The Times Leader

C M Y K
WILKES-BARRE, PA SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 $1.50
timesleader.com
7
6
6
2
6
5
SERENA WINS 5TH
WIMBLEDON
Serena Williams won
her fifth Wimbledon title,
and 14th major champion-
ship, by beating Agniesz-
ka Radwanska Saturday.
Williams had little trouble
at the start on Centre
Court, using her hard
serve and powerful
groundstrokes to win the
first five games and run
Radwanska all over the
grass. 1C
SPORTS
SHOWCASE
AMERICAN LEAGUE
YANKEES 6
RED SOX1
GAME1
TIGERS 8
ROYALS 7
NATIONAL LEAGUE
METS 3
CUBS1
PIRATES 3
GIANTS1
IL BASEBALL
BISONS 7
SWB YANKS 6
Municipal and school district
officials aren’t the only ones frus-
trated with Luzerne County’s
earned income tax collector.
David Wert, of Wilkes-Barre,
says he still hasn’t received his
approximately $2,500 local in-
come taxrefundfor 2011, andthe
Centax-Don
Wilkinson
Agency – the
tax collector
with whom he
filed his 2011
return – is giv-
ing him a run-
around.
Centax has come under fire in
several Pennsylvania counties,
including Luzerne County, in
the past couple months, as the
company is having problems dis-
tributingmillions of dollars inin-
come taxes received from em-
ployers to municipalities and
school districts.
The Luzerne County Tax Col-
lection Committee learned in
May that Centax was having “ex-
treme difficulties reconciling,
processing and efficiently distri-
buting earned income tax pursu-
ant to Act 32,” committee Fi-
nance Chairman Paul Keating
said at a June 27 committee
meeting.
Act 32 mandated that almost
all counties in the state appoint
one tax collector for all earned
income tax collection starting
Jan. 1. Previously, EIT was col-
lected by tax collectors appoint-
ed by each community.
As it turns out, Centaxwas not
the tax collector for Wilkes-
Barre in 2011; it was Berkheimer
Associates, according to city ad-
ministrator Marie McCormick.
So Wert apparently mailed his
tax return to the wrong agency.
But Centax never informed
him of the error.
Experiencing everything from
employees hanging up as soon
Centax comes under fire from communities
Earned income tax collector
having problems distributing
income tax money.
By STEVE MOCARSKY
smocarsky@timesleader.com
See CENTAX, Page 12A
Wert
6 09815 10077
INSIDE
A NEWS: Local 3A
Nation & World 5A
Obituaries 8A
B PEOPLE: 1B
Birthdays 6B
C SPORTS: 1C
Outdoors 10C
D BUSINESS: 1D
E VIEWS: 1E
Editorials 3E
F ETC: 1F
Puzzles 2F
Books 5F
G CLASSIFIED: 1G
WEATHER
Ava Swiderski
Partly cloudy. Morning
rain, T-storms. High 85,
low 65.
Details, Page 12C
PLYMOUTH – Three people
were killed and a fourth person
was woundedinashootingSatur-
day night inside an apartment
building at First and Orchard
streets in Plymouth.
Luzerne County District Attor-
ney Stefanie Salavantis said two
males and one female were dead,
while the wounded victim was
twice in the head Friday after-
noon. He remains hospitalized,
according to Salavantis. A spo-
keswoman at Geisinger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center in
Plains Township said on Satur-
day she could not release infor-
mation on Hughston’s condition.
In Plymouth, police closed off
the streets near the apartment
male. He was taken to an area
hospital. The D.A. would not re-
lease their identities.
Investigators donot believethe
shootings, which occurred at
about 7:30 p.m., were connected
toanother shootingFriday onJay
Street in Wilkes-Barre.
“There’s nothing that says it
may be related,” Salavantis said.
In the Wilkes-Barre shooting,
Kenyatta Hughston, 22, was shot
3 killed in Plymouth shooting
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Police
investi-
gate a
shoot-
ing near
First
and
Orchard
streets
in Ply-
mouth
Sat-
urday
around
8 p.m.
Another hurt in apartment gunfire
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See SHOOTING, Page 2A
On the surface, Luzerne Coun-
ty’s new home rule government
doesn’t seem very different from
the systemit replacedsixmonths
ago.
An appointed manager and
part-time, 11-member council re-
placed the three
elected commis-
sioners, but most
of the decisions
they’ve made to
date haven’t per-
ceptibly altered
the structure of
county govern-
ment.
The county offers the same ser-
vices. The majority of workers
are in the same jobs. Employees
are temporarily handling the du-
ties of most elected row officers
eliminated by home rule.
Council Chairman Jim Bobeck
said much of the first half of the
year was devoted to the tedious
but important crafting of codes
and procedures outlining how
the new government will oper-
ate.
“When you change a form of
government in place hundreds of
years, it doesn’t stop on a dime,”
Bobeck said. “The first six
months have been dedicated to
implementing the vision of the
new government, and the next
six months as well as the next
year will be a continuation of
that.”
County Manager Robert Law-
ton, who started work Feb. 29,
said he wanted to assess oper-
ations and personnel and get his
arms around county finances be-
fore instituting major changes.
He’s engrossed in preparing a
comprehensive mid-year finan-
cial report anddevelopingcorrec-
tive plans so the county doesn’t
end the year with a deficit.
Lawton said he held off on se-
lecting eight division heads des-
ignated in the charter because
the positions weren’t budgeted
but saidheplans totakeactionon
the appointments soon.
Home rule charter drafter
County
system a
work in
progress
After six months, Luzerne
County home rule draws
praise but still feels its way.
By JENNIFER LEARN-ANDES
jandes@timesleader.com
See HOME, Page 12A
HANOVER TWP. – After last night Al Uzdella can put
away the potato slicer.
The former fire chief won’t need it to make french fries
at the Breslau Hose Co. No. 5 bazaar anymore.
The volunteer firefighting company held its last one this
weekend, ending a more than 30-year run.
It’s not that people don’t turn out for the three-day
festival of food, drink and entertainment.
Just the opposite.
People packed the grounds of the hose company on the
corner of First and Delaney streets.
But it’s been a struggle getting volunteers.
Uzdella, who’s in his 60s, helped out at a job he’s done
For decades people have loved the Breslau Hose Co. bazaar,
but lack of new volunteers has made this year its last
DON CAREY PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
Volunteers Greg Kopiak, left, and Frank McKenzie of the Hanover Township Breslau Hose Co. No. 5 serve up cheese
steak hoagies at the final bazaar Thursday.
When the joy ended
The fire company’s signboard tells the tale. The Breslau
Hose Co. No. 5 bazaar has come to an end.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
See BAZAAR, Page 12A
SAVE $222.73 WITH COUPONS IN TODAY’S TIMES LEADER. INSIDE
RAIN CHECK?
You’ll save more money that way.
STEALS AND DEALS, Business 1D
K
PAGE 2A SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Alexy, Deborah
Devens, Donna
Finsel, Joan
Fowler, Joseph
Herman, Emma
Hubiak, Rosemary
Lobban, John
Nalaschi, Albert Sr.
Neary, Jeffrey
Ormanowski, Theresa
Palencar, Bernard
Supey, Thomas Sr.
OBITUARIES
Page 8A
PRASHANT SHITUT
President & CEO
(570) 970-7158
pshitut@timesleader.com
JOE BUTKIEWICZ
VP/Executive Editor
(570) 829-7249
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
DENISE SELLERS
VP/Chief Revenue Officer
(570) 970-7203
dsellers@timesleader.com
ALLISON UHRIN
VP/Chief Financial Officer
(570) 970-7154
auhrin@timesleader.com
LISA DARIS
VP/HR and Administration
(570) 829-7113
ldaris@timesleader.com
MICHAEL PRAZMA
VP/Circulation
(570) 970-7202
mprazma@timesleader.com
An company
DETAILS
➛ timesleader.com
Newsroom
829-7242
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Circulation
Jim McCabe – 829-5000
jmccabe@timesleader.com
Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per week
Mailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday
$4.45 per week in PA
$4.85 per week outside PA
Published daily by:
Impressions Media
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
Periodicals postage paid at
Wilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing offices
Postmaster: Send address changes
to Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)
USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-190
Daily Number, Midday
Sunday: 8-8-1
Monday: 7-4-7
Tuesday: 0-7-9
Wednesday: 6-0-4
Thursday: 7-7-6
Friday: 5-5-5
Saturday: 0-5-1
Big Four, Midday
Sunday: 6-3-2-9
Monday: 7-1-7-3
Tuesday: 2-9-6-6
Wednesday: 4-9-8-5
Thursday: 5-3-5-9
Friday: 3-1-2-0
Saturday: 1-5-2-9
Quinto, Midday
Sunday: 6-3-8-2-2
Monday: 0-1-6-0-5
Tuesday: 4-4-8-4-2
Wednesday: 1-3-2-5-1 (2-9-2-
3-4, double draw)
Thursday: 1-6-4-4-6
Friday: 9-4-9-6-6
Saturday: 4-6-8-5-3
Treasure Hunt
Sunday: 01-03-04-11-25
Monday: 16-19-21-26-30
Tuesday: 09-11-15-18-22
Wednesday: 01-04-06-11-30
Thursday: 02-04-07-17-19
Friday: 14-15-24-26-30
Saturday: 03-06-07-08-12
Daily Number, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 6-0-7
Monday: 0-5-7
Tuesday: 7-8-1
Wednesday: 5-7-5
Thursday: 7-5-1
Friday: 7-8-8
Saturday: 1-8-5
Big Four, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 2-9-1-5
Monday: 9-7-0-2
Tuesday: 5-3-3-0
Wednesday: 0-3-3-9
Thursday: 8-6-6-4
Friday: 8-1-6-4
Saturday: 4-3-0-1
Quinto, 7 p.m.
Sunday: 4-4-1-5-4
Monday: 5-9-7-8-0
Tuesday: 1-8-0-9-6
Wednesday: 7-0-6-7-0
Thursday: 4-4-9-9-6
Friday: 0-3-2-7-9
Saturday: 7-3-4-8-0
Cash 5
Sunday: 04-15-19-20-30
Monday: 02-05-26-30-40
Tuesday: 01-05-10-24-43
Wednesday: 01-08-31-32-34
Thursday: 03-10-20-36-43
Friday: 29-32-33-34-42
Saturday: 03-05-21-25-34
Match 6 Lotto
Monday: 07-22-23-43-44-48
Thursday: 04-19-25-39-46-47
Powerball
Wednesday: 14-19-35-39-56
powerball: 33
Saturday: 03-05-29-39-59
powerball: 29
Mega Millions
Tuesday: 03-04-24-36-52
Megaball: 45
Megaplier: 04
Friday: 20-23-28-35-39
Megaball: 21
Megaplier: 03
WEEKLY LOTTERY
SUMMARY
LOS ANGELES — Football
fans have the Super Bowl. Soc-
cer enthusiasts have the World
Cup. Cinephiles have the Acade-
my Awards.
For pop-culture lovers — the
self-professed geeks and nerds
who delight in fantasy-inspired
fun from anime to zombies —
there is Comic-Con, the Olym-
pic-sized celebration of movies,
TV, video games, costumes and
pop art that began as a humble
comic-book convention 43 years
ago and is now an annual mar-
keting extravaganza.
From Thursday to Sunday,
more than 100,000 pop-culture
aficionados will flood the San
Diego ConventionCenter, show-
ing off their Storm Trooper
suits, playing yet-to-be-released
video games and attending pan-
els featuring A-list filmmakers
like Peter Jackson and such hot
TV shows as “Game of
Thrones.”
But first comes Wednesday’s
“preview night.” Available only
to those who bought four-day
passes to the sold-out conven-
tion, the showing is decidedly
low tech, yet high end: it’s all
about collectible toys.
On display will be special-is-
sue, limited-edition playthings
and books made just for the pop-
culture fest. These include not
only the unique freebies that var-
ious booths are giving away, but
also coveted collectibles that
could fetch hundreds of dollars
at Comic-Con and hundreds
more in after-market sales.
“There are people who buy
tickets for every day of the show
so that onWednesday night they
can be the first in line for these
exclusive collectibles. That’s
their reward for going to a desti-
nation like Comic-Con,” said
pop-culture expert and host of
G4’s “Attack of the Show” Blair
Butler. “There are also people
who flip that stuff on eBay for
hundreds of dollars. They buy
two: One to keep and one to sell
on eBay.”
Collectors will literally run
across the massive convention
center floor when the doors
open Wednesday evening to cue
up for products like Hasbro’s
S.H.I.E.L.D. Super Helicarrier, a
four-foot-long replica of the fly-
ing superhero headquarters
from the “Avengers” movie and
Mattel’s quirky Dana as Zuul
“Ghostbusters” figurine. Others
seek out small-run exclusives
such as the golden Domo bob-
ble-head doll (only 1,000 made)
and Image Comics’ special hard-
cover comics collection “The
Walking Dead: Compendium
One” (only 900 available).
Toy companies andpublishers
large and small make special
products just for the Comic-Con
crowd. Hasbro and Mattel each
issue around 10 Comic-Con ex-
clusives a year. These toys are in-
troduced at Comic-Con and lim-
ited numbers are often made
available for sale later at Toys
“R” Us and on each company’s
collector websites.
“Everything is made in limit-
ed quantities. Products can dou-
ble, triple, quadruple in price
over the course of a year,” said
Hugo Stevenson, president of
Huckleberry Toys, which is of-
fering zombies and other figu-
rines based on the upcoming
film “ParaNorman.” “There’s a
whole group of people who ac-
tually make a business out of
this: Going down and buying
collectibles at San Diego Comic-
Con and then selling them in
their stores or on eBay.”
For most collectors, though,
adding exclusive items to a care-
fully cultivated collection is
priceless.
“No collector is going to sell
their collection,” saidScott Neit-
lich, a marketing manager at
Mattel whose personal toy cache
includes “roughly5,000” figures.
“It’s not just about the physical
price of the product, but the
emotional connection each col-
lector has about what figures
they’ve decided to include.”
Most toy collectors are men
ages 25 to 40, he said, though
women are getting into the hob-
by in growing numbers. Mattel
is aiming its limited DC Comics
Vertigo Death statuette and Pol-
ly Pocket DCComics Villains set
at female collectors. Hasbro
hopes to tap the market with a
special-edition My Little Pony: a
gray Pegasus with blonde hair.
“It’s peoplewhogrewupinthe
‘70s and ‘80s who now have dis-
posable income to recapture
their youth,” Neitlich said“Com-
ic-Con has become the place, re-
ally the only place, where you
can go to get these limited-edi-
tion, first-edition products,” said
Rich Collins, chief of Big Tent
Entertainment, which makes
toys and products for Domo,
Dark Horse Comics and other
brands.
AP PHOTO
The Marvel Universe S.H.I.E.L.D. Super Helicarrier, at center with a Captain America figure on the
foredeck, are among collectibles in this display for Comic-Con.
Business of fun
Comic Con extravaganza
now a marketer’s dream
By SANDY COHEN
AP Entertainment Writer
LOS ANGELES — Heart-
throb singer Justin Bieber has
been ticketed for speeding on a
Los Angeles freeway after being
chasedbyat least one other vehi-
cle, authorities said.
The 18-year-old “Boyfriend”
and“Baby” crooner was citedfor
driving in excess of 65 mph at
about10:45a.m. onFridaymorn-
ing, after calls came incomplain-
ing of a freeway chase on south-
bound U.S. Highway 101 near
Studio City, said Officer Ming
Hsu of the California Highway
Patrol.
Bieber told officers he was be-
ing chased by paparazzi, Hsu
said.
“The second vehicle left the
area and there’s a search to find
that driver,” Hsu said.
Hsudidnot have a description
of the other vehicle.
Acall and an email to Bieber’s
publicist we-
ren’t immedi-
ately returned.
The claim of
a chase is
backed by eye-
witness Los
Angeles City
Councilman
Dennis Zine, who called author-
ities after seeing Bieber’s dis-
tinctive chrome Fisker Karma
being chased by five or six other
cars.
On his morning commute to
City Hall, Zine said he sawBieb-
er’s sports car drive up behind
him and zoom around him,
weaving wildly in and out of traf-
fic while five or six other cars
gave chase.
Zine, who spent 33 years as an
officer for the LAPD, estimated
the chase exceeded 100 mph as
paparazzi engaged in wild ma-
neuvers to keep up with Bieber,
including driving on the shoul-
der and cutting off other vehi-
cles.
Zine said Bieber was breaking
the lawby drivingrecklessly and
speeding, and the paparazzi
were breaking the lawby hound-
ing him.
“This was very bizarre, very
outrageous and showed a total
disregard for life and property,”
Zine said.
Zine, a witness to countless
crashes and fatalities during his
time as an officer, said he was
surprised no one crashed.
“The way (Bieber) was driv-
ing was totally reckless, I would
have arrested himif I had pulled
himover,” said Zine. “I wouldn’t
have given him a ticket and let
him go.”
Friday’s incident isn’t the only
time the floppy-haired singer
has had conflict with paparazzi.
In May, a photographer called
authorities, complaining he was
roughed up by the pop star in a
shopping center, The Commons
at Calabasas.
Authorities said the scuffle
happened when a photographer
tried to snap photos of Bieber
and his girlfriend, teen actress
Selena Gomez. In April 2011,
Bieber called off a meeting with
the Israeli Prime Minister Benja-
min Netanyahu in Jerusalem,
saying he didn’t want to face the
country’s paparazzi.
Justin Bieber gets citation for speeding
Pop singer gets ticket for
speeding on Los Angeles
freeway after being chased.
By SHAYA TAYEFE MOHAJER
Associated Press
Bieber
building and went door to door
interviewing residents in the ar-
ea.
A witness who asked not to be
identified said he heard approxi-
mately three gunshots and went
to the second-floor apartment,
where he looked through a par-
tially opened door and sawa man
lyingonthefloor “unresponsive.”
The witness also said he saw
two men walking away from the
building. He yelled to a neighbor
to call 911, he said.
Donna Urban was driving in
the area when police cars passed
her on Shawnee Avenue. Urban
saidshefollowedthepolicetothe
apartment buildingandparkedin
front of an ambulance. She said
she saw a while male bleeding
from the head carried out on a
stretcher and placed into the am-
bulance.
“He didn’t look too good,” she
said.
Police from multiple depart-
ments and state police were
meeting at the Plymouth bor-
ough building coordinating the
investigation Saturday night. Of-
ficials were expected to issue a
statement late Saturday night
but had not done so by press
time.
SHOOTING
Continued from Page 1A
PLEASUREPOINT, Calif. —A
great white shark, estimated to
be up to 18 feet long, sheared
through the front end of a kayak
floating about a quarter-mile
from the popular Eastside surf
spot known as Pleasure Point in
Monterey Bay near Santa Cruz,
Calif., authorities said.
The attack, which happened
about 8:30 a.m. Saturday, is a rare
occurrence for the area, as no one
has reporteda shark bite insever-
al decades in the waters around
Santa Cruz County, according to
SeanVanSommeranof the Pelag-
ic Shark Research Foundation.
On Saturday, a 52-year-old Fre-
mont, Calif., man was fishing
from his 13.5-foot kayak when he
felt the shark bump up against
the back of the boat.
Within seconds, the shark lift-
ed up the kayak and attacked the
front, sheriff’s deputies said.
The man, thrown fromthe kay-
ak, was unharmed.
He was pluckedfromthe ocean
by a boater nearby who had wit-
nessed the incident.
The man was fishing with two
friends in about 40 feet of water
just outside a kelp bed when the
attack occurred.
The man’s friends, in separate
kayaks, were not injured.
The shark’s teeth sliced
through the thick shell of the yel-
low kayak, and investigators ex-
tracted tooth fragments from the
bite marks.
Van Sommeran was called to
inspect the bite, and he immedi-
ately confirmed it was the work
of a great white — the world’s
largest predatory shark.
"Those teeth can go right
through bones and saw apart
seals," Van Sommeran said.
"They’re designed to dismantle
sea animals. They rarely bite hu-
mans."
While shark attacks in the
Monterey Bay are rare, shark
sightings are common.
It’s not unusual to hear of
sharks beingspottednear Seacliff
and La Selva beaches, Van Som-
meran said.
A great white was reportedly
seen near Marina two weeks ago,
he said.
The only shark bite Van Som-
meran could recall in Santa Cruz
Countywas in1960, whena wom-
an was badly bitten near Sand
Dollar Beach between La Selva
and Watsonville.
Sharks are known to cruise the
California coast between Octo-
ber and January, feeding off seals
and other sea life before heading
farther out to sea for the winter.
Capitola, Calif., police issued a
text message alert onSaturday to
warn surfers and beachgoers
about the attack and advise cau-
tion when playing near the
ocean.
"Enter at your own risk," the
message read.
Surfers and beachgoers ap-
peared undaunted by news of the
attack.
The head-high waves churning
on Saturday brought large num-
bers out to enjoy the swell.
18-ft. great white
attacks a kayak
Attack, which happened
Saturday morning, rare for
area of California coast.
BY SHANNA MCCORD
Santa Cruz Sentinel
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — The
1960s mop top is gone, but Ringo
Starr is still flashing a peace sign.
The former Beatle marked his
72nd birthday in Nashville Satur-
day by holding a “peace and love”
moment at noon.
He asked people worldwide to
do the same at 12 o’clock in their
time zones.
The idea came to him in 2008
when an interviewer asked him
what he wanted for his birthday.
Since then, he has held events
each year in cities such as New
York, Chicago and Hamburg, Ger-
many.
“It’s sort of catching on more
and more, the more we do,” Starr
said before the festivities.
“We got lots of blogs fromJapan
and China and all over the world
saying, ‘Wedidpeaceandlove.’ So
it’s working.”
Hundreds of fans joinedStarr at
Hard Rock Café, shouting “peace
and love” at the magic hour and
holding two fingers in the air.
The crowd sang “happy birth-
day”andthechorusof “GivePeace
AChance.” One fan held up a sign
declaring the last time she saw
Starr in person.
He pointed to her and joked, “I
hugged this woman in 1964, and
she still can’t get over it.”
Organizers presented him with
a star magnolia tree that will be
planted nearby. He also cut a cake
shaped like a flower pot with a gi-
ant sunflower growing out of it.
Party favors included frosted coo-
kies and white, “peace and love”
rubber bracelets.
Starr’s family and friends
showed up, including country
singer Vince Gill andEagles guita-
rist JoeWalsh. Walshplayedinthe
72-year-old’s first All Starr Bandin
1989, which features a rotation of
celebrity musicians.
Nowthey’rerelated. Walshmar-
ried Marjorie Bach, who is the sis-
ter of Starr’s wife, Barbara Bach.
“He is my brother-in-law, so it’s
kind of family business. I’ve been
tothelast couple, andI didn’t want
tomissthisone,”hesaid. “I thinka
peace and love moment would be
good for the entire planet.”
Starr is touringtheU.S. withhis
13th All Starr Band and was set to
performat theRymanAuditorium
Saturday night.
Ringo Starr celebrates his
72nd birthday with peace
By CAITLIN R. KING
Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3A
LOCAL
➛ timesleader.com
AVOCA
Food drive rescheduled
The Avoca Lions Food Drive previ-
ously scheduled for last Thursday
will now be held this Thursday. The
drive will be held from 4 to 6:30 p.m.
at the Bethel United Methodist
Church on Main Street in Avoca.
Local food banks will deliver non-
perishable and other food items to be
distributed to anyone in need. The
items will be distributed at the
church on a first come first serve
basis.
Volunteers are also needed at 1:30
p.m. to help unload the truck. Any-
one that is interesting in helping
should arrive at the church at 1:30
p.m. and bring any boxes they have
available to them.
HARRISBURG
New line to help disabled
The Pennsylvania Department of
Aging today announced a new toll-
free number to help consumers with
questions about long-term living and
services for people with disabilities.
The Link to Aging and Disability
Resource Center line, 1-800-753-
8827, is answered by trained custom-
er service staff. Hours of operation
are 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday
through Friday, excluding holidays.
The toll-free number previously
used for the former Long Term Liv-
ing Helpline, 1-866–286-3636, will
automatically connect callers to the
new service.
For more information on the De-
partment of Aging’s programs and
services, visitwww.aging.state.pa.us.
BOALSBURG
Vietnam re-creators set
Visitors will be transported to 1968
Vietnam as they experience patrol
demonstrations and camp tours on
July 21-22, during the Fifth Annual
VIETNAM Revisited Combat Biv-
ouac Living History Weekend held
on the grounds of the Pennsylvania
Military Museum in Boalsburg, Cen-
tre County.
First Cavalry re-enactors from the
Greater Pennsylvania Military Pres-
ervation Association out of Altoona,
museum staff, and volunteers camp
out on the grounds providing a
glimpse into the recent past. The
event is held intentionally in July as
the intense heat and humidity were
“trademark elements for every per-
son who served in Vietnam,” says
museum educator Joe Horvath.
In addition to the weather, the
lush undergrowth and thick tree
canopy surrounding Spring Creek
beside the museum further repre-
sents an element of the Central High-
land jungle that soldiers fought in.
Greeted by a sign that reads “Wel-
come to the Republic of Vietnam,”
on which veterans are encouraged to
write their name, rank, and dates of
service, visitors will experience a
time-capsule presentation of a unit in
the field of war. Visitors will be in-
vited to go out on a short range re-
con patrol with a point-man. Long
trousers and good shoes are strongly
encouraged.
During a 2 p.m. tactical demon-
stration each day, the audience can
expect to hear gunfire as well as
communication relays between the
firebase and squad leader over au-
thentic field radios.
New to the event this year is Doug
Irwin, a local folk guitarist who will
entertain the troops and public.
Irwin served for real in the 82nd
Airborne Division with the 1/505th
Parachute Infantry Regiment. Al-
though a veteran, he will be dressed
as a green recruit set to perform at 1
PM on Saturday following recordings
of the Armed Forces Radio Network
on the camp intercom. Doug said he
will "be playing some songs from the
era, to stay within the appropriate
time frame, and a few originals that
focus on soldiers and veterans of that
time as well."
The bivouac opens to the public at
10 a.m. each day. Patrol ambush
demonstrations are scheduled for 2
p.m..
The Pennsylvania Military Mu-
seum and 28th Infantry Division
Shrine is administered by the Penn-
sylvania Historical and Museum
Commission and located on South
Atherton Street (Business Route
322) in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania - 3
miles east of State College and the
Pennsylvania State University. For
more information on the museum
please call 814-466-6263 or visitwww-
.pamilmuseum.org.
N E W S I N B R I E F
EDWARDSVILLE – A fire-
fighter was injured battling a
blaze at a Main Street business
early Saturday morning.
Capt. Ray Shinko of the Ed-
wardsville Fire Department was
knocked to the ground after
touching an electrified chain-
link fence while fighting the fire
at LocalOffice, a computer ser-
vice and sales company at 663
Main St., according to Fire
Chief Ray King.
A section of the building’s
metal-sided walls peeled away,
carrying an electric current into
the fence. The chief said the fire
started apparently near an elec-
trical service box at the rear of
the business, which is housed
on the first floor of the two-sto-
ry building.
Shinko was not knocked un-
conscious by the shock but was
hospitalized overnight for ob-
servation, King said.
According to King, the fire
was first reported at 3:34 a.m.
by Edwardsville Police Officer
John Fronzoni, who noticed it
while driving by on patrol. Fire-
fighters arriving on scene found
the building “fully charged”
with flames concentrated along
the rear wall of the building,
King said.
Approximately 50firefighters
from seven fire companies
joined efforts in fighting the
fire, alternating their efforts fre-
quently due to high temper-
atures Saturday morning, King
said. It took them about two
hours to fully extinguish the
fire.
In addition to the first-floor
computer business, King said
the building was home to two
apartments.
Firefighters believe one
apartment was vacant. The oth-
er was occupied but the resi-
dents werenot homeat thetime
of the fire. King said he believes
the tenants, possibly a mother
and daughter, were out of town
Saturday and that Kris Leeds,
the owner of the building and
the computer business, is at-
tempting to contact the ten-
ants.
Leeds didnot immediatelyre-
turn a phone message Saturday.
King said State Police Fire
Marshal Ron Jarocha was called
into investigate the cause of the
fire, which was undetermined
Saturday. Firefighters donot be-
lieve the cause of the fire is sus-
picious, King said.
Edwardsville firefighter hurt at blaze
Capt. Ray Shinko is
hospitalized for observation
after the electrical mishap.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
An Edwardsville firefighter was shocked after a piece of metal
siding transferred electricity to this fence during a fire at 663
Main St. in Edwardsville early Saturday morning.
WILKES-BARRE– City council
will again be asked to vote this
week on a resolution to award a
$650,000 contract to Schneider
Electric as a sole source provider
for 62 surveillance cameras at the
Intermodal
Transporta-
tionCenter.
But theis-
sue is far
from being
resolved.
Council
pulled the
item from
itsagendain
June be-
cause coun-
cil members
Tony George andMaureenLavelle
questioned the lack of paperwork
explaining what the city was pur-
chasing.
Only four of the five council
members were present in June –
George Brownwas absent.
George said he intends to ask
that the itembe pulled again from
the agenda because he has several
unansweredquestions.
At theJunecouncil meeting, city
Administrator Marie McCormick
said the purchase would be a “sole
source procurement,” noting that
Schneider is the only vendor avail-
able toprovide the cameras andin-
stall them to tie into the existing
camera system. George said he
wanted to see more information
about the contract.
“What are we paying $650,000
for?” George askedat the meeting.
Responding to questions from
the public as to why the contract
wasn’t publicly advertised, the city
said it didn’t solicit bids for the
work for a couple of reasons.
McCormickandLouLau, thecity’s
director of information technolo-
gy, said the new cameras must be
integrated with the existing sur-
veillance system and Schneider is
the only company able to provide
that service.
Schneider installed the existing
camera system in the city in 2009.
The company was then known as
TAC.
J.R. Roberts, owner of J.R. Ro-
berts Security Strategies of Savan-
nah, Ga., said last week that if the
contract were bid, the city would
havereceivedaminimumof fourto
five responses – maybe more.
Security
cameras
remain
question
W-B City Council member Tony
George is not sure about a
$650,000 contract.
By BILL O’BOYLE
boboyle@timesleader.com
See CAMERAS, Page 6A
Wilkes-Barre City
Council meets in
work session
Tuesday at 6 p.m.
and in regular
session Thursday
at 6 p.m. Public
comment is al-
lowed only at the
regular meeting.
W H AT ’ S
N E X T ?
WYOMING– The Wyoming
Farmers Market got off to a
slow start Saturday, but pa-
trons said they didn’t mind;
theylikehavingaproducemar-
ket in their neighborhood.
“I love coming here,” said
Terri Malast of West Wyoming.
“This makes it really conve-
nient. Wilkes-Barre’s kind of a
pain, because when you go
there it’s hard to find parking,
or youhave topayfor parking.”
“This is nice; I can walk up
here andwalk home,” saidCar-
ol Coutant, who lives just
downthe street frommarket in
Butler Street Park at the cor-
ner of Butler Street and 8th
Street.
Coutant said she also avoids
Wilkes-Barre’s Farmers Mar-
ket because of the difficulty of
finding parking.
“I’ve been to the one at the
Arena because they have park-
ing,” she said. “But that
doesn’t really have much more
thanthis here. They have more
stands but it’s the same thing. I
would say the variety here is
just as good as the one up
there.”
That variety came exclusive-
ly from Marty O’Malia Farms
of Plains Township, the only
produce vendor at Saturday’s
market. O’Malia offered a se-
lection of fruits and vegetables
from common staples – garlic,
corn and early season toma-
toes – to more exotic offerings
like cantaloupe andcousa, a Li-
byan variety of squash.
“It’s a nice market in a beau-
tiful setting here, so hopefully
things will pick up as the sum-
mer progresses,” said Sherry
Packing produce and convenience in 1 trip
Wyoming Farmers Market is
welcome addition to
neighborhood.
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Autumn Carter, 8, and Kayla Strach stopped at the Wyoming
Farmers Market Saturday morning to grab some plums from
Marty O’Malia’s tent, where Pat Welebob waited on them.
WHAT: The Wyoming Farmers
Market
WHERE: Butler Street Park, corner
of Butler Street and 8th Street
WHEN: Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
I F YO U G O
See MARKET, Page 6A
NESCOPECK TWP. – The roots of
American blues twanged and cried
through the air in Nescopeck Township
Saturday, as Rory Block performed at the
Brigg’s FarmBlues Festival.
Block, a blues veteran who has been
touringfor morethan25years, openedthe
second night of the Nescopeck Township
festival. She was joined by the Butterfield
Blues Band, Moreland and Arbuckle and
Bernard Allison on the main stage Satur-
day, theseconddayof thetwo-dayfestival.
Opening with blues pioneer Robert
Johnson’s “Crossroads Blues,” Block cov-
ered blues standards, including “Death
Letter Blues” and “Preachin’ Blues” by
Son House, “I’ll be Bound” by Muddy Wa-
ters and “Me and the Devil” by Robert
Johnson, interspersed with her own com-
positions.
Singing with a powerful voice that
swings from sweet to gravely, Block plays
traditional blues in the spirit of the art
form’s founders on a steel-stringed acous-
ticshesometimes plucks andslaps sohard
it makes her fingers bleed.
“The humidity is turning the strings in-
toeggslicers andmy fingers are the eggs,”
she joked with the crowd.
It’s a style that at first glance seems out-
of-sync with her image.
Atall, wiry white woman with a mop of
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Blues guitarist Rory Block performs at the Briggs Farm Blues festival Saturday in Nescopeck Township.
Witness to the blues
Rory Block is link to earliest days
By MATT HUGHES
mhughes@timesleader.com
See BLOCK, Page 9A
C M Y K
PAGE 4A SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
BOTH LOCATIONS
7 GEORGE AVE.
(PARSONS SECTION)
WILKES-BARRE • 270-3976
30 HANOVER ST.
WILKES-BARRE
970-4460
7
6
4
7
9
9
7
6
4
7
9
9
7
6
4
7
9
9
5% SENIOR
DISCOUNT
ON TUESDAY
MONEY
ORDERS
Shurfne Products Are
DOUBLE-YOUR-
MONEY-BACK
GUARANTEED!
At Our George Ave.
(Parsons) Location
Quality Rights Reserved,
Not Responsible For
Typographical Errors
Scan this with your smartphone
to visit our website now!
Follow Us On
FACEBOOK
Email us at
fredandfrank@schielsmarkets.com
& on the Web at
www.schielsmarkets.com
Prices Effective Sunday July 8, 2012 thru Saturday July 14, 2012
WITH GOLD CARD
Picnic Favorite, Refreshing Whole
RED RIPE SEEDLESS
WATERMELONS
3
98
EA.
WITH GOLD CARD
Full Pint
GRAPE TOMATOES
1
88
EA.
BAR S HOT DOGS
1 lb. pkg. or Jumbo Bun Length
WITH GOLD CARD
WITH GOLD CARD
99
¢
HATFIELD SAUSAGE PATTIES
4 ct. - 1 lb. pkg.
Mild or Hot
2
99
EA.
