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RESEARCH BRIEF

The Leading Edge of
Consumer Insight

STARING
AT THE SUN
IDENTIFYING, UNDERSTANDING
AND INFLUENCING
SOCIAL MEDIA USERS
By Doug Rozen
Mona Askalani,
and Tom Senn
MINE
aimia.com
GOLD
From the social graph to
communication networks to rewarding
new levels of loyalty, social media is data gold.
You need more than just a Facebook page.
You need a social loyalty strategy.
450
FACEBOOK
FRIENDS
240
TWITTER
FOLLOWERS
305
TUMBLR
FOLLOWERS
118
FOURSQUARE
FRIENDS
168
PINTEREST
FOLLOWERS
210
BLOG
SUBSCRIBERS
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
At the end of 2011 in the United States, Aimia conducted
a combination of primary and secondary research to
develop a unique framework for marketers to identify,
measure the activity of and build relationships with
customers who interact with brands via social media
channels. This white paper is the result of that research,
which represents the inaugural edition of an ongoing
Aimia focus on the intersection of social media marketing
and loyalty management.
In developing this report, Aimia created an overarching
usage framework to better understand how, where
and why consumers engage with social media. Our
research goals:
> To understand how to deliver the right message to
the right consumer through social media for the
best response;
> To better understand the up-front expectations
social media users;
> And to understand how to focus marketing investment
on the right social media tactics.
To develop our usage framework, Aimia conducted a
series of weeklong ethnographic research panels, and
then substantiated our findings with Forrester, Mintel
and GfK Mediamark Research & Intelligence. We used this
combination of primary and secondary research to create
six social media usage personas based on behavior. Finally,
we developed specific audience profiles to illustrate how
best to engage each of these discrete segments through
social media marketing.
In this white paper, you’ll learn about:
> The current landscape of social media measurement;
> Aimia’s proprietary social media segmentation
framework;
> The dierences between types of social media
participation via our six social media “personas”;
> Actionable approaches to building relationships
with addressable social media segments;
> And implications of this research for marketers.
Table of Contents
2 Introduction
4 Solar Flares: Evolving Social Media Metrics
6 The Social Media Usage Framework
8 Social Media Personas

16 Building Relationships Through Social Media
18 Here Comes the Sun
19 About the Authors
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 1

Summary and Table of Contents
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 2
Every child is taught not to stare
directly at the sun. But every day,
companies stare directly into the
massive celestial orb that is social
media marketing. And when you
spend precious marketing dollars
attempting to build customer
relationships and loyalty through
social media channels, you might as
well be staring at the sun—because
it’s that easy to get blinded.
The statistics on social media usage
beggar the imagination. There
are more than 845 million active
Facebook users worldwide. Every
week, LinkedIn gains a million new
users, and Twitter publishes nearly
two and half billion new tweets.
Every day, consumers view an
average of 3 billion YouTube videos.
Looking at the sheer momentum
and critical mass of social media
activity, we can be forgiven for
wanting to purchase a piece of
this consumer activity with our
marketing dollars.
But targeting those dollars in a way
that delivers return on investment
is easier said than done. For all the
heat and light generated from this
virtual star, harnessing this energy
remains an ongoing challenge for
marketers. Critical mass does not
equal engagement. Consumers “like”
brands on Facebook, follow them on
Twitter, and forward brand-generated
YouTube videos, which makes it easy
to mistake all of this activity for
marketing success. But if you look
past the dazzling brightness, then
the need for a more concrete,
measurable and actionable set
of social media activity metrics
becomes apparent. How often do
your customers “like” a brand?
How deep is their loyalty for those
brands? How often does that
“like” translate into purchases,
transactions and profitable behavior?
The days of being blinded by social
media activity are over. Marketers
require a more sophisticated approach
that leverages the tools of loyalty
management to identify, understand
and influence customer behavior
through social media channels. The
traditional approach to social media
measurement—racing to rack up
the most “likes,” followers, and
recommendations, and then proudly
displaying your scorecard like a prized
pelt—is no longer adequate. It has now
become imperative to understand the
meaning behind the numbers. Are your
thousands of Facebook “likes” driven by
brand engagement and loyalty, or by
one-o promotions? Are you defining
success by customer activity, or by
customer engagement?
To become an eective marketing
strategy, social media marketing must
first become part of an eective
customer strategy. The key is leveraging
loyalty management tools to build
greater customer understanding
through data that delivers actionable
insights. The problem is that, because
we find it dicult to understand the
motivations behind our customers’
social media activity, engaging them
consistently is a continual challenge.
Today, eective social media marketers
must leverage a segmentation approach
to identify, understand and influence
customers through these channels.
Social media has enjoyed an exciting
adolescence; it’s now time to grow up.
Introduction
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
1
1 in every 7 Minutes — ComScore, It’s a Social World: Top 10
Need-to-Knows About Social Networking and Where It’s Headed, Dec. 2011
2
3,000,000 Foursquare Checkins — www.technolog.msnbc.msn.com/
technology/technolog/foursquare-seeing-3-million-check-ins-daily-121720
3
2,380,000,000 Tweets Per Week (based on 340,000,000 tweets a day
x 7 - milestone announced March 21, 2012) — http://blog.twitter.com/
2012/03/twitter-turns-six.html, March 12, 2011
4
40% of all Media Users — Nielsen, Social Media Report:
Spending Time, Money and Going Mobile, Sept. 2011
1 IN EVERY
7 MINUTES
SPENT ONLINE
IS AT
FACEBOOK
1
3,000,000
FOURSQUARE
CHECK-INS
PER DAY
2

