Name:_______________________ 

 

 Date assigned:______________     

        Band:________ 

Precalculus | Packer Collegiate Institute
 
Boxes, Lottery Tickets, and Infinite Elephants, Oh my! 
 
Section 1: Puzzles!  
 
Puzzle #1 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

How many little squares are in the 42nd1 figure?  

 
 
 
 
 
 

Generalize the result: How many little squares are in the nth figure? 
 
 
 
Extend the generalization: How many little squares are in the zero‐th figure? 
 
 
 
Graph the result: 
squares













figure number

 

                                                            
1

 http://ind.pn/NfegPy 


Puzzle #2 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Part I: How many squares are in the 42nd figure?  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Generalize the result: How many squares are in the nth 
figure? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Graph the results: 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Part II: If the shaded area of the first figure is 81, what is 
the area of the 42nd figure?  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Generalize the result: What is the area of the nth figure? 

Graph the results: 

squares





area




























































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

figure number

figure number

 



 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Puzzle #3a 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

The number of small tiles in the nth figure is: 
 
 
If you had 12 tiles, the largest figure you could build would be 
the 3rd figure (you don’t have enough tiles to build the 4th figure). 
If you had exactly 7,570 tiles, the largest figure you could build 
would be the ___ figure. 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

The number of small tiles in the nth figure is: 
 
 
If you had 12 tiles, the largest figure you could build would be 
the 3rd figure (you don’t have enough tiles to build the 4th figure). 
If you had exactly 7,570 tiles, the largest figure you could build 
would be the ___ figure. 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 

 
Puzzle #3b 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Puzzle 3a: 





















small squares



Puzzle 3b: 

figure number






















small squares





figure number



 

Puzzle #4: Gardens are framed with a single row of border tiles as illustrated here 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
Draw the 4th garden: 

Part II: How many border tiles are required for a garden of 
length 30? 
 
 
 
 
Part III: How many border tiles are required for a garden of length 1000? Show and explain how you got your answer. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Now that you’ve found the answer one way, come up with a second (different) way to “count” the border tiles for a 
garden of length 1000. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Part IV (generalize the result): If you know the garden length (call it n), explain how you can determine the number of 
border tiles. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Part VI: Can there be a garden that uses 2012 tiles? What 
Part V: Show how to find the length of the garden if 152 
about 2013 tiles? Explain your reasoning. 
border tiles are used. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Part I: How many border tiles are required for a garden of 
length 10? 
 

 

Part VII: Graph the results 
 
border tiles






figure number

 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Section 2: Mathematical Terminology 
Each of the puzzles had you generate a set of numbers for the 1st figure, 2nd figure, 3rd figure, 4th figure, etc. In 
mathematics, we call this a sequence. 
For example, for Puzzle #1, you saw the pattern 1, 3, 5, 7, … 
And we have notation for this. We’ll call this sequence  {Rn }  (but we could just as well call it  {Badgern } or  {Snaken } ). 
We use the superextrafancy curly brackets to indicate it’s a sequence, and we use the subscript to say where in the 
sequence we are. So: 
Instead of saying… 

the 5th number in this sequence  R …  

Instead of saying… 

the 27th number in this sequence  R …   we say  R27   

Instead of saying… 

the nth number in this sequence  R …  

we say R5   
we say  Rn   

As you’ve seen, the terms in a sequence can grow bigger or smaller, and we shall see that they can be crazy and get 
bigger and smaller and bigger and smaller!2 
 
Although there are a number of different kinds of sequences (as we shall see), we will really focus on two particular 
kinds. 
In Puzzle #1 and Puzzle #4, we saw the graphs look linear and the equation for the nth term was a linear equation. You 
can now laugh, because we don’t call these sequences linear. We call them arithmetic. That’s because arithmetic is 
about adding and subtracting, and for each term in the sequence we are adding and subtracting a fixed amount. The 
hallmark of an arithmetic sequence is that there is a common difference between each term (if you subtract any term 
from the previous term, you always get the same common difference). 
In Puzzle #2, we saw the graphs look exponential and the equation for the nth term was an exponential equation. You 
can now laugh again, because we don’t call these sequences exponential. We call them geometric, which has something 
to do with the “geometric mean” (a geometry concept that I am going to ignore here). The hallmark of a geometric 
sequence is that there is a common ratio between each term (if you divide any term by the previous term, you always 
get the same common ratio). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                            
2