WITH GOLD CARD
SAHLEN’S
HAM OFF THE BONE
4
99
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Shurfine Deli Gourmet
AMERICAN CHEESE
3
98
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
SHURFINE 12 PACK SODA
Assorted Varieties
4
$
10
for
WITH GOLD CARD
KOOL AID or COUNTRY TIME
Assorted Varieties - 8 qt. Drink Mix
2
$
4
for
WITH GOLD CARD
PEPSI CO. FLAVORS
Sierra Mist, Brisk, Crush, Mug
& Schwepps
WITH GOLD CARD 99
¢
EA.
WITH GOLD CARD 98
¢
EA.
KINGSFORD MATCHLIGHT
CHARCOAL or KINGSFORD
REGULAR CHARCOAL
Matchlight Charcoal - 12.5 lb
Regular Charcoal - 16.6 lb.
7
99
EA.
WITH GOLD CARD
SWISS TEAS & DRINKS
½ gallon
99
¢
W
WAT
W
SHURFINE KETCHUP
24 oz.
C
Excludes
Chicken &
Turkey
4 ct.
Mild
WITH G
MEAT/DELI
GROCERY
FROZEN
BAKERY
JOIN US THIS WEEK FOR OUR
Fresh Picked Daily,
High in Antioxidants!
NEW JERSEY
BLUEBERRIES
1
98
Pint
Container
WITH GOLD CARD
Peak Flavor
SWEET
NORTHWEST
CHERRIES
1
98
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Great Caesar Salad
Starter!
CRISP ROMAINE
LETTUCE
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Greenhouse Grown!
CLUSTER TOMATOES
ON THE VINE OR
MEATY PLUM
TOMATOES
1
28
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Fresh Picked Daily,
Driscoll Brand
CALIFORNIA
STRAWBERRIES
2
48
16 oz.
Container
WITH GOLD CARD
Sweet, Juicy!
SEEDLESS
RED RIPE
WATERMELONS
3
98
WITH GOLD CARD
Each
Sweet,
Extra Large Size
CANTALOUPES
2
48
WITH GOLD CARD
Each
JUMBO
VIDALIA,
WHITE AND
RED ONIONS
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Fancy
CRISP
CUCUMBERS
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
2 FOR
Fancy
GREEN OR
YELLOW
SQUASH
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Giorgio Brand
FRESH SLICED
SALAD
MUSHROOMS
4 oz. Pkg.
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Convenient,
Ready to Serve!
SHURFINE
FRESH BABY
CARROTS
16 oz. Pkg.
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
r!
MAINEEEEEEEEE
CE
¢
LB.
CARD
Fanc Fanc Fa anc Fanc Fanc Fa F ncc n Fancyyyyyyy
CRISP
CUCUMBERS
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
2 FOR
FFFFan Fan FFan Fan Fan Fa
GR GREE
YELL
SQU
WITH GOL
9
8
¢
9
8
¢
P
R
O
D
U
C
E
P
R
O
D
U
C
E
S
A
L
E
S
A
L
E
Jumbo Size
LOOSE IDAHO
BAKER
POTATOES
98
¢
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Sweet Eating!
CALIFORNIA
LARGE SIZE
NECTARINES
1
28
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Juicy and Sweet
Smooth Flavor
EASTERN
PEACHES
1
28
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Sweet
CALIFORNIA
BLACK OR RED
PLUMS
1
28
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
Extra Large
FRESH GREEN
BELL PEPPERS
1
28
LB.
WITH GOLD CARD
IA NIA
ZE IZE
NES
8
ARD
FFFFR F
BBBBBE BB
W
1
2
8
1
2
8
P
R
O
D
U
C
E
P
R
O
D
U
C
E
S
A
L
E
S
A
L
E
Convenient,
Ready to Serve
FRESH EXPRESS
GARDEN
SALADS
1
28
WITH GOLD CARD
ShurSave Fresh
85% LEAN GROUND BEEF
2
99
LB. WITH GOLD CARD
Grade “A” All Natural Sanderson Farms
CHICKEN
40
%
OFF
WITH GOLD CARD
ANY
SIZE
PKG.!
WITH
GOLD CARD
(Water Added)
HATFIELD GOLD RIBBON
TAVERN HAM
WITH GOLD CARD
6
99
LB.
3
99
LB.
COCA COLA
All Varieties of Diet, Diet Caffeine Free, Sprite
or Zero - 20 pk./12 oz. cans
WITH GOLD CARD 4
99
NABISCO CHIPS AHOY!
All Varieties
9.5 - 15.25 oz.
WITH GOLD CARD 1
88
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE
House Blend, Master Blend, Original, Lite, French
Roast, Breakfast Blend or Gourmet Roast
28 - 34.5 oz.
WITH GOLD CARD 7
99
KELLOGG’S CEREAL
18 oz. Corn Flakes, 18.7 oz. Raisin Bran, 15 oz. Frosted
Flakes, 15.5 oz. Fiber Plus Caramel Pecan or 14.5 oz.
Raisin Bran Cinnamon Almond
2
$
4
FOR
WITH GOLD CARD
PUREX LIQUID OR ULTRAPACKS
LAUNDRY DETERGENT
All Varieties
50 fl. oz. btl. or
18 ct. pkg.
WITH GOLD CARD
Must Buy 2,
Lesser Quantities
2.50 Each
SHURFINE
CLASSIC ICE CREAM
All Varieties
½ gallon cont.
WITH GOLD CARD 1
99
HOT, LEAN OR
CROISSANT POCKETS
All Varieties - 9 oz. pkg.
6
$
10
FOR
WITH
GOLD
CARD
Scrumptious!
8 INCH CHERRY TOPPED
BOSTON CREAM CAKE
WITH GOLD CARD
3
99
EA.
STILL A FULL
½ GALLON
ShurSave Fresh
BONE-IN DELMONICO STEAK
ANY
SIZE
PKG.!
BUY 1, GET 1
FREE FREE
OF THE SAME
12 oz. Bags
WITH GOLD CARD
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 5A
➛ N A T I O N & W O R L D
7
6
5
2
2
8
Look in THE TIMES LEADERfor today’s valuable inserts from these advertisers:
FURNITURE KING
Some inserts, at the advertisers’ request, only appear in selected neighborhoods. If you would like to receive an insert that you do not currently receive, please call the advertiser.
PARK CITY, UTAH
Falling tombstone kills boy
A
4-year-old Utah boy was trying to
make other children smile for a
photograph when a 6-foot-tall tomb-
stone that weighed hundreds of pounds
fell on him and killed him at a historic
cemetery, family members and friends
said.
Carson Dean Cheney was with his
family in the resort town of Park City
on Thursday evening when the head-
stone toppled onto him after some
metal connecting it to its pedestal
broke, the boy’s grandmother Geri
Gibbs told The Associated Press.
The boy’s father, Zac Cheney, does
photography in his spare time and was
taking portraits of another family at the
Glenwood Cemetery, said Curtis Mor-
ley, a co-worker and family friend.
They chose the old cemetery because
of its extensive landscaping, he said.
PAMPLONA, SPAIN
6 injured in bull running
One elderly thrill-seeker was gored in
a leg and five others slightly injured as
thousands of adrenaline-fueled runners
raced ahead of six fighting bulls in the
streets of the northern Spanish city of
Pamplona in the first running of the
bulls of this year’s San Fermin festival,
officials said Saturday.
Runners, in traditional white cloth-
ing and red kerchiefs around their
necks, tripped over each other or fell in
the mad daredevil annual rush along
early morning dew-moistened slippery
streets to the city’s bull ring.
One youth got the top of his shirt
and kerchief caught on a bull’s horn,
inches from his face, and was dragged
several yards (meters) along the
ground, but was seen to get up and run
away.
CAIRO
Leader to visit Saudi Arabia
Egyptian President Mohammed
Morsi will travel to Saudi Arabia on
Wednesday on his first official trip
abroad since being sworn in, a move
suggesting the Islamist leader wants to
reassure the kingdom that strong rela-
tions are a priority.
Some Saudi officials are believed to
have supported Morsi’s former electo-
ral rival, a former prime minister and
ex-military general, in hopes of contin-
uing the warm relationship once
shared with Egypt’s ousted leader
Hosni Mubarak. Saudi Arabia’s King
Abdullah invited Morsi “to strengthen
relations.”
LOS ANGELES
Cat parasite-suicide link
A wily parasite well known for influ-
encing the behavior of its animal hosts
appears to play a troubling role in hu-
mans, increasing the risk of suicide
among women who are infected, new
research shows.
Researchers estimate that T. gondii
is carried by 10 percent to 20 percent of
Americans, who can get it by changing
litter used by infected cats or eating
undercooked meat from an animal
carrying the bug.
Despite its prevalence in humans,
the protozoan is most famous for the
strange effect it has on the brains of
rats and mice.
When a rat or a mouse is infected, it
suddenly flips from being petrified of
cats to being attracted to them. The
parasite has been linked to an in-
creased risk of schizophrenia and bipo-
lar disorder in humans. A new study
confirms the link by examining in-
fection rates and suicide attempts in
thousands of women in Denmark.
I N B R I E F
AP PHOTO
Is this what they call runner’s high?
A young woman falls down as others
run in Glamour high heels race in
downtown Moscow, Russia, Saturday.
Participants of the high heel run were
challenged to race 50 meters in stilet-
tos of at least 2.54 inches.
TRIPOLI, Libya — Jubilant Libyans
chose a newparliament Saturday in their
first nationwide vote in decades, but vio-
lence and protests in the restive east un-
derscoredthe challenges aheadas the oil-
rich North African nation struggles to re-
store stability after the ouster of long-
time dictator Moammar Gadhafi.
One person was killed and two wound-
ed in a gunbattle between security forces
and anti-election protesters in the east-
ern city of Ajdabiya, according to the
head of the election commission. Nouri
al-Abari said the polling center targeted
by the protesters was later reopened and
voting commenced normally.
The shooting followed a spate of at-
tacks on polling centers in the eastern
half of the country, which was the cradle
of the revolution against Gadhafi but has
become increasingly angry over the per-
ceived domination of power by rivals in
Tripoli.
The vote capped a chaotic transition
that has exposed major fault lines rang-
ing fromthe east-west divide to efforts by
Islamists to assert power.
Lines formed outside polling centers
more than an hour before they opened in
the capital Tripoli, with policemen and
soldiers standing guard and searching
voters and election workers before they
entered.
“I have a strange but beautiful feeling
today,” dentist Adam Thabet said as he
waited his turn to cast a ballot. “We are
free at last after years of fear. We knew
this day would come, but we were afraid
it would take a lot longer.”
The election for a 200-seat parliament,
which will be tasked with forming a new
government, was a key milestone after a
bitter civil war that ended Gadhafi’s four-
decade rule. It was the first time Libyans
have voted for a parliament since 1964,
five years before Gadhafi’s military coup
that toppled the monarchy.
But the desert nation of 6 million peo-
ple has fallen into turmoil since Gadhafi
was killed by rebel forces in his home city
of Sirte in late October. Armed militias
operate independently, refusing to be
brought under the um-
brella of a national ar-
my, and deepening re-
gional and tribal divi-
sions erupt into vio-
lence with alarming
frequency.
Growing resentment
in the east and the in-
ability to rein in unruly
militias have threat-
ened to tear the coun-
try apart.
Some easterners boy-
cotted the election and
protesters torched bal-
lot boxes in 14 out of 19
polling centers in Ajda-
biya, said Ibrahim
Fayed, a former rebel commander in the
area.
Gunmen shot down a helicopter carry-
ing polling materials near the eastern
city of Benghazi, birthplace of last year’s
revolution, killingone electionworker on
board, said a spokesman for the ruling
National Transitional Council.
Voters choose new parliament in first nationwide vote in decades,
but not without violence and protests in part of the country
AP PHOTO
A Libyan man kisses his ink-marked finger that shows that he has voted as he drives in Tripoli, Libya, Saturday.
Libyans go to the polls
By MAGGIE MICHAEL
Associated Press
“ We knew
this day
would
come, but
we were
afraid it
would take
a lot long-
er.”
Adam Thabet
Dentist and
voter
KABUL, Afghanistan — The
U.S. designation Saturday of Af-
ghanistan as its newest “major
non-NATOally” amounts to a po-
litical statement of support for
the country’s long-term stability
and solidifies close defense coop-
eration after American combat
troops withdraw in 2014.
“We see this as a powerful com-
mitment to Afghanistan’s fu-
ture,” U.S. Secretary of State Hill-
ary Rodham Clinton said at a
news conference during a brief
stop in the Afghan capital. “We
are not even imagining abandon-
ing Afghanistan,” she said in the
grand courtyard of the presiden-
tial palace after talks with Presi-
dent Hamid Karzai.
From Kabul, she and Karzai
headed separately to Japan for an
international conference on Af-
ghan civilian assistance. Donors
planned to pledge $16 billion
over four years, with the U.S.
share not immediately clear, ac-
cording to a U.S. diplomatic offi-
cial speaking onconditionof ano-
nymity ahead of the official an-
nouncement Sunday.
The non-NATO ally declara-
tion allows for streamlined de-
fense cooperation, including ex-
pedited purchasing ability of
American equipment and easier
export control regulations. Af-
ghanistan’s military, heavily de-
pendent onAmericanandforeign
assistance, already enjoys many
of these benefits. The non-NATO
ally status guarantees it will con-
tinue to do so.
Afghanistan is the 15th such
country to receive the designa-
tion. Others include Australia,
Egypt, Israel and Japan. Afghan-
istan’s neighbor Pakistan was the
last nation to gain the status, in
2004.
Clintonsaidprogress was com-
ing incrementally but consistent-
ly to Afghanistan after decades of
conflict. “The security situation
is more stable,” she said.
US gives
Afghans
‘powerful’
support
The non-NATO ally declaration
allows for streamlined
defense cooperation.
By BRADLEY KLAPPER
Associated Press
MOSCOW—Intense flood-
ing in the Black Sea region of
southern Russia killed 103
people after torrential rains
dropped nearly a foot of water,
forcing many to scramble out
of their beds for refuge in trees
and on roofs, officials said Sat-
urday.
Many people were asleep
when the flooding hit over-
night in the Krasnodar region,
and the water rushed into the
area around the hard-hit town
of Krimskwithsuchspeedand
volume that rumors emerged
that local officials had opened
a nearby water reservoir. Mud-
dy water coursed through
streets and homes, in some
cases highenoughtoflowover
the hoods of cars and even as
high as rooftops, according to
witnesses.
About 5,000 residences
were flooded, the Krasnodar
governor was quotedas telling
the Interfax news agency.
The Interior Ministry gave
the death toll as 103 on Satur-
day evening, according to Rus-
sian news agencies; a regional
ministry spokesmansaidearli-
er that at least 67 of the deaths
were around Krimsk, about
750 miles south of Moscow.
Five people were electrocuted
in the Black Sea coastal city of
Gelendzhik after a transfor-
mer fell into the water, state
news agencyRIANovosti said.
103 dead from flooding in Russia
Many people asleep when
flooding hit overnight after
nearly foot of rain fell.
By JIMHEINTZ
Associated Press
AP PHOTO
People walk in a muddy street after flooding in the Black
Sea resort of Gelendzhik, southern Russia, Saturday.
GETTYSBURG—This year’s
re-enactment of theBattleof Get-
tysburg is to feature breaking
news coverage of one of the piv-
otal engagements —140 charac-
ters at a time.
Four tweeters recruited from
two local newspapers planned to
deliver minute-by-minute cover-
ageof Saturday’sre-enactment of
thefightingat Devil’s Denas part
of the149th anniversary event at
the battlefield.
“We thought it would enhance
people’s understanding of what
happenedthere,” organizer Marc
Charisse, editor of the Hanover
Evening Sun, told The Philadel-
phiaInquirer. Hesaidonereport-
er would file from the Confeder-
ate side and another from the
Unionlines, while YorkDaily Re-
cord editor James McClure gave
a “big picture” overview of the
battle and he himself provided
color commentary.
The annual event, which has
attracted thousands to Gettys-
burg for decades, isn’t fought on
the actual 1863 battlefield but on
a farm about seven miles away,
andoftennot onthe actual battle
dates of July1-3. Andthenthere’s
the play-by-play froman announ-
cer. Still, Twitter adds a new di-
mension of social media and in-
stant communication for about
2,000re-enactors, whotakegreat
pains to achieve authenticity in
their portrayal of 19th century
warfare.
But some historians say they
don’t mind adding social media
to the mix, especially if it helps
bring one of the nation’s most fa-
mous battles tolifefor anewgen-
eration.
A battle over real time: War
re-enactment gets tweeted
Tweeters from Gettysburg
papers planned to deliver
minute-by-minute coverage.
The Associated Press
C M Y K
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
W I L K E S - B A R R E, P E N N S Y L V A N I A
KING’S COLLEGE
A Catholic College Sponsored by the Congregation of Holy Cross
Open House

Saturday, July 14
Register online at kings.edu
or call 1-888-KINGS PA
He said proprietary sourcing
couldbe a validreasonfor not bid-
ding the contract and contractors
sometimes develop a delivery
stream or technology system
that’s not compatible with other
systems, precluding other compa-
nies frombeingable toparticipate
in the competitive bid process.
But, Roberts said, if the work is
not bid and no specifications are
advertised, other companies are
excluded from the process. He
said without a competitive bid-
ding process, the city can’t deter-
mine if it could have saved any
money.
George wants to see warranty
George said he met with mem-
bers of the administration staff
last week and he was told the city
would lose its warranty on the ex-
isting system if another vendor
was chosen to do the Intermodal
work. George said he will ask to
see the warranty.
George did not say if the war-
ranty for the original system was
still in effect. George said he met
with Mayor Tom Leighton, Drew
McLaughlin, administrative coor-
dinator, Greg Barrouk, economic
development director, and Tim
Henry, city attorney.
“They told me if we use any of
those other vendors, we will lose
our warranty,” Georgesaid. “They
said it’s Schneider’s network and
infrastructure.”
George said he is still research-
ing the matter and he doesn’t
knowif he will be ready to vote on
the contract on Thursday.
Questions remain
J.R. Roberts said Saturday that
warrantiesareusuallyonetothree
years max, after which a service
agreement would be put in place.
Roberts said if the city advertised
the Intermodal work it would at
least be able to verify if it’s getting
the best possible price from
Schneider.
By not advertising the project,
Roberts said there is no systemof
checks and balances.
So the question to be asked is:
why wouldn’t the city want to be
assured it is getting the best price
for the 62 cameras for the Inter-
modal? Roberts said $650,000 for
the installation and integration of
62 cameras seems “highly expen-
sive.”
“It seems like there is a cozy re-
lationship somewhere,” he said.
“It all sounds rather troubling. It
just doesn’t sound right to me.”
Roberts said the surveillance
camera business has become
highly competitive in recent
years, actually driving down the
costs of cameras and other equip-
ment.
“If the city asked Schneider to
provide specifications, then the
workcouldhavebeenadvertised,”
he said. “Then, and only then,
would the city know for sure that
it’s getting a good deal.”
DVTel responds; city’s choice
Cathy McHugh, director of
global marketing at DVTel, said
other companies can install their
products.
“We work with integrators,”
McHugh said. “And we sell our
products to more than one inte-
grator.”
McHugh said the companies
they sell to must be certifiedto as-
sure DVTel that their cameras and
equipment are installed properly.
Schneider is one of those certified
companies, McHugh said.
“Thereareothers –ValuedAdd-
ed Retailers – who are certified as
well,” she said.
McHughsaidtheworkcouldbe
put out for bid, but the city would
need to be very clear about what
was neededandprovideall details
about the systemthat is already in
place.
“It would be the city’s choice,”
shesaid, regardingadvertisingthe
project.
McHugh said if the city would
choose to switch companies,
DVTel requires an authorized
change request form advising
themthat they have done so in or-
der to support themin the future.
She said service and support
agreements are typically a one-
yeartermanddifferent companies
(VARs) can sell them different
ways – by month, by channel, an-
nually, etc.
“I am not sure of the city’s ar-
rangement for its warranty with
Schneider – when the period
ends, howit is paid, et cetera,” she
said.
McHughsaidDVTel workswith
a range of integrators/installers
worldwide. She said “certified”
means they are trained on DVTel
systems and certified to install
and support them.
“In short, if the city changes in-
stallers, DVTel needs a written
consent form from the city that
they want to change their integra-
tor of record,” McHugh said. “If
thecitydecides tobuytheir future
cameras/upgrades, et cetera,
from another company and they
want DVTel cameras, we require
that company to be certified.”
At that point, McHugh said a
new SSA would go in place, with
the newcompany.
“Andif they want their previous
cameras/systems to be under
warranty, they need to discuss
that with the new company as
well,” she said.
Schneider, formerly known as
TACof Dallas, Texas, wasselected
in 2009 by the Hawkeye Security
Systems board to design, install
and maintain the city’s $2 million
150-digital camera surveillance
system. There were 13 proposals
received before TACwas chosen.
McCormick said the contract
with Schneider would be done in
two phases – each costing
$325,000. Thefundingfor thepro-
ject is provided by state gaming
funds and Federal Transit Agency
funds – $325,000 from each
source, McCormick said.
CAMERAS
Continued from Page 3A
O’Malia. She said the farm has
runa standat the market since its
inception three summers ago,
and that more vendors will likely
join soon. Perhaps the high heat
kept them away Saturday, she
speculated.
O’Malia said the farm could
use the business because of the
losses it sustained in the Septem-
ber flood.
“The timingwas very bad,” she
said. “We hadn’t picked any of
our fall crops. We lost our pump-
kins; our canning tomatoes.
That’s peak season for us. So we
want people to come over here
and support us and hopefully the
market will continue to grow.”
In addition to O’Malia’s stand,
food vendors offered potato pan-
cakes and lemonade in the shade
of the park’s many trees.
Gloria Kolbeck of Popcorn
Etc., a Tunkhannock-based gour-
met popcorn vendor, said the
store’s stand at the market will
help the business break into a dif-
ferent market.
“It seems like it’s going to be a
real nice thing to do over the next
couple of weeks,” she said.
“We’re doing real well. I’m glad
we decided to do this.”
Pittston resident Jacqueline
Troy rounded out the market’s
vendors, selling quilted hand-
bags she made herself.
“I heard last year it was pretty
busy; that’s why I decidedtotry it
out,” Troy said.
MARKET
Continued from Page 3A
LAURELRUN– The course on
the Giants Despair Hill Climb
hasn’t changed, but a section
near the bottomhas been cleared
and leveled for better access and
viewing of the event next week-
end.
Gone are the dirt mounds and
brush along a quarter-mile
stretch of East Northampton
Street near the starting line.
“Actually we did it for the spec-
tators,” said Darryl Danko, a
competitor and coordinator of
the Sports Car Club of America
time trial.
Thousands are expected to
turn out for the 106th hill climb,
the longest running one in the
United States, that serves as the
major fundraiser for the bor-
ough’s fire department.
“It wasn’t too fan friendly,” ac-
knowledged Danko of the former
condition of the borough-owned
land.
A 10- to 12-foot high mound
used to stand on the spot where
he and John D. Mosley Jr. stood
across from the Dickerson Street
entrance to Laurel Run Estate
Mobile Home Park. The ground
behind the mound was covered
with picker bushes, weeds and
sumac trees.
“You couldn’t see the road,”
said Mosley, Laurel Run borough
fire chief.
About a month ago, the bor-
ough, its fire department and Al
Bonkstartedworkonthe project.
Bonkdonatedhis timeandequip-
ment, said Danko.
There’s more room to walk
along the southbound lane in
which the drivers race and the
ground has been graded making
it suitable for people to set up
chairs and tents. The borough
has plans for the land where peo-
ple used to live until Luzerne
County bought their properties
due to a mine fire underground.
About seven or eight years ago
the county turned over the land
to the borough, Mosley said.
“The only thingthat it couldbe
used for is recreation,” he said.
But for now the focus is on the
hill climb.
“We should have at least 80 en-
trants,” said Danko. It’s capped at
100, he added.
Danko has his sights on win-
ning a seventh title, making him
king of the hill climb winding
around five turns, including the
110-degree hairpin named the
Devil’s Elbow.
Hill climb fans to get better view
Dirt mounds and brush have
been removed from an area
popular with spectators.
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
The Giants Despair Hill Climb will
be held on July 14 and 15 on East
Northampton Street in Laurel Run.
Drivers race against the clock on
the nearly one mile course.
Timed runs will be held from10
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on July 14 and
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on July 15.
U P H I L L B AT T L E F O R
H I L L C L I M B D R I V E R S
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Darryl Danko, left, and John D. Mosley Jr. stand along East North-
ampton Street in an area that has been improved for spectators
of the Giants Despair Hill Climb. The two men and others associ-
ated with the event scheduled for next weekend worked to remove
huge dirt mounds and clear brush.
LOS ANGELES - Some scien-
tists have likened it to voodoo,
while Albert Einstein called it
just plain "spooky."
In the bizarre realm of quan-
tum mechanics, entanglement
is the phenomenon in which
two seemingly distinct parti-
cles control each other in ways
that defy common physical
sense. For instance, when an
atom located in Beijing is mea-
sured by an observer, it will ex-
hibit the exact opposite quali-
ties of its entangled counter-
part in Boston.
In the 1930s, the idea of en-
tanglement seemed so absurd
that Einstein derided it as
"spooky action at a distance"
and argued that it revealed seri-
ous shortcomings in quantum
theory.
Today, however, entangle-
ment stands as the essential
feature of quantum mechanics,
and scientists say its exploita-
tioncouldleadto extraordinary
leaps in computing, communi-
cations and cryptology. Aquan-
tum computer, they say, would
take seconds to solve problems
that today’s PCs would take bil-
lions of years to parse. Govern-
ments, financial institutions
and armies, meanwhile, are in-
trigued by the potential for se-
cure long-distance communica-
tions that would instantly re-
veal attempts at hacking.
Those technologies may still
be sometime in the future, but
researchers in Germany have
taken a step closer to their real-
ization. In a report Friday in the
journal Science, physicists at
the Ludwig-Maximilians-Uni-
versity in Munich said they had
demonstrated that two atoms
separated by a distance of
about 65 feet could become en-
tangled and trigger an alert to
announce that they had done
so.
To visualize the phenom-
enon, imagine two boxes that
each contain a single coin, said
study co-author Wenjamin Ro-
senfeld. In quantum mechan-
ics, neither coin has a defined
orientation - heads or tails - un-
til an observer opens one of the
boxes and sees which side is
facing up. At that instant, the
second coin will be found, with-
out fail, to be lying in the exact
opposite position, no matter
how far away it is.
While other experiments
have successfully entangled
atoms, photons and diamond
crystals, this was the first to do
so at a long distance and in-
clude a signal, or herald, to let
scientists know that entangle-
ment had been achieved. Such
a signal - in this case, a message
on a computer screen - is cru-
cial to the further study of en-
tanglement and its future prac-
tical application, researchers
said.
‘Entanglement’ idea
is boon to physicists
The property of particles
could boost computing and
other fields, scientists say.
By MONTE MORIN
Los Angeles Times
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 7A
USDA Choice Black
Canyon Angus
Whole Boneless
Eye of Round
Heluva Good
Cheddar Cheese
Sharp or Extra Sharp
2 Lb. Stick
Fresh
Green
Peppers
Kraft
Salad
Dressing
All 16 Oz. Varieties
Chobani
Yogurt
All 6 Oz. Varieties
Ocean Spray
Cranberry
Cocktail Juice
All 64 Oz. Varieties
Fresh Store Made Angus
Ground
Chuck
5 Lb. Bag or More
Maiers
Rolls
Crustini, Kaiser or Steak
8 Count
Bountiful Harvest
Vegetable
Blends
All 32 Oz. varieties
Bountiful Harvest
Tomato Juice
46 Oz.
Bountiful Harvest
Mango
Chunks
5 Lb.Bag
USDA Choice Black
Canyon Angus
Petite
Tenders
Rejuv Powdered
Drink Mixes
All 24 Oz. Varieties
Byrne Dairy
Ice Cream
All 64 Oz. Varieties
Barilla
Pasta
All 10 Lb. Varieties
Great Lakes
Shredded
Cheese
Mozzarella or Cheddar
2 Lbs.
Corn Fed Boneless
Pork Sirloins
Dinosaur BBQ
BBQSauce
19 Oz.
Lynden Farms
French Fries
Regular, Crinkle or
Steak Cut
2 Lbs.
Oasis
White
Vinegar
128 Oz.
Cobblestone
Sliced Meats
Roasted Turkey, or
Honey/Smoked Ham
2.5 Lbs.
Chinet
Lunch Plates
8-7/8”
72 Count
$
2
99
$
6
99
99
¢
2/
$
5
99
¢
$
1
99
$
2
49
2/
$
5
$
2
79
$
1
39
$
10
49
$
5
99
$
1
59
$
2
99
$
9
99
$
4
99
$
1
99
2/
$
5
$
1
19
$
1
49
$
9
99
$
3
99
Young Chicken
Leq Quarters
10 Lb. Bag Avg.
Kellogg's
Cereal
Variety Pack
30 Count
Byrne Dairy
Half & Half
Half Gallon
Brisk
Teas
Fighter Pack
12 Pack - 16.9 Oz.
USDA Choice Black
Canyon Angus
Top Round
London Broil
Aunt Jemima
Pancake and
Wafe Mix
5 Lbs.
Good Humor
Ice Cream
Variety Pack
36 Count
Creative Expressions
Lunch
Napkins
All Solid Colors
50 Count
Digiorno
Pizza
All Varieties
28.3-32.7 Oz.
B & G
Pickles
Bread & Butter
64 Oz.
Asia Gold
RawShrimp
26/30 Count Easy Peel
2 Lb. Bag
Austin
Liquid Bleach
1 Gallon
Barber
Stufed Chicken
Cordon Bleu or
Broccoli & Cheese
30 oz.
Morningstar
Whipped
Topping
15 Oz.
Byrne Dairy
Orange Juice
1 Gallon
Cluster or Hot House
Tomatoes
79
¢
$
3
19
$
4
49
$
1
59
$
4
99
$
9
99
$
1
99 $
8
99
$
3
99
$
3
69
$
11
99
$
3
49
$
1
49
$
8
99
$
3
49
99
¢
/lb.
/lb.
/lb.
/lb. /lb.
/lb. /lb. /lb.
Prices Effective Sun. 07/08/12 - Sat. 07/14/12 While supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. MaineSource accepts EBT and Major Credit Cards.
We are not responsible for typographical errors in ad copy.
Visit www.MaineSource.net for even more deals. And don't forget to check
out our Facebook and Twitter pages for specials, giveaways and recipes.
Fire up the grill, grab
your tongs and bbq
sauce, it's grillin' season.
MaineSource has the
summers hottest deals
for all your backyard
cookout needs!
Red Ripe Seedless
Watermelons
Home Grown
Squash
Yellow or Green
Large Eastern
Peaches
Home Grown
Cucumbers
$
2
99
89
¢
99
¢
3/99
¢
/ea. /lb. /lb.
Pepsi
All 2 Liter Varieties
Silverbrook
Chicken
Breast
4 Oz. Portions - 10 Lbs.
99
¢ $
30
99
900 Rutter Ave. } ¦orty ¦ort, PA · /33 Davis Street } Scranton, PA
K
PAGE 8A SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O B I T U A R I E S
The Times Leader publish-
es free obituaries, which
have a 27-line limit, and paid
obituaries, which can run
with a photograph. A funeral
home representative can call
the obituary desk at (570)
829-7224, send a fax to (570)
829-5537 or e-mail to tlo-
bits@timesleader.com. If you
fax or e-mail, please call to
confirm. Obituaries must be
submitted by 9 p.m. Sunday
through Thursday and 7:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Obituaries must be sent by a
funeral home or crematory,
or must name who is hand-
ling arrangements, with
address and phone number.
We discourage handwritten
notices; they incur a $15
typing fee.
O B I T U A R Y P O L I C Y
D U PO N T M O N U M E N T S H O P,IN C .
S erving N ortheast PA F orO ver60 Y ears
B ronze • G ranite • M ausoleum s
V isit usat: w w w.d up ontm onum entshop .com
“R em em brance isan everlasting gift...
T he p reciousm em ory ofyourlove.”
H ours: O p en d aily 9A M -5PM • S aturd ay 9A M To N oon
(A nytim e B y Ap p ointm ent)
• M arkers• M ausoleum s
• Personalized m em orials
m onum entsand
Pre-p lanning services
• C ustom d esign service
available at no charge
• O ne ofthe largest
& m ost unique
m onum ent d isp lays
• A llengraving d one on p rem ises
• C em etery lettering
• C leaning & R estoration
• Ind oorshow room
• W elllighted outd oord isp lay
• E asy accessfrom R te. 81
north & south
Funeral Lunches
starting at $
7.95
Memorial Highway, Dallas • 675-0804
ST.M ARY’S
M ONUM ENTCO.
M onum ents-M arkers-Lettering
975 S.M AIN ST.HAN O VER TW P.
829-8138
N EXT TO SO LO M O N ’S CREEK
G enetti’s
AfterFu nera lLu ncheons
Sta rting a t$7.95 p erp erson
H otelBerea vem entRa tes
825.6477
The Harris
Family
would like to thank
everyone who has expressed
their condolences, shown
love and support, and
generous offerings at this
time of need. It is truly
appreciated and very helpful
through these diffcult times.
May God Bless.
RIP
Robert “Mowie” Harris
Mr. & Mrs.
Robert and Gayiel Harris,
Shanda, Megan, Gian
and Kayla King
DAVIS – Stacy, funeral services 10
a.m. Monday in Mamary-Durkin
Funeral Service, 59 Parrish St.,
Wilkes-Barre. Services at 10:30
a.m. in St. Mary Antiochian Or-
thodox Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Friends may call 4 to 7 p.m. today.
HIGGINS – Donald, funeral services
10 a.m. Monday in St. Peter’s
Lutheran Church, 1000 S. Main
St., Hanover Township. Friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. today in
Kniffen O’Malley Funeral Home
Inc., 465 S. Main St., Wilkes-Barre.
KWIATKOWSKI – Kenneth, funeral
services 9:30 a.m. Monday in the
Kopicki Funeral Home, 263 Zer-
bey Ave., Kingston. Mass of
Christian Burial at 10 a.m. in St.
John the Baptist Church, Larks-
ville. Friends may call 5 to 8 p.m.
today.
LADNER – James, funeral services
2 p.m. Monday in the Sheldon
Funeral Home, Main Street.,
Meshoppen. Graveside military
services to be conducted in
Overfield Cemetery in Meshop-
pen, by the members of the
Gardner-Warner Post #154,
American Legion. Friends may
call 4 to 7 p.m. today.
MACARCHICK – Joseph, funeral
Mass 10 a.m. Monday in St. Nicho-
las Byzantine Catholic Church,
Old Forge. Friends may call 4 to 7
p.m. today in the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. Parastas ser-
vices at 6:15 p.m. today.
PRICE – Shirley, funeral services 11
a.m. Monday in the Nat & Gawlas
Funeral Home, 89 Park Ave.,
Wilkes-Barre. Friends may call 4
to 7 pm today in the funeral
home.