2,380,000,000
TWEETS
EVERY WEEK
3
40%
OF ALL SOCIAL
MEDIA USERS
ACCESS FROM
THEIR MOBILE
DEVICE
4
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 3
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 4
Solar Flares: Evolving Social Media Metrics
Social media measurement is in
the midst of a dramatic and volatile
evolution. The problem is that no
single customer engagement channel
can currently deliver a complete
picture of customer behavior through
the data. Facebook knows who your
friends are, but not what you buy.
Google knows what you’re interested
in, but not what you’ve done.
Foursquare knows where you are, but
not what you like. And so on.
Connecting these “data dots” has
become the preeminent challenge for
marketers—a challenge that makes
social media measurement a critical
obstacle to success.
No one understands this need better
than the social media companies
themselves, and they’re moving rapidly
to address critical measurement gaps.
Facebook, for example, has evolved its
reporting and measurement tools to
better inform brand interactions; in
2011, the company debuted Facebook
Page Insights to address this need. As
Facebook Advertising Communications
Manager Elisabeth Diana told Mashable,
“one of the purposes behind Facebook
Page Insights is to provide... ways to
understand how to reach and acquire
new customers.” The company is also
developing new metrics to provide
businesses with not only information
about how consumers interact with
your brand page, but also to provide
a glimpse into how users connect
with page content through other
Facebook activity.
One problem is that it’s often dicult
to correlate “likes” with brand
activity—a brand page with millions
of “likes”, for example, may generate
little actual sharing activity on
Facebook. To address this issue,
Facebook recently added another
metric to Page Insights called “People
Talking About This.” This reporting tool
tracks activities that typically appear
in a user’s newsfeed, such as likes, wall
posts, comments, shares, questions
answered, event RSVPs, page
mentions, photo tagging and location
check-ins. The metric allows a brand
to understand which page posts are
the most compelling and interactive
to its fans.
Twitter has also dramatically
ramped up their engagement tools.
A December 2011 platform redesign
resulted in a number of potentially
useful new marketing tools: Four new
tabs, including an evolution of the
“Activity” tab called “Connect” that
includes your tweets, @mentions, new
follows and new list adds; new Brand
Pages with customizable header
images, free featured tweets and new
tools for followers; and new Discover
tools that focus on multimedia content
and more robust hashtag usage.
Social media engagement and
measurement is also evolving far
beyond Facebook and Twitter,
throughout the social mediaverse.
Brands can now avail themselves of
Google+ pages, LinkedIn pages and
Groups, YouTube Channels and more.
New social media players such as
Pinterest will continue to alter the
landscape, and third-party suppliers
will continue to innovate with new tools
and platforms designed to facilitate
measurement and understanding.
Likes, retweets and video forwards are
fine as far as they go, but how much of
this activity translates into profitable
behavior? The first step in answering
these questions is to understand how
dierent groups of consumers interact
with social media at a macro level, and
how marketers can leverage these
dierent behavioral segments to build
relationships. Aimia’s Social Media
Segmentation helps marketers take
this first step.
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
“UNADDRESSED BY
THIS RAPID EVOLUTION
IS THE NEED TO CONNECT
SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY TO
A MORE HOLISTIC VIEW OF
CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT
AND BEHAVIOR WITH
THE TRANSACTION
AT ITS CORE.”
IBM CMO Study 2011
Enhance customer loyalty/advocacy
Design experiences for tablet/mobile apps
Use social media as a key engagement channel
Use integrated software suites to manage customers
Monitor the brand via social media
Measure ROI of digital technologies
Analyze online/oine transactions
Develop social interaction governance/policies
Monetize social media
Gain comprehensive visibility of supply chain
67%
57%
56%
56%
51%
47%
45%
37%
29%
24%
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 5
Blinded by the Light
A 2011 IBM CMO study revealed that social media engagement is a top-three priority for US CMOs. But
the survey also revealed that their top priority was enhancing customer loyalty—most CMOs consider
social media as a tool to build loyalty, rather than as an end in itself. The critical challenge for marketers
will be to link social media data points to the customer loyalty lifecycle.
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 6
The total universe of social media
users has raced past critical mass
much faster than even the most
aggressive analyst could have
predicted. The case for segmenting
social media users hinges on the size,
scope and behavior of this consumer
audience. Without segmentation that
helps us understand the dierence
between active and passive audience
behavior, our ability to eectively
leverage social media won’t advance
much beyond our ability to leverage
mass media. The result of this
understanding: A more sophisticated
engagement strategy that considers
how dierent groups of consumers use
social media dierently.
In order to understand how best to
engage consumers through social
media channels, you must first
understand both the motivations
behind social media participation and
the degree to which certain types of
participation create discomfort for
particular consumer segments. Despite
some of the more strident statements
from industry executives about
consumer willingness to part with
personal information, social media
users are concerned about privacy.
Aimia’s own research on Millennial
consumer behavior (“Born This Way:
The US Millennial Loyalty Survey,”
October 2011) revealed that Generation
Y consumers, who are ostensibly less
concerned about data privacy than
older consumers, nonetheless share
broad consumer concerns about the
security and control of personal data.
Our segmentation therefore is
constructed on a framework of
behavior based on the two primary
emotional drivers of social
media participation:

> Control: Consumer desire for control
over their personal information
correlates to the amount of information
they’re willing to share, the number
of connections they make, the brands
with which they engage and the
reputation they build online. Control
equals exposure: The more control a
consumer perceives over their social
media activity, the more likely they are
to engage with a wider variety of
social media networks.
> Trust: Social media activity is driven
by the level of trust consumers have
in their ability to navigate social media,
how much they trust their friends
and networks with their personal
information, and how much trust they
place in the social networks themselves.
The degree of trust correlates with
consumers’ willingness to share
information about themselves through
social media. Trust equals participation:
The more trust a consumer places in
social media networks and their
connections, the more likely they
are to actively participate.
The Social Media Usage Framework
67%
57%
56%
56%
51%
47%
45%
37%
29%
24%
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 7
We plotted the Control and Trust
emotional drivers to create our Social
Media Usage Framework, which you
can see illustrated below. The X-axis
represents the consumer’s level
of social media exposure, which
correlates to the Control driver.
The Y-axis represents consumer
participation in social media, which
correlates to the Trust driver.
Combining these axes creates a
map that reveals four Control—
Trust behavioral quadrants:
> Passive, Single Network Users
(lower-left quadrant): Users with
low levels of trust and little perceived
control. These users reluctantly
join a social network because
they don’t want to feel left out
of the conversation, and protect
themselves by proactively
limiting their involvement.
> Passive, Multi-Network Users
(lower-right quadrant): Users who
generally don’t trust social media
networks, but who perceive
enough control to consume
information through these
networks daily while rarely, if
ever, sharing personal information.
> Active, Single Network Users
(upper-left quadrant): Users with
low perceived control but high trust,
these users restrict their social
network connections, but actively
share personal information with
their inner circle.
> Active, Multi Network Users
(upper-right quadrant): Users with
high perceived levels of control and
trust, they comfortably navigate the
wider social media universe, actively
control the dialogue and freely share
personal details. Within this group a
small pocket of super users emerge
who participate by creating
multi-media content (e.g. video
blogs) and share across multiple
social networks.
> In addition, the research considered
Non-Users, comprised of people
who had never used a social network
at all and past users who had not
logged on within the last 30 days.
For this group, social media lacks
utility in their personal or
professional lives.
So what should marketers take away
from this matrix approach to social
media behavior? Successful social
media engagement requires the active
provision of trust and control
mechanism for consumers to leverage
in their social media experiences. The
more users trust that their personal
information is both secure and firmly
within their control, the more likely
they are to migrate to the upper-right
quadrant of behavior and increase
brand engagement. To foster this
engagement, brands should develop
a segmented approach designed to
cater to consumers within these
behavioral quadrants. A one-size-fits-all
approach to social media won’t shine a
light on customer behavior—but it may
get you burned.
P
A
R
T
I
C
I
P
A
T
I
O
N
EXPOSURE
ACTIVE,
SINGLE
NETWORK
USERS
(Trusts Close
Friends)
ACTIVE,
MULTI-
NETWORK
USERS
(Trust
Themselves)
PASSIVE,
SINGLE
NETWORK
USERS
(Unsure Who
to Trust)
PASSIVE,
MULTI-
NETWORK
USERS
(Doesn’t Trust
“The System”)
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
With our social media usage
framework in place, we undertook
a combination of primary and
secondary research to identify six
social media “personas” defined by
our two behavioral variables of Trust
and Control. Our six proprietary
personas reveal an essential truth
about social media participation: That
a one-size-fits-all approach to social
media spending will result in a poor
use of your marketing dollars.
When building our social media
personas, we constructed our survey
to be representative of the entire US
adult population ages 18 and older.
We also defined “participation” as a
consumer engaging with one or more
social networks within the last 30 days.
Our research reveals that US consumers
fall into six primary segments of social
media behavior:
> No Shows: Although social media
usage is up substantially among the
general US population, 41 percent of
the total population has not logged on
to a social network in the last 30 days.
Most likely a 65-plus male, a typical No
Show exhibits low degrees of Trust,
and has no interest in broadcasting his
activities or interests to anyone.
> Newcomers: At 15 percent of the US
adult population, Newcomers are
typical passive users of a single social
media network. A passive user may
reluctantly join Facebook, for example,
in order not to feel “left behind.”
Newcomers primarily use social media
to enhance their oine relationships.
> Onlookers: At 16 percent of the adult
US population, Onlookers may lurk
on several social media networks,
but post infrequently. They rely on
social media primarily to keep up on
the online lives of others within their
social networks, but are reluctant to
share details about themselves.
Onlookers want complete control
of their online information.
> Cliquers: Making up six percent of
the adult US population, Cliquers are
active, single-network users who
congregate primarily on Facebook.
They’re most likely to be women,
and most of their online sharing
includes photos, status updates
and comments. Within their small
network of close friends and family,
they’re active and influential.
> Mix-n-Minglers: The largest group of
social media users at 19 percent of
the US population, Mix-n-Minglers
participate actively on multiple social
networking platforms. Mix-n-Minglers
like to follow brands in order to
receive oers and keep up with the
latest news. They also understand
the importance of data privacy.
Within their network of friends,
they’re influential—and they meet
many of these friends online.
> Sparks: Sparks represent only three
percent of the US adult population,
but are the most active and deeply
engaged users of social media. Sparks
use social media tools as a means of
self-expression—and they self-express
in a variety of creative and engaging
ways. While Sparks are still concerned
about online privacy, they work to
control the online conversation. Sparks
typically boast the most open social
networks amongst the six personas.
They engage with brands frequently,
and will serve as enthusiastic
ambassadors for their favorites.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 8
Social Media Personas






© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 9
Source: GfK MRI Fall 2011 database
41%
15%
16%
6%
19%
3%
ACTIVE
PARTICIPATION
PASSIVE
PARTICIPATION
LOW
EXPOSURE
HIGH
EXPOSURE
Our six social media personas represent the entire spectrum of US social media usage, from complete
inactives to highly active and engaged users. Their varying desires for trust and control reveal that a
single, monolithic approach to engagement and loyalty through social media channels will result in
missed opportunities to build relationships with your best customers.
Sun Spots:
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
AGE:
65
INCOME:
$
30K
EDUCATION:
High
School
Graduate
HOUSEHOLD:
Lives
Alone
“What’s the point
of social media?
I don’t need to know
what you ate
for breakfast!”
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 10
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
“I use social
media to keep in
touch with current
friends and to
reconnect with
old ones.”
AGE:
39
INCOME:
$
75K
EDUCATION:
Attended
College
HOUSEHOLD:
Married,
2 Children
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 11
CONNECTIONS:
> 50
NETWORKS:
Facebook
YouTube
TOOLS:
PC
Only
FREQUENCY:
Every
Few Days
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
“I use social
media to reconnect
with people and
typically observe
others. I share
almost nothing.”
AGE:
36
INCOME:
$
85K
EDUCATION:
College
Degree
HOUSEHOLD:
Married,
2 Children
CONNECTIONS:
< 100
TOOLS:
PC, Rarely
Android
FREQUENCY:
Daily
NETWORKS:
Facebook
YouTube
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 12
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
“I use Facebook
to post about my
day. I like to post
pictures, and I love
to comment on my
friends’ pictures
and videos.”
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 13
AGE:
47
INCOME:
$
95K
EDUCATION:
Graduate
Degree
HOUSEHOLD:
Married,
1 child
CONNECTIONS:
< 100
TOOLS:
PC,
iPhone
FREQUENCY:
Daily
NETWORKS:
Facebook
YouTube
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
“I use social
media to interact
with family and
friends — including
new friends I’ve
met online.”
CONNECTIONS:
< 200
NETWORKS:
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn
TOOLS:
Powerbook,
iPhone
FREQUENCY:
Multiple
Xs/Daily
AGE:
29
INCOME:
$
95K
EDUCATION:
Graduate
Degree
HOUSEHOLD:
Married,
1 child
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 14
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 15
“Social media
enables me to meet
with my regular friends
and meet new ones.
It increased my
confidence and allows
me to enjoy
my life.”
CONNECTIONS:
< 1,000
NETWORKS:
Facebook
Twitter
Blogs
TOOLS:
Powerbook,
iPhone, iPad
FREQUENCY:
Always
Online
AGE:
24
INCOME:
$
80K
EDUCATION:
In Grad
School
HOUSEHOLD:
Lives with
Partner
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
The dierences among our six
social media personas are as deep
as they are wide. Dierences in
demographics, lifestyle, attitudes,
behavior and loyalty make building
relationships with them a challenging
notion for the most sophisticated
marketers. Rather than spend
precious marketing dollars to blanket
social media with generic content
and oers, consider targeting social
media spend at the intersection of
customer spend, preferred channel
and relevant oer. Let your best
customers tell you where, when and
how they’d like to interact with you.
To that end, consider the following
strategies to help guide you in
marketing to that social media user
segment most representative of your
customer base:
> No-Shows: To reach this
curmudgeonly group, you’ll need
to rely on a mix of communication
channels that includes email, website,
direct mail and mobile. If a large
majority of your customers don’t
participate in social media, you
should minimize your investment
in these networks.
> Newcomers: Newcomers won’t flock
to your social channels without a
compelling reason. Try explicitly
rewarding them for participation
with compelling acquisition oers,
or link your social media marketing
to your company’s Corporate Social
Responsibility (CSR) eorts to
entice participation.
> Onlookers: Onlookers seek out
content they can’t get anywhere
else. To pique their interest, seed
your social media channels
with behind-the-scenes footage,
interviews with key company
personnel or celebrity
spokespersons, and exclusive
photo and video content. Stick
to a regular content schedule to give
them a reason to keep coming back.
> Cliquers: This group of users loves
to share photos and videos, so
developing viral content is a
necessity to build activity with this
group. To keep Cliquers engaged,
cultivate a strong Facebook presence
with frequent photo contests and
video uploading opportunities
that result in lots of likes, shares
and comments.
> Mix-n-Minglers: Because of their
presence on a variety of networks
and their eagerness to interact with
brands, Mix-n-Minglers often get
overwhelmed with marketing “noise.”
To pierce through the din, you’ll need
to develop a diverse social media
strategy with a focus on relevance
and value. Providing options for
social sharing and social sign-on is
critical to identifying and building
relationships with this group.
> Sparks: To identify and build
relationships with Sparks, combine
social media monitoring with a
review of your brand’s most active
social media followers. Engage this
elite segment with premium access
to your brand, and invite them
to co-create content with you.
For example, you might host a
brainstorming session with
prominent bloggers to help
shape future social media
campaigns or product launches.
Building Relationships Through Social Media
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 16
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 17
O
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Never
Infrequently
Occasionally
Regularly
Very Frequently
Viewing the Eclipse
Consumers engage in social media networks and access communication channels based on their needs
as individuals. Aimia’s social media personas can help you determine when, where and how to reach
these broad groups based on their actual and potential value to the brand.
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Here Comes the Sun
Despite the overwhelming brilliance
of the social media star to marketers
who are often blinded by the
opportunity to connect with valuable
customers, a reality check is in order.
Our research reveals that only 28
percent of the total US population
actively participates in social media.
These consumers—the ones who post,
upload, write reviews, share photos,
and upload videos—comprise our
“active” social media personas of
Cliquers, Mix-N-Minglers and Sparks.
Everyone else either “leans back,”
consuming social media content
without sharing—or they don’t
participate at all.
Not surprisingly, younger social media
users are more likely to actively engage
in social media. Aimia’s own proprietary
research confirms this; our 2011 survey
of Millennial consumers ages 19-29 in
Canada, the United Kingdom, and the
United States (“Born This Way: The
US Millennial Loyalty Survey,” available
on Aimia.com) reveals that Millennials
are far more likely to be active across
social media networks such as
Facebook and Twitter.
There are, however, a few important
demographic distinctions to note.
Consumers in our Cliquers persona
(single network, active users) are
more likely to skew older, between
the ages of 44 and 54. In addition,
our research reveals a direct
correlation between active social
media usage and higher household
income. Social media marketing isn’t
just for Generation Y—auent Baby
Boomers are also eminently reachable
through social media.
Social media segmentation has
potentially dramatic implications
for marketers. First, it reveals the
importance of targeting social media