 Some sequences are tricky to figure out. Here’s a fun one: 

LookAndSay  1, 11, 21, 1211, 111221, 312211,...  
Can you figure out  LookAndSay6 ? _____________________________________ (solution: http://bit.ly/KBeiSd) 

 


Section 3: Arithmetic Sequences 
1. If you know the first number in an arithmetic sequence is  5  and each term in the sequence goes up by  3 , come 
up with a formula for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
2. If you know the first number in an arithmetic sequence is  5  and each term in the sequence decreases by  3 , 
come up with a formula for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
3. If the first term in an arithmetic sequence is  a1  and the common difference is  d , what is the formula for  an ? 
 
 
 
 
 
4. If you know the seventieth number in an arithmetic sequence is  5  and each term in the sequence decreases by 
3 , come up with a formula for the nth term. (Hint: your work for the previous problem will help you!) 
 
 
 
 
 
5. If you know the fifth number in an arithmetic sequence is  5  and the eleventh number is  71 , come up with a 
formula for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
6. If you know the fifth number in an arithmetic sequence is  5.2  and the eleventh number is  9.4 , come up with 
a formula for the nth term. 
 
 
 
Extra Practice 
Arithmetic: Section 12.2 #3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33 
 

Section 4: Geometric Sequences 
7. If you know the first number in a geometric sequence is  5  and the common ratio is  3 , come up with a formula 
for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
8. If you know the first number in a geometric sequence is 5 and the common ratio is  1 / 3 , come up with a 
formula for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
9. If you know the first number in a geometric sequence is  a1  and the common ratio is  r , come up with a formula 
for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
10. If you know the fifth number in a geometric sequence is  80 / 81  and the common ratio is  2 / 3 , come up with a 
formula for the nth term. (Hint: your work for the previous problem will help you!) 
 
 
 
 
 
11. If you know the third number in a geometric sequence is  54 and the fifth number is  486 , come up with a 
formula for the nth term. 
 
 
 
 
 
12. If you know the fourth number in a geometric sequence is  156.25  and the ninth number is  488281.25 , come 
up with a formula for the nth term. 
 
  
Extra Practice: 
Geometric: Section 12.3 #9, 11, 13, 15, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 33, 35, 37 

Section 5: The Forwards Problem: Go From Formula to Sequence  
  
Example:  {sn }  {

s1   s2  
  1 

(1) n 1
} , so:    
n

s3   s4  

s5   s6  

 

 

s7  

1 1
1 1
1 1
  
    
    
 
2 3
4 5
6 7

 
 
 
 
Notice what is happening to this sequence as we go further and further along… although the numbers hop above and 
below the x‐axis, we see that the terms are getting closer and closer to 0.       
Will any of the dots ever lie on the x‐axis? How do you know? Convince me. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Geogebra Interlude 
To make this graph, open Geogebra. In the input bar at the bottom type: 
Sequence[(n,(‐1)^(n+1)/n),n,0,16] 
What this does is it graphs the points  (n,

(1) n1
)  for n=0 to n=16. Be careful with the parentheses and watch out for 
n

that extra “n” which I bolded. 
 
To resize your window so you can see everything, click on the 
 button at the top, and then place your arrow on the 
y‐axis, click and hold down the button while drag the cursor up and down. The same goes for the x‐axis.  
 


Armed with basic geogebra knowledge, answer the following questions: 
Given the following sequences, write out the first seven terms and then graph both in geogebra. 
1. (a)  {an }  {

n2  1
}   
2n

 

 

 

        (b)  {bn }  {

 

2n

n2

a1  

a2  

a3  

a4  

a5  

a6  

a7  

b1  

b2  

b3  

b4  

b5  

b6  

b7  

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
      
 
Use Geogebra to graph the first 16 values of these sequences. 
What I entered in Geogebra for  {an } :   

 

What I entered in Geogebra for  {bn }  

 Sequence[                                                ] 

 

 Sequence[                                                ] 

Change your window to [0,16]x[0,10] 

 

 

 

Change your window to [0,16]x[0,250] 

A rough sketch of what I see: 

 

 

 

A rough sketch of what I see: 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

10 

Section 6: The Backwards Problem: Go From Sequence to Formula 
1. Given the first few terms of a sequence, can you come up with a formula that defines it? Is the sequence arithmetic, 
geometric, or neither. Briefly explain how you decided your answer. 
 