SHAFER – John, funeral services 10
a.m. Tuesday in the S.J. Gront-
kowski Funeral Home, 530 W.
Main St., Plymouth. Mass of
Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. in
St. John the Baptist Church,
Larksville. Friends may call 5 to 8
p.m. Monday.
WENCH – Anthony, funeral 9 a.m.
Tuesday in the Howell-Lussi
Funeral Home, 509 Wyoming
Ave., West Pittston. Mass of
Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St.
Anthony’s Church, Exeter. Friends
may call 6 to 8 p.m. Monday.
ZNEIMER – Selma, graveside funer-
al service noon today in Temple
Israel Cemetery, Swoyersville.
FUNERALS
ROSEMARY “ROSE” HUBIAK,
age 77, of North Ridgeville, Ohio,
passed away Friday, July 6, 2012 at
her home.
To send condolences or sign the
e-guestbook, please go to www.ho-
merfuneralhome.com.
T
homas P. Supey Sr., 89, of
Wyoming, passed away Friday,
July 6, 2012 at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center, Plains Town-
ship.
Born in Wyoming on November
18, 1922, he was a sonof the late Em-
ery and Elizabeth Andrejko Supey.
He was a1940 graduate of Wyoming
High School.
He was a veteran of World War II,
serving in the United States Navy.
He was a member of St. Joseph’s
Church of St. Monica’s Parish,
Wyoming. Prior to his retirement,
he was the owner and operator of
the Mountain Coal Company in
West Wyoming. Thomas played an
instrumental role in refurbishing
Slope190 into the Lackawanna Coal
Mine Tour in McDade Park. He was
employed as a mine foreman in nu-
merous mines throughout the area,
including Number One Contract-
ing, Pagnotti Enterprises and the
Lackawanna County Mine Tour.
In earlier years, Thomas played
an important part in the recon-
struction of the Wyoming/West
Wyoming Little League. He also
served on the board of directors and
was a team manager.
The family would like to thank
the staff at Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center for the excellent
care and support provided to Tho-
mas and his family.
Preceding him in death were his
wife, Margaret, with whom he lov-
ingly cared for, for many years prior
to her death; brother, Andrew; sis-
ters, Pauline and Julia.
Surviving are his sons, Thomas
Jr. andhis wife, Mary, West Pittston,
and Andrew and his wife, Susan,
Exeter; grandsons, Tommy and his
wife, Dori, Samand his wife, Krissy,
Danny, Michael and Adam; great-
grandchildren, Sammy, Tommy IV,
Samara, Luke and Jake; special ne-
phew and niece, Roger Beatty, Exe-
ter, and June Supey, Trucksville;
several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Monday at 10:30 a.m. from
Bednarski Funeral Home, 168
Wyoming Ave., Wyoming, with a
Mass of ChristianBurial at11a.m. in
St. Joseph’s Church of St. Monica’s
Parish, Wyoming. Interment will be
held in St. John the Baptist Ceme-
tery, Schooley Street, Exeter.
Friends may call today from 5 to 8
p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of
flowers, memorial contributions
may be made to the Care and Con-
cern Free Health Clinic, 35 William
St., Pittston, PA18640.
Thomas Supey Sr.
July 6, 2012
E
mma Ann Herman, 99, Larks-
ville, passedawayTuesday, June
26, 2012 at Manor Care Nursing
Center, Kingston.
Emma was born in Scranton, a
daughter of the late Fred and Bruna
Reichert Herman. She was a gradu-
ate of Scranton High School.
Emma was a secretary with
PP&L, Scranton for 38 years. She
was also affiliated with the Boy
Scouts of America for many years.
Emma loved to paint and sew for
her family andfriends. She was a de-
vout Christian and a member of the
Republican National Committee
and the George Walker Bush Li-
brary. Emma had also been a mem-
ber of various women’s clubs in the
Wyoming Valley andTurlock, Calif.,
where she resided for many years. .
Surviving are nieces and neph-
ews, including Janet Balcerzak,
Scranton, and Fred Herman, Tunk-
hannock, plus many great-nieces
and great-nephews.
Emma’s family dedicated this po-
em at her memorial service:
A precious one from us is gone
A familiar and beloved voice is
stilled
A place is vacant in our home
That can never be filled,
God saw the road was getting
rough,
The hilltop hard to climb,
He gently closed your weary
eyes,
And whispered “Peace Be Thine”
Funeral services were held this
week. Interment was in Forest Hills
Cemetery, Dunmore. Arrange-
ments were under the direction of
The Richard H. Disque Funeral
Home Inc., 2940 Memorial High-
way, Dallas.
Emma Herman
June 26, 2012
T
heresa J. Ormanowski, 83, for-
merly of Kirmar Avenue, Nanti-
coke, passed away peacefully Fri-
day, July 6, 2012 at Birchwood Nurs-
ing Home, Nanticoke.
Shewas borninWilkes-Barre, Oc-
tober 28, 1928 to the late Stephen
and Margaret McKeown Walsh and
was a graduate of Harter High
School, West Nanticoke, and a pre-
sent member of St. Faustina Parish.
Theresa was employed as an of-
fice worker at McGregor Clothing,
Nanticoke and also for RCA.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Adrian, in 1994; sisters,
Mary Rita Walsh, Margaret Walsh,
Anna Pall, Loretta Stachouse and
Kathleen Mincher; brothers, Fran-
cis Walsh and Joseph Walsh.
She is presently survived by
Kathy and Richard Andrejko, Nanti-
coke; grandsons, Richard and fian-
cée Audrey Maniere, Stroudsburg;
Kyle and Jacquelyn Andrejko, Ha-
nover Township; great-grandchil-
dren, Madison and Tyler; sister,
Agnes (Murph) Sheehan, Mechan-
icsville, N.Y.; several nieces and ne-
phews; andagreat friend, Josephine
Smith.
The Rev. James Nash will con-
duct services Tuesday at 10 a.m.
from the Grontkowski Funeral
Home P.C., 51-53 W. Green St., Nan-
ticoke, with interment in St. Mary’s
Cemetery, Hanover Township. Fam-
ily and friends may call Monday
from 5 to 8 p.m.
The family requests that inlieuof
flowers, donations are tobe made to
the SPCA in her name.
Theresa Ormanowski
July 6, 2012
J
effrey Neary, of the Scrantonarea
and Tunkhannock, died Friday
evening, July 6, 2012 in the Hospice
Unit of the Community Medical
Center in Scranton.
Jeffrey was born in Scranton on
April 27, 1962, a son of the late
James and Jean Ruddy Neary.
Jeffrey was a resident at St. Jo-
seph’s Center and was the first resi-
dent to graduate from the Lacka-
wanna County Vocational Technical
School in 1983. He later resided in
Keystone Independent Living
Homes.
Jeff loved being part of the Spe-
cial Olympics, especially running in
the track events. He also enjoyed
playing basketball.
His many trips to Tunkhannock
allowed him to create an extended
family of loving and caring friends.
Some of his happiest moments
were spent at his brother’s hunting
cabin. His smile will be missed by
all.
Survivingare a brother, Jim; wife,
Jody Neary, Tunkhannock; sisters,
Janine and husband, Terrell Sewell,
Stafford, Va.; Janice and husband,
Mark Ross, and Juliann and hus-
band, Steve Jones, bothof Scranton.
Also surviving are several nieces,
nephews, aunts, uncles andcousins.
His family would like to express
their deepest thanks toall of his care
givers over the years.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesdayat11a.m. fromSheldon-Ku-
kuchka Funeral Home Inc., 73 W.
Tioga St., Tunkhannock, with Pas-
tor Lori Robinson, personal friend
of the family, officiating. Interment
will be in Cathedral Cemetery,
Scranton, with prayers by Father Ri-
chard J. Polmounter. Friends may
call at the funeral home on Monday
from 6 to 8 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to St. Jo-
seph’s Center, 210 Adams Ave,
Scranton, PA18509.
Online condolences may be sent
to www.sheldonkukuchkafuneral-
home.com.
Jeffrey Neary
July 6, 2012
B
ernard Palencar, 86, of Swoyers-
ville, passedawaySaturday, July
7, 2012 at Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Born January 21, 1926, he was a
son of the late Andrew and Eva Pa-
lencar, Kingston.
Bernard graduated from King-
ston High School in 1945. He was
employed as a jeweler at Frank
Clark’s of Wilkes-Barre.
His hobbies included fishing, col-
lecting antique cars and building
model airplanes.
He was preceded in death by his
wife, Marie Palencar and brother,
Andrew Palencar.
Surviving are his daughter, Mari-
lyn Kester, Swoyersville; grand-
daughter, Marcella Kester, Swoyers-
ville; sisters, Maryann Usaitis and
husband, Robert, Kingston, Joan
Siecko and husband, Joseph, Ber-
wick; brothers, George Palencar
and wife, Mary Paula, Stroudsburg,
LennyPalencar, Kingston; as well as
many nieces, nephews and cousins.
A Mass of Christian Burial will
be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday in St. El-
izabeth Ann Seton Parish, Hughes
Street, Swoyersville. Interment will
be held on Monday at Lehman-Gre-
gory Funeral Home, Church Street,
Swoyersville. Friends may call from
7 to 9 p.m. Monday at the funeral
home.
Bernard Palencar
July 7, 2012
ALBERT (CHURCH) NALAS-
CHI SR., 77, of Old Forge, died Fri-
day morning, July 6, 2012. He was
preceded in death by his wife, Ma-
rion Hughes Nalaschi; brothers,
Francis, Gino and Dino Nalaschi.
He is survivedbyhis sons, Albert J.
Nalaschi Jr. and his companion,
Brenda; James J. Nalaschi and his
wife, Dori; LeoNalaschi Sr. andhis
wife, Patty; Anthony J. Nalaschi
and his companion, Denise; Eu-
gene Nalaschi, Dino Nalaschi and
his wife, Lori; daughters, Louise
Lokuta and husband, Edmund,
and Cheryl Wilson and her hus-
band, Ronald; 15 grandchildren
and three great-grandchildren.
Private funeral services will
be held at Thomas P. Kearney Fu-
neral Home Inc., 517 N. Main St.,
Old Forge, with a private Mass
Tuesday in St. Mary of the As-
sumption R.C. Church, Prince of
Peace Parish, corner of Lawrence
and West Grace streets, Old Forge,
by the Rev. Joseph F. Cipriano.
J
oseph M. Fowler, 49, of King-
ston, diedThursdayJuly5, 2012
following an accident in the Sus-
quehanna River.
He was born in Kingston, a son
of the late Joseph and Marion Ha-
raschak Fowler. He graduated
from West Side Tech in 1981 and
had worked as a painter.
He was preceded in death by his
brothers, Francis and John.
He is survived by his daughters,
Clarissa Davis, Nanticoke, and
Amber Fowler, Tunkhannock;
brothers and sisters, Michael,
Kingston Township; Stephen,
Wilkes-Barre; Sally, Luzerne; Su-
san, Luzerne; Karen, Swoyersville
and Robert, Exeter; his two grand-
daughters, Alivia and Avery; and
several nieces and nephews.
The family would like to offer a
special thank you to all the rescue
workers, divers and all those who
helped in the effort to find Joe.
A memorial service will be
held Saturday at the Wyoming Val-
ley Detachment Marine Corps
League Home, 158 E. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, at 2 p.m.
Arrangements are provided by
the Kopicki Funeral Home, 263
Zerbey Ave., Kingston.
Joseph Fowler
July 5, 2012
J
ohn “Jack” M. Lobban, 98, for-
merly of Cook Street, Holden,
Mass., died peacefully on Thurs-
day, July 5, 2012 at his home in
Wesley Village in Pittston.
Born and raised in Cambridge,
Mass., Jack was a son of John P.
and Mary (Mitchell) Lobban and
lived in Holden for over 30 years.
Jack graduated from Bentley
College in Waltham, Mass., and
was an accountant and auditor at
State Mutual Life Assurance Co.
andAllmerica Financial inWorces-
ter, Mass., for 50 years.
He was preceded in death by a
brother, George Lobban.
He is survived and will be lov-
ingly missed by his wife of 64
years, Mae B. (Young) Lobban; her
daughter, Joan P. Cohen and her
husband, Joel, Swoyersville; a sis-
ter, Mary Hatfield, Chelmsford,
Mass.; a nephew, David Hatfield,
Boxford, Mass.; and two nieces,
Jean and Carol Macinnis, both of
Billerica, Mass.
Relatives andfriends are invit-
edtoattendcallinghours from5 to
7 p.m. on Friday at the Miles Fu-
neral Home, 1158 Main St., Hold-
en, Mass. A funeral service cele-
brating Jack’s life will be held at 11
a.m. on Saturday, July14, at the fu-
neral home. Burial will follow at
Grove Cemetery in Holden, Mass.
Memorial donations may be
made to Chaffin Congregational
Church, 155 Shrewsbury St., Hold-
en, MA 01520. To share a memory
or offer a condolence, please visit
www.milesfuneralhome.com.
John Lobban
July 5, 2012
D
onna L. Simoson Austin De-
vens, 65, of Plymouth, passed
away Friday, July 6, 2012 at home,
one year and one day after the
death of her son, Jack.
Donna was bornJune15, 1947in
Larksville, and was a daughter of
the late Sarah and Ralph Simoson.
She was employedfor the last 15
years at Comprehensive Microfilm
Co. in Edwardsville.
She is preceded in death by her
sister, Elenore Bombay; brothers,
Ralph and Lee; and son, Jack.
She has two surviving sisters,
Marie Martin, Edwardsville, and
June Leedock, Florida.
She was the loving mother to
her daughters Lisa Devens, Ply-
mouth, and Sherri Yeninas, and
husband, George, of Forty Fort.
She was the beloved grandmother
to Brandy and Michael Yeninas,
Jessica Glaser, Cheyenne, Paige
and Ty Billings, Holly Rivera, Deb-
orah and Kristy Austin .She had
seven great-grandchildren.
A private service will be held
for her immediate family at Kielty-
Moran Funeral Home Inc., 87
Washington Ave., Plymouth at
their convenience. There are no
calling hours.
Donna Devens
July 6, 2012
D
eborah A. Alexy, 54, of Hanover
Township, passed away Satur-
day, July 7, 2012 at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born on October 27, 1957, in Pitt-
ston, she was a daughter of the late
Donald and Dolores Grala Klatch.
Deborah was currently employed
as a Certified Nursing Assistant for
the Hampton House Nursing Home
in Wilkes-Barre. Previously, she was
employed for many years as a secre-
tary for Voitek Appliances in King-
ston.
Surviving are her son, Richard A.
Alexy, Wilkes-Barre; grandson, Jay-
den Alexy; brother, Donald Klatch,
Pittston; sister, Donna Kresge, Flor-
ida; fiancé, JohnFrankevich, Hanov-
er Township; niece and nephews.
Funeral services will be held on
Tuesday at 9 a.m. from Bednarski
Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in St. John the
Evangelist Church, Pittston. Inter-
ment will be held in Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton. Friends may
call Monday from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home.
“Debbie,
Angel on Earth, loving caring de-
votion, always cared for others first;
put herself last and now an angel in
Heaven.”
Deborah Alexy
July 7, 2012
JOAN W. FINSEL, 80, formerly
of Sherman Street, Wilkes-Barre,
died Friday, July 6, 2012 at Golden
Living Center-Summit, Wilkes-
Barre.
Funeral arrangements are
pending fromthe Yeosock Funeral
Home, 40S. MainSt., Plains Town-
ship.
HARGILL, Texas — A father
and two sons shot at a federal im-
migration agent parked outside
their home along the Texas bor-
der this week because they were
afraid someone was going to
break in, a relative told a newspa-
per.
U.S. Immigrations and Cus-
toms Enforcement agent Kelton
Harrison was shot in the back
early Tuesday, when prosecutors
say Pedro Alvarez and his sons,
ages 18 and16, fired at Harrison’s
vehicle and chased the agent as
he sped away. Prosecutors say
Harrison had been watching for
ananticipateddrugdeal. His con-
dition is improving.
Amparo Ramirez, the family
matriarch, told the San Antonio
Express-News (http://bit.ly/
PnQNxI) in a story published
Saturday that Harrison was
parked on the next-door property
and that no attempt was made to
notify home owners of surveil-
lance activity.
“They thought it was some-
body breaking in,” Ramirez said.
“The ICE didn’t identify itself.
The kids explained what they
did.”
Alvarez, 41, and his 18-year-old
son, Arnoldo Alvarez, are
charged with assault of a federal
officer and knowingly using and
carrying a firearm during a vio-
lent crime. His younger son has
been charged with attempted
capital murder in a state district
court.
A criminal complaint alleges
that the 16-year-old, whose iden-
tity is being withheld because of
his age, firedabout six shots from
a .22 caliber rifle and that Arnol-
do Alvarado fired “numerous”
shots from a 9mm handgun as
they rode in a vehicle being dri-
ven by their father. The vehicle
had its headlights off in the pre-
dawndarkness as it drove by Har-
rison, according to the com-
plaint.
Relative:
Agent shot
out of fear
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 9A
➛ N E W S
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
DESOTO `36 AIRSTREAM
2 door, stored 60
years. In very good
condition. All
metal, chrome &
headlights intact.
Highly restorable.
$5,000, OBO 570-
823-2307
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
GMC `92 VANDURA
Box Truck. Great
454ci engine,
250K. 2 year old
tranny, good rub-
ber. Hydraulic lift,
1600 lb. capacity.
Chassis needs
welding. $2,500.
570-650-6365
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
WATER TECHNICIAN
NEEDED
MPW Industrial
Water located in the
Hanover Industrial
Park is looking for
hard working career
minded individuals
to join our team.
We are looking for
potential employees
who meet the fol-
lowing qualifica-
tions:
· Mechanically
inclined
· Ability to work
weekends and
Overtime
· Lift 50 plus lbs.
· 1 year experience
in a manufacturing
or industrial envi-
ronment
· Ability to work 1st
or 2nd shift
Interested
applicants can
apply in person at
420 Stewart Road,
Hanover Township
or apply online at
mpwservices.com
or call
570-829-4207
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DELIVERY DRIVER-
WAREHOUSE
2 OPENINGS
Established Scran-
ton based company
is seeking a CDL
Class A and a Non-
CDL driver large
body truck driver, to
add to the team.
Both positions
require excellent
driving experience,
at least 5 years cur-
rent and a clean
MVR. Lifting up to
75 lbs and travel up
to 100 miles a day.
All same day deliv-
ery. Hourly rates are
determined by
experience level.
Monthly incentive
plans and benefits
after 90 days.
Please provide a
complete resume
with current experi-
ence and stable
work history to: c/o
The Times Leader
Box 4050
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18704
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
Dedicated account
• Up to 37 cents per
mile
• $170 unload
• Health and 401K
• Also hiring Owner
Operators
Requires CDL A and
3 months OTR
experience. Don’t
miss out. Call today!
866-475-3621
HOME
WEEKLY,
ACT FAST!
548 Medical/Health
Pediatricians.
Hazleton Profes-
sional Services dba
Alliance Medical
Group, Hazleton,
PA. Provide medical
assessments, treat-
ments and patient
care consultations
in the field of pedi-
atrics. Required:
Medical degree
(M.D., D.O. or for-
eign equivalent) and
completion of 3-
year residency in
pediatrics. Must be
Board Certified or
Board Eligible in
Pediatrics, and have
PA Medical License.
Please refer to Job
Code P2012 & send
resumes to Hazle-
ton Professional
Services dba
Alliance Medical
Group, 700 East
Broad Street, Hazle-
ton, PA 18201. Attn:
Director of Risk
Management &
Regulatory Compli-
ance
SURGICAL ASSISTANT
Oral surgery office.
Full time position
available. Salary
commensurate
with experience.
Health benefits and
retirement plan.
Send/Fax/Email
resume to Debbie
at: 550 Third Avenue
Suite 1
Kingston, PA 18704
Fax: 570-288-4201
callahanbergey@
gmail.com
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
THERAPEUTIC
STAFF SUPPORT
Small Community
Agency seeks ener-
getic, caring individu-
als to provide 1-on-1
behavioral interven-
tion to children in
school, home & com-
munity. Require-
ments include Bach-
elor’s degree in
Human Services &
experience working
with children. Back-
ground in Autism a
plus. Competitive
salary & full-time
benefits.
Send resume to:
Evergreen BIC
90 Main Street
Luzerne, PA 18709
Call: 570-714-3860
Fax: 570-714-7594
Email: judithm@
evergreenbic.com
551 Other
VIVE Health & Fitness
Is currently except-
ing resumes for the
following positions:
Personal Training,
Front Desk, Sales,
Cyclists, Group
Exercise Instructors
and Massage
Therapy. To be con-
sidered please
send cover letter
and resume to
pmeshyock@
gmail.com.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES & MARKETING
LEADERS NEEDED
Opening in Northern
PA. Will Train. Well-
ness Product Sales.
Part-time/Full-time.
Interviewing
Wednesday - Satur-
day from 11am-9pm
in Wilkes-Barre.
Call 954-557-7624
for an appointment.
573 Warehouse
WAREHOUSE
Wednesday 7/11
9 am until 11 am
We are a National
Convenience Store
Distribution Compa-
ny. Seeking 2nd &
3rd SHIFT WARE-
HOUSE STOCK-
ERS AND LOAD-
ERS. Previous
Forklift experience
a plus. All positions
are Full time 40
hours per week,
with a generous
benefit package,
and various bonus
programs! Work for
the Best! Apply @
100 West End Rd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18706
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE
SHOW UP AND BE
INTERVIEWED!!
All applicants sub-
ject to pre-employ-
ment drug and
background check.
E O E
610 Business
Opportunities
BUY A JOB,
CAREER &
BUSINESS
Retiring. Buy my
sales route, with
established, repeat
customers. Make
$35K now, $70K
when economy
improves. Includes
all equipment &
training needed.
$25,000
570-650-6365.
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
Found Basset
Hound mix.
Brown-ish red,
short legs, about 2
years old, tan col-
lar. Found in Par-
sons about 2
weeks ago.
Free to a good
home.
570-823-9438
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
FAMILY
COMPOUND
Korn Krest
Includes 2 newly
renovated houses.
Great location. Park
across street.
$140,000.
Appointment only.
570-650-6365
912 Lots & Acreage
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
210’ frontage x 158’
deep. All under-
ground utilities, nat-
ural gas. GREAT
VIEW!! $37,500
2 LOTS AVAILABLE
100’ frontage x 228’
deep. Modular
home with base-
ment accepted.
Each lot $17,000.
Call 570-714-1296
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST PITTSTON
1 bedroom, living
room, dining
room, storage
space, wall to wall
carpeting, wash-
er/ dryer, refriger-
ator & stove with
modern kitchen &
bath - 2nd floor.
$595 / month.
Heat, sewer &
water included. 1
month security
with 1 year lease,
no pets. Refer-
ences required
AVAILABLE NOW
CALL LOU JR.
570-654-4040 or
570-446-7682
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE NORTH
723 N. Main St.
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room, w/w carpet, ,
water included.
Tenant pays electric
No pets. $450 plus
security. Call
570-814-1356
ries of some of the masters she
met during her set. Block de-
scribed Son House as a preacher
who sometimes had trouble ex-
pressing to others his love of the
blues at a time when it was still
considered the devil’s music.
“He taught me that blues and
Gospel are really married,” she
said.
Thoseartists represent agener-
ationthat is rapidly disappearing;
2011 saw the deaths of legends
Pinetop Perkins and Honeyboy
Edwards (who headlined the
2010 Briggs FarmBlues Festival.)
Block said keeping their work
alive andrelevant has become her
life’s work.
“To meet some of the original
players and some of the innova-
tors is just a spectacular thing,”
Block said. “And when they are
part of ages and they’re gone, it
leaves us with a terrible sense of
loss, but it leaves us with a tre-
mendous desire to keep the tradi-
tion going.”
Block has also recorded and
flaxenhair, Blockhardlylooks the
part of the traditional blues musi-
cian, but she said her style grew
out of her upbringing in Green-
wich Village, “a setting where
there was a lot of very raw acous-
tic roots music all around.”
Her father, who ran a sandal
shop in the New York City neigh-
borhood during the 1960s, was
friends with Pete Seeger, and
John Sebastian of The Lovin’
Spoonful lived nearby.
At 15, she left home to seek out
and study under some of the liv-
ing masters of the blues.
Now 62 and a master in her
ownright, Block has devotedher-
self torecordingtributealbumsto
the artists she studied under. She
has recorded tributes to Son
House and Mississippi Fred
McDowell, and her latest, a trib-
ute to the Rev. Gary Davis, debut-
ed at number 3 on the Living
Blues radio charts in June.
“It really represents my life’s
work, and the source of my inspi-
ration,” Block said. “It’s a sort of a
thank you to the unbelievable
players that I got to meet in per-
son.”
Block shared personal memo-
shared the stage with more con-
temporary artists like Bonnie
Raitt, Stevie Wonder, Bruce
HornesbyandTaj Mahal. Shesaid
her approach to song-writing is
difficult to describe – “It’s hard to
tell somebody else how to love
something that you personally
love, she said – but that emotion
is its key.
“Soulfulness is part of what
makes something great, more
than talent,” she said. “Part of
what makes something great is
the depth of feeling that’s embod-
ied in it.”
And it’s soul that has keeps her
going. At an age when some
might think of retiring, Block
tours regionally almost constant-
ly, makes occasional trips cross-
country and tours in Europe once
a year.
“I always thinkthat I’mgoingto
retire and I always keep going,”
she said. “I always say I’m going
to settle down and retire, and it
only just morphs into doing more
tours and doing more record-
ings.”
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Sheryl Popkin checks out some dresses during the Briggs Farm Blues Festival Saturday.
BLOCK
Continued from Page 3A
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Richard Briggs, founder of the Briggs Farm Blues Festival, speaks
to his crew on the phone backstage at the event Saturday.
NESCOPECK – Richard
Briggs was born into a family of
farmers and grew up to become
the ninth generation proprietor
of a 350-acre estate founded in
the 1760s. It was a desire to
keep that farm in his family,
Briggs said, that inspired him to
found the Briggs Farm Blues
Festival 15 years ago.
“My son and grandson both
still live here,” Briggs said back-
stage at the blues festival Sat-
urday. “It’s just a way to keep
the farm going, and keep it in
the family.”
Besides providing inspiration
for his descendants to carry on
the family business, the annual
festival provides financial sup-
port that allows Briggs to con-
tinue operating his farm, where
he raises corn, soybeans, hay
and eggs used in the production
of flu vaccines, the other 51
weeks of the year.
But the festival was never just
about money, Briggs said.
“The act of putting on the
festival is an act of art for me,”
Briggs said. “It’s putting on a
show.”
Built on a love of blues-based
rock ’n’ roll fixed in his teenage
years, Briggs said his interest in
the roots of the blues grew deep-
er as he grew older. His interest
in exploring the history of the
art form has led him to recruit
older musicians like Louisiana
Red, Big Jack Johnson and Da-
vid ‘Honeyboy’ Edwards, who at
94 years old performed one of
his last shows at the 2010 Briggs
Farm Festival.
“One of the reasons why I get
the old-timers here is because of
the connection to the history of
the blues,” he said. “Finding out
more about the old players,
going way back when they still
had plantations. They were
chopping cotton in the South
before mechanization. It was
still very close to slavery in
those days, and that’s where the
blues started.”
The festival has become a
larger and more involved affair
over the last 15 years. This
year’s festival attracted about
5,000 concert-goers, about 1,500
of whom camped overnight at
the farm, expanding from one to
two days, allowing camping and
adding a second, “Back Porch”
stage where the audience can
have greater interaction with
artists during their sets.
But Briggs said the concert
remains a family affair, orga-
nized by himself, a small staff
and his family members.
“Size is not the only thing
about it,” he said. “The down
home good vibe aspect of it is
really good.”
Laura McCourt of Philadel-
phia, attending her fifth festival
at the farm, agreed with Briggs’
depiction of the festival.
“The atmosphere is just so
laid back, and it brings together
different age groups and gener-
ations,” she said. “Just for the
love of the music.”
Keeping a farm alive
brought blues festival
By MATT HUGHES
Mhughes@timesleader.com
PHILADELPHIA — Highways
buckled across the country, the wa-
ters of Lake Michigan were unusual-
ly warm for this time of year and
even a minor train derailment out-
sideWashingtonwas blamedonheat
as the hot weather gripping much of
thecountryonlyworsenedSaturday.
Temperatures of more than 100
degrees were forecast in Philadel-
phia and excessive heat warnings
were issued for several states in the
Midwest as the days of smothering
heat piled on, accompanied by se-
vere storms that have knocked out
power in spots fromMichigan to the
East Coast. Most notable was last
weekend’s sudden and severe storm
that drenched the mid-Atlantic re-
gion, where thousands remained
without electricity a week later. At
least 24 deaths have been blamed on
the heat and several others on the
weather or a combinationof the two.
Hundreds of thousands remained
without power Saturday, mostly in
West Virginia, Ohio and Michigan.
At New York City’s Penn Station,
theair conditioningwas fallingshort
of full capacity. Amtrakofficials have
said for weeks that they’ve been try-
ing to adjust it. The doors were left
wide open at a half dozen locations
around the two-block-wide under-
ground station.
“It’s so hot I feel like I want to
faint,” said Betty De la Rosa, 19, of
the Bronx, who was working at a sta-
tion doughnut shop.
Record temperatures were set in
several places, including Indianapo-
lis, Washington and Milwaukee. In
central Arkansas, Russellville reac-
hed 106 degrees Friday, breaking a
record set in 1964.
The heat was also blamed for at
least 24 deaths.
Nine people in Maryland have
died of heat-related causes in recent
days, the state said. Authorities in
Chicago said heat was a factor in six
deaths there, mostly among older
people. Three deaths in Wisconsin,
two in Tennessee and one in Penn-
sylvania were also reported to be
heat-related.
In Ohio, a man in his 70s and two
women — one in her late 60s, the
other in her 80s — were found dead
this week, said Dr. Jeff Lee, a deputy
county coroner in the central part of
the state. He said all three were suf-
fering from heart disease but died
from stress caused by high temper-
atures intheir houses. Temperatures
inside were stifling, recorded in the
90s in two cases, with windows shut
and no ventilation. The houses
lacked electricity because of recent
power outages.
“If they had gotten cooling, we
would have expected them to sur-
vive,” he said.
Relief was on the way in the form
of a cold front as the weekend ends,
but forecasters expected it to bring
more severe weather, too.
Seeking relief from
the unbearable heat
Temperatures of more than 100
degrees bake parts of the East
Coast and Midwest.
By RON TODT
Associated Press
The high temperature of 92 degrees
Saturday morning failed to break the
record of 98 set in 1988, according to
the National Weather Service in
Binghamton, N.Y.
The high temperature was recorded
at 11:46 a.m. at the Wilkes-Barre/
Scranton International Airport.
The low for the day was 68 and that
occurred at 5:06 a.m.
The normal values for the day are 82
and 61, according to the NWS.
Thunderstorms that moved through
the region helped lower the temper-
ature, but they also caused power
outages in the southern part of Lu-
zerne County and in Mountain Top.
PPL Electric Utilities reported 17,542
customers were without power as of
6:13 p.m.
PPL reported the heaviest hit areas
were: West Hazleton with 5,359 cus-
tomers affected; Wright Township,
4,538; Butler Township, 4,124; and
Sugarloaf 3,232.
A R E A R E C O R D S TAY S
C M Y K
PAGE 10A SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
7
6
5
9
6
4
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 11A
➛ C L I C K
7
5
9
4
4
1
Thank You For A Job Well Done You Are The BEST!!
Somerville Construction
Murray J. Miller Architect
Petroski Plumbing
Zukosky Electrical
Power Engineering
Hopson Specialties
Designer Acoustics
King Glass and Paints
Mesko Glass
Voitek Appliances
Newberry Services
Fieseler Neon Signs
Cintas
Attorney Bernard Walter
General Contractor
Architect
Plumbing
Electrical
HVAC
Drywall Finishing
Ceilings
Flooring
Storefront
Sound System
Alarm
Sign
Fire Protection
Legal Advisor
Mr. Joseph Lipinski
Ms. Kim Rosentel
Mr. Norman Knoll
Mr. Carl, Stephen and Greg Zukosky
Mr. Ed Wilson
Mr. Robert Blaker
Mr. George Konnick
Mr. Cliff Hannigan
Mr. George Mesko
Mr. Ed Voitek
Mr. Mark Muller
Ms. Deborah Dourand
Mr. George Kapalka and Mr. Mike Estock
Attorney Bernard Walter
Forty Fort
Wilkes-Barre
Nanticoke
Swoyersville
Plains
Forty Fort
Forty Fort
Swoyersville
Moosic
Exeter
Wilkes-Barre
Wilkes-Barre
Pittston
Dallas
NAUGLES
BLUEBERRIES
477-5215
Loyalville Rd. (Off Route 118)
Hours: Mon., Tues., & Thurs.
8am to 12pm • 4pm to 8pm
Saturday 8am to 2pm
Bring Containers
BACK MOUNTAIN
LIBRARY AUCTION
BRESLAU FIRE COMPANY’S
FINAL BAZAAR
COMMUNITY LITTLE
LEAGUE GAME
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Kris, left, and her daughter Courtney McCarthy, Dallas
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Ann Lewis of Pittston, left, Carolyn Johnson, Dallas, and
Maddie Lewis, Pittston
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Jim Daubert of Pittston, left, and Mel Vrhel, Trucksville
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
John and Jennifer Kolessar, Bear Creek
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Tea Jola, left, Christie Kane and Erika Povilitus
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Anne Cawley of Bear Creek, left; Rosalie Cullagh, West Pitt-
ston; Tina Menn, West Pittston; Dorothy Stella, Plains Twp.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Savannah Winslow, left, with mom Maryann Tesar
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Paula Minichello, left, Toni Minichello, 8, and Amy Melberger
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Shawn, left, and Zoey Elliott with dad Shawn Sr.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Anthony and Lisa Nardell of West Pittston
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Ralph and Andrea Demchak
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Christina Kosco, 9, left, and Amy Kosco, both of West
Wyoming
C M Y K
PAGE 12A SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ N E W S
for years and offered a matter-of-
fact explanation.
“Somebody has to do it,” he
said.
Approximately 75 people are
needed to set up, pour the beer,
make the cheese steaks and
french fries, sell the tickets, clean
upandeverythingelseassociated
with the bazaar expected to raise
$25,000 in funds for the hose
company.
It almost didn’t happen with-
out Dan Wegrzynowicz.
“Nobody wanted to run it,” he
said Thursday afternoon in the
shade of a tent as the temper-
ature approached 90 degrees and
the final details were being at-
tendedtoa fewhours before the 6
p.m. start.
Wegrzynowicz, a firefighter for
16 years, got involved at a meet-
ing earlier this year.
“I raised my hand and said, ‘We
at least have to do (it) one more
year,’ ” he said.
The decisionhas tobe made by
the end of February in order to
book the bands and start the
planning process, he said.
Wegrzynowicz, who served as
chairman for the bazaar, took off
two days of work. Co-chairman
Chris Weaver said he works
around his work schedule.
At 43, Wegrzynowicz is one of
the younger volunteers. Weaver
is 36.