spend by consumer behavior, rather
than by Silicon Valley buzz. Second,
the segmentation places the
importance of social media followers
and fans in the proper context—for
a customer that likes or follows
your brand is not necessarily a
loyal, profitable customer. Third,
it demonstrates the importance
of using social media as a dialog
channel rather than as just another
broadcast channel.
To begin to apply social media
personas and segmentation in your
own marketing eorts, consider the
following best practices:
> Extend the loyalty lifecycle. The
old model of building customer
loyalty post-transaction is giving
way to a model that incorporates
relationship marketing, rewards
and dialog throughout the purchase
cycle, from awareness to advocacy
and from pre-purchase to post-
purchase interactions. Social media
provides an invaluable set of tools
to build relationships both before
and after the core transaction.
> Connect the data dots. Look
for ways to connect customer
interactions with your social media
channels to other data sources that
provide insight into customer
behavior. Can you connect social
media data to transactional data?
To your reward program data?
To your website clickstream data?
Connecting these “data dots” will
become critically important to
developing a complete view of
your customer relationships.
> Deliver value and relevance. Combine
social media marketing with your
customer analytics to ensure that
every communication, oer and dialog
opportunity is perceived by your
customers as valuable, relevant to
the relationship and worth their time.
Leverage social media as a tool to
build relationships that increase trust
and facilitate the flow of information.
It’s hard not to be dazzled by
social media: It’s sexy, it generates
tremendous media buzz, and traditional
agencies push social media services
as high-margin revenue. But it’s not
enough for marketers to apply
traditional media approaches to this
highly personal communication channel.
By understanding that consumers
interact with social media based on
the drivers of trust and control, you
can place social media in its proper role:
As a tool that helps build long-term
customer relationships based on deep
consumer insight. Our behavior-based
social media personas are a valuable
tool to help you begin your journey to
profitable loyalty management. You
don’t need to get burned by staring at
the sun—you just need to harness its
power as an endlessly renewable
source of energy.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 18
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Mona Askalani
Director,
Social Marketing
Mona leads the Social Loyalty
practice for Aimia in the US, where
she builds strategies that drive
engagement and advocacy through
a powerful combination of emerging
media, traditional media and loyalty
marketing expertise. From start-ups
to large corporations, her work has
propelled companies in the financial
services, retail, technology, consumer
goods and hospitality industries.
Prior to joining Aimia, Mona served
as Vice President of Advertising
Services at Marketing Architects,
where she partnered with clients
to drive consumer response from
emerging media, online, TV and
radio. Mona also created customer
engagement and loyalty strategies
at BI/Digital Marketing.
Identifying, understanding and influencing social media users / 19
About the Authors
Tom Senn
Director, Research and
Customer Insights
Tom leads research and customer
insights for Aimia in the US. An expert
interviewer and moderator, Tom has
designed, implemented and analyzed a
variety of qualitative and quantitative
market research and exploratory
studies around the globe. His broad
range of cross-industry experience
about how companies collect, store
and analyze information helps Aimia’s
clients make better decisions, improve
processes and strengthen customer
relationships. Prior to joining Aimia,
Tom worked for MarketResponse
International, a boutique market
research firm; Nielsen Marketing
Research, where he worked with major
consumer packaged goods firms; and
Accenture, where he was a member of
the Customer Insight Center of
Excellence for Accenture’s Customer
Relationship Management team.
About Aimia
We are a global leader in loyalty management. Our unique capabilities include
proven expertise in building proprietary loyalty strategies, launching and managing
coalition loyalty programs, creating value through loyalty analytics and driving
innovation in the emerging digital and mobile spaces. We build and run loyalty
programs for ourselves and for some of the world's best brands. Customer data is
at the heart of everything we do. We are Aimia. We inspire customer loyalty.
Doug Rozen
SVP, Communications, Design
& Emerging Technologies
Doug Rozen is responsible for
leading Communications, Design
and Emerging Technology capabilities,
including the creative, digital, media,
mobile, social and consumer research
oerings for Aimia. His vision and
know-how has helped position Aimia
as the recognized global leader in
loyalty management with clients like
Chase, AT&T, General Motors, Hallmark,
Delta, P&G, Amtrak, Coca-Cola, JetBlue
and Ford. Prior to Aimia, Doug was
the Senior Partner, Managing Director
at JWT — one the world’s largest
advertising agencies. There, he
established digital@jwt in 1998, and
combined JWT’s digital/direct
oerings into connect@jwt in 2003,
which ultimately lead to RMG Connect.
AIMIA and the AIMIA logo are trademarks of Aimia Inc. FACEBOOK, TWITTER, FOURSQUARE, TUMBLR, PINTEREST,
YOUTUBE, GOOGLE, IBM, LINKEDIN, POWERBOOK, IPHONE, IBM CMO and IPAD are the property of their respective
holders, and are used only to directly describe the products or services being provided. Their use in no way indicates any
relationship between Aimia Inc. and the holders of said trademarks. © 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
SAMPLE OUR BRAIN FOOD.
If you found this helping of leading-edge content both nutritious
and delicious, sample some of these tasty dishes from our
full menu of loyalty thought leadership at Aimia.com:
BORN THIS WAY: The Millennial Loyalty Survey
By Rick Ferguson, Vice President Knowledge Development
The results of Aimia’s 2011 consumer research in
Canada, the UK, and the US reveals surprising insights
into the behavior of Generation Y and their relationship
to technology, data privacy, brand loyalty and
reward programs.
THE NEW DATA VALUES: Securing Customer
Data as a Renewable Resource
By David Johnston, President and CEO, EMEA,
and Jeremy Henderson-Ross, Legal Director and
General Counsel, EMEA
David and Jeremy review the landscape of consumer
data privacy, including the government and regulatory
environment in Canada, Europe and the United States,
and provide a template for brands to publicly proclaim a
set of Data Values that keep the sanctity and security of
consumer data at the center of their marketing eorts.
JOINING THE DATARATI: How Customer
Data Will Redefine Loyalty Management
By Rupert Duchesne, Group Chief Executive
In this Insights white paper, Aimia’s Group Chief Executive
outlines his vision of the future of loyalty management,
with a focus on extending the Loyalty Cycle, connecting
the data dots and delivering value and relevance through
our marketing eorts. It’s a big-picture vision that keeps
the needs of the customer squarely in focus.
BORN THIS WAY:
THE US MILLENNIAL LOYALTY SURVEY
How Generation Y
will reshape customer loyalty
By Rick Ferguson,
Vice President
Knowledge Development
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JOINING
THE DATARATI
HOWCUSTOMER DATA WILL
REDEFINE LOYALTY MANAGEMENT
INSIGHTS
March 2012
Tomorrow’s Best Practices,
Delivered Today
By Rupert Duchesne
Group Chief Executive
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