WORK 
 
 
 
 
(a) 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 ... thus an   
 
(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(b) 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, ... thus an   
 
(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(c) 2,  9, 16,  23, 30, ... thus an   
 
 
(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1 1 1 1
,
, ... thus an   
(d) 1, , ,
 
3 9 27 81
 
(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

11 

(e) 1,

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1
1 1
1
,  ,
,  , ... thus an   
3
9 27
81

(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(f)

2 4 6 8 10
, , , ,
, ... thus an   
11 9 7 5 3

(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(g) .2, .02, .002, .0002, .00002,... thus an   
(circle one) arithmetic, geometric, or neither 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(h) (baby challenge)  
1, 2, 6, 24, 120, 720 ... thus an   
 
(i) (challenge)  
2, 6, 12, 20, 30, 42, 56 ... thus an   
 
(j) (uber‐challenge)  

0, 1, 10, 33, 76, 145, 246, 385, 568, 801,
 
... thus an 
 
(k) (ultra‐challenge)   

1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21... thus an   
 
 
 

Hints for the challenges: 
(h) http://bit.ly/Mcg3FT  … 
interesting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 
 
(i) it’s a quadratic 
 
(j) it’s a cubic 
 
(k) the answer is  an 

(1  5)n  (1  5)n
. Weird, huh. 
2n 5

I guess that isn’t much of a hint as the answer. But isn’t it 
strange that even though the formula involves  5 , you 
always get an integer output. 
 
 
 

 
 

12 

Section 7: An Introduction to Arithmetic Series 
 
A prelude (from http://bit.ly/MC7YHk)  
 
About  100  years  ago,  a  young  boy  (who  grew  up  to  be  a  great  mathematician)  by  the  name  of  Gauss  (pronounced 
"Gowss")  was  at  school  when  the  class  got  in  trouble  for  being  too  loud  and  misbehaving.  Their  teacher,  looking  for 
something to keep them quiet for a while, told her students that she wanted them to "add up all of the numbers from 1 
to 100 and put the answer on her desk." She figured that would keep them busy for an hour or so. 
 
About  30  seconds  later,  the  10‐year‐old  Gauss  tossed  his  slate  (small  chalkboard)  onto  the  teacher's  desk  with  the 
answer "5050" written on it and said to her in a snotty tone, "There it is."  
 
 
Let us look at the following diagram. We can come up with a sequence for the number of boxes in each figure. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

The sequence is 1, 3, 6, 10, 15, 21, … 
However, if we want to find the nth term in the sequence, we have a problem. It turns out (and we’ll show this) that the 
formula is:  sn 

1 2 1
n(n  1)
n  n  … or written more elegantly,  sn 

2
2
2

WHAT IN THE WHAT? How in the world does that work? 
1. Compare each figure to the previous one. Describe how the nth figure is changing based on the n‐1th figure. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
If we want the number of squares in the nth figure, we have to add together a bunch of numbers.  
 
For the fifth figure, we add  s5  1  2  3  4  5  
For the ninth figure, we add  s9  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  
For the nth figure, we add  sn  1  2  3  ...  (n  2)  (n  1)  n  
 
 
 

13 

2. But if we want to find what this sum is, we are going to have to add together a lot of numbers. Which is 
annoying. Here’s a shortcut. Let’s calculate  s5 in a special way, that might seem convoluted.  We’ll add the sum 
to itself, but in a special way. 
 

s5  1  2  3  4  5

s5  5  4  3  2  1

 

2 s5  6  6  6  6  6
Now we see that  2 s5  6(5)  30 . Thus  s5  15 . Which we know. 
 

Check yo’self! Using this method, find  s10 . 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Practice one more time. Be Gauss. Find the sum of the first 100 positive integers:  s100 . 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3. Now try it more generally for  sn  1  2  3  ...  (n  2)  (n  1)  n  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

14 

4. Does this work for other sequences? Try this technique out with: 
4, 7, 10, 13, 16, 19...  
 
Find the sum of the first five numbers by adding them: __________ 
 
Find the sum of the first five numbers by using the technique… Does the technique work? (If it doesn’t, explain 
why not.) 
 