Many of the others helping out
are in the 50s, 60s and 70s.
Weaver followed the lead of his
60-year-old dad, Gary.
“He was chairman of the ba-
zaar years ago,” said the younger
Weaver. “He taught me howto do
it.”
Weaver looked at his participa-
tion as a way to give back and la-
mented the lack of “kids” getting
involved in the fire company and
its bazaar. “I wish more people
would volunteer for their com-
munity,” he said.
His dad rattled off a list of men
who answered the calls for emer-
gencies andbazaars –HarryMan-
gan, Lenny Price, Uzdella, Gary
Makarczyk, Frank McKenzie,
Lou Sewell, Stanley Browski, To-
ny Truskoski and the late Gene
Lasecki, who was township fire
chief.
He said their efforts helped
double the size of the fire hall in
the 1980s, adding a ground-floor
kitchen, and social room and a
basement garage with a truck to
pull their water rescue crafts.
The township owns the front half
of the building with a single bay
for twotrucks, anoffice andsmall
storage areas.
“Our first bazaar was across
thestreet,” saidtheolder Weaver.
The former St. Casimir church
allowed use of its property. The
firefighters built the stands on
the church lot and cooked the
food and washed the pots at the
hose company, Weaver ex-
plained.
The grass lot’s since been used
for parking for the bazaar.
“I’m expecting a good turn-
out,” said Chris Weaver. People
come fromfar away to attend the
social event and reunite with old
friends.
For more than two decades
Tess Urban of Lee Park Avenue, a
member of the hose company’s
Women’s Auxiliary, has been
bringing a group to work at the
bazaar.
Her daughter Mary Ann Rom-
pola and son-in-law Randy and
their children Sarah, Emily, and
Ryan traveled from Indiana to
make potato pancakes. Another
daughter, Ellie Urban, grand-
daughter Angela Genoese and
her boyfriend traveled from out
of state and pitched in. So did Ur-
ban’s friend, Sabine Thomas.
“We’ve done this for 25 years,
since the kids were little,” said
Urban. “It’s a tradition.”
It ended with the hose compa-
ny’s final bazaar. But a new one
couldbeginwithplans toconsoli-
date the township’s fire compa-
nies and hold one large festival in
a few years.
BAZAAR
Continued from Page 1A
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Volunteer Al Uzdella of the Hanover Township Breslau Hose Co. No. 5 cuts potatoes for french fries
at the final Bazaar Thursday.
DON CAREY/THE TIMES LEADER
Left to right, Chairman Dan Wegrzynowicz and Co-Chairman
Chris Weaver of the Hanover Township Breslau Hose Co. No. 5
Bazaar headed up the final event last week.
HANOVER TWP. – Firefight-
ers will some day be answering
the call from a centrally located
headquarters along the Sans
Souci Parkway.
Plans are being made to build
the facility on the former Square
H lumber company site, but no
date has been set yet to break
ground.
Fire Chief Jeff Tudgay said
none of the six companies
throughout the township will be
eliminated.
“We’re putting companies in
one location,” he said Saturday.
The departments cover a
22-square-mile area with “every-
thing under the sun you can
imagine,” said the chief. The
township has residential neigh-
borhoods, shopping centers,
manufacturing facilities, the
Susquehanna River and Inter-
state 81 and other major road-
ways running through it.
The move has to do with
economics and staffing, ex-
plained Tudgay.
“We don’t have the manpow-
er,” he said.
Last year the Hanover Area
Fire District was created to serve
as the “parent company” and to
act as the applicant for grants,
he added.
Funding is being sought for
the construction. The local share
gaming funds are being pursued
as a source, he said.
The Breslau Hose Co. No. 5,
Franklin Hose Co. No. 4 and the
Goodwill Hose Co. No. 1 will
relocate to the planned Sans
Souci facility, said Tudgay. It will
be manned around the clock.
Franklin, which used to be on
Lee Park Avenue, is stationed
with Breslau on First Street.
Goodwill will move from Center
Street in the Hanover Green
section.
Newtown Hose Co. No. 2 will
remain on Raymond Drive.
Askam Hose Co. No. 6 on
McGovern’s Hill Road will stay
somewhere in that area, said
Tudgay.
Hanover set to consolidate 6 fire companies
By JERRY LYNOTT
jlynott@timesleader.com
Christopher Kersey said several
goals of the new government
have already “come to fruition.”
He noted:
• An ethics commission has
been set up to police the coun-
ty’s first ethics code, with sever-
al complaints already filed.
• Council is publicly inter-
viewing applicants for outside
authorities and boards. In the
past, names of appointees ap-
peared on commissioner agen-
das with no public discussion.
• The public also heard op-
tions and details about the 2012
amended budget the same time
as council. In the past, commis-
sioners had public budget hear-
ings but hammered out the ac-
tual budget in private.
“I think you’re going to have
much more honest budgeting
under the new government,”
Kersey said.
Lawton’s recommendation to
cancel county funding for the
Hotel Sterling demolition and
the Market Street Square train
stationrenovationalsoshowthe
manager is making nonpolitical
decisions based on what’s best
for the county – another home
rule objective, Kersey said.
Kingston Mayor Jim Hagger-
ty, a charter drafter, said he is
“extremely pleased” with the
new government after six
months.
The manager is making pro-
fessional decisions about day-
to-day operations “without re-
gard to politics.”
The newcouncil is a “tremen-
dous improvement” over the
former three-commissioner
board, he said. Council mem-
bers from both political major
political parties and an Inde-
pendent have proven to be “dili-
gent, transparent and largely
non-partisan,” he said.
More citizens are involved in
county government through ap-
pointments to outside boards,
and most of these volunteers
wouldn’t have a chance to serve
when appointments were con-
trolled by two majority commis-
sioners, he said.
Division heads
The appointment of division
heads must be priority because
these administrators will help
Lawton implement consolida-
tions that comply with the new
government structure and
make county government more
efficient, Kersey said.
Fairmount Township resi-
dent Michael Giamber, a fre-
quent county meeting attendee
and fervent home rule support-
er, said division head appoint-
ments can’t wait.
“The monumental task of
standing up a new government
requires a cabinet of experts to
advise the manager and help
steer the organization forward.
The manager cannot be expect-
ed to accomplish the transition
alone,” Giamber said.
Charter drafter Richard Hef-
fron agreed, saying in-house
promotions are an option. Hef-
fron particularly wants to see
the restructuring of the central
law office and the judicial ser-
vices division covering civil
and criminal court records and
other offices.
Streamlining of offices will
free up funding for other prior-
ities, he said.
Charter
drafter Veroni-
ca Ciaruffoli,
another regu-
lar at council
meetings, said
division heads
will help Law-
ton restruc-
ture offices
and sort
through inher-
ited financial
problems.
“We put a
new manager
intotransition
into a whole
new organiza-
tional struc-
ture, which is
different than
taking some-
thing that al-
ready exists
and refining
it,” she said.
Ciaruffoli
said the coun-
ty’s new lead-
ers are moving
the govern-
ment in the
right direc-
tion, though
she wants
them to re-
view the char-
ter again to
make sure ev-
ery home rule
mandate is un-
derstood and
followed.
Poised to move forward
Kingston resident Brian Shin-
er, who hasn’t missed a council
meeting, said progress under
the newgovernment was largely
“hampered by mundane neces-
sities mandated by the charter,”
including drafting of the admin-
istrative, ethics and personnel
codes.
“Now that all of those things
are finalized, they can move on
withthe taskof actuallyrunning
the county,” Shiner said.
Shiner said Lawton should be
ready to start implementing
changes.
“Mr. Lawton has had four
months now to get his feet wet
and get to knowand understand
our county a little better. Now
he needs to start making some
firm and aggressive decisions,”
Shiner said.
Shiner said he accepted coun-
cil’s decision to raise taxes 2 per-
cent in the amended budget to
provide wiggle room until the
new manager was on board.
“Nowit’s time to start making
all the necessary cuts in the line
items of the budget and to in-
crease our revenue,” Shiner
said, noting that he’s also refer-
ring to the judicial branch.
He believes most of the new
council members are trying to
make the best decisions with no
ulterior motives and supports a
council of “average citizens” as
opposed to “seasoned politic-
ians.”
The council composition will
change again in 2014 because
fiveof the11seats areupfor elec-
tion in 2013, he said.
Jackson Township resident
Ed Chesnovitch, a charter sup-
porter and faithful meeting at-
tendee, said he will continue to
push for charter compliance.
“I think we’re on the path, but
it’s a new government. It’s a
learning experience, and some-
times they sidestepthe charter.”
HOME
Continued from Page 1A
Bobeck
Ciaruffoli
Haggerty
Kersey
Lawton
as the phone was answeredtonot
having his messages returned,
Wert was beginning to lose pa-
tience.
“They can’t even tell me if they
received my return or not. It’s
like it’s Looney Tunes down
there,” said Wert, who works as a
car salesman at Ertley Kia in
Moosic.
Representatives frustrated
Municipal and school district
representatives sitting on the tax
committee are just as frustrated,
if not more. Several have said
they might not be able to meet
payroll or pay other bills if the
problem with Centax is not re-
solved soon. They might have to
take out tax anticipation loans to
do so.
Luzerne County Tax Collec-
tion Committee Solicitor Jeff
Malak said that as of July 2, un-
distributed earned income tax
collections totaling $5.4 million
have been sitting in a special in-
vestment trust account created
for Luzerne County because Cen-
tax hasn’t been able to reconcile
what amounts are owed to which
municipalities and school dis-
tricts.
Since the June 27 committee
meeting, at which the TCCvoted
to have Malak research how to
end the contract with Centax,
Malak said he has sent a letter to
the state Department of Commu-
nity andEconomic development,
which has been overseeing the
implementationof Act 32, asking
for emergency relief.
Specifically, the committee is
requesting permission from
DCED for Centax to release
funds in the account to munici-
palities and school districts
based on predetermined percent-
ages andworry about reconciling
the amounts with what is actual-
ly owed them at a later time.
Malak also sent a letter to the
office of state Attorney General
Linda Kelly asking her to look in-
to collections to determine if
there was “any type of fraud or il-
legal activity,” as suggested by a
TCCmember at thelast meeting.
The TCCwas set to vote to fire
Centax at the meeting, but that
day, the TCC received a letter
from Centax pointing to a clause
in its contract that allowed the
agency 90 days to cure any prob-
lem pointed out to company offi-
cials.
Bond rate set by DCED
At that meeting, committee
members asked how DCED de-
termined that Centax was Act
32-compliant and eligible to be
considered as an EIT collector.
Others questioned why Centax’s
performance bond was set at
$3.28 million when the agency
had more money than that tied
up.
At the meeting, Malak said
DCED set the bond rate and
made the determination.
In response to an inquiry from
The Times Leader on what made
a tax collector Act 32 compliant,
a DCED spokesman said a tax
collection committee cannot ap-
point a tax collector that:
• Has been convicted of a felo-
ny involving fraud, extortion or
dishonesty;
•Has engaged in conduct that
adversely reflects onthe Tax Offi-
cer’s credibility, honesty or integ-
rity;
• Is unable to attain bonding
requirements;
• Has not met the mandatory
education requirements estab-
lished by DCED; or
• Has not met additional re-
quirements established by both
the tax collection committee and
DCED.
The spokesman did not supply
the requested mandatory educa-
tion requirements or additional
requirements requested by close
of business Friday.
The spokesman also said that
each county tax collection com-
mittee was responsible for set-
ting the bond rate “in an amount
equal tothe maximumamount of
taxes that may be in the posses-
sionof the taxofficer at any given
time; or sufficient to secure the
financial responsibility of the tax
officer as determined by the tax
collection committee.”
Malak said the committee fol-
lowed DCED guidelines on the
bond determination and said the
EITrevenue collectedshouldnot
have surpassed $3.2 million be-
fore distribution began by April.
Unfortunately, because revenue
was still “trickling in” from 2011
collections and small amounts of
revenue distributed for 2012,
most municipalities didn’t real-
ize there was a problem until
May.
CENTAX
Continued from Page 1A
Luzerne County isn’t the only
Pennsylvania county experiencing
problems with the Centax Group.
According to the Republican-
Herald, the Schuylkill County Tax
Collection Committee ousted
Centax on June 27 for failing to
process earned income tax bills in
a timely manner.
That county TCC plans to appoint
Berkheimer Associates as the new
EIT collector at a meeting on
Tuesday.
And according to the Observer-
Reporter, the Greene County Tax
Collection Committee authorized
its solicitor on June 28 to file a
court injunction halting Centax
from collecting earned income
taxes in that county.
The action was taken after munici-
palities reported receiving neither
full disbursements nor monthly
reports from Centax since it began
collecting earned income taxes for
that county’s municipalities and
school districts in January, the
newspaper reported.
P R O B L E M S E L S E W H E R E
The Luzerne County Tax Collection
Committee is scheduled to meet
next at 6 p.m. July 27 at the Lu-
zerne County Community College
Education Conference Center, 1333
S. Prospect St., Nanticoke.
W H AT ’ S N E X T
C M Y K
PEOPLE S E C T I O N B
timesleader.com
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012
“I
don’t knowwhat’s gotten into
kids today,” said my buddy Al-
ner, showing me a Times Leader
story on the latest juvenile delinquency
statistics (though that termisn’t used
much anymore).
“With all this violence in the media,”
he went on, “howcan we expect the kids
to behave?”
I smiled indulgently.
“Alner, old friend,” I said. “Everybody’s
entitled to an opinion, and even the
experts don’t agree on this question. So
let’s take a little trip and do some re-
search of our own.”
“Not again,” he
sighed. “I have a
cookout planned,
and I just realized I
forgot the bratwurst
and…”
Well, to make a
long story short, we
were soon in a typ-
ical Wyoming Valley
neighborhood of
about 60 years ago,
thanks to my powers
of metaphysical
travel.
“Where are all
those kids heading?”
he asked.
“Let’s take a walk around the corner.”
“Hey, it’s a movie theater,” he said.
“Right! It’s just one of the innumerable
neighborhood movie houses that used to
dot the area. The multiplex that’s 20
miles away hasn’t been invented yet.
We’re going to a Saturday matinee, a
staple of young people’s lives back then.
Those kids you sawhave been looking
forward to it all week.”
“Wow, ‘Terror fromthe Sea,’ it says on
the marquee.
“Two adult,” I tell the young lady in
the ticket booth.
“Oh, we’re not going in, are we?”
moaned Alner.
“Relax,” I smiled. “I have yet another
power – that of theoretical invisibility.
We can buy our Good and Plenties and
cheer for the heroes and nobody will
knowwe’re there.”
“Show’s starting,” whispered Alner.
“Look, a Bugs Bunny cartoon.”
“Notice howElmer Fudd is hunting
Bugs with a shotgun,” I said. “But Bugs
manages to blast himto smithereens
instead. And then Bugs rolls a huge
boulder down on Elmer, completely
flattening him.”
“Boy, I never sawthat kind of thing on
‘Mister Rogers.’”
“The Three Stooges are next,” I said.
“It’s 15 minutes of Moe, Larry and Curley
poking each other in the eye and getting
bashed with heavy objects. Listen to the
kids. They love the Stooges, but no one
will actually do anything like this when
they get home. I think they’re on to some
distinction between art and reality that
we’ve forgotten.”
“Nowwe’re seeing a cowboy movie.”
“Right on, pardner,” I smiled. This is a
serial. By the time it’s over, there will
have been all kinds of gunfights, fistfights
and chases on horseback, and you’ll have
to come back next week to see howthe
hero survived being thrown off a cliff.”
“This ‘Terror fromthe Sea’ should be
good,” said Alner as the credits rolled.
“Look howthe giant, slimy creature is
destroying our cities and stomping peo-
TOM MOONEY
R E M E M B E R W H E N
No fight with
those violent
good old days
See MOONEY, Page 2B
“The Three
Stooges are
next,” I said.
“It’s 15 minutes
of Moe, Larry
and Curley poki-
ng each other in
the eye and
getting bashed
with heavy ob-
jects.”
D
orothy Stucker is the assistant to the librarian at the North Branch of the
Osterhout Free Library in Wilkes-Barre. Stucker, 71, has inspired many peo-
ple as a breast cancer survivor who has lived a fruitful life since being diag-
nosed with the disease 25 years ago. Dorothy attended West Pittston High
School and has been married to her husband, Paul, for 50 years. They have
three children: Arlene, Sandy and Paul Jr. The couple lives in Parsons.
You have been working at the
Osterhout Library for more than
30 years. How has that been
and what are some of your fon-
dest memories there? “I have
always worked for the North
Branch and we have had three
locations in the time I have
been there. We were located
on George Avenue and had to
move when there was a fire
there. We relocated to Washing-
ton Street for a time and have
been at the Oliver Street location
the last two years. The time spent
at all those locations had been
dear to me because I really enjoy
the people. The children have been
special and I have seen so many
people come and go there over the
years. One of the moments there
that stands out was when a woman I
was talking to was going to a job
interview once she left the library
that day. She was worried because
she did not have a nice top to wear to
the meeting. I had two blouses on, so
I took the top one off and let her
wear it to the interview. She was very
thankful and that was a special mo-
ment.”
Tell us about your experience or
battle with breast cancer and what
transpired the last 25 years. “In
1987 I felt a lump and went for an
ultrasound and mammogram. The
tests were negative and everything
seemed fine. The lump was still there
so I decided to have a biopsy. It
proved to be cancer. I decided to see
Dr. David Greenwald and I went
through mastectomy surgery and
chemotherapy for a while. I then
decided I had enough of the chemo
and that God and I did not want to
have it anymore. Twenty-five years
later I am still here and making it.”
The help you received seemed to
make you want to support others.
How has your experience been ben-
eficial to others? “Having cancer is
not good, but in another instance, I
have met and hopefully helped so
many people. I am part of The Brave-
hearts, which is a support group for
cancer survivors. I was recently part
of the Star Survivors group that
walked in the “Relay for Life” this
past June at King’s College, to raise
awareness for cancer.”
CLARK VAN ORDEN/
THE TIMES LEADER
See MEET, Page 2B
MEET DOROTHY STUCKER
L
OS ANGELES - Jonathan Beggs want-
ed an easy way for his neighbors to
share books.
Using odds and ends of fiberboard
and Douglas fir, the retired building contractor
fashioned a hutch the size of a dollhouse. He
gave it a pitchedcedar-shingle roof cappedwith
copper. The door, trimmed in bright red, opens
tothreeshelves filledwithbooks byJoyceCarol
Oates, Tony Hillerman, James Michener and
others. Below hangs a sign: “Take a book or
bring a book or both.”
In the half-year that Beggs’ Little Free Li-
brary has perched on a post in front of his Sher-
man Oaks, Calif., home, it has evolved into
muchmorethanabookexchange. It has turned
strangers into friends and a sometimes imper-
sonal neighborhood into a community. It has
become a mini-town square, where people
gather todiscuss SherlockHolmes, sustainabil-
ity and genealogy.
“I met more neighbors in the first three
weeks than in the previous 30 years,” said
Beggs, 76.
When a 9-year-old boy knocked on his door
onemorningtosayhowmuchhelikedthelittle
library, Beggs knewhewas ontosomething. He
added amenities to make it more welcoming.
He crafted wooden benches from leftover
beams and installed them on either side of the
library amid redwood chips that cushion the
feet.
Beggs heardabout little libraries fromanoth-
er member of a group interested in self-suffi-
ciency. “I thought it was such a cute idea, so I
built one,” he said. “It’s a lot of fun.”
His Little Free Library is part of a movement
that started in Wisconsin and has begun to
catch on in Southern California. In large cities
and small towns, suburbs and rural communi-
MCT PHOTO
Fiona Sassoon, 10, gets some neighborly advice fromDavid Dworski, left, on book selections at the Little Free Library, a small house stuffed with
books to leave and take. This one is in Venice, Calif., but there are small book boxes throughout the world and they are gaining in popularity.
Binding neighbors together with
TINY LIBRARIES
Outside their beach cottage on a Venice,
Calif. walk street, Susan and David Dworski
have installed the latest thing in literacy.
By MARTHA GROVES
Los Angeles Times
See TINY, Page 8B
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ P E O P L E
2
0
5
0
1
4
760-4797
Professional Work That Is Guaranteed!
Licensed and Insured - Ask for References
LOTS CLEARED - TREES REMOVED
DRAINAGE PROBLEMS SOLVED
WALLS, WALKS & DRIVEWAYS
DEMOLISHED
SPECIALIZING IN - INGROUND
POOL FILL - IN
COMPLETE LANDSCAPING
NEW LAWNS - YARD PROJECTS
TOP SOIL, FILL & GRAVEL SPREAD
PAVERS, FIELD STONE, FLAGSTONE
AND CONCRETE
SHRUBS & BUSHES REMOVED
LANDSCAPING
AND
EXCAVATING
RED TREES REMOVED
7
6
2
0
5
5
Price includes removal & disposal of your old windows,
double or triple pane windows, low E, argon gas,
insulation & installation of the new windows.
*Capping additional if needed. *Minimum of 5 windows.
570-287-1982
licensed & insured • license # PA025042
L
ife
T
ime
Windows
& Vinyl Siding
NELSON
FURNITURE
WAREHOUSE
210 Division St., Kingston
288-3607
Absolutely Free Estimates
E-STERN CO.
30 year Architectural Shingles
Do Rip Off & Over the Top
Fully Insured • PA014370
570-760-7725 or
570-341-7411
7
6
4
8
7
2
Now Accepting
Composite Decking/Decks • Siding
Ceramic Tile Hardwood Flooring
Vinyl Flooring
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling • Roofing
Lifetime Warranty on Shingles
GET YOUR ROOF BEFORE WINTER RETURNS
HEY BOOMERS
CHECK THIS OUT!!
Turning 65? Going on Medicare? Need
Medicare Supplement Insurance?
We also offer long/short term care
coverage, life insurance, and annuities
for nursing home care that pay 6.7%
You have questions,
we have answers!
570-580-0797
www.babyboombroker.com
7
6
5
2
0
6
1ST QUALITY CONSTRUCTION CO.
570-606-8438
Roofing, Siding,
Gutters, Insulation,
Decks, Additions,
Windows, Doors,
Masonry & Concrete
SENIOR CITIZENS
DISCOUNT!
State Lic. # PA057320
601 Market St., Kingston, PA 288-9311
EXPLORER OF THE SEAS,
ROYAL CARIBBEAN CRUISE LINE
October 14th to 21st
Interior Stateroom- $699pp
Promenade - $799pp
OceanView- $899
Balcony - $1,049pp
7 NIGHT BERMUDA CRUISE FROM
BAYONNE, NJ
INCLUDES ALL TAXES AND
ROUNDTRIP MOTOR COACH
KELLER’S LAWN CARE
Mowing, Mulching, Summer Cleanup,
Gravel & Trimming, Landscaping, Planting
Affordable - Free Estimates
Fully Insured.
Commercial & Residential
570-332-7016
The fifth-grade class of Wyoming Area Catholic School recently visited Junior Achievement Biztown for a day of work readiness and fi-
nancial literacy. Participants, from left, first row, are Abigail Kolessar, Adiya Golden, Lauren Best, Allyson Lauivara, Lindsey Chepalonis, Alex-
is Stella, Danielle Morris, Elizabeth Kravitz, Emma Ulichney, Relena Horwath and Alexandra Van Horn. Second row: Bianca Mazzarella, Mack-
enzie Crake, Rachel Kern, Dylan Burwell, Abby Connors, Tyler Mozelski, Jacob Modlesky, Jeffrey Johnson, Nichola Prociak, Josh Hartigan,
Ryan Bella, Greg Godlewski, Dominic Cirelli, Christian Holmes, Kenneth Remus, Courtney Wartella, Rebecca Lalko and Josephine Toomey,
fifth-grade teacher. Third row: Mrs. Mazzarella, Mrs. Kolessar, Ms. Connors, Mrs. Mozleski, Mrs. Hartigan and Mrs. Kravitz.
Wyoming Area Catholic fifth-graders attend Junior Achievement Biztown
The Pennsylvania Association
of School Retirees (PASR) re-
cently held its spring luncheon at
the Genetti Hotel and Conference
Center. The Lauretta Woodson
Awards were given to Jeanne
Kravitz, educator, and Marcie
Padavan, support staff, from the
West Side Career and Tech-
nology Center (WSCTC). The
awards were presented by Nancy
Tkatch, administration director,
WSCTC. The awards are given to
honor an educator and a support
staff person for their dedication
and achievements in public edu-
cation. At the awards presenta-
tion, from left: Carol Williams,
vice president; Tkatch; Padavan;
Alice Hudak, chairperson; Kra-
vitz; and Cathy Cortegerone,
president.
Educator, support staff
honored by PASR
MotorWorld Lexus recently presented a $5,000 gift to Miser-
icordia University in support of speech-language and hearing
services for children at the Misericordia Speech-Language and
Hearing Center. The Department of Speech-Language Pathology
operates the clinic and has provided free and low-cost therapy
and diagnostic services to more than 2,000 clients of all ages
since its inception in 2003. The gift includes a $2,500 donation
from The Lexus Pursuit of Potential that was matched by Motor-
World Lexus. At the check presentation, from left: Judith Ellis,
manager, corporate, government and foundation relations, Miser-
icordia University; Rick Osick, president, MotorWorld; Stacy Otero,
marketing director, Motorworld; and Michael A. MacDowell, presi-
dent, Misericordia University.
MotorWorld Lexus makes donation to Misericordia
ple,” I said. “It knows no mer-
cy. But we’ll get it in the end.
Humanity rules on Saturday
afternoon.”
After quaffing a couple of
Ma’s Old Fashion Root Beers at
a corner store, we headed back
to 2012.
“Strange,” said Alner. “The
movies were – well – pretty
violent, but that didn’t seem to
rub off on the kids I saw.”
I nodded. “Maybe it was the
parenting. I’m not an expert.
But these kids did know how
to enjoy a thriller and then go
back to their own world with
its own rules.
“Oh no,” shouted Alner.
“What’s wrong?”
“The bratwurst! I could have
picked up some for 19 cents a
pound.”
MOONEY
Continued from Page 1B
Other than your obvious
victories against cancer and
your volunteer work, what
would you say is another
proudest moment in your
life? “So many moments
relate to my family. Renewing
my wedding vows with Paul
stands out. Having children
and grandchildren have also
been the biggest blessings.”
Did you ever go on trips
with your family? “We went
to Aruba with the family and
it was wonderful. We have
also traveled to Cape May,
New Jersey and Las Vegas.
We went on an Alaskan cruise
and own a timeshare in Flor-
ida that we visit. My favorite
trip is in my own home these
days. We love spending time
here.”
What do you like to do
here, locally? “Paul and I like
to frequent the Odyssey and
do cardio water aerobics
three days a week if possible.
We like to be part of their
Silver and Fit group. We
wreck ourselves in those
exercises even though it is for
the older generation.”
What is a phrase or saying
you live by or like? “My hus-
band and I joke about it, but
we think the key to a good
marriage is being able to tell
your spouse the phrase, ‘yes
dear,’ when trying to co-exist.”
What are you reading?
“Any James Patterson
books.”
What music are you lis-
tening to? “’60s and ’80s
music and Engelbert Humper-
dinck and Clay Aiken.”
What’s in your fridge? “We
always have spaghetti on
hand and I enjoy Captain
Morgan with Diet Coke.”
What would you like to see
improved in Northeast
Pennsylvania? “The crime
level is much higher than
years ago. I don’t want to be
afraid to walk at night. I would
like to see more of a crack-
down on crime.”
MEET
Continued from Page 1B
John Gordon writes about area
people for the Meet feature. Reach
him at 970-7229.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
O ffering Q u ality I n Perso nal C are
M ead ow s C om plex • 200 L ak e Street• D allas • 675-9336
Th e M eado w s M ano r Th e M eado w s M ano r
E.O.E.
2
4
0
3
5
3
Your Power Equipment
Headquarters
CubCadet • Stihl • Ariens
Troybilt • Gravely
Lawntractors • Mowers • Trimmers
Blowers and more
687 Memorial Hwy., Dallas
570-675-3003
Blowers and more
0 6 3003
EQUIPMENT
My Mommy Creates Beautiful Smiles!
No matter what your age... Dr. Joseph offers
comprehensive dental care for the entire family.
337 Third Ave., Kingston • 714-1800
Comprehensive, Family & Cosmetic Dentistry
Elizabeth A. Joseph, DMD, PC
Dr. Joseph offers all aspects of general dentistry.
She and her staff focus on their patients comfort,
as well as educating them on their dental needs
and treatments.
Dr. Joseph accepts most insurances,
including United Concordia, Delta, Guardian,
MetLife, Aetna, Cigna and Medical Access.
. Joseph offers
hhee en enti tire re ffam amil ilyy.
00
PC
ti tist stry ry.
mfort,
eeds
ian,
www.kingstonpadentist.com
BEL L ES
C O N S TRUC TIO N C O .
PA012959
824- 7220
NATIO NAL
AW ARD W INNING
C O M PANY
S EL EC T
S HING L E M AS TER
ABO VE AL L THE
BES T RO O F!
JNJ Contractors, LLC
All Types of Construction
Electric, Plumbing &
Commercial Maintenance
570-579-3264
fully insured, LIC# PA06281
jnjcontractors.com
FREE ESTIMATES
Compare our prices on:
• Painting • Custom Tile Work
• Roofing • Landscaping
• Remodeling • Handyman Services
Something Else? Give Us A Call.
• Individual Instruction
• Certified Teachers/
Licensed Therapists
• Kindergarten Readiness Classes
• Safe, Secure Environments
• Conveniently Located
• 88 Years of Serving Children
Fall Openings Available
Call:
570.714.1246
or visit
www.wvcakids.org
A Rich Learning Experience
For All Children
Ages 3, 4 and 5 Years
AT THE CORNER OF E. NORTHAMPTON AND HILLSIDE ST., WILKES-BARRE • 829-9779
NEVER A COVER! • KITCHEN HOURS: SUN 1-8, WED-SAT 5-9 • NOW ACCEPTING ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
WEEKLY SPECIAL CHEF SPECIAL
BAKED HADDOCK
with French Fries
& Cole Slaw
$8.95
HOMEMADE CHICKEN
POT PIE
with Cole Slaw
$5.95
* A bilateral procedure. Offer expires August 31st, 2012.
Make Your
FREE LASIK
Consultation And Receive
$
1,000
Off
Your Procedure*
Call Wendy Or Kristen at
(570) 718-6707
Patrick McGraw, M.D.
Harvey Reiser, M.D.
703 Rutter Ave.
Kingston, PA 18704
icarespecialists.com
Interest Free Financing Available
7
6
4
3
9
0
A+ Grades Earn
A+ Employment
570-497-6993
Exceptional Tutoring in:
Speech & Public Speaking
Writing
Leadership
NEPA Native - National Experience
Major Media, Fortune 500,
Government, NFL, Major Non-Profit
Employee & Group Communication
Expertise on Request
Local – Powerful – Inspirational
Pittston Area Senior High
School
John Haas, principal, Pittston Area
Senior High School recently
announced those students who
have qualified for the Honor Roll
for the 2012 fourth quarter.
Grade 12: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Danielle Acernese, Thomas
Allardyce, Anthony Amitia, Shel-
by Aruscavage, Jonathan Aston,
Jessica Baker, Miranda Bellas,
Kathleen Blazosek, Emily Bog-
dan, Bianca Bolton, Kaitlin Brady,
Charles Bressler, Ashley Brown,
Ciera Callahan, Vincenzo Chi-
mento, Pietro Colella, Charles
Cometa, James Connors, El-
izabeth Cox, Tyler Cummings,
Brittany Czerniakowski, Brian
Delaney, Amanda Dockett, Pa-
trick Dougherty, David Dragon,
Bruce Edwards, Dominique Exter,
Danielle Fereck, Michelle Fernan-
do, Nina Fischer, Afton Fonzo,
Paul Gestl, Brian Gima, Daniel
Ginocchetti, Breana Gonzalez,
Jordan Gruttadauria, Angelo
Guariglia, Jennifer Hadley, Jo-
seph Harth, Rebecca Hetro,
Michael Hizny, Samantha Hor-
chos, Rachel Kashuba, Kelly
Keener, Susan Kitcho, Edward
Klein, Cherie Klush, Alexandra
Kochis, Alexander Korjeski,
Sarah Kosik, Charles Kovaleski,
Jeremie Kudey, Robert Kuzynski,
James Lamarca, Jamie Lee,
Timothy Lello, Kelly Lynn, Ken-
dall Melochick, Ashley Menichini,
Robert Meranti, Kenneth Miller,
Taylor Miller, Samantha Moluski,
Jaret Monteforte, Amy Moze-
leski, Christopher Musto, Patrick
Nallin, Marissa Nardone, Kristi
Naylor, Grace O’Neill, Benjamin
Pace, Michael Panuski, Brandon
Pernot, Anna Podrasky, Ariel
Porzuczek, Rachele Poveromo,
Jame Pramitha, Dylan Prescott,
Elizabeth Raffa, Nicholas Rem-
sky, Christopher Santana, Cam-
eron Savidge, Jamie Scarantino,
Anthony Schwab, Samantha
Scialpi, Christen Sedlak, Jenna
Sharr, Steven Sklanka, Alison
Slomba, Shelby Smith, Michael
Stankoski, Joseph Stoss, Steven
Stravinski, Matthew Taylor, Tanya
Tiffany, Jessica Welter, David
Whispell, Edward Winn, Mallory
Yozwiak. First Honors: Saman-
tha Bird, Joshua Blaker, Tina
Boyanowski, Nicolette Bradshaw,
Adam Bykowski, Jennifer Cerulli,
Christine D’Agostino, Sarah
Demace, Madeline Dworak, Ryan
English, Daniel Fyock, Christoph-
er Gerrity, Evan Hahn, Dalton
Hazlet, Josh Houghtlin, Caci
Kern, Anthony Mancini, Caroline
Manganiello, Brandon Matthews,
Thomas Matthews, Katherine
McGinty, Todd Mitchell, Kimber-
lee O’Hop, Jessica Oliveri, Aus-
tyn Pivarnik, Justin Searfoss,
Anthony Semyon, Amber Tirva,
Gabrielle Vaxmonsky, Bryan
Winters, Kyle Yockey, Ashley
Young. Second Honors: Chastity
Anderson, Ariel Ardo, James
Arens, Sara Arias, Donald Booth,
Caitlynn Cadwalder, Devon Davis,
Nellie Diaz, Kristina Dixon, Dy-
nelle Evans, Brittany Gilley,
Joshua Herron, Nicholas Holl,
Katlyn Jumper, Nikole Kenyon,
Matthew King, Melissa Kolakoski,
Anthony Lizza, Tyler Loftus,
Joseph Longo, Shaun McDer-
mott, Kevin O’Brien, Victoria
Pierson, Thomas Powell, Ali
Quinn, Samantha Schneider,
Alissa Stegman, Thomas Strunk,
Brielle Warren.