GOLD
From the social graph to communication networks to rewarding new levels of loyalty, social media is data gold. You need more than just a Facebook page. You need a social loyalty strategy.

MINE

450
FACEBOOK FRIENDS

FOURSQUARE FRIENDS

118

TWITTER FOLLOWERS

240

TUMBLR FOLLOWERS

305

BLOG SUBSCRIBERS

210

PINTEREST FOLLOWERS

168

aimia.com
© 2012 Aimia, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Identifying. > Actionable approaches to building relationships with addressable social media segments. you’ll learn about: > The current landscape of social media measurement. To develop our usage framework. Finally. Mintel and GfK Mediamark Research & Intelligence. Inc. This white paper is the result of that research. Aimia created an overarching usage framework to better understand how. We used this combination of primary and secondary research to create six social media usage personas based on behavior. > And implications of this research for marketers. Table of Contents 2 4 6 8 Introduction Solar Flares: Evolving Social Media Metrics The Social Media Usage Framework Social Media Personas 16 Building Relationships Through Social Media 18 Here Comes the Sun 19 About the Authors © 2012 Aimia. Aimia conducted a combination of primary and secondary research to develop a unique framework for marketers to identify. In this white paper. which represents the inaugural edition of an ongoing Aimia focus on the intersection of social media marketing and loyalty management. All Rights Reserved. and then substantiated our findings with Forrester. > And to understand how to focus marketing investment on the right social media tactics. where and why consumers engage with social media. measure the activity of and build relationships with customers who interact with brands via social media channels. understanding and influencing social media users / 1 Summary and Table of Contents At the end of 2011 in the United States. Aimia conducted a series of weeklong ethnographic research panels. In developing this report. Our research goals: > To understand how to deliver the right message to the right consumer through social media for the best response. > Aimia’s proprietary social media segmentation framework. . > The di erences between types of social media participation via our six social media “personas”. we developed specific audience profiles to illustrate how best to engage each of these discrete segments through social media marketing. > To better understand the up-front expectations social media users.

Marketers require a more sophisticated approach that leverages the tools of loyalty management to identify. LinkedIn gains a million new users. understand and influence customers through these channels. or by customer engagement? To become an e ective marketing strategy. Looking at the sheer momentum and critical mass of social media activity. Today. we can be forgiven for wanting to purchase a piece of this consumer activity with our marketing dollars. companies stare directly into the massive celestial orb that is social media marketing.Identifying. e ective social media marketers must leverage a segmentation approach to identify. harnessing this energy remains an ongoing challenge for marketers. you might as well be staring at the sun—because it’s that easy to get blinded. But every day. Every week. Consumers “like” brands on Facebook. because we find it di cult to understand the motivations behind our customers’ social media activity. The traditional approach to social media measurement—racing to rack up the most “likes. and recommendations. How often do your customers “like” a brand? How deep is their loyalty for those brands? How often does that “like” translate into purchases. Critical mass does not equal engagement. follow them on Twitter. © 2012 Aimia. transactions and profitable behavior? The days of being blinded by social media activity are over. it’s now time to grow up. Social media has enjoyed an exciting adolescence. and forward brand-generated YouTube videos. There are more than 845 million active Facebook users worldwide. then the need for a more concrete. But targeting those dollars in a way that delivers return on investment is easier said than done. social media marketing must first become part of an e ective customer strategy. But if you look past the dazzling brightness. understand and influence customer behavior through social media channels. . measurable and actionable set of social media activity metrics becomes apparent. The problem is that.” followers. consumers view an average of 3 billion YouTube videos. engaging them consistently is a continual challenge. which makes it easy to mistake all of this activity for marketing success. Inc. Every day. and Twitter publishes nearly two and half billion new tweets. And when you spend precious marketing dollars attempting to build customer relationships and loyalty through social media channels. For all the heat and light generated from this virtual star. or by one-o promotions? Are you defining success by customer activity. All Rights Reserved. and then proudly displaying your scorecard like a prized pelt—is no longer adequate. Are your thousands of Facebook “likes” driven by brand engagement and loyalty. The key is leveraging loyalty management tools to build greater customer understanding through data that delivers actionable insights. The statistics on social media usage beggar the imagination. understanding and influencing social media users / 2 Introduction Every child is taught not to stare directly at the sun. It has now become imperative to understand the meaning behind the numbers.

msnbc. Inc.com/ 2012/03/twitter-turns-six.msn. March 12.com/ technology/technolog/foursquare-seeing-3-million-check-ins-daily-121720 2. 2011 3.000 FOURSQUARE CHECK-INS PER DAY 2 2.000 TWEETS EVERY WEEK 3 OF ALL SOCIAL MEDIA USERS ACCESS FROM THEIR MOBILE DEVICE 4 1 40% 1 in every 7 Minutes — ComScore. . Social Media Report: Spending Time.technolog. 2011 40% of all Media Users — Nielsen.html.000 Tweets Per Week (based on 340. 2012) — http://blog. 2011 2 3 4 © 2012 Aimia. understanding and influencing social media users / 3 FACEBOOK 1 IN EVERY 7 MINUTES SPENT ONLINE IS AT 1 3.Identifying. All Rights Reserved.000.twitter.000. Money and Going Mobile. It’s a Social World: Top 10 Need-to-Knows About Social Networking and Where It’s Headed.000.000. Sept.milestone announced March 21.000 Foursquare Checkins — www.000. Dec.380.380.000 tweets a day x 7 .

the company debuted Facebook Page Insights to address this need. and they’re moving rapidly to address critical measurement gaps. © 2012 Aimia. And so on. Facebook. Facebook recently added another metric to Page Insights called “People Talking About This. To address this issue. . shares.” This reporting tool tracks activities that typically appear in a user’s newsfeed. but how much of this activity translates into profitable behavior? The first step in answering these questions is to understand how di erent groups of consumers interact with social media at a macro level. Twitter has also dramatically ramped up their engagement tools. As Facebook Advertising Communications Manager Elisabeth Diana told Mashable. but not what you like.. Foursquare knows where you are. A December 2011 platform redesign resulted in a number of potentially useful new marketing tools: Four new tabs. event RSVPs. including an evolution of the “Activity” tab called “Connect” that includes your tweets.Identifying. has evolved its reporting and measurement tools to better inform brand interactions. “one of the purposes behind Facebook Page Insights is to provide. but not what you buy.. and third-party suppliers will continue to innovate with new tools and platforms designed to facilitate measurement and understanding. may generate little actual sharing activity on Facebook. @mentions. such as likes. The metric allows a brand to understand which page posts are the most compelling and interactive to its fans. wall posts. Inc. for example. All Rights Reserved. YouTube Channels and more. but also to provide a glimpse into how users connect with page content through other Facebook activity. and new Discover tools that focus on multimedia content and more robust hashtag usage. questions answered. photo tagging and location check-ins. Brands can now avail themselves of Google+ pages. Facebook knows who your friends are. Google knows what you’re interested in. No one understands this need better than the social media companies themselves. new Brand Pages with customizable header images. page mentions. New social media players such as Pinterest will continue to alter the landscape. new follows and new list adds. in 2011. retweets and video forwards are fine as far as they go. for example. One problem is that it’s often di cult to correlate “likes” with brand activity—a brand page with millions of “likes”. understanding and influencing social media users / 4 Solar Flares: Evolving Social Media Metrics Social media measurement is in the midst of a dramatic and volatile evolution. and how marketers can leverage these di erent behavioral segments to build relationships. ways to understand how to reach and acquire new customers. but not what you’ve done. free featured tweets and new tools for followers. comments. Aimia’s Social Media Segmentation helps marketers take this first step. throughout the social mediaverse. Connecting these “data dots” has become the preeminent challenge for marketers—a challenge that makes social media measurement a critical obstacle to success.” The company is also developing new metrics to provide businesses with not only information about how consumers interact with your brand page. Likes. The problem is that no single customer engagement channel can currently deliver a complete picture of customer behavior through the data. Social media engagement and measurement is also evolving far beyond Facebook and Twitter. LinkedIn pages and Groups.