 
 
 
 
5. Try this technique out with:  
2,  3,  8,  13,  18,  23, ...  
 
Find the sum of the first six numbers by adding them: __________ 
 
Find the sum of the first six numbers by using the technique… Does the technique work? (If it doesn’t, explain 
why not.) 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Try this technique out with: 
2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, ...  
 
Find the sum of the first five numbers by adding them: __________ 
 
Find the sum of the first five numbers by using the technique… Does the technique work? (If it doesn’t, explain 
why not.) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Key Mathematical Conclusion: This technique of adding the sum to the original sum, but reversing the order of 
the terms, works for __________________________ series because___________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________________________________________. 
It will not work for ___________________________ series because ___________________________________ 
__________________________________________________________________________________________. 

15 

7. Generalize things now! To find the sum of an arithmetic sequence, you need to know the first term, the last 
term, and the number of terms total. Write an equation (using only the terms “first term” “last term” and 
“number of terms”) which gives you the sum. 
 
 

Sum of an Arithmetic Series   
 
 
8. A proof without words. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Yeah, it may be a “proof without words,” but you need to words to explain that you understand it. Explain how this 
“proof without words” is a visual illustration of the equation you came up with in the previous problem. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

16 

Section 8: Sigma Terminology and Notation  
So we’ve talked about adding the integers from 1 to 100 together. There is a mathematical way to say that. It looks fancy 
and possibly scary, but it isn’t! Promise. 
100

1  2  3  ...  98  99  100   i  
i 1

If you don’t understand this, let me show you a few other examples of our fancy notation in action: 
6

n

2

 1  4  9  16  25  36  

n 1

7

 (2 p  5)  1  1  3  5  7  9  
p 2

k

5

6

7

8

1
1
1
1
1
2   2   2   2   2   

3
3
3
3
k 5  3 
8

1

n
n 1

2

1 1 1 1
1
1
       ...     (weird fact3) 
1 4 9 16 25 36

The variable itself is just a placeholder… any letter will do! Just make sure you pay attention to the top and bottom 
numbers!  
1. Represent the following sums using sigma notation: 
 
(a) (problem 4 from the previous section):   4  7  10  13  16 

 

 
 
(b) (problem 5 from the previous section):  2  3  8  13  18 

 

 
 
(c) (problem 6 from the previous section):  2  4  8  16  32 

 

 
 
 
                                                            
 Okay, here’s a huge surprise. If you add all these terms up, the sum will get closer and close to   / 6 . WHAAAAT? WHY IS PI 
INVOLVED IN THIS AT ALL?! I know, so very strange. Is it related to circles? Calculus can help you understand this here. I know, I 
know, you’ll have to wait a bit. Also, this series is tied up with something called the Riemann‐Zeta function. You might not have 
heard about it, but understanding the zeros to this function will literally make you a millionaire. Check out the million dollar 
problems (including the Riemann Hypothesis) here: http://bit.ly/LX4nHv 
3

2


17 

 
2. Expand the sigma notation to show the sum. You do not need to actually find the sum: 
 
4

(a)

 5  3(i  1)   
i 1

 
k

2
(b)  9     
k 1  3 
5

 

(c)

4

 (10)

i

 

i1

 
9

(d)

i2

 i 2  
i 3

 
9

(e)

n2

2
4  

n
n 3

 
3. Now we’re going to cycle back to arithmetic series. First, look at the following problems below and before you 
find the sum, explain (in words) how you know these are arithmetic series (as opposed to geometric, or 
something else). 
 
Explanation: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10

(a) 

 2  3i  
i 5

 
 
 
10

(b) 

 2  3(i  1)  
i 5

 
 
 
 
15

(c) 

 5i  2  
i 1

 

18 

 
6

(d) 

 1  67i  

i 6

 
 
 
100

(e) 

 1  67i  

i 23

 
 
 
 
Additional Problems: 
Sigma Notation:  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

19 

Section 9: An Introduction to Finite Geometric Series! 
Lotto!  Money for Life! 
You are going to see if you’re going to win a million dollars! Below are three scratch offs – but someone has already 
scratched off the first two circles. If the three scratch offs all show $ under them, you win a million dollars that will be 
paid to you in $50,000 installments at the end of each year for 20 years. If you see a cherry, you win a piece of candy. If 
you see anything else, you win nothing. 
 