Grade 1 1: Honors with Distinction:
James Ardoline, Kyle Berlinski,
Aaron Black, Nicholas Bolka,
Maria Capitano, Anthony Capo-
zucca, Matthew Carroll, Michael
Chisdock, Jamie Coyne, Jordan
Cumbo, Christian Curtis, Ronald
D’Eliseo, Sarah Driscoll, Austin
Elko, Kassandra Erfman, Kristen
Fereck, Carmella Gagliardi, Mi-
chael Harding, Jeremy Hom-
schek, Mianna Hopkins, Austin
Kostelansky, Kyle Kostelansky,
Joseph Koytek, Kaitlynn Kuchta,
Olivia Lanza, James Lizza, Cath-
erine Lombardo, Jamie Lombar-
do, Kristen Lombardo, Katrina
Lutecki, Christopher Lynch, Felix
Mascelli, Elizabeth Mikitish,
Connor Mitchell, Kelly Mitchell,
Nicholas Montini, James Musto,
Santino Musto, Cassandra Noci-
to, Calvin O’Boyle, Karlee Patton,
Matthew Pierantoni, Gabrielle
Poplarchick, Mark Prebish, Suraj
Pursnani, Shelby Rinaldi, Dakota
Rowan, Bryan Russo, Matthew
Shamnoski, Julia Shandra, Amy
Silinskie, Jillian Starinsky, Jo-
seph Starinsky, Stephen Starin-
sky, Brian Stonikinis, Jonathan
Sulkoski, Gary Thomas, Cory
Tobin, Ian Tracy, Ryan Tracy,
Shannon Turner, Alexa Turney,
Miranda Warunek, Ariele Wil-
liams, Kaitlynn Wolfram, Mat-
thew Yatison, Hannah Zondlo.
First Honors: Mary Theresa
Anderson, Katlyn Arena, Chelsea
Balchune, Alexandra Cawley,
Anthony Cotto, Sara Czerniakow-
ski, Ciara Edwards, Jessica
Kmetz, Raeann Loftus, Angelo
Lussi, Nicholas Maruska, Kaitlyn
McGuire, John Minich, Nicole
Piccoletti, Joshua Rugletic,
Marina Sell, Tiffany Smith, Jo-
nathan Tonte, Michael Twardow-
ski, Marissa Vogel, Kansas White.
Second Honors: Alyssa Adkins,
Alexandra Anastasi, Frank Ardo,
Trina Davila, Cassandra Giarrata-
no, Ryan Hawksley, John Kielba-
sa, Jenna Leiva, Kristopher
Littleton, Justin Martinelli, Dako-
ta Miller, Ashley Muchler, Angeli-
na Reed, Joshua Reynolds,
Kristen Santey, Alexandria Sera-
fin, Taylor Stull, Tiana Stull,
Carissa Suhockey, Todd Thorne,
Sierra Williams, Ryan Young-
blood, James Ziobro.
Grade 10: Honors with Distinc-
tion: Kevin Boone, Ali Brady,
Laura Brady, Nicole Chaiko,
Joseph Champi, Enrico Connors,
Robert Costello, Brielle Culp,
Anthony D’Eliseo, Alexan Danko,
Lori DeFazio, Dominique DelPri-
ore, Megan Dougherty, James
Emmett, Brandon Ferrance,
Kayle Forkin, Marie Terese Fox,
Lea Garibaldi, Alia Gestl, Mason
Gross, Michael Harth, Emily
Herron, Zachary Hoffmann,
Brittany Hypolite, Katie Jobson,
Samantha Kachinsky, Tyler
Koval, Adrian Langan, Kaycee
Langan, Steven Lee, Sierra
Lieback, Carmen LoBrutto,
Rachel Longo, Tyler Lutecki,
Jessica Maleta, Cameron Marot-
to, Jennifer Mataloni, Dana
Maurizi, Nicole Mayerski, Patrick
McGinty, Zachary McKitish,
Summer McLaughlin, Bareana
Miller, Kallie Miller, Samantha
Moska, Tyler Mullen, Courtney
Osiecki, Cales Owens, Leanne
Para, Michael Parrs, Justin Pe-
terson, Michael Pieszala, Troy
Platukus, Charles Poli, Taylor
Powers, Rosemary Ritsick, Alys-
sa Rodzinak, Alexander Roper,
Sara Ruby, Samantha Rydzy,
Scott Sayer, Megan Schuster,
Michael Schwab, Rachel Siman-
sky, Kyle Sommer, Tyler Spurlin,
Bridget Starinsky, Alyssa Taler-
ico, Kayla Vogue, Carly Walker,
David Wilczewski, Trent Wood-
ruff, Tyler Woodruff, James
Wychock, Meredith Yozwiak,
Jean Luc Yurchak. First Honors:
Michael Antal, Taylor Balasav-
age, Daniel Brady, Christine
Briggs, Samantha Coleman,
Christopher Cummings, Nicole
Dale, Karysa Fashouer, Kenneth
Hoover, Allison Kizer, Rachel
Lazevnick, Maria Lussi, Elizabeth
MacDormott, Irene Magdon,
David Mancini, Mark Miscavage,
Tyler Mooney, Jenna Mundenar,
Justin Paglianite, Jacqueline
Rabender, Alleysha Reynolds,
Jordan Rose, Robert Ryzner,
Alya Samano, Ian Satkowski,
Kaitlyn Simyan, Ciara Smith,
Andrea Stephenson, Richard
Weinstock, Corey Wetzel, Andew
Yuhas. Second Honors: Antoi-
nette Antonacci, Rhiannon Av-
visato, Brandyn Ayers, Kyla
Balchune, Anthony Baldiga,
Samantha Baldwin, Terry Briggs,
Christie Cadwalder, Matthew
Cawley, Casey Deaton, Tyler
Demich, Christopher DePrimo,
Robert Dudek, Adam Ginocchet-
ti, Robert Haas, Anthony Halat,
Brandon Hudacko, Ashley Hurtt,
Julie Kalinas, Jonathon Kamor,
Robert Koprowski, Matthew
Miller, Mark Modlesky, Brittni
Morrell, Matthew Mott, Saman-
tha Piazza, Whitney Prescott,
Joshua Razvillas, Taylor Roberts,
Justin Roche, Hurley Simon,
Jordan Spindler, Antonia Tim-
onte, Kaitlyn Wallace, Marissa
Williams, Ryan Witman, Rebecca
Wolfram, Mariah Zimmerman,
Haleigh Zurek.
Grade 9: Honors with Distinction:
Angelo Aita, Harlow Alexander,
Robert Bamrick, Allison Barber,
Marina Barnak, Alex Bauman,
Keith Boone, Patrick Cadden,
Kristen Capitano, Elizabeth
Cappelloni, Madison Cardinale,
Christian Charney, John De-
Board, Michael Delaney, Lauren
Dragon, Emily Earlley, Jordan
Fritz, Jasmine Gage, Kyle Gattu-
so, Olivia Giambra, Gina Gross-
bauer, Michael Gutowski, Chris-
tian Hansen, Michael Havrilla,
Chistopher Hufford, Jade Jones,
Jacob Kaminski, Megan Karuzie,
Christopher Konsavage, Edward
Kosierowski, Nia Lombardo,
Brendon Lukachko, Marina Mai-
da, Tyler McGarry, Christopher
McGlynn, Elaina Menichelli,
Katrina Mikitish, Rhonda Miller,
Michael Minich, Mikhaela Moher,
Madeline Moss, Virginia Myrkalo,
Mark Naples, Mikayla Nardone,
Rachel Naylor, Kristen Nerbecki,
David Pacovsky, Nicole Psaila,
Dylan Ratzin, Kristen Richards,
Anamarie Rogers, Cassandra
Ross, Nuncio Savoy, Elizabeth
Scialpi, Claudia Shandra, Eric
Sklanka, Jamie Smicherko, Mara
Stella, Aryana Thompson, Jacob
Vaxmonsky, Sarah Velehoski,
Elizabeth Waleski, Nicole Wal-
ters, Rebecca Weinstock, Bran-
don Winters, Stephen Yuhas,
Brandon Zaffuto. First Honors:
Hunter Antal, Jamie Baker,
Michael Barney, Shivon Bellas,
Shannen Brady, Mackenzie
Carroll, Bryan Davis, Theresa
Domarasky, Courtney Dougal,
John Fagotti, Michelle Gross-
bauer, Joshua John, Katie Kelly,
Joshua Kramer, Kayla Kruchin-
sky, Joseph Lombardo, Sabrina
Lyons, Vance Maslowski, Jas-
mine McGrade, Jared Melochick,
Callie O’Donovan, Dylan Phillips,
Amanda Radginski, Trina Ra-
falko, Jamie Rosencrans, Lauren
Senese, Chyanne Sherman,
Katherine Stonikinis, Brandon
Strelecki, Robert Swartz, Mitchell
Tomaszewski, Brandon Winn,
Rebecca Zielinski, David Zydko.
Second Honors: Rebecca Battis-
ta, Elizabeth Brandt, Destiny
Coolbaugh, Taylor Eichler, Shane
Flannelly, Harlee Fyock, Daniel
Gambini, Olivia Goleneski, Cody
Holl, Rachel Hoover, Patrick
Joyce, Caycee Karpinski, Julian
Kester, Matthew Klein, Thomas
Luder, Vincent Mikus, Joseph
Musto, Brittany Myers, Thomas
Nickas, Kevin Peters, Sydney
Ralston, Ryan Renfer, Lauren
Robbins, Tynaisa Robertson,
Abigail Rodriguez, Girard Scate-
na, Rebecca Tomko, Kevin Walsh,
Katie Wynn.
HONOR ROLL
Albright College, Reading
Alura R. Benek, Summit Hill.
Coastal Carolina University,
Conway, S.C.
Shelby Butz, Larksville.
Grove City College
Lauren Dallachiesa, Nuremberg.
Johnson College, Scranton
President’s List: Mark Callahan,
Pittston; Howard Fulmer,
Wyoming; David Haff, Dun-
more; Stephen Williamson,
Wilkes-Barre; Kyle Getz, Pitt-
ston; Nathan Jackloski, Wyom-
ing; Jesse Malecki, Old Forge;
Stephen Washicosky, Larks-
ville; Christine Geiser,
Swoyersville; Jeffrey Miko-
laichik, West Wyoming; Mi-
chael Stiltenpole, Dunmore;
Claude Smith, Dunmore;
Joshua Evarts, Old Forge;
Matthew Price, Dallas; Carlton
Williams, Tunkhannock; Rachel
Gittens, Duryea; Andrew
Inman, Tunkhannock; Tobin
Lyons, Pittston; Kori Shep-
herd, Larksville.
University of Delaware,
Newark, Del.
Ashlee Schaeffer, White Haven;
Jillian Seamon, Hazle Town-
ship.
University of New Hampshire,
Durham, N.H.
Michael Ryan, Dallas.
Wagner College, Staten Island,
N.Y.
Mark Gilbert, Dallas.
OUT-OF-TOWN
DEANS’ LISTS
K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ O C C A S I O N S
The Times Leader allows you to
decide how your wedding notice
reads, with a few caveats.
Wedding announcements run in
Sunday’s People section, with
color photos, free of charge.
Articles must be limited to 220
words, and we reserve the right to
edit announcements that exceed
that word count. Announcements
must be typed or submitted via
www.timesleader.com. (Click on
the "people" tab, then “weddings”
and follow the instructions from
there.) Submissions must include
a daytime contact phone number
and must be received within 10
months of the wedding date. We
do not run first-year anniversary
announcements or announce-
ments of weddings that took place
more than a year ago. (Wedding
photographers often can supply
you with a color proof in advance
of other album photographs.)
All other social announcements
must be typed and include a day-
time contact phone number.
Announcements of births at local
hospitals are submitted by hospi-
tals and published on Sundays.
Out-of-town announcements
with local connections also are
accepted. Photos are only accept-
ed with baptism, dedication or
other religious-ceremony an-
nouncements but not birth an-
nouncements.
Engagement announcements
must be submitted at least one
month before the wedding date to
guarantee publication and must
include the wedding date. We
cannot publish engagement an-
nouncements once the wedding
has taken place.
Anniversary photographs are
published free of charge at the
10th wedding anniversary and
subsequent five-year milestones.
Other anniversaries will be pub-
lished, as space allows, without
photographs.
Drop off articles at the Times
Leader or mail to:
The Times Leader
People Section
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711
Questions can be directed to
Kathy Sweetra at 829-7250 or
e-mailed to people@timeslead-
er.com.
SOCIAL PAGE GUIDELINES
S
arah Marie Doman and Jason Jude
Bozinko, together with their par-
ents, announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
George and Donna Doman, Larksville.
She is the granddaughter of Joan
Miglionico Naugle and the late Do-
nald Naugle, Pittston, and Victoria
Doman and the late Robert Doman,
Larksville.
Sarah is a 2003 graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School, Ply-
mouth. She earned a bachelor’s degree
in elementary education and a second
bachelor’s degree in English from
Wilkes University in 2008. Sarah also
earned a master’s degree in instruc-
tional media in 2010 fromWilkes
University. She is enrolled in the Mas-
ter of Education programat Edinboro
University with a concentration in
reading. Sarah is employed as an
English teacher at Wyoming Valley
West High School.
The prospective groomis the son of
Jay and Joann Bozinko, Swoyersville.
He is the grandson of the late Mary
Gulla Vozniak and the late John Voz-
niak and Connie Bozinko and the late
Raymond Bozinko, all of Swoyersville.
Jason is a 2002 graduate of Wyom-
ing Valley West High School, Ply-
mouth. He earned a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in biology fromWilkes
University in 2006. Jason is enrolled in
the Master of Science programwith a
concentration in biochemistry at the
University of Scranton. He is employ-
ed as a lab technician at Sanofi Pas-
teur, Swiftwater.
The couple will be happily united in
marriage in an outdoor ceremony
Sept. 22, 2012, at The Highlands at
Newberry, Dallas. The couple will
honeymoon in Antigua.
Bozinko, Doman
A
mber Elizabeth Kenny and Rob-
ert James Fiorelli, together with
their families, would like to announce
their engagement and upcoming
marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Brenda Kenny, Dallas, and James W.
Kenny, Tunkhannock. She is the
granddaughter of Roseadell Scully
and James R. and Helen Kenny, Dal-
las.
The prospective groom is the son
of Dr. and Mrs. Robert Fiorelli, Sha-
vertown. He is the grandson of Mr.
and Mrs. Robert Fiorelli, Peckville,
and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Ogonosky,
Taylor.
The bride-to-be is a 2004 graduate
of Lake-Lehman High School and a
2008 graduate of Penn State, where
she earned her bachelor’s degree in
health and human development.
Amber is employed at Bright Hori-
zons, Schaumburg, Ill., as a teacher.
The prospective groom is a 2001
graduate of Bishop O’Reilly High
School, Kingston, and a 2005 gradu-
ate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical
University, Daytona Beach, Fla.,
where he earned his bachelor’s de-
gree in aeronautical science. Robert
is employed with Express Jet Air-
lines, Chicago Ill.
The couple will exchange vows on
Nov. 9, 2012, at Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church, Peckville.
Kenny, Fiorelli
J
ames Byers and Tracy Chmie-
lewski, together with their
families, announce their engage-
ment and approaching marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter
of Patricia Kalinowski, Wapwallo-
pen, and John Chmielewski,
Jacksonville, Fla. She is the
granddaughter of the late John
and Pearl Chmielewski, Wap-
wallopen.
Tracy is a graduate of Nanti-
coke Area High School. She is
employed as an account manager
with Travelocity, Hanover Town-
ship.
The prospective groom is the
son of Janet Byers, Dallas, and
James Hivish Jr., Forkston. He is
the grandson of the late Ruth
Byers, Wilkes-Barre, and James
Hivish Sr., Plains Township.
James, formerly James Hivish,
is a graduate of Meyers High
School. He earned a bachelor’s
degree in communications from
Bloomsburg University and an
associate’s degree in social sci-
ence from Luzerne County Com-
munity College. He is employed
at Offset Paperback, Laflin.
The couple became engaged on
July 1, 2011, and will exchange
wedding vows on Sept. 2, 2012,
at Firwood United Methodist
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
Chmielewski, Byers
N
atalie Lynn Chiarolanza and
Aaron Michael Katyl, together
with their families, are pleased to
announce their engagement and
upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of
Ronald and Marla Chiarolanza, War-
minster. She is the granddaughter of
Mario and Josephine Chiarolanza,
Lafayette Hill, and Ruth Haslam and
the late Franklin Haslam, Wyndmoor.
The prospective groom is the son
of William and Cynthia Katyl, Dallas.
He is the grandson of John and Cath-
erine Van Sickle, Manahawkin, N.J.;
Irene Katyl, Trucksville; and Joseph
Katyl, Wilkes-Barre.
Natalie is a 2000 graduate of Arch
Bishop Wood High School. She
earned a Bachelor of Science degree
in biology from Hofstra University in
2004. Natalie is pursuing a Master of
Medical Science degree in physicians
assistant studies at DeSales Uni-
versity, Center Valley.
Aaron is a 1999 graduate of Wyom-
ing Seminary College Preparatory
School. He earned a bachelor’s de-
gree in communication from Susque-
hanna University in 2003. He is a
financial adviser in the Lehigh Valley
area.
The couple will exchange vows on
Aug. 25, 2012.
Katyl, Chiarolanza
K
irsten Elyse Cavany and Natha-
niel Mark Raymond were united
in marriage on July 23, 2011, at the
First United Methodist Church,
Tunkhannock, by the Rev. Alice Ann
Bonham.
The bride is the daughter of Bob
and Pam Cavany, Tunkhannock. She
is the granddaughter of Al and Kay
Dymond and Catherine Cavany, all of
Tunkhannock.
The groom is the son of Robin
Raymond, Sanford, Maine, and Milt
Raymond, Shapleigh, Maine. He is
the grandson of Phil and Betty
Dodge, Danvers, Mass. and the late
Roger and Anneliese Raymond, Sa-
lem, Mass.
The bride was escorted down the
aisle and given in marriage by her
father. She chose her best friend,
Tristin Brown, as her maid of honor.
Bridesmaids were Casey Hartford,
Holly Holdredge, Anna Welch and
Chelsea Brown, all friends of the
bride.
The groom chose his best friend,
Benjamin Cavarretta, as his best man.
Groomsmen were Matthew Ray-
mond, Andrew Raymond and Mi-
chael Raymond, brothers of the
groom, and Kyle Cavany, brother of
the bride.
Following the ceremony, an eve-
ning cocktail hour and reception
were held at the Triton Hose Co. No.
1, Tunkhannock.
The bride is a 2005 graduate of
Tunkhannock Area High School and
earned a bachelor’s degree in educa-
tion and aquarium science from the
University of New England in 2009.
She is employed as a science teacher
at Tunkhannock Area High School.
The groom is a 2004 graduate of
York High School, York, Maine, and
earned a bachelor’s degree in crimi-
nal justice from the University of
Southern Maine in 2008. He is em-
ployed as an IT support technician at
Northeast Data.
The couple vacationed at the Outer
Banks, North Carolina. They reside
in Tunkhannock.
Cavany, Raymond
M
egan Pickett and Eric Cleary
were united in marriage on
Oct. 22, 2011, on the outdoor
patio at the Waterfront Banquet
Facility, Plains Township. The
ceremony was officiated by
Judge Joseph Halesey.
The bride is the daughter of
Donald and Debra Pickett,
Wilkes-Barre. She is the grand-
daughter of Edward and Alice
Ramsey and Marie Pickett and
the late Donald Pickett, all of
Wilkes-Barre.
The groom is the son of Karen
Cleary, Hanover Township. He is
the grandson of Kathleen Horn,
Wilkes-Barre.
The bride was given in mar-
riage by her father. She chose
her sister, Allison Holden, as
matron of honor. Maid of honor
was her best friend, Amanda
Magda. Bridesmaids were Kaycee
Hughes, Beth Brislin, Jenn Ro-
man and Nicole Ward, friends of
the bride. The flower girls were
Reilly and Reagan Holden, nieces
of the bride.
The groom chose his best
friend, Michael Mill, as best
man. Groomsmen were Josh
Oravic, Jeff Holda, Colin Hatten,
Alex Hairston and John Boylan,
all friends of the groom. The
ring bearer was Christopher Pap-
ciak, cousin of the groom.
An evening cocktail hour and
reception were held at the Wa-
terfront Banquet Facility. The
bride was honored at a bridal
shower given by her mother and
bridesmaids at The Gallery. The
rehearsal dinner was hosted by
the groom’s mother at Patte’s
Sports Bar.
Megan is a 2003 graduate of
GAR Memorial High School. She
earned her Bachelor of Science
degree in nursing from Blooms-
burg University in 2007. She is a
registered nurse at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley.
Eric is a 1999 graduate of Ha-
nover Area Jr.-Sr. High School.
He earned a Bachelor of Science
degree in business administra-
tion and marketing from Blooms-
burg University. He is employed
at the T.J. Maxx Distribution
Center.
Megan and Eric traveled with
friends to Riviera Maya, Mexico,
for their honeymoon. They re-
side in Hanover Township and
are expecting their first child in
August.
Cleary, Pickett
R
on and Elaine Evans, Lake Pine-
crest, formerly of Glen Lyon,
recently celebrated their 50th wed-
ding anniversary.
Elaine is the former Elaine Sager,
daughter of the late Russell and Julia
Sager.
Ron is the son of the late Willard
and Mabel Evans.
They were married on July 4, 1962,
at St. Joseph’s Slovak Roman Cathol-
ic Church, Nanticoke. Their attend-
ants were the late Russell Sager,
brother of the bride, and Theresa
Coburn Wilkes, cousin of the bride.
The couple has one daughter, Lori,
Dallas.
The occasion was celebrated on a
cruise to Bermuda in May, a gift from
their daughter, and also with a dinner
on July 4.
The Evanses
M
r. and Mrs. Patrick J. Liber-
aski Sr. are celebrating their
45th wedding anniversary today,
July 8. They were married on
July 8, 1967, at St. Joseph’s Mon-
astery, Wilkes-Barre Township.
The groom’s cousin, the Rev.
James Boyle, officiated.
Matron of honor was Barbara
Kwochko Ambrose, cousin of the
bride. Best man was Frank Bon-
ner, cousin of the groom.
A reception was held at the
Silver Queen Restaurant.
Mrs. Liberaski is the former
Dorothy Prutzman, daughter of
the late Patrick and Elizabeth
Basham Prutzman. She retired
from Nationwide Insurance, work-
ing with John Saraka and Joe
Valenta.
Mr. Liberaski is the son of the
late Theodore and Kathleen Bon-
ner Liberaski. He was a member
of the Ironworkers Union, Local
Number 489, and is retired from
the Pennsylvania Department of
Corrections.
They have two children Patrick
Jr., Dallas, and Christine Kroz-
nuski and her husband, Ed, Blue
Bell.
They are the loving grandpar-
ents of three granddaughters,
Emily Liberaski and Ellie and
Cate Kroznuski.
A trip to the Florida Keys is
planned in celebration of their
anniversary.
The Liberaskis
A
lexis Reilly Coltrane and Hai-
ley Irene Coltrane, twin
daughters of Doug and Kristy
Coltrane, Plains Township, were
baptized on June 24, 2012, by the
Rev. John Victoria at St. Nicholas
Roman Catholic Church, Wilkes-
Barre.
Lexis’ godparents are her aunt
and uncle, Anne and Levi Harris.
Hailey’s godparents are her aunt,
Erin Reilly, and Adam Newirth.
The twins have an older sister,
Ava, 1.
They are the granddaughters of
Bruce and Paulette Reilly, Wilkes-
Barre; Steve and Debbie Shack-
elford, Arkansas; and the late
Ronald Douglas Coltrane Sr. They
are the great-granddaughters of
Roberta Reilly, Mountain Top;
Aaron and Flora Stark, Arkansas;
and the late Irene Hando.
A family luncheon was held in
the twins’ honor after the bap-
tism.
Alexis R. and Hailey I.
Coltrane baptized
P
atrick Joseph Roman Jr., son of
Patrick and Danay Roman, Pitt-
ston, was baptized on June 10, 2012,
at St. John’s Evangelist Church, Pitt-
ston, by Monsig-
nor Bendik.
Patrick is the
grandson of Frank
and Maureen
Roman, Pittston,
and Gerald and
Sandra Rebo,
Drums. He is the
great-grandson of Rita Finnerty, Pitt-
ston; the late Patrick Finnerty;
Jeanne Roman, Pittston; the late
Frank Roman; the late John and Emi-
ly Rebo; and the late James and
Louise Davis.
Patrick’s godparents are Dann
Gwynn and Tara Skutack.
Patrick has two older sisters, Ire-
lyn, 12, and Gabriella, 3, and an older
brother, Dominic, 8.
Patrick J. Roman Jr.
baptized
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 5B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
Dallas Middle School
Dr. Thomas J. Duffy, principal,
Dallas Middle School, recently
announced the Honor Roll for
the fourth marking period.
Grade 6: Honors with Distinction:
Audrey Aristeo, Rebecca Balara,
Cassidy Buda, Annalise Cheshire,
Jessica Chinikaylo, Caroline
Conrad, Steven Finarelli, Andrew
Francis, Emma Hastings, Olivia
Kimmerle, Andrew Kovalick,
Alicia Langan, Gianna Leo, John
Macey, Kimberly Manganella,
Matthew Metzloff, Ryan Nelligan,
Benjamin O’Connell, Mikayla
Reynolds, Rayna Roberts, Rachel
Rollman, Heather Shively, Sa-
mantha Sorokin, Logan Tomp-
kins, Bryce Van Deutsch, Hannah
Vitale, Jennifer Yencha, Kyle
Zern. First Honors: Scott Alex-
ander, Erin Amos, Madeline
Arthur, Ian Backus, Victoria
Barral, Shania Bearce, Dasha
Bidding, Kayla Bidding, Michael
Biesecker, Adam Borton, Maken-
na Bryant, Nicholas Carr, Alexan-
der Charlton, Michael Collins,
Sarah Congdon, Kaitlin Connolly,
Megan Dailey, Christopher Dau-
trich, George Davies, Cassidy
DeLeur, Drake Dettore, Joseph
Deyo, Jenny Dickerson, Matthew
Dillon, Max Dzugan, Morgan
Edwards-Lewis, Sayde Ellsworth,
Joseph Fioti, Sydney Fulton,
Mason Gattuso, Andrew Grabow-
ski, Kyle Gurzynski, Joshua
Holdredge, James Hunter, Mi-
chael Huntington, Joshua Jar-
den, Morgan Jenkins, Hanna
Johnson, Olivia Johnson, Olivia
King, Angel Klemunes, Nicholas
Kocher, Kaitlyn Kozick, Kade
Kravits, Samuel Kravitsky, Nicho-
las Krivak, Mikail Krochta, Clau-
dia Leu, Dylan Lisnow, Megan
Lyons, Nathan Maransky, Mat-
thew Mathers, Evan McLain,
Madison McEvoy, Erica McGov-
ern, Jordyn Miller, Zachery
Minarik, Nicholas Mishu, Rylee
Muldoon, Christopher Murray,
Emma Oley, Corey Osborne,
Olivia Ostrowski, Maria Ostrum,
Garrett Pall, Drew Patton, Mat-
thew Pehala, Alex Perry, Caitlyn
Pike, Gabriela Ramirez, Melinda
Ratchford, Hunter Resavage,
Larson Rice, Catherine Rinehart,
Marissa Roberts, Mark Roginski,
Peyton Ross, Christopher Se-
deski, Joshua Segear, Dylan
Shaver, Kelly Shimonis, Dalton
Simpson, Kaveri Singh, Ryan
Spears, John Stachnik, Brody
Strickland, Kaitlyn Strumski,
Adam Sutton, Rayna Swida,
Rena Troy, Madison Willis, Erika
Wintersteen, Josh Wyandt,
Jacob Yakus, Patrick Yurish,
Edward Zochowski, Abigail Zol-
ner. Second Honors: Bradley
Adams, Lauren Alves, Emily
Baranowski, Adam Barberio,
Lucas Birdsall, James Bittner,
Christina Blankensop, Zachary
Bloom, Hannah Boyd, Nora
Brown, Jeffrey Buscher, John
Bynon, Michael Caravaggio,
David Chopyak, Makiah Cintron,
Katherine Colacito, C.J. Cool-
baugh, Harold Dauernheim,
Dylan Davenport, Joshua Deyo,
Anthony Dixon, Jacob Dragon,
Gage Elliott, Mya Enright, Marga-
ret Evanoski, Ivan Gingo, Collin
Gleco, Bridget Goodrich, Kimber-
ly Gruver, Christopoher Hadsall,
Jaclyn Hodle, Hollie Holthaus,
Joshua Kalna, Madison Klopp,
Kara Kochanski, Ryan Kollar,
Jessica Kush, Alexis LaNunziata,
Ty Madden, Matthew Magnotta,
Thomas Marsola, Ariyonna
Martin, Nicholas Matcho, Saman-
tha Mazula, Autumn McCrum,
Aaron McGuire, Julianna Myers,
Rachel Nelligan, Gerald Ogurkis,
Mark Regan, Kyle Ripa, Nicole
Russell, Kendra Saba, Kaitlyn
Sarday, David Schuster, Michael
Sebolka, Nathaniel Steele, Tyler
Stivers, Dylan Sutherland, Fran-
cesca Treslar, Jake Weiland,
Nicholas Whitesell, Richard
Wooditch, Katherine Yablonsky,
Kyle Yagloski.
Grade 7: Honors with Distinction:
Christopher Arvletta, Liam
Barrett, Maria Bednar, Angela
Bendick, Paige Boyle, Zachary
Charlton, Maxine DeRome,
Courtney Devens, Christopher
Good, Greta Ketchner, Kate
Lazzeri, Sara Lojewski, Justin
Marshall, Connor McAndrew,
Jordan McLaughlin, Ann Met-
zloff, Collin Pertl, Troy Reinert,
Arthur Spears, Allison Stallard,
Sarah Strazdus, Shayla Stuart.
First Honors: Aloysha Acker-
man, Ashlie Alves, Chase An-
derson, Jonathan Andrews,
Jacob Besecker, Jarod Blockus,
Kaylynn Bruch, Daniel Burkhart,
Mikaila Chakon, Nicholas Christ-
man, Brandon Clemow, Ryan
Cohen, Jason Culp, Sarah Daly,
Katelyn DeAnthony, Meghan
Donahue, Blake Dyke, Lee Eck-
ert, Michael Farrell, Maggie
Gilbertson, Savannah Gochoel,
Max Gordon, Leah Gorr, Mia
Greenwood, Elizabeth Grose,
Rachel Habib, Kaitlyn Hill, Emily
Howell, Joshua Hunter, Chris-
topher Huntington, Madison
Hurst, Haley Karasinski, Ryan
Kelly, Elizabeth Kennelly, Ga-
brielle Kosierowski, Talia Kosie-
rowski, Jessica Kus, Tori Landon,
Anna Lehane, Emma Lehman,
Rachel Maniskas, Stone Manello,
Carl Markowski, Erin May, Corey
McAndrew, Abigail McCabe,
Megan Meyer, Megan Miller,
Richard Morgan, David Orehot-
sky, Riley Oremus, James Os-
chal, Ronald Ostrowsky, Emily
Pellam, Carley Perloff, Connor
Phillips, Ryan Phillips, Sara Rei-
chold, Margaret Rinehart, Brian-
na Rinehimer, Christian Roberts,
Madeleine Ross, Michael Santo-
ra, Justin Sarker, Sara Schwartz,
Joelle Serafin, Jeffrey Simon,
Megan Sinoracki, Madison Slack-
tish, Alexis Spaciano, Jacob
Stritzinger, Jessica Stuart, Ethan
Szczecinski, Josephina Treslar,
Skylar Vanderhoff, James Vitale,
Jaydin West, Jordan Wilson,
Alexander Zaykowski, Andrew
Zeyher. Second Honors: Mousta-
fa Almeky, Hannah Baloga,
Gregory Banks, John Barrett,
Kyle Besecker, Malynda Cook,
Breiana Coolbaugh, Nico DeLu-
ca, Jacqueline Dottor, Robert
Emil, Charles Giacometti, Mi-
chele Gill, Nicholas Green, Emily
Heltzel, Ryan Hulbert, Brandon
James, Madalyn Kelley, Connor
Kerkowski, Rachael Kozick, Nina
Leeds, Kady Mamola, Michael
Mesko, Kyle Moskaluk, Abigail
Noone, Justin Phillips, Jonathon
Scintilla, Jacob Serafin, Owen
Sprau, Robert Swida, Christian
Sypniewski, Andrew Thomas,
Joseph Thompson, Justin
Thompson, Ryan Trumm, Erica
VanEtten, Dillon VanTuyl, Victo-
ria Vespico, Christophe Waters,
Abigale Zondlo.
Grade 8: Honors with Distinction:
Mohammad Abualburak, Chris-
topher Biesecker, Catherine
Blankensop, Andrew Chupka,
Catherine Dillon, Chase Feeney,
Tanner Gattuso, Devon Gerstein,
Courtney Hoats, Lauren Hudak,
Michael Kovalick, Kyleigh Kravits,
Angelo Kwak, Michelle Leonard,
Rachel Luke, Ryan Martin, Sukh-
mail Mathon, Justin Novitski,
Marlena Ostrowski, Mira Patel,
Alexandra Rome, Kathryn Sne-
deker, Krista Vivian, Emilee
Zawatski. First Honors: Saleem
Abualburak, Rebecca Andrews,
Kyle Archer, Emily Atiyeh, Bren-
dan Balara, Lia Barbacci, Joseph
Bevevino, Joseph Blaine, Jessica
Bowden, Brielle Brace, Anthony
Brominski, Lorenzo Buchhalter,
Jacob Buda, Julie Butwin, Da-
neille Caputo, Taryn Chopyak,
Arthur Coolbaugh, Allsion De-
Boer, Anthony DeLuca, Alexa
Dosiak, Lauren Dottor, Zachary
Dottor, Tayler Dove, Timothy
Elston, Madison Evans, James
Farrell, John Fessler, Lauren
Finnegan, Joseph Fiorello, Josh-
ua Frankevich, Anna Giacometti,
Madison Goodwin, Tabitha Gra-
bowski, Tabbytha Greene, Kath-
ryn Grose, Makayla Guzzo, Ra-
chel Healey, Alexis Hockenberry,
Annalisa Jolley, Madison Kamin-
ski, Katie Kapral, Morgan Kapral,
Michael Kelly, Christian Kimmer-
le, Kaitlyn Kochanski, Katherine
Kravitsky, Jared Krawetz, Caitlyn
Landau, Paige Lewandowski,
Stephanie Lyons, Connor Macar-
ty, Rachel Magnotta, Megan
Mancinelli, Robert Martin, Ruby
Mattson, Daniel Mingey, Connor
Motley, Adam Niznik, Michaela
O’Connell, Byron Oldeack, David
Oley, Katherine Pugh, Julia
Ramirez, Arden Rice, Samantha
Rinehimer, Jacob Roberts, Jacob
Ross, Colin Ryniec, Janelle Sher-
man, Shawn Spencer, Justin
Sweeney, Alexis Wyandt, Kaitlyn
Yakus, Tyler Yang, Anne Yanik,
Justin Yavorski, Kevin Young,
Tiffany Zukosky. Second Hon-
ors: Abdulrhman Almeky, Calli
Amadio, Maria Ansilio, Dominic
Augustine, Julia Baloh, Jessica
Blat, Spencer Bowanko, Felicia
Brittain, Kathleen Brown, Peter
Capitano, Kaitlyn Chacke, Ivy
Chamberlain, Maura Chappel,
Jared DelGatto, Devin Dickson,
Nathan Dix, Mariana Dymond,
Keith Gillette, Matthew Harrison,
Edward Hontz, Joshua James,
Taylor Joseph, James Kelly,
Rachel Kon, Joseph Latzko,
John Luksic, John Lyback, Aidan
Martinez, Andrew Matcho, Cory
Metz, Alyxandrea Mikolaichik,
Cassidy Muldoon, Josh Orlandi-
ni, Grant Payne, Derek Peters,
Chad Phillips, Kyle Piskorik, Bria
Polachek, Courtney Powell,
David Powell, William Robbins,
Cameron Shaner, Jackson Shav-
er, David Simpson, Griffin Stone,
Bret Storrs, Jayson Strausser,
Stephen Strumski, Alycia Tho-
mas, Cameron Tuck, Danielle
Walsh, Nicole Wren, Aaron Yurko,
Julia Zochowski.