understanding and influencing social media users / 5 Blinded by the Light A 2011 IBM CMO study revealed that social media engagement is a top-three priority for US CMOs. But the survey also revealed that their top priority was enhancing customer loyalty—most CMOs consider social media as a tool to build loyalty. Inc. The critical challenge for marketers will be to link social media data points to the customer loyalty lifecycle.Identifying. All Rights Reserved. .” © 2012 Aimia. Enhance customer loyalty/advocacy Design experiences for tablet/mobile apps Use social media as a key engagement channel Use integrated software suites to manage customers Monitor the brand via social media Measure ROI of digital technologies Analyze online/o ine transactions Develop social interaction governance/policies Monetize social media Gain comprehensive visibility of supply chain 29% 24% IBM CMO Study 2011 67% 57% 56% 56% 51% 47% 45% 37% “UNADDRESSED BY THIS RAPID EVOLUTION IS THE NEED TO CONNECT SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITY TO A MORE HOLISTIC VIEW OF CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT AND BEHAVIOR WITH THE TRANSACTION AT ITS CORE. rather than as an end in itself.

the brands with which they engage and the reputation they build online. social media users are concerned about privacy. . scope and behavior of this consumer audience. Inc. understanding and influencing social media users / 6 The Social Media Usage Framework The total universe of social media users has raced past critical mass much faster than even the most aggressive analyst could have predicted. and how much trust they place in the social networks themselves. who are ostensibly less concerned about data privacy than older consumers. In order to understand how best to engage consumers through social media channels. Without segmentation that helps us understand the di erence between active and passive audience behavior. All Rights Reserved. the more likely they are to actively participate. © 2012 Aimia. The degree of trust correlates with consumers’ willingness to share information about themselves through social media. Trust equals participation: The more trust a consumer places in social media networks and their connections.” October 2011) revealed that Generation Y consumers. The result of this understanding: A more sophisticated engagement strategy that considers how di erent groups of consumers use social media di erently. > Trust: Social media activity is driven by the level of trust consumers have in their ability to navigate social media. Control equals exposure: The more control a consumer perceives over their social media activity. you must first understand both the motivations behind social media participation and the degree to which certain types of participation create discomfort for particular consumer segments. the number of connections they make. The case for segmenting social media users hinges on the size. Despite some of the more strident statements from industry executives about consumer willingness to part with personal information. nonetheless share broad consumer concerns about the security and control of personal data. Our segmentation therefore is constructed on a framework of behavior based on the two primary emotional drivers of social media participation: > Control: Consumer desire for control over their personal information correlates to the amount of information they’re willing to share. Aimia’s own research on Millennial consumer behavior (“Born This Way: The US Millennial Loyalty Survey.Identifying. our ability to e ectively leverage social media won’t advance much beyond our ability to leverage mass media. the more likely they are to engage with a wider variety of social media networks. how much they trust their friends and networks with their personal information.

Identifying. ACTIVE. Within this group a small pocket of super users emerge who participate by creating multi-media content (e. Multi Network Users (upper-right quadrant): Users with high perceived levels of control and trust. they comfortably navigate the wider social media universe. > Passive. these users restrict their social network connections. if ever. So what should marketers take away from this matrix approach to social media behavior? Successful social media engagement requires the active provision of trust and control mechanism for consumers to leverage in their social media experiences. which correlates to the Trust driver. the more likely they are to migrate to the upper-right quadrant of behavior and increase brand engagement.g. The X-axis represents the consumer’s level of social media exposure. video blogs) and share across multiple social networks. . For this group. These users reluctantly join a social network because they don’t want to feel left out of the conversation. Combining these axes creates a map that reveals four Control— Trust behavioral quadrants: > Passive. A one-size-fits-all approach to social media won’t shine a light on customer behavior—but it may get you burned. > In addition. > Active. SINGLE NETWORK USERS (Unsure Who to Trust) PASSIVE. brands should develop a segmented approach designed to cater to consumers within these behavioral quadrants. but who perceive enough control to consume information through these networks daily while rarely. which correlates to the Control driver. but actively share personal information with their inner circle. Single Network Users (lower-left quadrant): Users with low levels of trust and little perceived control. understanding and influencing social media users / 7 We plotted the Control and Trust emotional drivers to create our Social Media Usage Framework. MULTINETWORK USERS (Doesn’t Trust “The System”) © 2012 Aimia. > Active. MULTINETWORK USERS (Trust Themselves) EXPOSURE PASSIVE. the research considered Non-Users. actively control the dialogue and freely share personal details. comprised of people who had never used a social network at all and past users who had not logged on within the last 30 days. Multi-Network Users (lower-right quadrant): Users who generally don’t trust social media networks. SINGLE NETWORK USERS (Trusts Close Friends) PARTICIPATION ACTIVE. All Rights Reserved. sharing personal information. To foster this engagement. The Y-axis represents consumer participation in social media. The more users trust that their personal information is both secure and firmly within their control. Single Network Users (upper-left quadrant): Users with low perceived control but high trust. which you can see illustrated below. and protect themselves by proactively limiting their involvement. social media lacks utility in their personal or professional lives. Inc.

Most likely a 65-plus male. Sparks typically boast the most open social networks amongst the six personas. They also understand the importance of data privacy. Inc. . and most of their online sharing includes photos. Our research reveals that US consumers fall into six primary segments of social media behavior: ™ ™ > No Shows: Although social media usage is up substantially among the general US population. but are the most active and deeply engaged users of social media. All Rights Reserved. Within their network of friends. for example. 41 percent of the total population has not logged on to a social network in the last 30 days. © 2012 Aimia. a typical No Show exhibits low degrees of Trust. Newcomers are typical passive users of a single social media network. Onlookers may lurk on several social media networks. Mix-n-Minglers like to follow brands in order to receive o ers and keep up with the latest news. they’re influential—and they meet many of these friends online. ™ ™ > Onlookers: At 16 percent of the adult US population. status updates and comments. we undertook a combination of primary and secondary research to identify six social media “personas” defined by our two behavioral variables of Trust and Control. They engage with brands frequently. Onlookers want complete control of their online information. > Sparks: Sparks represent only three percent of the US adult population. but post infrequently. Sparks use social media tools as a means of self-expression—and they self-express in a variety of creative and engaging ways. in order not to feel “left behind. A passive user may reluctantly join Facebook. they’re active and influential. Within their small network of close friends and family. While Sparks are still concerned about online privacy. ™ > Mix-n-Minglers: The largest group of social media users at 19 percent of the US population. we constructed our survey to be representative of the entire US adult population ages 18 and older. They’re most likely to be women. We also defined “participation” as a consumer engaging with one or more social networks within the last 30 days. Our six proprietary personas reveal an essential truth about social media participation: That a one-size-fits-all approach to social media spending will result in a poor use of your marketing dollars. Cliquers are active. and will serve as enthusiastic ambassadors for their favorites. > Cliquers: Making up six percent of the adult US population. understanding and influencing social media users / 8 Social Media Personas With our social media usage framework in place.Identifying. they work to control the online conversation. Mix-n-Minglers participate actively on multiple social networking platforms. single-network users who congregate primarily on Facebook.” Newcomers primarily use social media to enhance their o ine relationships. ™ > Newcomers: At 15 percent of the US adult population. When building our social media personas. and has no interest in broadcasting his activities or interests to anyone. but are reluctant to share details about themselves. They rely on social media primarily to keep up on the online lives of others within their social networks.