 
 

$

 
Some of you won, some of you lost. For us, here, now, in math class, let’s assume you won, and you want to maximize 
your money in safe way, so when you’re 36 or 37 you have a pile of money that you are sitting on.4 You have a ton of 
patience, so you have this money direct deposited in a bank account which gives you 2% interest, earned at the 
beginning of the year. Let’s check to see how much money your bank account will show at the end of the each year. 
1. How much money do you have at the end of the first year? 
 
Answer: You have $50,000. This is because you haven’t yet earned interest on this (interest is earned at the 
beginning of the following year.) 
 
2. How much money do you have at the end of the second year?  
 
 
3. How much money do you have at the end of the third year? 
 
 
4. How much money do you have at the end of the fourth year? 
 
 
5. Can you write your answer to #4 using summation notation?  
 

 

6. Can you write how much money you’ll have at the end of 20 years using summation notation? 
 

 

 
                                                            
4

 We are going to ignore taxes for now. However, they could be factored in with a little effort. 


20 

7. Do you see that each term in the sum above forms a geometric sequence?  
 
The first term is _______________ and the common ratio is _______________. 
 
What we have is a geometric series! And we saw that the technique to sum an arithmetic series doesn’t work for 
geometric series.  
 
I’m going to show you a technique to add a geometric series! Let’s consider a four‐term series with first term of 
5 and a common ratio of 4.  
 

s  5  5(4)  5(4)2  5(4)3  
 
Let’s multiply  s  by the common ratio to get  4s . 
 

4 s  5(4)  5(4) 2  5(4)3  5(4) 4  
 
And now let’s subtract the two equations! 
 

4s 

5(4)  5(4) 2  5(4)3  5(4) 4

s  5  5(4)  5(4) 2  5(4)3

 

3s  5(4) 4  5
 
Thus we have  s 

5(4) 4  5
 425  
3

Will this technique always work? Try it out by calculating how much money you’ll have at the end of the fourth  
year! See if the algebra works out. And then compare your answer to your sum on the previous page. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

21 

8. Use this technique to calculate how much money you’ll have at the end of the twentieth year! Because of 
interest, it should be more than a million dollars. How much more money than a million dollars have you made? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Practice! 
9. Add the first seven terms of the series in this manner  s  5 

5 5 5 5 5 5
      
2 4 8 16 32 64

 
 
 
 
 
 
10. If you wrote out ten terms, what would be the tenth term in this sum? What about the fifteenth term? What 
about the fiftieth term? What about the nth term? 
 
 
 
 
 
11. Using this new technique, exactly find the sum of the first fifteen terms. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

22 

12. (a) Using this new technique, exactly find the sum of the first n terms. 
 
 
 
 
 
(b) As n gets bigger and bigger, what happens to the sum? 
 
 
13. (a) If the series were altered, so that it is:  s 

1 1 1 1
    ... , exactly find the sum of the first n terms. 
3 9 27 81

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(b) As n gets bigger and bigger, what happens to the sum? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
14. (a) If the series were altered, so that it is:  s 

23 23 23 23
    ... , exactly find the sum of the first n terms. 
3 9 27 81

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(b) As n gets bigger and bigger, what happens to the sum? 
 


23 

15. If the series were altered, so that it is:  s 

3 3 3
6
12
  

 ...  
4 10 25 125 625

(a) Explain how you know this series is a geometric series. 
 
 
 
 
(b) Exactly find the sum of the first eight terms. Write the sigma notation for the sum of the first 8 terms. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(c) What is the nth term in this series? 
 
 
 
(d) Exactly find the sum of the first n terms. Write the sigma notation for the sum of the first n terms. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(e) As n gets bigger and bigger, what happens to the sum? 
 
 
 
16. If the series were altered, so that it is:  s  1  2  4  8  (it is finite and doesn’t go on forever!), use this 
technique to find the sum of these four terms. Then check your answer by adding these four terms together.  
 
 
 
 
 

24 

17. Does infinity equal ‐1?  
 
Using your brain, what is the sum of this infinite geometric series:  s  1  2  4  8  16  ...  
 
 
 
Now let’s use the technique we’ve perfected above.  
 
s  1  2  4  8  16  ...  
 
2 s  2  4  8  16  32  ...  
s  1  
 
Thus we can see that  s  1 . 
 
 

Explanation the discrepancy between your brain answer and our procedural answer. Which is the correct sum?  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18. If the series were altered, so that it is:  s  a  ar  ar  ar  ar  ... , we are designating the first term as  a  
and the common ratio as  r . 
  