HONOR ROLL
Crestwood Middle School
Brian Baddick, principal, Crestwood
Middle School, recently an-
nounced the Honor Roll for the
fourth quarter.
Grade 7: Principal’s Honors: Paige
Allen, Lauren Anderson, Lance
Blass, Anna Clark, Noah Coffin,
Alyssa Cuono, Marlee Dillon,
Joshua Edwards, Maria Ellis,
Natalie Everett, Kimberly Floyd,
Kate Garcia, Madeline Heller,
Cara Henahan, Megan Hudock,
Danielle Jones, Schyler Kelsch,
Michael Kozelsky, Cataldo La-
marca, Abigail Martino, Mychae-
la Neal, Alexandra Olszyk, Lau-
ren Rowski, Troy Simko, Rachel
Speck, Curtis Tokach, Emily
Traficante, Jacob Way. High
Honors: Alyssa Allen, Zachary
Anderson, Gregory Chang, Suraj
Dalsania, Drake Dewald, Saman-
tha Forgatch, Alexa Gaetano,
Amanda Goss, Madisyn Granoski,
James Graves, Huntier Hash-
agen, Elizabeth Hines, Emily
Hiott, Nicholas Jones, John Kehl,
Mackenzie Koslop, Jordan Ko-
towski, Noah Kulp, David Lacken-
mier, Emily Lehman, Samuel
Majdic, Zachary Matson, Nicho-
las Miller, Rebecca Navin, Jordan
Olenginski, Quinn Roberts, Jake
Rosner, Gwyneth Shermanski,
Neil Simasek, Nicole Teberio,
Stephanie Thorpe. Honors:
Austin Amelung, Nicholas An-
drews, Ashton Balliet, Hannah
Barry, Maeghan Day, Noah Dean,
Sara DeSino, Matthew Dopp,
Alexis-Taylor Ermish Gattuso,
Kyle Gegaris, Paige Good, Taylor
Herron, Brianna Hischak, Jai
Hoover, Zachary Humenick,
Brandy Jones, Kyle Katra, Aaron
Keller, Misha Kazmierski, Allison
Knorek, Benjamin Kreuzer, Gar-
rett Mcafee, Maria Morgante,
Andrea Pegarella, Amelia Prez-
kop, Madison Quijano, Kyle Ri-
chards, Christian Rickrode,
Hunter Rinehimer, Monica Schul-
er, Alexandria Smolenak, Kaitlin
Snipas, Katherine Sorokes,
Jennifer Soto, Richard Spaide,
Olivia Stemrich, Gianna Uhl,
Michael Ullman, Stephen Wegen-
er, Taylor Wells, Justin Whet-
stone.
Grade 8: Principal’s Honors:
Hannah Ackers, Alexandra Ayers,
Danielle Gendler, Haley Gre-
bousky, Olivia Hassinger, David
Havard, Preston Israel, Jenna
Kanyak, Erika Karassik, Jennifer
Katulka, Connor Keenan, Lauren
Lehnowsky, Emily Liberaski, Amy
Loveless, Derek Lutz, Zachary
Metzger, Joanne Monfiletto,
Alison Moyer, Michael Paranich,
Megan Parsons, Hunter Pitman,
Jillian Prezkop, Irfan Punekar,
Connor Sheloski, Emily Shiplett,
Richard Supkowski, Ryan Topor-
cer, Jordan Wilkinson. High
Honors: Kyle Argenziano, Sierra
Austin, Spenser Bevins, Patrick
Brennan, Sarah Burleson, Lauren
Carter, Skyler Davis, Sarah De-
nion, Derek Distasio, Tara Full,
John Hawley, Cassandra Hol-
brook, Cara Jarmiolowski, Alexa
Johnson, Brian Jumper, Joshua
Kaminski, Sydney Kellar, Noah
Kita, Jason Klusewitz, Richard
Kresge, Michael Leri, Lance
Lysiak, Abigail Macko, Sadie
Mcnulty, Nathan Mehalick, Ab-
bey Murphy, Julie Murphy, Mor-
gan Novosel, Ashley Paranich,
Nicole Paranich, Jay Patel, Kish-
an Patel, Taryn Pecile, Yekateri-
na Petrash, Alee Pettit, Isabella
Possinger, Lindsay Ratushny, W.
Jacob Reilley, Madeline Ritsick,
David Scavone, Tyler Scott,
Robert Shovlin, Joel Sledziewski,
Gabriella Slucki, Taylore Smigel-
ski, Samantha Stasko, Joshua
Sterling, Ashleigh Thomas,
Nicole Wert, Alaina Williams,
Austin Wood, Paige Zaleppa.
Honors: James Albee, Matthew
Andrews, Timothy Antosh, Skye
Benninger, Jessie Bonnevier,
Bailey Bowman, Michael Brooks,
Sarah Brown, Morgan Cava-
naugh, Alexis Davidson, El-
izabeth Dessoye, Raegan Dis-
tasio, Mallory Dixon, Mark Dixon,
Skyler Dixon, Courtney Dorn-
heim, Madison Emanski, Sean
Ermish, Sarah Estok, Breann
Fetterman, Christa Filbert, Men-
dell Foreman, Bailey Gallagher,
Madisen Gavin, Maxwell Genti-
lesco, Allison Geroski, Sarah
Gower, Wilson Guarnera, Gabriel
Hagen, John Hoops, Zachary
Howton, Kara Johnson, Aaron
Jumper, Bernhard Kahlau, Josh-
ua Keil, Timothy Kindler, Logan
Knapp, Stefan Krupski, Harley
Langford, Ryan Leroy, Karissa
Levenoskie, Michelle Loveless,
James Mack, John Macri III,
Ryan Magin, Alexander Makow-
ski, Ian Malia, Joshua Malkemes,
James Martino, Sean Meehan,
Morgan Melovitz, Mckenna Mera,
Christina Mercadante, Kyle
Mitchell, Rachel Morgan, Gavin
Morgans, Alice Novatnak, Amy
Paisley, Tyler Papura, Grace
Penney, Amanda Petroski, Kayla
Pickering, Rachel Pickett, Mi-
chaela Plouffe, Daniella Ramirez,
Brett Reidinger, Katie Reilly,
Chase Riccio, Brandon Rinehim-
er, Conor Rogan, Ryan Rogan,
Kayla Roman, Seamus Rother,
Kaitlin Saake, Kyle Sanders,
Alexander Scaramastro, Aytion-
na Scott, Gary Scott III, Brianna
Scutt, LeeAnn Shene, Amanda
Stopper, Melissa Szmurlo, Nicole
Van Kirk, Abigale Walton, Kevin
Wascavage, Stephanie Wychock,
Joshua Wynn, Tyler Zasada.
HONOR ROLL
Schuyler Avenue Elementary School, Wyoming Valley West School District, recently announced the
Star Students for the month of May. Awarded students have exemplary behavior and have displayed
positive attitudes towards themselves, their school and teachers. Star students, from left, first row, are
Mcguire Martin, Kiah Winston, Zanya Hickson, Anthony Griffiths, Thanaporn Meejinda, and Ashanti
Jones-Rampel. Second row: Raymond Whalen, principal; Wendy Patton, head teacher; Tianna Brunson;
Connor Flaherty; Joshua Cheetham; Mia Simon; Irvin DeRemer, director of elementary education; and
Ben Sobieski.
Schuyler Students of the Month named for May
K.M. Smith Elementary School, Nanticoke, recently announced the Students of the Month for May.
The students have excelled in acting safely, being responsible and caring about others. One student
from each class was selected for the honor. Nicholas Hornlein was chosen as the school-wide Student
of the Month winner. His teacher is Janell Stapert. Star students, from left, first row, are Lacey Gushock,
Zachary Kopeck, Jai-Lin Green, Riley Burke and Kielie Schoch. Second row: Jordan Lamb, Zachary
Tesar, Hannah Guydosh, Brayden Warman, Kaya DeStefano, Haylee Delaney, Hornlein and Stapert. Jose
Finn and Josh Duncan are also Students of the Month.
Students of the Month named at K.M. Smith Elementary
Crestwood Middle School principal Brian Baddick recently announced the Students of the Month for
May. Award-winning students, from left, first row, are Noah Kita, Megan Hudock, Spenser Bevins and
Nick Andrews. Second row: Lauren Carter, Isabella Possinger, Kimberly Floyd and Richard Spaide.
Students of the Month named at Crestwood Middle School
The University of Scranton’s Mathematics Department recently held its fifth annual Integration Bee
for high school and college students. The format of the competition is similar to that of a spelling bee,
except contestants are given integrals to calculate. In the first round of the bee, participants were asked
to evaluate approximately 20 definite integrals. Five participants in each category moved on to the final
round, where they were challenged to find an anti-derivative of a single real variable function within
two minutes. Finalists in the high school competition, from left: Joshua Cohen, East Stroudsburg South;
Hoang Tran, Varodom Theplertboon, high school bee winners, Wyoming Seminary; Noah Brewer and
Tyler Martin, Wyoming Seminary; and Stacey Muir, associate professor of mathematics.
Students win honors at Integration Bee
Our Lady of Victory
HARVEYS LAKE
Our Lady of Victory Harveys Lake continues to host the
Annual Six Month Devotion to Our Lady of Fatima
This month’s service will take place on FRIDAY,
JULY 13TH AT 7:00 PM, the Devotions will continue to be
held on the 13th of each month through October 13th.
The Devotions to Our Lady of Fatima consist of
The Rosary, Beautiful Marian Hymns and Benediction.
For Further Information Call 639-1535
Handicap Parking & Access is Available
7
6
4
8
3
5
303 MARKET STREET corner 3rd ave
kingston pa 570.287.9999
tue & wed 11-6 / thu 12-8 / fri & sat 10-4
making room for new fall yarns!
CLEARANCE SALE
20-60% OFF YARN
July 5-14
• Custom Homes
• Additions • Remodeling
• Roofing • Siding •
Interior Damage •
Fire, Water and Storm
Restoraton
We Will Work With Your
Insurance Company!
DOMBROSKI BUILDERS, LLC
Prompt – Reliable – Professional
570-406-5128 / 570-406-9682
Over 26 Years Experience
PA#088686 • Fully Insured
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
BACK MOUNTAIN BOWL
Memorial Hwy Dallas • 675-5026
Eat in and Take Out!
Sicilian Pizza • Wings
Hoagies and More!
12 Main Street, Dallas • 674-7565
Monday-Saturday 10am-5pm
7
5
9
2
1
5
ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
VITO & GINO
288-8995 •
Forty Fort
Highest Prices Paid In Cash.
Free Pickup. Call Anytime.
Croix Maddox Markunas, son of
Robynn and Chris Markunas,
Chandler, Ariz., is celebrating his
first birthday today, July 8. Croix
is a grandson of Stan “Pops”
Markunas, Tunkhannock; Karen
“Mimi” and Steve “Grandpa”
Antosh, Mehoopany; Patti “Gigi”
and Mark “Poppy” Jackloski,
Swoyersville. He is a great-
grandson of Lil and Ray Jack-
loski, Swoyersville. Croix has a
brother, Chase, 5.
Croix M. Markunas
Chase Connor Oravic, son of
Josh and Nicole Oravic, Moun-
tain Top, is celebrating his third
birthday today, July 8. Chase is
a grandson of Mark Ciavarella
and Cindy Ciavarella and Rick
and Maureen Oravic. He has a
sister, Cali, 1.
Chase C. Oravic
Nesbitt Women’s and
Children’s Center at
Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital
Rivera, Holly and Brian, Wilkes-
Barre, a daughter, June 25.
Lyons, Kristi and Jason, Harveys
Lake, a son, June 26.
Rodriguez, Claudia, Wilkes-
Barre, a son, June 26.
Harrison, Courtney and Justin
Crop, Hanover Township, a
daughter, June 26.
Krofchok, Amanda and Nicholas,
Ashley, a daughter, June 26.
Clymo, Heather and Donald
Mosley III, Bear Creek Town-
ship, a son, June 27.
Palmer, Katrina and Trellius
“Dontay” Young, Edwardsville,
a son, June 28.
Delhagen, Victoria and Michael
Grier, Kingston, a son, June
28.
Miner, Cindy and Douglas, Tunk-
hannock, a son, June 29.
Peters, Beth and Nate Evans,
Wilkes-Barre, a son, June 30.
Martin, Cady and Joshua Pol-
lins, Wyoming, a son, June 30.
BIRTHS
Orlando Regional Hospital,
Orlando, Fla.
Coe, Erica and Charles, a daugh-
ter, June 6. Grandparents are
Leon and Susan Belles Zimol-
zak, Shickshinny.
OUT-OF-TOWN
BIRTHS
Kindergarten students from St. Jude School in Mountain Top recently gathered in St. Jude Church to celebrate graduation. Musical selec-
tions and presentations prepared by the students were given. Jeanne Rossi, principal, delivered opening remarks and assisted Deacon Gene
Kovatch, Pastoral Outreach at St. Jude Church, with the presentation of diplomas. Kovatch also offered reflections on the kindergarten stu-
dents and their experiences during the past year. The students presented their mothers with flowers to mark the special occasion. Refresh-
ments were served in the cafeteria, where the tables were decorated with custom-designed gifts. Graduates, from left, first row, are Chase
Rasmus, Carly Glaser, Lauren Lokuta, Kyle Kocon, Ahyaan Sayed, Gianna Musto, Ronald Ungvarsky, Abe Hagenbuch, Joseph Kopko, Mia
Kramer, and Donato Strish. Second row: Avery Chepolis, Emerson Zito, Jack Novelli, Olivia Bilbow, Alexandra Hargreaves, Mary Kate Banford,
Colton Moran, Ryan Grieves, Benjamin Butterfield and Emily Kuchar. Third row: Brendon Brobst, Natalie Hunsinger, Hannah Hickey, Lainey
Conway, Kayden Ayre, Alex Martin, Austin Campbell, Margaret Mary Ganter, Francesca Basalyga and Kesi Wambold. Fourth row: Anita Legge,
faculty; Mary Ann Ostrowski, faculty; Kovatch; and Rossi.
St. Jude celebrates kindergarten graduation
Graduation exercises for the kindergarten class at the United
Hebrew Institute in Wilkes-Barre were conducted in the Weiss
Auditorium at the Jewish Community Center. Rabbi Raphael Ne-
metsky, principal, greeted families and friends and introduced
Geveret Sophie Pernikoff, Judaic studies teacher, who directed the
students in a musical presentation. Pernikoff was assisted by
Nicole Klapat, secular teacher for the kindergarten. Accompani-
ment was provided by Sandra Himelstein. Diplomas and certif-
icates were given by Klapat, Nemetsky and Pernikoff after the
presentation. The parents of the graduates provided a reception.
Graduates, from left, are Lia Stone, Bayla Griver, Juliana Good and
Gianna Lehner.
UHI students graduate from kindergarten
First-grade students in Mr. Kline’s class at the Northwest Area
Primary School recently received perfect spelling awards for
spelling more than 300 words without a single mistake through-
out the school year. Award winners, from left, are Carter Hontz,
Lexxi Sink, Sarah Whitenight and Landon Hufford.
Students win spelling awards
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Rachael A. Talpash, Larksville,
received the Wandell Award at
Wilkes University’s com-
mencement ceremony. The
award is presented to the
undergraduate students with
the highest grade-point aver-
age in the
graduating
class. The
award was
established
in memory
of Mable
Scott Wan-
dell and
Sterling
Leroy Wan-
dell. Talpash had a perfect 4.0
average, earning her Bachelor
of Arts degree with a major in
psychology summa cum laude.
She is the daughter of Michael
and Lisa Talpash. Talpash tied
for the honor with senior
Michele Wakeley, Endicott, N.Y.
She served as a supplemental
instruction leader for statis-
tics courses in the psychology
department and was a mem-
ber of the Psi Chi Honor So-
ciety and the Alpha Chi Honor
Society. Talpash was also the
recipient of the Mark Slomo-
witz Scholarship and the
Eugene T. Kolezar Scholarship.
She has worked on the Wilkes
Campaign Phonathon; as a
note-taker for the Office of
Disability Services; and as an
aide in the Student Services
Department. A graduate of
Wyoming Valley West High
School, she will continue her
education this fall, pursuing a
master’s degree in school
psychology at Northeastern
University in Boston.
Bethany Brody, Edwardsville,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David
Brody, received the Samuel
Stephen Popky Leadership
Award dur-
ing com-
mencement
at Wyoming
Seminary.
The award
was given in
recognition
of her ser-
vice to the
school and
her concern for her fellow
students. She also received
the Eugene Goldstein Memo-
rial Community Service Award
in recognition of her out-
standing initiative and com-
mitment to providing volun-
teer service to the community.
Prior to commencement, she
received the President’s Edu-
cational Excellence Award, the
Bradford Stuart Kline Award
for accomplishment in biology
and the James A. Ross Memo-
rial Award for high scholarship
in Biblical and religious study
and outstanding leadership in
the religious and worship life
of the school community. A
Levi Sprague Fellow, she has
been inducted into the Cum
Laude Society, the national
academic honor society for
college preparatory schools.
NAMES AND FACES
Talpash
Brody
Pennsylvania American Water recently announced that 10 high
school seniors throughout Pennsylvania, including one from Lu-
zerne County, were selected to receive Stream of Learning Schol-
arships. This is the third year that Pennsylvania American Water
offered the program to support outstanding students within its
service areas who are charting a course of study that is critical to
the water and wastewater industry. Each winning student received
a $2,000 scholarship. Local recipient was Angela Marie Coco from
Wyoming Area Secondary Center. At the scholarship presentation,
from left: Vito Quaglia, principal, Wyoming Area Secondary Center;
Coco; and John Yamona, water quality manager, Pennsylvania
American Water.
Wyoming Area student awarded scholarship
Four students from Lake-Lehman High School recently compet-
ed in the National History Day National Competition at the Uni-
versity of Maryland, College Park. Both Lake-Lehman High School
projects won first place in their respective categories at the state
competition in May at Cumberland Valley High School, Mechan-
icsburg. Freshmen Hannah Cross, Sela Fine and Shauna Leahy
competed in the Group Exhibit category and senior Shelby Foster
competed in the Individual Research Paper category. The exhibit
by Cross, Fine, and Leahy was chosen to represent the state of
Pennsylvania at a one-day exhibition of outstanding History Day
projects from across the nation at the Smithsonian Museum of
American History on June 13. The research paper by Shelby Foster
won the Outstanding Entry from the State of Pennsylvania Award
and finished 10th place in the nation in the Research Paper cate-
gory. Participants, from left: Fine; Cross; Leahy; Foster; and Michael
Novrocki, teacher.
Lake-Lehman students compete in history competition
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 7B
➛ C O M M U N I T Y N E W S
7
5
9
4
8
4
ANTENNA STAR
866-929-4491
WYOMING VALLEY LANDSCAPING & MASONRY
Walls, Pavers
& Firepits
Stamped and Colored
Concrete, Pavers, Flagstone,
All Types of Retaining Walls,
Excavation, Drainage,
Custom Landscaping Designs
WATER PROBLEMS
DRAINAGE
IS OUR SPECIALTY
#1
IN CUSTOMER
SATISFACTION
“Tired Of Contractors Not Showing Up?”
LICENSED & INSURED • ALL WORK GUARANTEED
287-4144
All Estimates
Given in 2 Days
PA. 066987
www.wvlandscaping.com
References and Photos
Upon Request
From Te Wilkes-Barre Riverfront
Parks Committee
Tank You
RIVERFEST - A GREAT SUCCESS
Three Days of Fun Activities, Music, Paddling and Dragon Boat Racing
Over 400 Paddlers On The River • Eight Dragon Boats
Over 3000 In The Wilkes-Barre Riverfront Parks and River Common
Photo: Mike Burnside
WILKES-BARRE: The La-
dies Ancient Order of Hiber-
nians will host a dinner for the
Irish teachers participating in
the King’s College Irish Teach-
ers Program at 6 p.m. on July
16 at St. Andrew’s Parish (for-
merly St. Patrick’s), Parrish
Street. This year there will be
12 teachers from Ireland vis-
iting the area as part of the
program. Cost is $15 per ticket
and reservations are due by
Tuesday.
Anyone interested in attend-
ing the event, should contact
Kellie at 825-7849.
WILKES-BARRE: Kaitlyn
Miller, Miss Pennsylvania’s
Outstanding Teen, is hosting a
Princess in Training Camp to
benefit the Children’s Miracle
Network July 17-19 at David
Blight School of Dance Studio,
91 S. Main St. The camp is for
girls ages 5-12.
The camp sessions will take
place 9 a.m. to noon on July 17
and 18 and 4 p.m. on July 19. A
princess pageant will take place
at 6 p.m. on July 19.
Cost is $45 and includes hair
and makeup by Dawn’s Hair
Fashions; headshots by Photog-
raphy by Andy; arts and crafts;
opening number; interview
prep; camp T-shirt and princess
bag.
For applications, email mis-
spaot2012@aol.com or mom-
mamia33@comcast.net. For
more information call 283-2289.
Deadline to sign up is Monday.
IN BRIEF
Kent School, Kent, Conn.
Melissa Flack, Dallas.
OUT-OF-TOWN
HONOR ROLL
Wyoming Seminary Upper
School
Wyoming Seminary Dean Jay
Harvey recently announced the
Upper School Dean’s List for the
spring trimester of the 2011-2012
academic year.
Dean’s List High Honors: Sai
Abhishek, Oren Adam, Ali
Ahmed, Ava Alexander, Nada
Bader, Sean Banul, Skylar Banul,
Michael Blaine, Olivia Bolus,
Brandon Bombe, Emily Brecher,
Noah Brewer-Houghton, Mary
Siobhan Brier, Bethany Brody,
Katelyn Buyarski, Qifang Cai,
Seth Callahan, Xinyi Chen, Qianyi
Cheng, Eric Cholish, Alexander
Christine, Henry Cornell, Jason
Curtis, Salvadore Diaz, Hoang
Doan Do, Matthew Doggett,
Kelsey Dolhon, Hannah Dressler,
Lauren Fernandez, Yifan Fu,
Hannah Gabriel, Kristopher
Gildein, Leah Goldberg, Jamie
Goldstein, Bryden Gollhardt,
Julia Grosek, Tyler Harvey, Frank
Henry, Devin Holmes, Benjamin
Hornung, Byoungjoon Jang, Ann
Marie Karis, Gordon Stewart
Kiesling, Christopher Kim, Alex
Kolessar, Sarah Kwiatek, Scott
Kwiatek, Lauren Larar, Phong
Hoang Le, Chia-Yen Lee, Andrew
Levandoski, Olivia Levine, Jiajing
Li, Xi Li, Yan Liu, Julia Mag,
Katherine Marsman, Tyler Mar-
tin, Katherine Maximov, Logan
May, Danielle Melnick, Megan
Molitoris, Madison Nardone, Ha
Thi Thu Nghiem, AnhHong
Nguyen, Loc Dang Xuan Nguyen,
Renata O’Donnell, Dakota Pace,
Hoang Anh Phan, Adithya Pu-
gazhendhi, Ashlyn Reiser, Car-
oline Reppert, Adam Rinehouse,
Katherine Rogers, Sukanya Roy,
Thomas Rundell, Margaret Rupp,
Amanda Schall, Katherine
Schraeder, Amanda Sedor, Bra-
dley Sedor, Sejal Sharma, Nath-
an Shearn, Amy Shick, Henry
Smith, Isaac Sours, Emma Spath,
Locchanan Sreeharikesan, Wil-
liam Thede, Varodom Theplert-
boon, Megan Tindell, Hoang Viet
Tran, Hai Yen Trinh, Alannah
Trombetta, Mairead Tuttle, Krys-
ten Voelkner, Hongyi Wang,
Mengqi Wang, Marguerite Wiles,
Lillian Williams, Karin Williner,
Zachary Wise, Jin Xing, Chunhui
Yu, Simon Zafrany, Junkai Zeng.
Dean’s List: Tipok Aekviriyasath-
ane, Imaz Athar, Udai Aulakh,
Rebecca Barnes, Olivia Bar-
ragree, Dylan Bassham, Jacob
Berger, Emma Bertram, Matthew
Bilodeau, Matthew Blom, Victo-
ria Bost, Evan Botwin, Charlotte
Brecher, Scott Burstall, Matthew
Cartwright, Tseng-Yu Chang,
Danielle Chichilitti, Caitlin Con-
way, Corinne Conyngham, Ga-
brielle Coslett, Maegan Coulter,
Rebecca Czajkowski, Trang
Quynh Dang, Morgan Dowd,
Atalia Dressler, Scott Edmunds,
Troy Edwards, Nora Fierman,
David Fox, Walker Cohl Fulk,
Emily Gabriel, Neel Gadhoke,
Zubin Gadhoke, Anita Ghosh,
Brandon Gonzalez, Emily Gran-
ger, Katrina Grosek, Celine Gui-
chardan, Kyoungjun Han, Chris-
tine Harris, Jane Henry, Jacob
Idec, Pierce Jaswinski, Han Seol
Jeong, Riku Kaizaki, Grigor
Kerdikoshvili, Alexandra Kilya-
nek, Daniel Kopec, Stephanie
Larar, Jae Hee Lee, Ching-Kuang
Lin, Zixiang Lin, Yu-Liang Liu,
Sophia Lovito, Kristen Mericle,
Philipp Metzger, Kathleen Moo-
ney, Chiu Hong Ng, Spencer
Norris, Ines Nowack, Adam
O’Brien, Hunter Obeid, Harry
Parkhurst, Meera Patel, Chris-
topher Paulsen, Gianna Plaksa,
Abhinav Prasad, Alexis Quick,
Zachary Riegel, Harold Roberts,
Alxis Rodis, Ann Romanowski,
Brandon Rome, Alaina Schukraft,
Joseph-John Simons, Olivia
Smialek, Ashlyn Smith, Sarah
Spillane, Jingwen Su, Douglas
Thomas, Tuan Viet Vu, Marra
Wagner, Thomas Walsh, Dawei
Wang, Jamila Wemple, Jamie
Williams, Qian Yang, Kristina
Yannotta, Ye Eun Yoon, Aria
Zarnoski, Yijia Zhang, Jonathan
Zirnheld.
DEAN’S LIST
Meyers High School recently recognized the senior members of the National Honor Society. Members, from left, first row, are Amanda
Tredinnick, Mary Pettit, Ingrid Ritchie, Ann Nace, Anastasiya Shelest, Frances Kwok and Kasey Conahan. Second row: Alivia Weidler, Tess
Sauer, Leanne McManus, Abigail Mercadante, Kyra Wolsieffer, Amy Kowalczyk, Brianna Wallace, Mia Scocozzo, Tabassum, Megan McDade,
Gabriella Romanelli, Mikaela Carlson, Jasmine French, Kristin Sheetz and Sierra Hairston. Third row: Michael Kishbach, Timothy Brodhead,
Nicholas Fonzo, Sean Bergold, Tyler Byrd, David Oram, Vito Pasone, Julian Welsch, Alexander Marino and Christopher Yanovich. Fourth
row: Collin Gallagher, Matthew Kropp, Joshua Fox, Corey Dubil, Evan Domanski, William Christian, Branden Ott, William Trowbridge, David
Zych, Jeremy Labatch, Jonathon Zionce and Alexander Pape. Also a member is Anthony Morrash.
Meyers honor society students recognized
C M Y K
PAGE 8B SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ P E O P L E
Landlords
• Find Good Tenants
• Address ProblemTenants
• Supply Landlord Forms
• Free Rental Advertising
• Investing in Properties
• And more...
5 Free Landlord Forms with Coupon
Plus Free Rental Advertising
Coupon
Thurs &Fri.. 2 to 8pm Sat &Sun.. 1 to 5pm: (570) 829-1702
We Can Help...
sizzle!
Park Office Bldg.
400 Third Ave. • Suite 109
Kingston, PA
(570) 714-2656
1132 Twin Stacks Drive
Twin Stacks Center
Dallas, PA
(570) 675-8113
NEW LOCATION
Family
Hearing Center
Zeigler - Asby Audiology
www.afamilyhearingcenter.com
Are you missing the best
sounds of summer?
Whether it’s a story from an old friend or a child telling you
about their latest adventure. ReSound Alera
®
hearing aids are
packed full of features to help you hear better even in the most
challenging summer environments!
• Understand speech better, even in noisy environments
• Automatically adjusts to your listening situation
• Experience a phone call or hug without whistling or
buzzing in your ear
• A truly wireless hearing aid that connects you directly to
your TV, cell phone, and other audio devices.
• Free hearing consultation
• Free demonstration of our most advanced
hearing aid technology
• Trial period and financing options available
ReSound Alera is
nearly invisible!
WE DO IT ALL!
Chimneys, Stoves, Fireplaces
Sales - Service - Installation
“Your Most Complete Fireplace and Chimney Experts”
FIREPLACE GALLERY
Many Stoves, Fireplaces & Furnaces on Display
Midway Between Tunkhannock & Dallas
570-298-2150 Tues. 12-5 • Wed.-Fri. 10-5 • Sat. 10-2
Beautiful Fire with
Glowing Logs
Lifetime Warranty
Heater Rated
Quality Fireplaces
Variable Speed Blower
Wood
Pellets
Available
Heat Your Home Economically
MMid B
Gas Fireplaces and Inserts
7
5
9
1
1
9
on Spring & Summer Shoes and Sandals
158 MEMORIAL HWY. • SHAVERTOWN • 1-800-49-SHOES
Hours: Mon. & Sat. 10-5:30pm • Tues. Fri. 10am-8:30pm • Sun. 12-4pm
SHOE SALE
up to 50%
Birkenstocks Now on the Sidewalk!
As low as $39
ties, advocates see the libraries as
a way to keep the printed word in
the hands of seasoned and bud-
ding bibliophiles.
The concept of passing along a
favorite book speaks to people’s
desire to connect in person at a
time when much communication
takes place via texts and Face-
book, said Dana Cuff, a UCLA
professor and director of city-
LAB, a think tank.
“The small-scale sharing of
somethingthat was special toyou
seems like a great version of bor-
rowing sugar and bringing toma-
toes to your neighbor,” Cuff said.
“It helps youmakeconnections to
people who live around you.”
Little Free Library was the in-
spiration of Todd Bol, who in the
fall of 2009 landed on a way to
honor his late mother, a book-lov-
ing teacher. He built a miniature
wooden one-room schoolhouse,
mounted it outside his Hudson,
Wis., home and stocked it with
books. Evenonrainydays, friends
and neighbors would happen by
tomakeselections, dropoff books
and remark on the library’s cute-
ness.
Bol, anentrepreneur ininterna-
tional business development, en-
listed Rick Brooks, a community
outreach specialist in Madison,
Wis., to help spread the word. In
the last two years, nearly 1,800 li-
brary stewards, as Bol calls them,
have registered cabinet-size athe-
naeums in about 45 states and
dozens of countries, including
Ghana, England and Germany.
Each owner pays $25 to the Lit-
tle Free Library, a nonprofit orga-
nization, for a sign and a number.
The group’s website features a lo-
cater map and photos of people
attending grand openings for li-
braries.
Bol anticipates nearly 3,000
registered libraries by the end of
July.
That doesn’t count the unregis-
tered library of Susan and David
Dworski, who after seeing a TV
report about Little Free Library
hired a handyman to convert a
vintage beer crate into a book re-
pository that hovers over their
wooden fence on a Venice walk
street.
Since opening their house of
books on May 12, they have de-
tected a familiar pattern. They
hear the sound of footsteps ap-
proaching, fading and then re-
turning. They hear the latch
open. Then . silence. That is the
sound of a friend or a stranger in-
specting the books nestled with-
in, which typically include mem-
oirs, mysteries and self-help
manuals.
Over the weeks, visitors have
taken such varied titles as
“McCullough’s Brief Lives,”
“Mere Christianity” and “Living
Wicca” and have returned, some-
times inthemistypredawn, tode-
posit replacements such as “Nev-
er Come Morning,” “Perfect
Health” and “The Black Ice.”
“I make a point to leave people
alone while they browse,” said
Susan Dworski, a graphic design-
er, writer andjewelrymaker. “I do
hear conversations at thebox, but
I also see loners arriving with
books and taking them, rather
covertly, it seems to me. I think
perhaps folks wonder if they’re
stealing somehow, or fear being
caught on ’Candid Camera.’ “
She relishes seeing which
books appear or disappear, and
how rapidly. “It’s not unlike the
excitement of raising chickens
and going out each morning to
the coop to see which hens have
laid warm eggs, hidden in the
straw,” Dworski said.
Aware that most people do not
stroll around the neighborhood
with a spare book in hand, she
adapted the sign to read: “Take
one now. Leave one later.”
One recent Saturday morning,
Fiona Sassoon, 10, picked up a
kids mystery and the Roald Dahl
classic “Matilda” at the Dworskis’
library. She had read about the
Little Free Library movement on-
line at school. She and her par-
ents, Timand Dawn, contributed
afewbooks - some“FancyNancy”
picture books, “Ramona the Pest”
and “The Indian in the Cup-
board.”
Many library custodians get
creative, designing boxes shaped
like beehives or roosters. Others
have used plywood previously
painted by artists and birch bark
fromthe woods near their homes.
They have converted mailboxes
and newsstands.
One library stands at the end of
a boat dock on Honey Bee Island,
one of the Thousand Islands
along the St. Lawrence River,
which separates New York state
fromOntario, Canada. Bol knows
of a man who travels with his li-
brary in his RV and mounts it on
the bumper when he settles in for
the night at a park. In New Or-
leans, volunteers built10libraries
usingmaterials salvagedfromthe
Hurricane Katrina cleanup.
In the Central Valley, home
builder Lennar Corp. has put lit-
tle libraries in its subdivisions in
Fresno, Hanford and Clovis. Su-
san Wilke, vice president of sales
and marketing, commissioned
Bol to build book repositories
painted with rural and small-
town California scenes, featuring
poppies, barns, dairy cows,
horses anda womanwitha water-
ing can.
She views the libraries as a sell-
ing point. “People are needing in-
teraction,” Wilke said. “They nev-
er meet their neighbors. This pro-
vides an excuse for people to
meet and be nice.”
That was certainly the case for
Beggs and his wife, actress Mitzi
Hoag. They so enjoyed making
new friendships that they decid-
ed to hold an open house. Beggs
posteda small invitationonthe li-
brary, and, on the last Friday in
May, they welcomed half a dozen
neighbors who drank wine, ate
chips with dips and chatted until
11 p.m.
Beggs and Hoag intend to
make it a monthly tradition.
“I find the whole thing quite
gratifying,” Beggs said.
TINY
Continued from Page 1B
MCT PHOTO
Since David and Susan Dworski opened their Little Free Library, they’ve noticed a change in the
’hood. People are talking more. ’What a loving thing to do!’ one neighbor told them.
Little Free Library was the inspiration
of Todd Bol, who in the fall of 2009
landed on a way to honor his
late mother, a book-loving teacher.
C M Y K
SPORTS S E C T I O N C
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012
timesleader.com
WIMBLEDON, England — For Sere-
na Williams, the lowpoint came in early
2011, when she spent hours laying
aroundher home, overwhelmedby a de-
pressingseries of healthscares that sent
her to the hospital repeatedly and kept
her away fromtennis for10 months.
Thehighpoint cameSaturdayonCen-
tre Court at Wimbledon, whenWilliams
droppeddowntothegrass, hands cover-
ing her face. She was all the way back, a
GrandSlamchampionyet again.
Her serve as good as there is, her grit
as good as ever, Williams was dominant
at thestart andfinish, beatingAgnieszka
Radwanskaof Poland6-1, 5-7, 6-2towina
fifth championship at the All England
Cluband14thmajor titleoverall, ending
a two-year drought.
“I just remember, I was on the couch
and I didn’t leave the whole day, for two
days. Iwasjustoverit. Iwaspraying, like,
‘I can’t take any more. I’ve endured
enough. Let me be able to get through
this,’” recalled Williams, a former No. 1
whose ranking slid to 175th after a
fourth-round loss at the All England
Club last year, her second tournament
back.
“Coming here and winning today is
amazing,” she said. “It’s been an unbe-
lievable journey for me.”
Certainly has.
That’swhytearsflowedduringtheon-
W I M B L E D O N
Comeback complete for Serena with title
AP PHOTO
Serena Williams poses with the trophy for winning Wimbledon on Saturday
defeating Agnieszka Radwanska in the finals. See SERENA, Page 11C
Williams won fifth Wimbledon title
after being sidelined with health
issues for nearly a year.
By HOWARD FENDRICH
AP Tennis Writer
DALLAS – Seeing
major leaguers Kevin
Millwood and Roy
Halladay pitch no-hit-
ters is one thing.
Tossing a gemyour-
self – in a huge game
no less – carries a spe-
cial significance.
J.D. Barrett, a wit-
ness to Millwood’s
and Halladay’s no-
nos, threw a four-in-
ning no-hitter Satur-
day, helping Back
Mountain American
winthe District 31Lit-
tle League Major
baseball title with a
14-0 victory over
Wyoming/West
Wyoming.
“He pitched incredible today,”
American manager Steve Mathers
said. “After coming off that Exeter
game, what I thought was his best
game, he came in here and absolutely
shut these guys out.”
That in itself was impressive consid-
ering Wyoming/West Wyoming had
scored six or more runs in five of its
seven tournament games. But by mix-
ing in a solid change-up, Barrett was
able tofanfive includingthree looking.
Wyoming/West Wyoming had just
three baserunners. Alex Hawk drew a
four-pitchwalkinthe second, andMatt
Selinskie and Alex Gonzales worked
consecutive free passes in the fourth
with one out.
That didn’t phase Barrett in part be-
cause his offense gave hima huge cush-
ion early on.
“It was good because there wasn’t a
lot of pressure on
me,” Barrett said.
“And I knew my fiel-
ders would make the
plays.”
Flawless defense
was obscured by
pitching and offense.
Americanled3-0af-
ter one inning, even
sacrificinganout for a
run when David
Schuster got in a run-
down between first
and second to allow
Christian Roberts to
score from third.
“It was very impor-
tant,” Mather said.
“As you see, we trad-
ed in our third out for
a run there. Runs to
come by at this level
are tough to come by.
At least they were for us this year.”
Not Saturday as American tacked on
seven more in the second. Barrett had
a two-run double, while Schuster and
Devin Robbins each singled in runs as
American sent 11 batters to the plate.
The victory also means American
will be home for the entire Section 5
tournament as the D31 champion
L I TTL E L EAGUE BASEBAL L
Special performance
leads to championship
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Back Mountain American players swarm the field after winning the District 31 championship game Saturday after-
noon against Wyoming/West Wyoming.
No-hitter lifts American to district title
By JOHN ERZAR
jerzar@timesleader.com
Back Mountain American pitcher J.D. Barrett delivers a pitch during
Saturday’s District 31 championship game.
See SPECIAL, Page 6C
LAS VEGAS — Blake Griffin,
Andre Iguodala and James Har-
den were chosen Saturday to
complete the roster for the U.S.
Olympic basketball team.
They earned the final three
spots that opened after a rash of
injuries knocked out at least four
players who would have been on
the team. They beat out Eric Gor-
don, Rudy Gay and No. 1 draft
pick Anthony Davis of New Or-
leans, who couldn’t scrimmage
this week because of a sprained
ankle.
Also heading to Londonfor the
defending gold medalists are: Le-
Bron James, Kobe Bryant, Car-
melo Anthony, Chris Paul, Deron
Williams, Kevin Durant, Russell
Westbrook, Tyson Chandler and
Kevin Love.
Griffin showed he was healthy
again after being slowed by a
knee injury during the playoffs,
puttingonanimpressivedunking
display following practice Satur-
day. Harden, theNBA’sSixthMan
of the Year with Oklahoma City,
gives the Americans more scor-
ingpunchoff thebench, andIguo-
dala is a defensive specialist who
can guard multiple positions.
The Americans lost Dwight
Howard, Derrick Rose, Dwyane
Wade and Chris Bosh to injuries
inrecent months, forcingthemto
scrap plans to name their 12-man
roster on June18. They asked the
US Olympic Committee for a ros-
ter extension and added Harden
andDavis totheir original pool of
finalists that was chosen in Janu-
ary.
USABasketball chairmanJerry
Colangelo was intrigued by Da-
vis’ skills, but the national player
of the year at Kentucky sprained
his ankle last week and was not
able to take part this week, rob-
bing him of a chance to show he
was readytohandle international
competition now.
James, Bryant, Anthony, Paul
and Williams were all part of the
2008 Olympic gold medalists.
Durant, Westbrook, Chandler
and Love played on the world
championship team two years
ago.
The injuries leave the Ameri-
cans short-handed at center,
where Howard started four years
ago in Beijing and Bosh backed
him up. Chandler is the only nat-
ural center left, so the Americans
will be forcedto use some players
out of their normal NBA posi-
tions.
B A S K E T B A L L
Olympic
roster for
U.S is now
complete
Final three spots were filled
by Griffin, Iguodala and
Harden.
By BRIAN MAHONEY
AP Basketball Writer
T
he kid on the mound for Back
Mountain National was no
stranger to no-hitters.
He’s watched a couple from the
stands at major league stadiums.
He’s pitched a few himself on Lit-
tle League mounds.
But what he accomplished Sat-
urday may have given J.D. Barrett a
bigger thrill than all the rest.
Because the no-hitter he threw in
the 11-12-year old District 31 title
game solidified one last Little League
season in which Barrett and his Back
Mountain American buddies could
call themselves the best.
“Pretty good,” Barrett said of his
feat.
The circumstances surrounding it
made Barrett’s performance great.
OK, so he only had to pitch four
innings of a game that was ended
early by the 10-run rule as Back
Mountain bashed its way to a 14-0
victory over Wyoming/West Wyom-
ing.
And “Big Game” Barrett’s becom-
ing known for such stellar perform-
ances, after pitching a five-inning
no-hitter in Back Mountain’s 10-11-
year old district championship victo-
ry last summer and after helping his
teams of 9-and-10-year olds win dis-
trict titles during the previous two
years.
“He’s kind of used to it at this
point,” said his father John Barrett.
But this was the final time Barrett,
who recently turned 13 but made
Little League Baseball’s cutoff age
date, would wind up on a District 31
mound.
And he was facing a Wyoming/
West Wyoming team that just
torched opposing pitchers throughout
the district tournament.
“He pitched unbelievable today,”
Back Mountain National manager
Steve Mathers said. “Absolutely came
in and shut these guys out.”
How dominant was Barrett?
Only one ball left the infield
against him, when Wyoming/West
Wyoming’s Matt Silinskie slammed a
first-inning drive that was tracked
down in deep right field by Devin
Robbins to end the opening frame.
Other than that, hard-hitting
Wyoming/West Wyoming didn’t real-
ly come close to getting a hit, as
Barrett walked three, struck out five
and polished off his no-hit gem by
inducing two ground outs to finish
the game.
“It wasn’t on my mind,” Barrett
said. “It just happened.”
It just so happened that Barrett, a
Phillies fan, was in the stands as a
3-year-old toddler when Kevin Mill-
wood pitched a no-hitter for Philadel-
phia at Veterans Stadium in 2003.
Barrett has better recollection of
the second no-hitter he witnessed in
person, which came when his pitch-
ing hero Roy Halladay made his first
career playoff start so memorable by
holding the Cincinnati Reds hitless
in a 2010 playoff game at Citizens
Bank Park.
“Maybe he emulated them,” sug-
gested Lisa Barrett, J.D.’s mom.
More likely, Barrett was more con-
cerned about imitating his own past
playoff success. He knew Wyoming/
West Wyoming’s power-packed lineup
was dangerous, because he grew up
playing with some of those kids.
Before moving to the Back Moun-
tain, J.D. Barrett got his start in
baseball at the Tee-ball level in the
Wyoming/West Wyoming region,
where his mother works as a teacher
in the Wyoming Area school district.
“He was so thrilled to be playing
them,” Lisa Barrett said.
It turns out facing J.D. Barrett
with a championship on the line isn’t
nearly as big of a thrill.
PAUL SOKOLOSKI
O P I N I O N
True to form
with one last
unhittable pitch
Paul Sokoloski is a Times Leader sports
columnist. You may reach him at 970-7109 or
email him at psokoloski@timesleader.com.
K
PAGE 2C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
868-GOLF
260 Country Club Drive, Mountaintop
www.blueridgetrail.com
Tuesday thru Friday
Play & Ride for Just
$
33.00
Weekday Special
Must Present Coupon.
One coupon per foursome. Cannot be used in
tournaments or with any other promotion. ST
Monday Special $32
Senior Day Mon-Thurs $28
Ladies Day Thursday $28
Weekends After 1 p.m. $36
GPS CART INCLUDED
27 Unique Holes
One Breathtaking Course
Pinnacle
Rehabilitation
Associates
Kevin M. Barno, MPT • K. Bridget Barno, PT
Sharon Marranca, MPT • Hal Glatz, MPT
Maria Hall, PTA • William Montross, MPT
520 Third Ave.
Kingston
Most Insurances Do Not Require A Referral
714-6460 www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
Massage Therapy Now Available
201 S. Main St.
Pittston
602-1933
NEW
LOCATION!
Feel Better, Hit It Further
and Win Your Match!
• Treatment for all golf injuries or any
injury that is affecting your game
• Golf specific flexibility and
strengthening programs available
• Most insurances do not require a referral
for physical therapy
7
5
9
2
1
4
ALL JUNK CARS &
TRUCKS WANTED
VITO & GINO
288-8995 •
Forty Fort
Highest Prices Paid In Cash.
Free Pickup. Call Anytime.
WILKES-BARRE
GOLF CLUB
1001 FAIRWAY DR.,
WILKES-BARRE, PA
472-3590
$
16
- Must Present Coupon - Valid Up To Four Players
Mon. - Fri.
CART &
GREENS FEE
$
22
SENIORS 55
+
WEEKDAYS
AFTER 11
SAT & SUN
(after 1PM)
Exp. 8-1-12
$
30
Super Early Bird
Special
Before 7:00am
EARLY BIRD BEFORE 8:00AM WEEKDAYS - $20
www.wilkes-barregc.com
(Excludes Holidays and Tournaments)
CALL AHEAD FOR TEE TIMES
7
6
4
9
6
1
BLUE RIDGE TRAIL GOLF CLUB
2
ND
ANNUAL PINK & BLUE TOURNAMENT
All Proceeds To Benefit Local Charities for
Breast, Prostate & Colon Cancer
Saturday, July 14th, 2012
Captain & Crew ~ 1:30 Shotgun Start
Entry Fee: $100 per person
Hole-In-One Prize - 2 Year Car Lease
~ Cash Prizes ~
Flights for Men, Women & Mixed Teams
Prize Raffle • Basket of Cheer • Delicious Buffet Dinner
Call 570-868-GOLF(4653) to Register
www.Blueridgetrail.com
NO physical will be done without a
completed school physical form
signed by a parent/guardian.
Forms are available at the princi-
pal’s office of nurse’s office and
bring it the day of physical. If you
are unable to attend on your
schedules date, please attend
another day.
REGISTRATIONS/TRYOUTS
Dick McNulty Bowling League
needs bowlers to fill their Tuesday
night bowling, The league is a
men’s league with an 80% hand-
icap and bowls on Tuesday nights
at 6:30 p.m. at Chacko’s Family
Bowling Center on Wilkes-Barre
Boulevard. Interested bowlers can
call Windy Thoman at 824-3086 or
Feed Favire at 215-0180.
Dukey’s Golf Outing still has open-
ings available for the “Rowan Elise
Frederick” Memorial Golf Tourna-
ment which benefits the Children’s
Hospital of Philadelphia. The event
will take place Sunday July 29 at
Sand Springs Golf Club with an 8
a.m. shotgun start and a captain &
crew format. Cost is $80 per
person which includes carts, green
fees, equal prizes 3 flights, a hot
buffet and refreshments at Dukey’s
and more.
South Wilkes-Barre Mini Mohawk
football sign ups and equipment
hand out to be held at Charles
Street Park in Wilkes-Barre as
follows: July 8-1:00 p.m. to 3:00
p.m., July 9-6:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m., July 15-1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Registration cost is $40 per child/
$60 per family and $35 for lottery
calendars. South Wilkes-Barre Mini
Mohawk monthly meeting is July 9
at the Riverside at 7 pm.
Wyoming Valley Soccer Club is
running tryouts for tthis fall sea-
son. New players sgoyld attend
two tryouts during the month of
July. If interested, please check the
club website at www.wyoming-
valleys.com. Click on training link
and pick the age, day and time.
Please send an email with the day
and time you will be attending as
well as child’s age. Please include
yourhome and cell bumber in case
the weather does not cooperate.
Any questions contact Javier
Rodriguez at 233-0238 or ja-
vierr@ptd.net or contact Jerry
McDonald Club Director at 706-
5893 or j-mcdonald1@comcast.net.
UPCOMING EVENTS
First Annual Curt Hannon Whiffle
Ball Tournament will be held On
August 5 at 9 a.m. with regis-
tration at 8 a.m. at the West Pitt-
ston Little League. The proceeds
will benefit the Joseph Rubino
family of West Pittston.Registra-
tion is $25 per team and can be
mailed to Kory Angeli at 205 York
Ave. West Pittston, Pa. 18643. Age
brackets for teams are ages 7-9,
10-13, and 14-adult.Please include
name and number with payment
made payable to the Joseph
Rubino Charity Fund. Anyone
wishing to donate a basket for
raffle, food or volunteer please call
Paula at 237-0596. Monetary
donations may be mailed to PO
Box 3178 c/o J. Evans.
GAR Blue-Gray Fund of the Luzerne
Foundation will hold its sixth
annual golf tournament and outing
July 28 at the Wilkes-Barre Golf
Club in Laurel Run. Shotgun start
is at 8 a.m. and will be a captain
and crew format. Cost is $85 per
golfer and includes golf, prizes and
lunch afterward at the Wilkes-
Barre Township Fire Hall at 150
Watson Street. For more informa-
tion contact Jim at 855-4543.
St. Leo’s/Holy Rosary Church
located in Ashley, Pa will hold its
"Second Annual Golf Tournament"
on Saturday, August 25 at Wilkes-
Barre Municipal Golf Course in
Wilkes-Barre. Registration is from
Noon to 1 p.m. Cost is $100 per
Golfer with a Captain & Crew. Fees
include green fees, cart, regis-
tration, prizes, refreshments,free
range balls and much more. Buffet
Dinner to follow. Hole sponsorships
are being accepted. Call Mike at
822-9278 or Rose at 829-2007.
Cut off date for registration is
August 17.
CAMPS/CLINICS
Camp St. Andrew is accepting regis-
trations for its upcoming camps.
There will be two weeks of basket-
ball for girls entering grades 5-10.
The first week will run from July
8-13, and the second from July
15-20. There will also be two weeks
of traditional resident camp for all
girls entering grades 3-10 held on
the same dates. There will be a
father/son weekend for boys ages
6-13 from July 20-22. There will be
one week of basketball for boys
entering grades 4-9 from July
22-26. For more information or to
register, visit www.dioceseof-
scranton.org or call 226-4606.
Holy Redeemer Volleyball Skills
Camp will be held July 9-13 at the
Holy Redeemer gymnasium. Di-
rected by former Eastern Illinois
University coach Elijah Porr, the
camp will feature a morning ses-
sion (9 a.m.-noon) for junior high
and an afternoon session (1-5 p.m.)
for varsity athletes. The camp fee
is $90 and there is a team discount
available. For more information,
contact Jack Kablick at 472-2073
or Bob Shuleski at 357-7784.
King’s College/Kirby Park Jr. Tennis
Camp will be held July 9 through
July 20 at Kirby Park Tennis
courts. The camp will run Monday
through Thursday from 9:30 - 11:30
a.m. with Friday serving as a make-
up day. The camp features funda-
mentals of tennis instruction,
competition and various related
tennis activities. Each student will
receive a free tennis racket if
required as well as a complimen-
tary camp t-shirt. Any student
enrolling in two or more sessions
will receive a free Junior Tennis
Membership. Interested parties
should call the Kirby Park Tennis
Office at 714-9697 to sign up or to
get an information camp flyer.
Participants may also sign up the
first day of the session and can
visit the Kirby Park Tennis web site
at www.kirbyparktennis.net.
King’s College Football Camp will be
held Saturday, July 28 at the
Robert L. Betzler Athletic Complex.
The one-day camp is available for
students entering grades 9 and
above and will be held from 8:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Cost is $55 per
camper. The camp staff will teach
the fundamentals of each position
with a heavy emphasis on tech-
nique and individual teaching
drills. The camp is geared to quar-
terbacks, wide receivers, running
backs, tight ends, offensive line-
men, defensive linemen, lineback-
ers, and defensive backs. For a
brochure go to the Summer Sports
Camps link atwww.kingscollegeath-
letics.com. For additional informa-
tion, contact coach Jeff Knarr at
208-5900, extension 5378 or by
email at jeffknarr@kings.edu.
King’s College Men’s Lacrosse
Camp will be held at Betzler Fields
from July 30 -August 2. This camp
will be open to all boys ages 10-17.
Campers will be grouped by age
and experience and be coached by
college coaches in a structured
learning environment focused on
improving skill and having fun.
Camp will start at 9 a.m. and finish
each day at 4 p.m. Drop off can be
as early at 8 a.m. and pick up no
later than 5 p.m. please. Space will
be limited to ensure optimal coach
to player ratios in each age and
skill group. Contact andreworlow-
ski@kings.edu for camp applica-
tion.
MEETINGS
Ashley/Newtown Little League will
be hold their monthly meeting
Monday July 9 at 7 p.m. The meet-
ing will be at the Ashley fireman’s
grounds and is open to the public
to attend.
County Line Softball will meet today
at 7:30pm at the Dupont field to
discuss 14u playoffs. All 14u coach-
es as well as town reps should
attend. Call Bob at 881-8744 for
more info.
Wyoming Area Boys’ Soccer will
hold a Meet the Coach Night July
9 at 6 p.m. at the 10th St. Field. All
ninth through 12th grade boys who
will be playing varsity soccer this
fall are invited to meet the new
Wyoming Area varsity soccer
coach, Nick Hufford. Parents are
also invited to come to the meet-
ing.
Wyoming Area sports physicals will
be given the following dates and
time: Football, grades 7-12, July 11 at
3:15 p.m. Girls Volleyball and Field
Hockey, grades 9-12, July 18 at 3:15
p.m. Cross Country, grades 7-12,
July 18 at 3:15 p.m. Golf, grades
9-12, July 18 at 3:15 p.m. Girls and
Boys Soccer, grades 7-8, July 25 at
3:15 p.m. Boys and Girls Soccer,
Cheerleading and Girls Tennis,
grades 9-12, July 25 at 3:15p.m. All
physicals will be done in the field
house at the football stadium and
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, emailed to
tlsports@timesleader.com or dropped
off at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
A total of eight divisions of the Pennsylvania All Stars stakes top
another solid fourteen race slate at the Mohegan Sun at Pocono
Downs. It certainly was a fun week with the stars of tomorrow dom-
inatingthe racingcards, andit sure looks like the Pennsylvania racing
scene is blessed with plenty of talent for years to come. I amcertainly
looking forward to seeing what all these youngsters do on the track
moving forward; future sure looks bright.
BEST BET: SANDRA VOLO (7TH)
VALUE PLAY: BLESSED VICTORY (2ND)
POST TIME 6:30 p.m.
All Races One Mile
First-$32,000 PA ALL STARS
5 Can’t Have My Moni T.Tetrick 5-1-3 Tetrick kicks off the night 7-2
6 Delicious M.Kakaley 1-6-2 Won div of Currier & Ives 5-2
2 Voluptuous Ronda J.Bartlett 1-7-8 Jogged vs lesser 3-1
4 Powell Blue Chip R.Pierce 3-5-4 Big M invader 9-2
7 Barefoot Brook B.Zendt 1-4-1 Dunn having good year 8-1
3 Devilicious J.Pavia 7-1-5 Lacks spunk 6-1
1 By A Nose Hanover T.Schadel 5-5-8 Sees a lot of tails 12-1
Second-$16,000 Clm.Hndcp Trot;clm.price $20-25,000
1 Blessed Victory G.Napolitano 3-1-4 The rail is the trick 4-1
5 Mr Caviar R.Pierce 1-9-2 Fairly consistent 5-1
2 Jeter Marvel D.Miller 2-1-2 Joins the Morgan barn 5-2
3 Litany Of Lindy A.McCarthy 2-1-2 In career form 6-1
9 Home Towne Jeff M.Macdonald 1-7-3 Nap opted off 3-1
8 Civic Duty T.Jackson 4-4-8 Tends to tire late 12-1
6 Dream Lake T.Tetrick 4-2-5 Overpowered 15-1
4 Badboy Paparazzi A M.Simons 1-4-4 Gobbled up 10-1
7 Nice Dream A.Napolitano 7-4-9 Trounced 20-1
Third-$50,000 PA ALL STARS
3 So Easy Baby M.Macdonald 5-8-4 Nice turn of foot 3-1
6 Moonlit Dragon E.Carlson 1-3-7 Won Reynolds stake at Big M 4-1
5 Winning It M.Kakaley 1-6-4 Has 8 wins in 2012 9-2
4 Sangaal G.Napolitano 1-4-4 In with tough group 7-2
7 Real Touch R.Paver 1-1-8 Going for three in a row 8-1
8 Chrome Over D.Palone 2-3-3 Used up early 12-1
1 Arodasi J.Pavia 7-4-1 Pavia down to .226 5-1
2 All Star Player R.Pierce 5-3-1 Demoted 10-1
Fourth-$32,000 PA ALL STARS
2 Cocktail Attire Tn.Schadel 2-1-7 Tony wins one for the locals 5-2
3 Sterling Volo R.Pierce 3-1-1 Lightly raced filly 3-1
4 Lady Andi D.Palone 2-2-2 Been close 7-2
1 Transgressive M.Simons 5-8-4 Yet to flash stakes speed 9-2
5 Meadowbranch Jill A.Miller 4-3-3 Reunites with Miller 8-1
6 Holier Than Thou J.Pavia 5-6-3 Slugged 6-1
7 Funny Fashion G.Napolitano 7-6-4 Joke is on her 12-1
Fifth-$50,000 PA ALL STARS
4 Dream Of Winning T.Tetrick 1-3-1 Late blooming filly 3-1
9 Marty Party D.Miller 7-3-1 One to catch 7-2
3 Kiss Don’t Bite A.Miller 2-7-5 In from Mohawk 9-2
7 Sara Diamond M.Wilder 1-2-3 Fan favorite 10-1
8 Yagonnakissmeornot J.Pavia 6-3-2 Slowing down a bit 4-1
1 Frontierpan M.Kakaley 3-7-5 Weak Burke trainee 6-1
6 I Am Passionate M.Simons 1-6-6 No love from here 8-1
2 How ‘Bout A Smooch R.Pierce 6-8-2 Maybe a peck 15-1
5 Alibi Hanover T.Buter 6-8-4 Rough spot for maiden 20-1
Sixth-$18,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $18,000 last 5
6 Tui A.Napolitano 3-7-3 Drops and pops 5-2
5 Big And Little B.Zendt 1-4-2 Comes off career mile 3-1
1 Avenue Of Dreams M.Kakaley 1-5-1 2nd time lasix user 4-1
4 Mama Made Me Blue B.Simpson 7-1-1 Goes for team Simpson 10-1
8 Chaplin Hall G.Napolitano 6-1-2 Loves to rally 15-1
3 Man About Town H.Parker 3-5-6 Jim Raymer having off yr 6-1
2 Live Jazz T.Buter 5-5-5 Not showing much spunk 5-1
7 Opinion Hanover M.Simons 4-1-3 Can’t keep up 12-1
9 Ginger Tree Jimmy T.Jackson 8-1-2 Stomped 20-1
Seventh-$32,000 PA ALL STARS
2 Sandra Volo R.Pierce 1-4-1 Reason Pierce is here 7-2
6 On The Bright Side D.Palone 4-4-1 Does get Palone in bike 5-2
8 Uncommon Night G.Napolitano 7-3-3 Rich maiden 6-1
1 Gaynor Blue Chip M.Kakaley 6-4-1 Only has 10 lifetime starts 4-1
5 Keystone Tempo Tn.Schadel 3-2-6 Tony warming up a bit 5-1
7 Jupiter T.Buter 8-1-5 Too slow for these 8-1
4 Pilgrims Elan T.Tetrick 8-6-7 Gapper 15-1
3 Valentine Queen M.Simons 4-6-3 Wrong time of season 12-1
Eighth-$21,000 Cond.Trot;n/w $25,000 last 5
2 He’s Spooky T.Tetrick 6-1-4 Goes well with Timmy 7-2
3 Don’t Know Chip T.Buter 1-5-1 Won last start here at PD 3-1
5 Opening Night M.Kakaley 1-1-2 Rolls on the throttle 4-1
4 Mystery Photo A.Miller 2-2-3 Hit board 5 of last 6 9-2
6 Zitomira J.Ingrassia 1-4-3 Had dream trip in that win 20-1
7 Sonny Mcdreamee B.Simpson 1-3-1 Sharp, but in tough 10-1
1 Lightning Lady G.Napolitano 3-2-1 Newcomer to the Downs 15-1
8 Sand Top Gun M.Macdonald 4-1-2 Mac done well here 8-1
9 Waldorf Hall H.Parker 7-6-1 Long price for sure 6-1
Ninth-$10,000 Clm.Hndcp Pace;clm.price $10-12,500
9 Brave Call G.Napolitano 1-3-5 Repeater 7-2
5 Herzon A.Napolitano 7-3-3 It’s a Nap bros. exacta 12-1
6 Tamayo A.McCarthy 1-1-2 Solid at this condition 5-2
8 Booze Cruiser J.Taggart 2-4-2 Almost won right off the claim 6-1
7 Thunderfist J.Pavia 2-4-5 Drops in for a tag 4-1
4 Lombo Powershot A F.Davis 3-1-5 Davis with rare visit 5-1
3 State Of The Union M.Kakaley 9-6-8 Missed month of action 15-1
2 Persuader Raider T.Buter 6-8-7 Dull 8-1
1 Urjokin A B.Simpson 9-2-8 Tough one to like 20-1
Tenth-$50,000 Open Trot
4 Sevruga A.Miller 1-1-1 Hard to go against 5-2
2 Revenue Agent D.Miller 1-1-1 Can be any kind 4-1
6 Anders Bluestone G.Napolitano 2-1-3 Winner of almost $750k 6-1
5 Spice It Up Lindy T.Jackson 1-1-1 Another red hot trotter 3-1
3 Ice Machine T.Tetrick 8-1-1 Picks up the pieces 5-1
7 Windsun Galaxie M.Macdonald 3-1-1 Speed folds up in here 15-1
8 Rose Run Hooligan B.Simpson 4-2-3 Out of chances 10-1
9 Monsignor Flan M.Kakaley 3-2-5 Against the plan 20-1
1 Neighsay Hanover M.Simons 7-5-4 I’d say nay 12-1
Eleventh-$32,000 PA ALL STARS
1 Superstar Hanover J.Takter 5-5-1 Should jog 5-2
3 Sequin Hanover M.Kakaley 2-1-2 Rounds out chalky number 3-1
7 Oasis Dream T.Tetrick 1-2-2 Stewart good with youngsters 8-1
8 Southwind Moni D.Miller 7-1-5 Searching for a bit more 5-1
2 Love Walked In M.Lachance 2-6-4 Slow in final stanza 4-1
5 She Wears It Well A.McCarthy 4-3-4 Beaten fave last couple 10-1
6 Sunset Magic B.Simpson 1-9-9 Breaker 12-1
4 Touch Of Charm R.Pierce 7-7-7 Extremely uncompetitive 15-1
Twelfth-$10,000 Clm.Hndcp Pace;clm.price $10-12,500
2 Itchy Pickle’s G.Napolitano 2-2-2 Goes coast to coast 3-1
9 Cheyenne Oxe M.Kakaley 3-4-4 Just joined Sherman barn 4-1
3 Artsbred Camotion D.Miller 7-2-2 Does retain Dave in the bike 7-2
1 It’sabouttime J.Kakaley 1-8-9 Big move up off the score 9-2
8 Track My Desire T.Jackson 4-1-3 TJ still on warm side 6-1
7 Supreme Court T.Buter 4-5-7 Way off form 20-1
4 He’s Great A.Miller 5-6-7 Not living up to name 15-1
5 Prestissimo A.McCarthy 5-8-4 Off his game 8-1
6 Love To Rock M.Simons 6-8-9 Rolled over 10-1
Thirteenth-$32,000 PA ALL STARS
5 End Of Innocence D.Miller 6-1-5 Ready for a picture 5-2
3 Upfront Bye Bye B.Zendt 3-2-6 A weaker division 9-2
2 Cantab Cabela T.Schadel 1-5-1 Has home track edge 7-2
1 Enfilade T.Buter 2-2-2 Donato Hanover filly 3-1
4 Cannot Tell A Lie T.Tetrick 7-4-5 I’ll pass on 8-1
7 Carry A Torch J.Oscarsson 7-1-2 Didn’t like the big track 6-1
6 Marion Mon Ami A.McCarthy 7-7-4 One more race to go 12-1
Fourteenth-$50,000 PA ALL STARS
3 Podges Lady E.Ledford 1-1-2 One fast gal 3-1
5 Campanile M.Macdonald 2-1-3 Mark gets the catch drive 4-1
1 Gottaseeaboutagirl D.Miller 2-5-7 Lack of speed a killer 7-2
7 Mcsauna T.Tetrick 2-1-6 Harrah’s import 10-1
9 Lightning Paige R.Pierce 6-4-5 Did make Lynch Final 9-2
4 Love You Bye A.Miller 3-1-6 Won two back in 1:53.1 15-1
6 Tykesa Moon M.Kakaley 8-3-4 Roughed up 8-1
2 We Adore Thee T.Buter 2-1-4 ……next 20-1
8 Bittorsweet Terror A.Napolitano 6-1-1 See you on Tues 6-1
ON THE MARK
By Mark Dudek
Times Leader Correspondent
BASEBALL
Favorite Odds Underdog
American League
INDIANS 9.0 Rays
TIGERS 9.0 Royals
WHITE SOX 11 Blue Jays
ANGELS 9.0 Orioles
A’S 6.5 Mariners
RANGERS 11.5 Twins
RED SOX 10 Yankees
National League
METS 8.0 Cubs
PIRATES 8.5 Giants
NATIONALS 9.0 Rockies
PHILLIES 9.0 Braves
Brewers 9.0 ASTROS
CARDS 9.5 Marlins
Reds 6.5 PADRES
D’BACKS 9.0 Dodgers
AME RI C A’ S
L I NE
BY ROXY ROXBOROUGH
L O C A L
C A L E N D A R
TODAY'S EVENTS
PREP LEGION BASEBALL
(All games 1 p.m. unless noted)
Abington Blue at Swoyersville
Back Mountain at Dunmore
Green ridge at Mountain Top
Nanticoke at South Scranton
Nanticoke at Moscow, 4 p.m.
SENIOR LEGION BASEBALL
Swoyersville at Mountain Post-B, 5:45 p.m.
LITTLE LEAGUE
District 16 9-10 Baseball
Championship
Pittston Twp. at Nanticoke, 2 p.m.
District 16 Major Baseball
Championship
Mountain Top at South Wilkes-Barre, 2 p.m.
District 16 Junior Baseball
Duryea/Pittston Twp. at Avoca/Dupont, 2 p.m.
District 31 Junior Baseball
Swoyersville at Kingston/Forty Fort, 2 p.m.
TBA at Back Mountain-2, 2 p.m.
District 16 Junior Softball
TBA at Jenkins Twp., 6 p.m.
District 31 Junior Softball
Kingston/Forty Fort/Swoyersville at Horlacher/Har-
veys Lake, 6 p.m.
W H A T ’ S O N T V
AUTO RACING
Noon
FOX — Formula One, British Grand Prix, at Tow-
cester, England (same-day tape)
12:30 p.m.
ABC — IRL, IndyCar Series, Indy Toronto
8 p.m.
ESPN2 — NHRA, Summit Racing Equipment Na-
tionals, at Norwalk, Ohio (same-day tape)
CYCLING
8 a.m.
NBC — Tour de France, stage 8, Belfort to Porren-
truy, France
Noon
NBCSN — Tour de France, stage 8, Belfort to Por-
rentruy, France (same-day tape)
GOLF
8 a.m.
TGC—European PGATour, Open de France, final
round, at Paris
3 p.m.
CBS — PGA Tour, The Greenbrier Classic, final
round, at White Sulphur Springs, W.Va.
NBC—USGA, U.S. Women’s Open, final round, at
Kohler, Wis.
7 p.m.
TGC — Champions Tour, First Tee Open, final
round, at Pebble Beach, Calif.
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
1 p.m.