All Rights Reserved. from complete inactives to highly active and engaged users. understanding and influencing social media users / 9 Sun Spots: Our six social media personas represent the entire spectrum of US social media usage. ACTIVE PARTICIPATION 3% 6% 19% LOW EXPOSURE HIGH EXPOSURE 15% 41% 16% PASSIVE PARTICIPATION Source: GfK MRI Fall 2011 database © 2012 Aimia.Identifying. monolithic approach to engagement and loyalty through social media channels will result in missed opportunities to build relationships with your best customers. . Inc. Their varying desires for trust and control reveal that a single.

understanding and influencing social media users / 10 AGE: INCOME: 65 EDUCATION: $ 30K Lives Alone High School Graduate HOUSEHOLD: “What’s the point of social media? I don’t need to know what you ate for breakfast!” © 2012 Aimia. Inc.Identifying. . All Rights Reserved.

2 Children CONNECTIONS: “I use social media to keep in touch with current friends and to reconnect with old ones. . All Rights Reserved. understanding and influencing social media users / 11 AGE: INCOME: 39 EDUCATION: $ 75K HOUSEHOLD: Attended College Married.” > 50 Facebook YouTube NETWORKS: PC Only TOOLS: Every Few Days FREQUENCY: © 2012 Aimia. Inc.Identifying.

All Rights Reserved. 2 Children CONNECTIONS: “I use social media to reconnect with people and typically observe others. Inc. understanding and influencing social media users / 12 AGE: INCOME: 36 EDUCATION: $ 85K HOUSEHOLD: College Degree Married.” < 100 Facebook YouTube NETWORKS: PC. I share almost nothing. Rarely Android TOOLS: FREQUENCY: Daily © 2012 Aimia.Identifying. .

and I love to comment on my friends’ pictures and videos. .” < 100 TOOLS: Facebook YouTube NETWORKS: PC. I like to post pictures. understanding and influencing social media users / 13 AGE: INCOME: 47 EDUCATION: $ 95K HOUSEHOLD: Graduate Degree Married.Identifying. iPhone FREQUENCY: Daily © 2012 Aimia. Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1 child CONNECTIONS: “I use Facebook to post about my day.

Inc.” < 200 TOOLS: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn FREQUENCY: Powerbook. .Identifying. All Rights Reserved. iPhone Multiple Xs/Daily © 2012 Aimia. understanding and influencing social media users / 14 AGE: INCOME: 29 EDUCATION: $ 95K HOUSEHOLD: Graduate Degree Married. 1 child NETWORKS: CONNECTIONS: “I use social media to interact with family and friends — including new friends I’ve met online.

iPhone.” < 1. iPad Always Online © 2012 Aimia.000 TOOLS: Facebook Twitter Blogs FREQUENCY: Powerbook. Inc. . All Rights Reserved. understanding and influencing social media users / 15 AGE: INCOME: 24 EDUCATION: $ 80K HOUSEHOLD: In Grad School Lives with Partner NETWORKS: CONNECTIONS: “Social media enables me to meet with my regular friends and meet new ones.Identifying. It increased my confidence and allows me to enjoy my life.

interviews with key company personnel or celebrity spokespersons. > Onlookers: Onlookers seek out content they can’t get anywhere else. you’ll need to rely on a mix of communication channels that includes email. you’ll need to develop a diverse social media strategy with a focus on relevance and value. Stick to a regular content schedule to give them a reason to keep coming back. or link your social media marketing to your company’s Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) e orts to entice participation. All Rights Reserved. To keep Cliquers engaged. cultivate a strong Facebook presence with frequent photo contests and video uploading opportunities that result in lots of likes. website. attitudes.Identifying. Let your best customers tell you where. combine social media monitoring with a review of your brand’s most active social media followers. understanding and influencing social media users / 16 Building Relationships Through Social Media The di erences among our six social media personas are as deep as they are wide. you might host a brainstorming session with prominent bloggers to help shape future social media campaigns or product launches. . Inc. > Sparks: To identify and build relationships with Sparks. Providing options for social sharing and social sign-on is critical to identifying and building relationships with this group. Try explicitly rewarding them for participation with compelling acquisition o ers. direct mail and mobile. consider the following strategies to help guide you in marketing to that social media user segment most representative of your customer base: > No-Shows: To reach this curmudgeonly group. If a large majority of your customers don’t participate in social media. and invite them to co-create content with you.” To pierce through the din. seed your social media channels with behind-the-scenes footage. Rather than spend precious marketing dollars to blanket social media with generic content and o ers. Di erences in demographics. To pique their interest. lifestyle. consider targeting social media spend at the intersection of customer spend. Mix-n-Minglers often get overwhelmed with marketing “noise. > Cliquers: This group of users loves to share photos and videos. > Mix-n-Minglers: Because of their presence on a variety of networks and their eagerness to interact with brands. © 2012 Aimia. Engage this elite segment with premium access to your brand. when and how they’d like to interact with you. > Newcomers: Newcomers won’t flock to your social channels without a compelling reason. behavior and loyalty make building relationships with them a challenging notion for the most sophisticated marketers. and exclusive photo and video content. you should minimize your investment in these networks. preferred channel and relevant o er. To that end. For example. so developing viral content is a necessity to build activity with this group. shares and comments.

O N LI N E C O W M A M TC ER H C ES E FL V ID A SH EO /A SA U LE W D S/ RI IO TE D A RE IL Y V BR D IE EA A W N LS S D IN TE G A RA M IN C TI G O N FO S RU M S BL O G G IN G LO C A TI O N C -B RE A A SE TE D V ID EO /A U D IO Never Infrequently Occasionally Regularly Very Frequently .Identifying. © 2012 Aimia. Aimia’s social media personas can help you determine when. where and how to reach these broad groups based on their actual and potential value to the brand. understanding and influencing social media users / 17 Viewing the Eclipse Consumers engage in social media networks and access communication channels based on their needs as individuals. All Rights Reserved. Inc.

The old model of building customer loyalty post-transaction is giving way to a model that incorporates relationship marketing. it generates tremendous media buzz. o er and dialog opportunity is perceived by your customers as valuable. Third. Aimia’s own proprietary research confirms this. upload. from awareness to advocacy and from pre-purchase to postpurchase interactions. Our research reveals that only 28 percent of the total US population actively participates in social media. it reveals the importance of targeting social media spend by consumer behavior. Social media provides an invaluable set of tools to build relationships both before and after the core transaction. between the ages of 44 and 54. our 2011 survey of Millennial consumers ages 19-29 in Canada. Second. the United Kingdom. rather than by Silicon Valley buzz. a reality check is in order. share photos. rewards and dialog throughout the purchase cycle.com) reveals that Millennials are far more likely to be active across social media networks such as Facebook and Twitter. Can you connect social media data to transactional data? To your reward program data? To your website clickstream data? Connecting these “data dots” will become critically important to developing a complete view of your customer relationships. however. By understanding that consumers interact with social media based on the drivers of trust and control. and upload videos—comprise our “active” social media personas of Cliquers. consider the following best practices: > Extend the loyalty lifecycle. relevant to the relationship and worth their time. younger social media users are more likely to actively engage in social media.” consuming social media content without sharing—or they don’t participate at all. © 2012 Aimia. Social media marketing isn’t just for Generation Y—a uent Baby Boomers are also eminently reachable through social media. In addition. These consumers—the ones who post. Our behavior-based social media personas are a valuable tool to help you begin your journey to profitable loyalty management. write reviews. Social media segmentation has potentially dramatic implications for marketers. But it’s not enough for marketers to apply traditional media approaches to this highly personal communication channel. and the United States (“Born This Way: The US Millennial Loyalty Survey. > Connect the data dots.” available on Aimia. and traditional agencies push social media services as high-margin revenue. the segmentation places the importance of social media followers and fans in the proper context—for a customer that likes or follows your brand is not necessarily a loyal. Mix-N-Minglers and Sparks. Consumers in our Cliquers persona (single network. understanding and influencing social media users / 18 Here Comes the Sun Despite the overwhelming brilliance of the social media star to marketers who are often blinded by the opportunity to connect with valuable customers. Not surprisingly. There are. To begin to apply social media personas and segmentation in your own marketing e orts. . active users) are more likely to skew older. Everyone else either “leans back. All Rights Reserved. First. Combine social media marketing with your customer analytics to ensure that every communication.Identifying. a few important demographic distinctions to note. Leverage social media as a tool to build relationships that increase trust and facilitate the flow of information. it demonstrates the importance of using social media as a dialog channel rather than as just another broadcast channel. It’s hard not to be dazzled by social media: It’s sexy. Look for ways to connect customer interactions with your social media channels to other data sources that provide insight into customer behavior. You don’t need to get burned by staring at the sun—you just need to harness its power as an endlessly renewable source of energy. Inc. you can place social media in its proper role: As a tool that helps build long-term customer relationships based on deep consumer insight. profitable customer. > Deliver value and relevance. our research reveals a direct correlation between active social media usage and higher household income.

Mona served as Vice President of Advertising Services at Marketing Architects. Managing Director at JWT — one the world’s largest advertising agencies. where she builds strategies that drive engagement and advocacy through a powerful combination of emerging media. digital. Tom has designed. Social Marketing Mona leads the Social Loyalty practice for Aimia in the US. retail. improve processes and strengthen customer relationships. Their use in no way indicates any relationship between Aimia Inc. PINTEREST. and combined JWT’s digital/direct o erings into connect@jwt in 2003. technology. TWITTER. Research and Customer Insights Tom leads research and customer insights for Aimia in the US. Prior to Aimia. © 2012 Aimia. JetBlue and Ford. Customer data is at the heart of everything we do. including the creative. Coca-Cola. understanding and influencing social media users / 19 About the Authors Doug Rozen SVP. POWERBOOK. and are used only to directly describe the products or services being provided. and the holders of said trademarks. which ultimately lead to RMG Connect. We build and run loyalty programs for ourselves and for some of the world's best brands. Nielsen Marketing Research. Mona Askalani Director. TV and radio. online. We inspire customer loyalty. implemented and analyzed a variety of qualitative and quantitative market research and exploratory studies around the globe. where he was a member of the Customer Insight Center of Excellence for Accenture’s Customer Relationship Management team. Delta. a boutique market research firm. consumer goods and hospitality industries. Prior to joining Aimia. YOUTUBE. IBM CMO and IPAD are the property of their respective holders. P&G. Inc. LINKEDIN. Prior to joining Aimia. Communications. her work has propelled companies in the financial services. AT&T. His vision and know-how has helped position Aimia as the recognized global leader in loyalty management with clients like Chase. traditional media and loyalty marketing expertise. and Accenture. There. mobile. FACEBOOK. GOOGLE. . he established digital@jwt in 1998. media. TUMBLR. Our unique capabilities include proven expertise in building proprietary loyalty strategies. social and consumer research o erings for Aimia. Design and Emerging Technology capabilities. Amtrak. Doug was the Senior Partner. Mona also created customer engagement and loyalty strategies at BI/Digital Marketing. IBM. where he worked with major consumer packaged goods firms. launching and managing coalition loyalty programs. An expert interviewer and moderator. All Rights Reserved. Hallmark. FOURSQUARE. IPHONE. where she partnered with clients to drive consumer response from emerging media. Tom worked for MarketResponse International. About Aimia We are a global leader in loyalty management. His broad range of cross-industry experience about how companies collect. Design & Emerging Technologies Doug Rozen is responsible for leading Communications. General Motors. From start-ups to large corporations.Identifying. We are Aimia. store and analyze information helps Aimia’s clients make better decisions. creating value through loyalty analytics and driving innovation in the emerging digital and mobile spaces. Tom Senn Director. AIMIA and the AIMIA logo are trademarks of Aimia Inc.

Vice President Knowledge Development THE NEW DATA VALUES: Securing Customer Data as a Renewable Resource By David Johnston. Inc. How Generation Y will reshape customer loyalty By Rick Ferguson. and Jeremy Henderson-Ross. and the US reveals surprising insights into the behavior of Generation Y and their relationship to technology. Legal Director and General Counsel. EMEA. Vice President Knowledge Development The results of Aimia’s 2011 consumer research in Canada. It’s a big-picture vision that keeps the needs of the customer squarely in focus. .com: BORN THIS WAY: THE US MILLENNIAL LOYALTY SURVEY BORN THIS WAY: The Millennial Loyalty Survey By Rick Ferguson. brand loyalty and reward programs. and provide a template for brands to publicly proclaim a set of Data Values that keep the sanctity and security of consumer data at the center of their marketing e orts. Aimia’s Group Chief Executive outlines his vision of the future of loyalty management. with a focus on extending the Loyalty Cycle. the UK. EMEA David and Jeremy review the landscape of consumer data privacy. JOINING THE DATARATI HOW CUSTOMER DATA WILL REDEFINE LOYALTY MANAGEMENT JOINING THE DATARATI: How Customer Data Will Redefine Loyalty Management By Rupert Duchesne. Delivered Today By Rupert Duchesne Group Chief Executive © 2012 Aimia. connecting the data dots and delivering value and relevance through our marketing e orts. Europe and the United States. including the government and regulatory environment in Canada. sample some of these tasty dishes from our full menu of loyalty thought leadership at Aimia. INSIGHTS March 2012 Tomorrow’s Best Practices. All Rights Reserved. If you found this helping of leading-edge content both nutritious and delicious. President and CEO. data privacy.SAMPLE OUR BRAIN FOOD. Group Chief Executive In this Insights white paper.