(a) Explain how you know this series is a geometric series. 
 
 
 
 
(b) Exactly find the sum of the first eight terms. Write the sigma notation for the sum of the first 8 terms. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(c) What is the nth term in this series? 
 
 
 
2

3

4


25 

(d) Exactly find the sum of the first n terms. Write the sigma notation for the sum of the first n terms. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(e) As n gets bigger and bigger, what happens to the sum? 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Key Mathematical Conclusion: This technique is powerful and can be used to find the sum of the first n terms of 
________________ sequences. The reason this technique works is because _____________________________ 
___________________________________________________________________________________________ 
___________________________________________________________________________________________ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

26 

Section 10: Infinite Geometric Series!  
Infinity! 
0. First, watch this: http://bit.ly/NbitTN 
1. I am giving you 8 infinite geometric series. Add the first 20 terms using the formula you came up with! Write 
your answer next to the series… 
 
n

1
(a)       
n 1  2 

1
(b)  3  
n 1  2 

(c)

  2

n

1
(e)    4  
n 1  10 
 

 

 1.01
n 1

(f)

 1

n

 

 

n1

(g)

n1

(d)

n 1

n 1

n

 

n

n 1

2
5   

n 1  3 

2
(h)  5  
n 1  3 

 

 
2. Put an * next to the ones you think will go off to infinity if you keep on adding all the remaining terms!  
 
 
 
 
3. Explain why (f) should definitely have an * next to it. 
 
 
 
 
4. Explain why you chose to give or not give (c) an asterisk. 
 
 
 
 
5. Explain why you chose to give or not give (b) an asterisk. 
 
 
 
 
 
6. Explain why you chose to give or not give (d) an asterisk.  
 
 
 

27 

7. Proof without words.  
Yeah, it may be a “proof without words,” but you need to words to 
explain that you understand it. Explain what this “proof without 
words” is a visual illustration of. (Hint: The large square is a 1 by 1 
square.) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8. Now we are going to consider geometric series with a negative common ratio! Add the first 20, 21, 22, and 23 
terms using the formula you came up with! Use these sums (we call them partial sums) to conjecture whether 
the infinite series is convergent or divergent (put an * next to the ones you think are divergent). 
 
k

(i)

 1

   
2
k 1 
 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
22 terms: 
23 terms: 
 

m

m 1

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
22 terms: 
23 terms: 
 

(l)

  1

p

 

p 1

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
               22 terms: 
               23 terms: 
 

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
22 terms: 
23 terms: 
 

i

 1
(k)  3     
2
i1 

  2 

 1
4    

n 1  10 

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
               22 terms: 
               23 terms: 
 

(m)

n

(j)  

 

(n)

n

 2
5    

3
n1 

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
               22 terms: 
               23 terms: 
 


28 

(o)

  1.01

k

 

(p)

k 1

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
22 terms: 
23 terms: 

 2
5  

3
n 1 

n1

 

 
20 terms: 
21 terms: 
               22 terms: 
               23 terms: 

 
Key Mathematical Conclusion: Infinite geometric series will shoot out to infinity if ___________________________ 
______________________________________________________________________________________________. 
Mathematically we call this sort of series divergent. However infinite geometric series will get closer and closer and 
closer to particular (finite) number if ________________________________________________________________.  
We call this sort of series convergent. 
 
If the series is convergent, you can figure out what the sum is approaching! In problem 18 of the previous section, 
you determined that the sum of the first n terms of a geometric series is:  
 
As n increases to infinity, we can say that one term in that equation becomes negligible. What term is that, and 
why? 
 
 
 
 
As a result, we can determine that the sum, as we have more and more terms, approaches:  
 
 
 
Decide if each of these series are convergent or divergent. If they are convergent, write down what number the 
series converges to next to the sum. 

(a)

n

 
n1
 
 
convergent / divergent    

(b)

1

 2 (3)

(d)

n

n 1

 
 
convergent / divergent

n

1
3 

n 1  2   

(e)

convergent / divergent

n

 
 
convergent / divergent

n

 3
(c)  5   
 2  
n 1

100(1.72)
n1

 

convergent / divergent

1

 10 (1)

(f)
 

100(0.72)

n

 
 
convergent / divergent
n1

 

29 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful