier.
Smart packaging could also have an impact on
the logistics chain. Printed electronics incorpo-
rated in the box could store information regarding
temperature during transport or guarantee that
the product is genuine, or that the box is unopened
and hasn’t been tampered with.
“Theft tags are today most commonly applied
to the packaging at a later stage, but there is at
present an application for theft tags to be printed
directly on the packaging,” Nilsson says.
Small electronic units communicating over a
large area can also be used in personal care prod-
ucts or in hospital care, such as moisture detectors
in incontinence care or bed sheets.
“Comfort is essential in this area,” Nilsson says.
“The sensors must not be felt or seen but still be
able to sense a large area. Diferent applications,
like detecting small or large amounts of moisture
depending on usage, have been tested. The chal-
lenge is to upgrade to a large-scale production to
make it fnancially viable.”
PAPER FOUR
PAPER FOUR is a science project of the Fiber
Science and Communication Network at
Mid Sweden University in Sundsvall. By
combining paper with printed graphic codes
and electronically conductive ink, the team
has created “talking paper” that delivers
messages through printed speakers. This
project is partly funded by SCA.
Read more at http://mkv.itm.miun.se/
projekt/paperfour/
PRINTED
ELECTRONICS
PRINTED ELECTRONICS is a term that
describes various methods of depositing
electronic inks that create active or pas-
sive devices on various substrates, such as
paper. The technological platform consists
of components such as conductors, resis-
tors, transistors, batteries, antennas or push
buttons that can be printed on next-gen-
eration packaging or paper displays. The
printing can be done through most com-
monly used printing methods. Compared
with conventional electronics, this approach
allows cheaper mass production at lower
cost. The technique also has great potential
for environmentally sound production.
The challenge
is to upgrade
to a large-
scale produc-
tion to make
it financially
viable.
Smarter handling
saves time, money
and improves
ergonomics.
www.sca-tork.com
Choose the easy way to
handle boxes and bags
Cleaning crews spend a lot of time carrying and handling boxes and bags. To make their
job easier and free time for other tasks, Tork
®
has developed Tork Easy Handling

.
Here are some of the smart solutions:
& Smart one-hand-grip – you can lift and carry a box and still have one hand free,
or carry two boxes at a time.
& Quick opening – no tools are needed to open our packs.
& Easy disposal – carry away up to ten flattened boxes at a time.

Tork Easy Handling

– the easy way to improve your business.
Talk to your distributor or read more at www.sca-tork.com.
38 SCA SHAPE 2

2012
  S
ILVIA SCHIRINZI MANAGES INSTITUTIONAL
sales promotion for the TENA brand. She
is part of the sales support team, working
with account managers who handle the
commercial aspects of business, and with
nurse advisers who provide technical support.
The contest “La passione di assistere” is a
sales support program aimed at SCA’s client base
of nursing homes, hospitals and public health
centers. It is one of many initiatives that Schirinzi
juggles in the course of an average day.
She lives in Milan, where she was born, grew
up and attended university. As a child, she stud-
ied languages, rode horses and dreamed about
traveling and becoming a journalist. Her current
responsibilities are more varied than those of a
journalist. She works on new business proposals,
writes marketing materials, manages advertis-
ing campaigns, chooses promotional items, works
with suppliers and printers, and maintains contact
with universities for research projects, some of
which become books.
12 HOURS
with Silvia Schirinzi
10 AM – 3 PM 8:30 AM 8 AM 7 AM
Leaves home in Milan.
9 AM
2. Checks morning
mail and meets with
Mailyn Seyoum,
account manager, to
discuss a competi-
tor’s diaper product.
1. Arrives at the SCA
office in Legnano;
has coffee with Lucia
Tagliaferri, SCA
marketing director
region south, and
Alessandro Nigro,
logistics operator.
Up to bid goodbye to
her partner Manuel
Macrì, who has a longer
commute to work.
3. A five-hour meet-
ing with nurse advis-
ers from northern
and central Italy.
Off to work at 8 am. Thank
goodness for a reverse
commute from Milan to
Legnano, and for SCA’s
flexible hours.
“La passione di assistere” (The passion to assist) is more than just a
slogan at SCA Italy. It is also a description of Silvia Schirinzi, who is re-
sponsible for promoting sales to institutions. On a typical day bracketed
by meetings, Schirinzi’s passion for her work never flags, even though
she is eight months pregnant.
1
TEXT CLAUDIA FLISI PHOTO MAURIZIO CAMAGNA
SCA SHAPE 2

2012 39
Making a point
to the nurse
advisers about
the training
video being
discussed.
3
2
4
12 HOURS
12:30 PM 7 PM 6 PM 4 PM
Leaves for home.
Because of today’s
meeting and inclement
weather, the commute
takes longer than usual.
3 PM
4. Greets Manuel
at the door.
Works on the content
of a new project tender.
These tenders, up to 50
pages long, constitute
an important part of new
business development.
Meeting ends and Silvia
works with Manuela
Grassi, a sales support
assistant who will take
her place while she is on
maternity leave.
Lunch is part of today’s
meeting; usually Silvia
eats in the SCA canteen.
Along with
Mailyn Seyoum,
account manager,
Silvia inspects a
competitor’s diaper
product. Good
practice for Silvia.
Silvia Schirinzi
Age: 33
Title: Manager, institu-
tional sales promotion
Born: Milan, Italy
Lives: Milan, Italy
Family: First son
expected at the end of
May 2012
Interests: Travel, food,
films
Personal passion:
Loves tattoos and has
four, will add a fifth to
honor the birth of her son
Favorite food: Spa-
ghetti alla carbonara,
with risotto Milanese
second
Best-loved gelato:
Stracciatella (cream with
chocolate streaks)
Taste in cinema: The
Rocky Horror Picture
Show is one of her all-
time favorites
40 SCA SHAPE 2

2012
ECONOMY
SCA’s shareholders had every
reason to feel happy at this year’s
Annual General Meeting. Recent
major corporate transactions had
made the stock price rise by 25
percent since the bid for Georgia-
Pacific’s European tissue operations
was announced in November.
Upbeat AGM after
PPROXIMATELY 300 shareholders gathered
for the AGM in central Stockholm in
March. Chairman Sverker Martin-Löf
devoted a large part of his speech to the
acquisition of Georgia-Pacifc’s Euro-
pean tissue operations and the sale of SCA’s packaging
operations (valued at SEK 15.3 billion or EUR 1.7 billion),
which he described as milestones in the history of SCA.
“The transactions provide strong synergies,
strengthen the European operations and provide
enhanced development opportunities in emerging
markets, while maintaining fnancial fexibility,” said
Sverker Martin-Löf.
CEO JAN JOHANSSON stated that 2011 was the fourth
consecutive year that was marked by crisis, but he saw
hope in the future.
“It is important to complete the acquisition and
integration of Georgia-Pacifc and the sale of our
packaging operations as it is equally important that
we reduce costs and continue with further ef ciency
measures and innovation,” he said. “With that, I feel
confdent that we are well positioned for continued
value creation at SCA.”
There is rising demand for hygiene products as a
result of increased disposable income in emerging
markets and an aging population.
SCA’s acquisitions of hygiene operations in Turkey
and Brazil further strengthen the Group’s position in
emerging markets. An agreement has also been signed
to acquire the Taiwanese-Chinese personal care com-
pany Everbeauty. Today SCA is the third-largest player
in the world in the hygiene market, but including the
acquisitions it will become the second largest.
What can you cont ri b-
ute to SCA’s board?
“As CEO of EF Edu-
cation First, I man-
aged and developed
global operations, and
I hope this experience
can be of use in my
board duties. Above
all, I have knowledge
and experience about
what consumers think,
where they are, what
they do and when they
make decisions about
purchases. I also know
a bit about SCA’s new
markets in Asia and
Latin America. I spent a
lot of time in Asia when
I was growing up.”
What are SCA’s great-
est challenges over
the coming years?
“I need a little time
to immerse myself in
SCA’s operations and
will probably wait to say
something until I under-
stand more. There are
many tough competi-
tors, and I hope SCA
will continue to be as
bold and strategic as
before when it comes
to entering new mar-
kets.”
 
Why is SCA an
excit ing company to
be a board member
of?
“I appreciate that it’s
a Swedish company
with a long history and
strong values, and that
is has done so well
in the tough global
market. SCA has good
products and is right
now in a very exciting
and demanding phase,
where the aim is to
increase the focus on
consumer operations.”
TWO NEW BOARD MEMBERS
The AGM elected two new board members,
Louise Julian and Bert Nordberg.
Sören Gyll, who declined re-election due to age
reasons, was thanked for his 15 years of
service in the board.
WITH A STRONG
KNOWLEDGE OF
THE CONSUMER A
TEXT MALIN HALLARE PHOTO SCA
SCA SHAPE 2

2012 41
an eventful 2011
Louise Julian
Born: 1958
Education: Master’s degree
in business and economics
Previous experience:
For 24 years, Louise Julian
served in management posi-
tions at EF Education First,
the last eight as CEO. Since
2010 she has been a consult-
ant and adviser, mainly
in structural and cultural
development, productivity,
processes and efficiency.
Family: Three children and
her partner Carl-Henric
Svanberg.
Interests: In addition to her
job, spending time outdoors,
hiking, sailing, skiing, family
and children
Unexpected talent: 
Sewing, although there’s
been less of that in
recent years.
Bert Nordberg
Born: 1956
Education: Electri-
cal engineering, studied
management and economics
at the European Institute
of Business Administration
(INSEAD)
Previous experience: Bert
Nordberg has held manage-
ment positions in the Erics-
son group since 1996. Today
he is president and CEO of
Sony Mobile Communica-
tion, previously called Sony
Ericsson.
42 SCA SHAPE 2

2012
DID YOU
KNOW…
SCA INSIDE
NewsfromSCA
BY PLANTING smaller tree seed-
lings – half the size of their pre-
decessors – SCA minimizes its
environmental impact and speeds
up planting. Transportation
becomes more cost-efficient, and
the people who plant the smaller
seedlings can carry more plants
with them.
SCA grows 100 mil-
lion spruce, pine and
contorta pine seedlings
each year. About one-
third of these seedlings
are planted in SCA’s
own forests, while the
remaining plants are sold
to other forest owners.
CONSUMER
RESEARCH
shows that
menstrual
odor is a key
concern among
young women,
particularly
during heavy
flow periods. To address this, Libresse has
launched a new range of sanitary pads and
liners in Malaysia with an odor control fea-
ture and a refreshing green tea scent.
“There is a largely unmet consumer need
for feminine care products that can offer
women a scented odor-control benefit,”
says Christine Kok at SCA.
The Libresse PureFresh Green Tea Odor
Control feature is designed to effectively
capture and block menstrual odor, for a
fresher feeling during periods.
Sanitarypads
withgreen tea
Small plants –
bigadvantages
THE FOURTH GLOBAL FORUM on Incontinence
(GFI) was held in Copenhagen in April. This
year the theme was “Strategies Through Life
– An Integrated Approach to Incontinence
Care.” By taking the perspective of a single
lifetime, the forum illustrated how incontinence
affects individuals, families
and society. The GFI was
established by SCA in 2006
as a platform for learning
about and debating inconti-
nence issues.

Read more:
www.gfiforum.com
INCONTINENCE
MEETING
IN DENMARK
MORE THAN ONE in
SCA’s forests are left to
die of natural causes.
Dead wood are a natural
habitat for insects, wood
fungi and even owls.
SCA INSIDE
PHOTOS SCA, ISTOCKPHOTO
SCA HAS ONCE AGAIN been named one of
the world’s most ethical companies by the
American Ethisphere Institute. The institute
recognizes companies that demonstrate how
business ethics are decisive for a company’s
brand and profitability.
Every year the competition intensifies for
Ethisphere’s ranking, and the record number
of companies nominated for 2012 was no ex-
ception. Ethisphere evaluated several thou-
sand companies from more than 40 indus-
tries. The list of nominees for 2012 included
145 companies that outperform their peer
competitors in ethical business practices.
SCA stays with
sustainable friends
SCA CONTINUES to be listed in the global sus-
tainability index FTSE4Good; this is the com-
pany’s 12th consecutive year. SCA received
99 points out of a possible 100 in FTSE-
4Good’s rating system for index inclusion.
Read more about SCA’s sustainability work
at www.sca.com/sustainability.
SCA HAS DONATED 2,000 trees in
order to combat climate change and
restore the ecological environment
in northern China’s Inner Mongolia
region.
For the Million Tree Project, SCA put
together a team of employees to plant
poplars in the city of Kulun Qi. On the
trip, five SCA employees participated
in a group of 60 people planting about
600 poplars in one day.
The Million Tree Project is an
initiative of the Shanghai Roots
& Shoots NGO that aims to plant
1  million trees in Inner Mongolia by
2014 to help stop desertification and
offset China’s greenhouse emis-
sions. The land has been reforested
with poplars, pines and yellowhorn,
species that are particularly effec-
tive in fighting desertification and
sequestering carbon. 
Read more: www.mtpchina.org.
Employeesplant
poplarsinInnerMongolia
LIBERO’S NEW THIN Comfort dia-
per came out as No. 1 in a recent
independent test of 10 different baby
diapers in a Swedish publication.
The baby diaper study was initiat-
ed by the Swedish independent test
and research company Testfakta.
Libero rules
in  diaper test
ETHICAL
ROLE MODEL
www.sca.com
In recognition of the importance of sustainability
excellence for the success of our business we are
raising the bar with a number of new sustainability
ambitions and targets.
Read more on how we create value for people
and nature on www.sca.com/sustainability
$SFBUJOēąBMVđøPĞ
ĀFPQMđBOĐÿBUVSđ
We are raising the bar!

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