SNY — Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets
1:30 p.m.
WQMY — Atlanta at Philadelphia
ROOT – San Francisco at Pittsburgh
2 p.m.
WGN — Toronto at Chicago White Sox
8 p.m.
ESPN — N.Y. Yankees at Boston
MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
5 p.m.
ESPN2 — Exhibition, All-Star Futures Game, at
Kansas City, Mo.
SOCCER
3 p.m.
ESPN — MLS, Los Angeles at Chicago
TENNIS
9 a.m.
ESPN — The Championships, men’s champion-
ship match, at Wimbledon, England
.
T R A N S A C T I O N S
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMOREORIOLES—Recalled INFSteve Tol-
leson from Norfolk (IL).
BOSTONREDSOX—Recalled RHPClayton Mor-
tensen from Pawtucket (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned LHP Nick Ha-
gadone to Columbus (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Claimed C Adam
Moore off waivers fromSeattle and optioned himto
Omaha (PCL).
NEW YORK YANKEES — Recalled RHP Cory
Wade from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
TEXAS RANGERS — Reinstated LHP Derek Hol-
land from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Justin
Grimm to Frisco (TL).
National League
PITTSBURGH PIRATES — Recalled INF/OF Matt
HaguefromIndianapolis (IL). OptionedCEric Fryer
to Indianapolis.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS — Announced the
resignation of president Larry Miller.
B A S E B A L L
Minor League Baseball
International League
North Division
W L Pct. GB
Lehigh Valley (Phillies) ........... 51 37 .580 —
Pawtucket (Red Sox) .............. 49 41 .544 3
Yankees ................................... 48 41 .539 3
1
⁄2
Syracuse (Nationals)............... 44 44 .500 7
Buffalo (Mets)........................... 44 45 .494 7
1
⁄2
Rochester (Twins) ................... 41 47 .466 10
South Division
W L Pct. GB
Charlotte (White Sox) ............. 49 41 .544 —
Norfolk (Orioles) ...................... 46 44 .511 3
Durham (Rays)......................... 43 47 .478 6
Gwinnett (Braves) ................... 41 49 .456 8
West Division
W L Pct. GB
Indianapolis (Pirates)............... 55 33 .625 —
Columbus (Indians) ................. 44 44 .500 11
Toledo (Tigers) ........................ 36 52 .409 19
Louisville (Reds) ...................... 32 58 .356 24
Friday's Games
Buffalo 5, Syracuse 1
Columbus 10, Indianapolis 6
Durham 4, Gwinnett 1
Yankees 8, Lehigh Valley 1
Toledo 8, Louisville 0
Rochester 3, Pawtucket 1
Norfolk 4, Charlotte 0
Saturday's Games
Toledo 2, Louisville 0
Rochester 4, Lehigh Valley 0
Pawtucket 3, Syracuse 2
Buffalo at Yankees, late
Indianapolis at Columbus, late
Durham at Gwinnett, late
Norfolk at Charlotte, late
Today's Games
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 12:05 p.m., 1st game
Indianapolis at Columbus, 1:05 p.m.
Syracuse at Pawtucket, 1:05 p.m.
Buffalo at Yankees, 2 p.m.
Toledo at Louisville, 2:05 p.m.
Norfolk at Charlotte, 2:15 p.m.
Lehigh Valley at Rochester, 2:35 p.m., 2nd game
Durham at Gwinnett, 5:05 p.m.
T E N N I S
Wimbledon Results
Saturday
At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet
Club
Wimbledon, England
Purse: $25.03 million (Grand Slam)
Surface: Grass-Outdoor
Singles
Women
Championship
Serena Williams (6), United States, def. Agnieszka
Radwanska (3), Poland, 1-6, 7-5, 6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Jonathan Marray, Britain, and Frederik Nielsen,
Denmark, lead Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, and Ho-
ria Tecau (5), Romania, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (5),
6-3.
Mixed
Semifinals
Mike Bryan and Lisa Raymond (2), United States,
def. Nenad Zimonjic, Serbia, and Katarina Srebot-
nik (3), Slovenia, 6-3, 6-4.
Leander Paes, India, and Elena Vesnina (4), Rus-
sia, def. Bob Bryan and Liezel Huber (1), United
States, 7-5, 3-6, 6-3.
Invitational Doubles
Round Robin
Gentlemen
Goran Ivanisevic, Croatia, and Cedric Pioline,
France, def. Justin Gimelstob and Todd Martin,
United States, 6-3, 7-6 (4).
Greg Rusedski, Britain, and Fabrice Santoro,
France, def. Thomas Enqvist, Sweden, and Mark
Philippoussis, Australia, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 11-9 tiebreak.
Senior Gentlemen
Patrick McEnroe, United States, and Joakim Nys-
trom, Sweden, def. Mansour Bahrami, Iran, and
Henri Leconte (1), France, 5-7, 7-5, 11-9 tiebreak.
Pat CashandMark Woodforde, Australia, def. Peter
McNamara and Paul McNamee, Australia, 6-3, 6-2.
Junior Singles
Girls
Championship
Eugenie Bouchard (5), Canada, def. Elina Svitolina
(3), Ukraine, 6-2, 6-2.
Junior Doubles
Boys
Semifinals
Matteo Donati and Pietro Licciardi, Italy, def. Evan
Hoyt, Britain, and Wayne Montgomery, South Afri-
ca, 7-6 (4), 7-6 (5).
Andrew Harris and Nick Kyrgios (4), Australia, def.
Juan Ignacio Galarza and Mateo Nicolas Martinez
(6), Argentina, 6-2, 6-1.
Girls
Semifinals
Belinda Bencic, Switzerland, and Ana Konjuh (7),
Croatia, def. DariaGavrilova, Russia, andElinaSvi-
tolina (2), Ukraine, 5-7, 6-3, 6-1.
Eugenie Bouchard, Canada, and Taylor Townsend
(1), United States, def. Francoise Abanda, Canada,
and Sachia Vickery (4), United States, 7-6 (4), 7-5.
Wheelchair Doubles
Men
First Round
Robin Ammerlaan and Ronald Vink (1), Nether-
lands, def. Marc McCarroll and Gordon Reid, Bri-
tain, 6-2, 6-2.
Tom Egberink, Netherlands, and Michael Jere-
miasz, France, def. Stephane Houdet and Nicolas
Peifer (2), France, 2-6, 7-6 (5), 7-5.MORE
C Y C L I N G
Tour de France Results
Saturday
At La Planche des Belles Filles, France
Seventh Stage
A123.7-mile, medium-mountain ride in the
Vosges from Tomblaine to the ski resort of La
Planche des Belles Filles, with a pair of
Category 3 climbs and the first Category 1 of
this year's Tour at the finish
1. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, 4 hours,
58 minutes, 35 seconds.
2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, 2 seconds
behind.
3. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, same
time.
4. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, :07.
5. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, :19.
6. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nissan,
:44.
7. Pierre Rolland, France, Team Europcar, :46.
8. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, same time.
9. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, :50.
10. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-Nissan,
:56.
11. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mon-
diale, 1:06.
12. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, RadioShack-Nis-
san, 1:09.
13. Richie Porte, Australia, Sky Procycling, 1:14.
14. Michael Rogers, Australia, Sky Procycling, 1:24.
15. Thibaut Pinot, France, FDJ-Big Mat, same time.
16. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
1:31.
17. Daniel Martin, Ireland, Garmin-Sharp-Barracu-
da, 1:39.
18. Gorka Izaguirre, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
same time.
19. Tony Gallopin, France, RadioShack-Nissan,
1:44.
20. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, RadioShack-
Nissan, 1:52.
Also
22. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol,
1:52.
30. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioSh-
ack-Nissan, 2:19.
32. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack-Nis-
san, same time.
33. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, 2:24.
37. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, 2:53.
46. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Rac-
ing, 3:08.
48. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega Phar-
ma-QuickStep, 3:11.
88. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing,
8:00.
139. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 13:17.
142. DavidZabriskie, UnitedStates, Garmin-Sharp-
Barracuda, 13:21.
180. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-
Barracuda, 20:29.
Overall Standings
(After seven stages)
1. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Procycling, 34
hours, 21 minutes, 20 seconds.
2. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing, :10.
3. Vincenzo Nibali, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, :16.
4. Rein Taaramae, Estonia, Cofidis, :32.
5. Denis Menchov, Russia, Katusha, :54.
6. Haimar Zubeldia, Spain, RadioShack-Nissan,
:59.
7. Maxime Monfort, Belgium, RadioShack-Nissan,
1:09.
8. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, France, AG2R La Mon-
diale, 1:22.
9. Chris Froome, Britain, Sky Procycling, 1:32.
10. Michael Rogers, Australia, Sky Procycling, 1:40.
11. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, RadioShack-
Nissan, 1:43.
12. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi,
2:02.
13. Jurgen Van den Broeck, Belgium, Lotto Belisol,
2:11.
14. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Omega Pharma-
QuickStep, 2:22.
15. Rui Costa, Portugal, Movistar, 2:25.
16. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, RadioShack-Nis-
san, 2:29.
17. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Astana, 3:04.
18. Tejay Van Garderen, United States, BMC Rac-
ing, 3:09.
19. Tony Gallopin, France, RadioShack-Nissan,
3:13.
20. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Cannondale, same
time.
Also
24. Christopher Horner, United States, RadioSh-
ack-Nissan, 3:39.
26. Frank Schleck, Luxembourg, RadioShack-Nis-
san, 3:43.
27. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Omega Phar-
ma-QuickStep, 3:47.
39. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, 6:57.
46. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing,
10:18.
130. DavidZabriskie, UnitedStates, Garmin-Sharp-
Barracuda, 27:29.
142. Christian Vande Velde, United States, Garmin-
Sharp-Barracuda, 28:57.
178. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Sharp-
Barracuda, 46:32.

BUILDING TRUST
The Times Leader strives to
correct errors, clarify stories and
update them promptly. If you
have information to help us
correct an inaccuracy or cover
an issue more thoroughly, call
the sports department at 829-
7143.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3C
➛ S P O R T S
MI NOR L EAGUES
The Tampa Yankees have
been one of the most dominant
teams in the Florida State
League with three league cham-
pionships in the last eight years,
including two in the last three
years.
They stumbled to begin the
2012 season finishing under .500
in the first half standings with a
30-37 record. But looking to add
to championships, the T-Yanks
are off to a good start in the
second half and just added some
help last week.
Three of the organization’s
top prospects – catcher Gary
Sanchez and outfielders Mason
Williams and Tyler Austin –
were promoted to the high
Class-A affiliate from Low-A
Charleston just a few days ago.
In the FSL winners of the divi-
sion in each half advance to the
postseason. Tampa seems to
have a good chance to advance
to the playoffs with the addi-
tions because the trio helped
the RiverDogs to a 39-28 first-
half record in the South Atlantic
League and an overall record of
46-33 record before their promo-
tions. With another top prospect
in Slade Heathcott also on the
Tampa roster, the team now
consists of four of the top 14
according to MLB.com and
three of the top six.
Here are the New York Yan-
kees top-10 prospects according
to MLB.com.
1. Manny Banuelos, LHP,
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (Triple-
A): The left-hander, currently on
the disabled list, is 0-2 with a
4.50 ERA in six starts for Yan-
kees with 22 Ks in 24 innings.
2. Dellin Betances, RHP,
Trenton (Double-A): The 6-
foot-8, 260-pounder was demot-
ed to the Thunder last week
because of continuous com-
mand problems. For Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre he totaled 69
walks in 74 2/3 innings along
with a 6.39 ERA. He has started
two games for Trenton and
shown improvement with a 0.75
ERA and has walked six in 12
innings.
3. Gary Sanchez, catcher,
Tampa (High-A): The 19-year-
old was promoted from Char-
leston after hitting .297 with 13
home runs, 56 RBI and 11 stolen
bases. In three games with the
T-Yanks, he’s 4-for-13 with a
home run and a stolen base.
4. Mason Williams, outfielder,
Tampa (High-A): Just like his
teammate Sanchez, he was
promoted to Tampa last week.
He hit .304 with eight home
runs, 28 RBI, 19 doubles and 19
steals for Charleston. In four
games for Tampa, he is 4-for-19
with an RBI.
5. Jose Campos, RHP, Char-
leston (A): A19-year-old ac-
quired from Seattle is currently
on the DL with elbow inflamma-
tion and is currently 3-0 with a
4.01 ERA and 26 strikeouts in 24
2
⁄3 innings.
6. Slade Heathcott, outfielder,
Tampa (A): The 2009 first-round
draft pick is finally healthy and
producing. In 12 games so far
with Tampa and he’s hitting .267
with two home runs, 8 RBI and
four stolen bases.
7. Austin Romine, catcher,
TBA: The 23-year-old who is on
the DL with an inflamed disc in
his back, has started catching
bullpen sessions. He may be a
few weeks away from seeing
game action.
8. Dante Bichette Jr., third
base, Charleston (A): Bichette
was New York’s first pick in 2011
(51st overall) and is batting .252
on the season with one home
run and 28 RBI.
9. Cito Culver, shortstop,
Charleston (A): A first-round
pick in 2010 (32 overall), the
19-year-old switch-hitter contin-
ues to get on base at a solid clip
for the RiverDogs. On the sea-
son, he has a .321 on base per-
centage and in his last six
games, he’s reached base nine
times.
10. Adam Warren, RHP,
Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (Triple-
A): His return to the Yankees
from the majors didn’t go so
well as he gave up six runs and
10 hits in six innings last week
while taking a loss. On the sea-
son for SWB, he is 5-6 with a
4.19 ERA in 92
1
⁄3 innings.
YA N K E E S P R O S P E C T S
Trio of prospects
join Tampa Yanks
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Just two weeks, the Lehigh
Valley IronPigs were in the
middle of a four-game losing
streak that had them sitting a
game behind Pawtucket in the
International League North
Division.
Since that time, the ’Pigs have
been on a roll winning eight of
12 and entered Saturday’s action
with a three-game lead over the
PawSox in the standings.
Lehigh Valley got a boost
from rehabbing Philadelphia
slugger Ryan Howard, who
helped the team win all four
games he played in.
Howard hasn’t been the only
player playing a big part for the
IronPigs as everyone has been
contributing. No. 9 hitter Tug
Hulett walloped a grand slam in
a win over Scranton/Wilkes-
Barre last week.
Also for Lehigh Valley, start-
ing pitcher Tyler Cloyd learned
he was going to start the Tri-
ple-A All-Star game for the In-
ternational League. The 25-year-
old, right-handed Cloyd is 8-1
with a 2.15 ERA in 13 starts for
the ’Pigs. When his numbers
from Double-A Reading this
season are added in, he is 11-1
with a 2.07 ERA in 17 starts.
Here are Philadelphia’s top 10
prospects according to
MLB.com and how they are
faring in 2012.
1. Trevor May, RHP, Reading
(Double-A): A fourth-round pick
in 2008, he’s shown some com-
mand issues in his last two
outings walking 10 in 10 innings.
But he came out of the stretch
with a 1-0 record. For the sea-
son, he has a 4.92 ERA with 91
strikeouts in 89
2
⁄3 innings.
2. Jesse Biddle, LHP, Clear-
water (A-Advanced): In two
starts over the last week, he
went 1-0 allowing five runs in 12
1
⁄3 as his record improved to 5-3
for the season with an ERA of
3.23.
He has also punched out 85
hitters in 83
2
⁄3innings this sea-
son.
3. Brody Colvin, RHP, Clear-
water (A-Advanced): In his last
three starts, he’s 1-0 while only
giving up three runs in 19 in-
nings and also struck out 16 in
that span. To date for the
Threshers, he has a 4.25 ERA
with a 4-4 record to go with 75
strikeouts in 82
2
⁄3 innings.
4. Larry Greene, outfielder,
Williamsport: The 19-year-old
first-round pick from last June is
heating up. Known as a power
hitter, he’s still homerless, but
he’s hitting .324 (12-for-37) over
his last 10 games to raise his
average for the season up to
.270. He is also getting on base
with a .397 on base percentage
so far this season in 18 games.
5. Phillippe Aumont, RHP,
Lehigh Valley (Triple-A): The
6-foot-7, 260-pound reliever has
thrown 4
2
⁄3 consecutive score-
less frames. Currently for the
IronPigs, he’s 2-1 with a 4.15
ERA and 10 saves. He’s also
fanned 37 in just 26 innings.
6. Sebastian Valle, catcher,
Reading (Double-A): The 21-
year-old is mired in a little
slump hitting just .171 (6-for-35)
in his last 10 games. His average
has dropped to .250 for the
season. He also has nine home
runs and 33 RBI.
7. Justin De Fratus, RHP,
TBA: On the disabled list, he
could begin a rehab assignment
this week.
8. Maikel Franco, third base,
Lakewood (Class A): The 19-
year-old seems to be finding his
stroke. During a nine-game
hitting streak that ended on
Friday he hit .410 (16-for-39). In
the span, he’s raised his average
more than 20 points to .233. He
also has seven homers and 45
RBI this season.
9. Jonathan Pettibone, RHP,
Reading (Double-A): The 21-
year-old missed his last start
with tightness in his groin. He is
7-5 with a 3.27 ERA with 63
strikeouts in 93
2
⁄3 innings.
10. Roman Quinn, shortstop,
Williamsport: The 19-year-old is
starting to get on base regularly
for the Crosscutters, which pays
off for the speedster as he’s
stolen five bases in his last nine
games. On the season, he’s bat-
ting .276 with an on base per-
centage of .382 and eight steals
in 18 games.
P H I L L I E S P R O S P E C T S
IronPigs on track
after recent streak
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
Today
Buffalo
2 p.m.
at Syracuse
Monday
All-Star break
Tuesday
All-Star Break
Wednesday
All-Star Game
7 p.m.
at Buffalo
Saturday
Syracuse
7 p.m.
at Syracuse
Friday
at Syracuse
7 p.m.
Thursday
at Syracuse
(DH)
6 p.m.
THI S WEEK’ S SWB YANKEES SCHEDUL E
Russ Canzler,
Hazleton Area, Colum-
bus (Cleveland, Triple-
A): The Hazleton native,
who will participate in
the Triple-A All-Star
Game for the second
straight year, has been
heating up as of late as
his batting average has
ballooned in the last
month rising to .276 for
the season.
He has got a hit in
nine of his last 11 games
and is hitting .333
(11-for-33) in that span
with four home runs
and 12 RBI.
Also on the season
he now has 12 home
runs, 48 RBI, 20 dou-
bles, two triples and a
.335 on base percent-
age for the Clippers. In
last year’s All-Star
Game while playing for
Durham, Canzler was
the MVP after hitting a
game-winning home
run.
Canzler was original-
ly drafted by the Cubs
in the 30th round in
2004. He was signed as
a minor league free
agent by Tampa Bay
last year and then
traded to Cleveland.
Kyle Landis,
Hazleton Area, Akron
(Cleveland, Double-A): An
18th round pick by the
Indians in 2007, the
right-handed reliever is
having a solid season for
the Aeros, putting up a
3.45 ERA in 27 games
while striking out 40 in
44
1
⁄3 innings and posting
a 4-3 record with two
saves.
The right-hander will
participate in this week’s
Eastern League All-Star
Game to be held in
Reading on Wednesday. It
will be his second all-star
appearance as a profes-
sional previously partici-
pating in the New York/
Penn League contest in
2007. Akron currently
has a 4.5 game lead in
the Eastern League West
Division.
Landis had a short
stint for Triple-A earlier
this season, pitching
three innings for the
Clippers.
His best year in the
minors was in 2011, when
he combined to go 10-2
with a 2.54 ERA in 42
appearances spanning
three affiliates.
Cory Spangen-
berg, Abington
Heights, Lake Elsinore
(San Diego, Class A
advanced): The 10th
overall pick in 2011 by
the Padres hasn’t
played since June 28
nursing a head injury
and is on the disabled
list.
For the season, the
left-handed batting
second baseman is
batting .288 with one
home run, 33 RBI and 21
stolen bases in 27
attempts, to go along
with six triples, 11 dou-
bles and 40 runs in 67
games.
Ray Black, Cough-
lin, San Francisco
(extended spring train-
ing): A power pitcher,
Black is nursing a
shoulder injury which
arose at the end of
spring training and he’s
been sidelined for about
three months. He is still
rehabbing in Scottsdale,
Ariz.
After experiencing
soreness, he received a
cortisone shot and has
begun another throwing
program.
The seventh-round
draft pick (237th over-
all) out of the University
of Pittsburgh last June
is hoping to join the
short season Salem-
Keizer Volcanoes in
Oregon or the Low Class
A team in Augusta or
possibly join the Arizo-
na Rookie League
Giants.
Rich Thompson,
Montrose, Durham
(Tampa Bay, Triple-A): A
33-year-old speedy
outfielder, is batting .281
with seven RBI and nine
stolen bases in 21 games
since being sent to the
Bulls.
For the Rays, he had
just one hit in 17 at-bats
for the Rays, picked up
two stolen bases,
scored two runs and
knocked one in.
Last month, he was
traded to Tampa from
the Phillies and was
immediately called up
to the big leagues.
Before the trade, he
was hitting .307 for
Lehigh Valley with
seven stolen bases
along with an on-base
percentage of .390 for
the IronPigs. His minor
league totals this
season include a .294
batting average with 16
stolen bases and an on
base percentage of .375.
Kyle McMyne, Old
Forge, Bakersfield
(Cincinnati, Class A
Advanced): The right-
handed reliever has
pitched in 15 games
since a promotion from
Low-A ball.
Taken by the Reds in
the fourth round (145th
overall) of last year’s
draft out of Villanova,
he has continued a nice
stretch having a seven-
inning scoreless streak
and allowing just three
hits in the seven-game
stretch while and earn-
ing three saves.
For the season for
Bakersfield, he has
given up nine earned
runs in 20 innings, but
his ERA dropped by
nearly three runs to
4.05 after the impres-
sive stretch. He is 1-1
with three saves and 18
strikeouts against nine
walks.
Overall this season in
the minors, he is 4-3
with a 3.25 ERA in 34
games.
D I S T R I C T 2 ’ S P R E S E N C E I N P R O F E S S I O N A L B A S E B A L L
The Scranton/Wilkes-Barre
Yankees made their intentions
known recently that when the
team returns for the 2013 sea-
son it wants to be more fan-
friendly.
Ideas have been taken by
members of the organization
from people all over Luzerne
and Lackawanna counties and
it’s also been known that the or-
ganization wants to use the Le-
high Valley IronPigs’ mold for
building a strong relationship
with fans.
The Phillies Triple-A affiliate
located in Allentown is packed
with promotions and in-game
entertainment every game.
But there’s another Philadel-
phia affiliate that may be even
more gracious with fans than
Lehigh Valley. About an hour
drive fromAllentown is FirstEn-
ergy Stadium in Reading, the
home of the Double-A Reading
Phillies and the host for
Wednesday’s Eastern League
All-Star Game.
The stadiumtakes on the mo-
niker Baseballtown, U.S.A., and
for good reason. Promotions are
always in full force in Reading
and there’s always more than
one going on whether it’s a con-
cert on the plaza or one of many
giveaways.
And when there isn’t a band
playing live, a disc jockey takes
the stage for a performance.
Last month when the DJ
couldn’t make the showing,
Phillies top prospect and R-
Phils ace starting pitcher Trevor
May showed off his DJ skills.
“There’s so much history
here, especially since it’s been
around so long,” May said. “It’s
just a great place to play. It’s a
fun atmosphere all the way up
(the Phillies farm system). It’s
definitely fun to play baseball
when there’s an atmosphere ev-
ery night.”
When entering FirstEnergy
Stadium for the first time, fans
notice the historic stadium con-
cessions in a closed-in setting.
Once you make your way to the
field, the throwback seats will
make sure you are comfortable
while watching the game and
will make spectators feel like a
setting from the old days.
The stadium isn’t all about
old time settings though. That’s
evident by a swimming pool in
right field.
Once the game begins, there’s
more to see than two teams at-
tempting to score more runs
than the other.
Heck, some regulars at Read-
ing Phillies games will even say
that the focus is more on fans
and entertainment than about
baseball when you go to a base-
ball game.
That’s because there’s some-
thing to see in between every in-
ning. Whether it’s the popular
vegetable race – between pa-
trons suited up in cauliflower,
broccoli, carrot or a lettuce cos-
tume – the Crazy Hot Dog Ven-
dor throwing franks into the
stands or one of many other at-
tractions, you’re sure to have a
laugh.
At most ballparks, if celebrat-
ing a birthday, fans will see their
name on the outfield board or a
similar setting. In Reading, you
can throw out the first pitch on
your birthday.
A winning team is also a part
of the winning-with-fans formu-
la. Like Scranton/Wilkes-Barre,
Reading always seems to have a
proven club. Especially this sea-
son as the R-Phils’ roster con-
sists of several top prospects in
the organization. In addition to
May, fellow pitcher Jonathan
Pettibone andcatcher Sebastian
Valle are ranked by MLB.com
on the Phillies’ top 10 prospect
list. The trio has won at every
level they have played together
and have moved up the ladder
together, which works well for
their team chemistry.
“Lots of guys area really grow-
ing into their game. It’s kind of
happened for a lot of us,” May
added. “It’s fun knowing the
guys and it’s easy to have chem-
istry when you play with each
other and see each other every-
day. We’re all friends and we’re
always having fun, especially af-
ter wins.”
Whether going to see an ex-
citing team – that wears one of
many alternate jerseys – or just
in attendance to see one of sev-
eral attractions, fans line up out-
side the stadium two hours be-
fore gametime to get a great ex-
perience at the ballpark.
That’s something Scranton/
Wilkes-Barre officials would
love to see night in and night
out, and not by traveling to a
nearby venue.
More than baseball in Reading
By DAVE ROSENGRANT
drosengrant@timesleader.com
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Fans flock to FirstEnergy Stadium in Reading everyday for one of numerous promotions or to see
a winning ballclub packed with prospects.
C M Y K
PAGE 4C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Communities need bricks and mortar to grow and prosper.
Since 1985, Mericle has been doing its part to build Northeastern Pennsylvania’s
economy. We’ve developed more than 16.5 million square feet of industrial,
office, and flex space in 15 area business parks. Today, those buildings are home
to 12,000 workers who earn more than $400 million in annual payroll.
When you’re ready to grow your business, call Mericle. Whether you need 1,000
square feet or 1 million square feet, we’ ll have the bricks and mortar that are
perfect for you.
Mericle constructs a 120,000 square foot speculative flex building
in CenterPoint Commerce &Trade Park East.
- Grccec, fcl 51.15 ccre: :ile
- Frcpc:ec 282,000 SF Lui|cing
- Ccn Le expcncec lc 507,ó00 SF
- Lcrge lrci|er :lcrcge crec
- 42,000 SF cffce fcci|ily
- High prcf|e :ile cn ó.ó ccre:
- Ccn Le :uLcivicec lc 3,500 SF
- Slrcng pcwer cnc le|eccm
- Wel :prink|er :y:lem
- Necr Gei:inger
- Le:: lhcn cne mi|e frcm l-81
- 210 pcrking :pcce:
- 408,200 SF cvci|cL|e
- ExpcnccL|e lc ó48,200 SF
- 30´º" lc 3ó´ó" cei|ing:
- 32 |cccing cccr: {crc::-ccckec)
- 1ó,884 SF
- 3 |cccing cccr:
- 2º´10" lc 34´2" cei|ing:
- Energy effcienl I-Lcy |ighling
- 32´ lc 37´ cei|ing:
- 4ó |cccing cccr:
- 1 crive-in cccr
- Fci| cvci|cL|e
- ESFF fre prcleclicn
- Ccn Le :uLcivicec
- C|c:e lc l-81, l-80
- /cunccnl pcrking
- I-Lcy |ighling
- Lcrge pcrking crec:
- Wel :prink|er
- Necr l-81 cnc l-47ó
- ESFF fre prcleclicn
- ó" ccncrele fccr
- /mp|e lrci|er :lcrcge
- Cuick ccce:: lc l-81, l-47ó
32 32 lc lc ´´
1104 North Park Drive
Humboldt Industrial Park, Hazle Township
I LL |i i hhli li
345 Enterprise Way (Parcel 7A)
CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township
61 Green Mountain Road
Humboldt Industrial Park, East Union Township
ó 884 S S f i
240-258 Armstrong Road
CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, Jenkins Township
320-330 Stewart Road
Hanover Industrial Estates, Hanover Township
- ó,427 SF lc 81,037 SF
- 30´ lc 33´ cei|ing:
- 12 |cccing cccr:
- Necr Wc|mcrl Supercenler
- 410,000 SF cn 41.03 ccre:
- ExpcnccL|e lc ó15,000 SF
- Ccn Le :uLcivicec
- I-Lcy |ighling
1155 East Mountain Boulevard (Parcel 2A)
Corporate Center at East Mountain, Plains Township
250 Enterprise Way (Parcel 13)
CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park West, Pittston Township
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47ó
- Fermillec & cpprcvec
- /|| uli|ilie:
- Grecl |ccclicnl
- 108,000 SF {expcnccL|e)
- 30´ lc 32´11" cei|ing:
- 2º |cccing cccr:, 1 crive-in
- Fccking, ccnveyer cvci|cL|e
- ESFF fre prcleclicn
- C|c:e lc l-81
- Emp|cyee Lreck rccm
- Lcrge pcrking crec:
570.823.1100
Developing Pennsylvania’s I-81 Corridor for 27 Years.
Visit our Web site to see hundreds
of buildings and sites from
1,000 SF to 1,000,000 SF
- ó,000 SF fcci|ily cn 2.ó ccre:
- 1,000 SF cffce, 12´ lc 14´ cei|ing:
- 3 cverhecc cccr:
For Sale ... Ron Koslosky
- 124,000 SF incu:lric| ccmp|ex
- ó.2 ccre:, 12´ lc 18´ cei|ing:
- 3 ccck high cverhecc cccr:
- For Sale … Dave Daris
- Service/inlernel Lu:ine::
- Cpercling :ince 1º73
- FrcflcL|e, :c|ic lrcck reccrc
- For Sale … Steve Barrouk
- 10+/- ccmmercic| ccre: {8-2)
- Exi:ling grcve wilh |i¢ucr |icen:e
- Sing|e-fcmi|y 38F hcme & 2 pcnc:
- For Sale ... Al Guari
2 124 00 0000 SF SF ii cc ll ii || ||
507 N. Washington St, Berwick
00 000 SF SF ff i| i|il il 22 óó
127 Import Road, Pittston
ic i e/ e/in inllernel l el LLL :iine::
Business Opportunity!
10 10+/ +/ ii || {{8 2) 2)
500 Thornhurst Rd, Bear Creek Twp.
- 2,380 SF 2nc fccr cffce ccncc.
- Exce||enl ccncilicn, we|| kepl
- Frevicu:|y c cenlc| cffce
- For Sale … Dave Daris
2 380 SF 22 cc f ff c
10 W. Northampton St, Wilkes-Barre
501-575 Keystone Avenue (Parcel 7)
CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, Jenkins Township
1065 Hanover Street
Hanover Industrial Estates, Hanover Township
- Wel :prink|er
- ó" ccncrele fccr
- Ccnvenienl pcrking
- 5 minule: frcm l-81
- ó,015 SF cvci|cL|e
- 2,130 SF cffce
- 2ó´5" lc 2º´ó" cei|ing:
- 1 |cccing cccr
190 Welles Street
Cross Valley West Professional Buildings, Forty Fort
R
E
A
D
Y
T
H
I S
S
U
M
M
E
R
!

RE ADY T O GO S I T E S

OF F I CE

F L E X

I NDUS T RI AL

R
E
A
D
Y
T
O
G
O
S
I T
E
!
- 120,000 SF fex Lui|cing
- 22.78 ccre :ile
- Ccn Le :uLcivicec lc 1ó,000 SF
- 30´1" lc 34´3" cei|ing:
- 13 |cccing cccr:
- 1 crive-in cccr
- C|c:e lc l-81 cnc l-47ó
- Highwcy vi:iLi|ily
U
N
D
E
R
C
O
N
S
T
R
U
C
T
I O
N
!
- Mccern cffce :pcce: cvci|cL|e
- Up lc 7,4º4 SF
- C|c:: / fni:he:
- Mcny mecicc| lencnl:
- Gc: hecl, cir ccncilicnec
- Wel :prink|er
- Ccnvenienl pcrking
- ' mi|e frcm S.F. 30º
For more information on the above properties, call Bob Besecker, Jim Hilsher, Bill Jones, or Dan Walsh.
BROKERAGE DI VI SI ON

mer i cl e. com/br oker age
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 5C
➛ M A J R O L E A G U E B A S E B A L L
NEW YORK — Ike Davis
homered, Jordany Valdespin
hit one out for the second day
in a row and Dillon Gee
pitched one-run ball for eight
innings to help the New York
Mets beat the Chicago Cubs 3-1
Saturday.
Gee (6-7) gave up seven hits
without a walk and struck out
four to keep up a run of strong
starts by Mets pitchers.
They’ve gone at least six in-
nings in 19 of the past 21
games, and have an ERA of
3.16.
Braves 6, Phillies 3
PHILADELPHIA — Tommy
Hanson pitched effectively into
the eighth, Brian McCann
homered and the Atlanta
Braves beat the struggling
Philadelphia Phillies.
Cardinals 3, Marlins 2
ST. LOUIS — Kyle Lohse
beat the Miami Marlins with
seven innings of three-hit ball
in 106-degree heat and Tony
Cruz hit a go-ahead two-run
triple in the St. Louis Cardi-
nals’ victory.
Pirates 3, Giants 1
PITTSBURGH — James
McDonald scattered four hits
over seven innings, Mike
McKenry homered and the
Pittsburgh Pirates edged the
San Francisco Giants.
Astros 6, Brewers 3
HOUSTON — Scott Moore
homered for the second
straight day and J.D. Martinez
and Jose Altuve had three hits
each as the Houston Astros
took advantage of the first-
inning ejection of Zack Greinke
to get a win over Milwaukee
and break a season-long nine-
game losing streak.
Nationals 4,
Rockies 1
WASHINGTON — Gio Gon-
zalez pitched six innings of
three-hit ball to earn his 12th
win, Ian Desmond homered,
and the Washington Nationals
used a three-run sixth to beat
the Colorado Rockies.
N AT I O N A L L E A G U E R O U N D U P
AP PHOTO
The New York Mets’ Ike Davis (29) follows through on a two-run
home run during the third inning of a game against the Chicago
Cubs on Saturday in New York. The Mets won, 3-1.
Gee, Davis lift
Mets over Cubs
The Associated Press
BOSTON — Newcomers
Pedro Ciriaco and Mauro Go-
mez had three hits each and
the Boston Red Sox gained a
split of their day-night double-
header with a 9-5 win over the
New York Yankees on Sat-
urday.
Ciriaco drove in three runs
with a bases-clearing double
one day after being called up
from Pawtucket. Gomez is 8
for 17 in five games since being
promoted from the Triple-A
team Tuesday night.
Andruw Jones hit three
homers in the doubleheader,
including two of the Yankees’
four in their 6-1 win in the
opener in which Freddy Garcia
pitched 6 2-3 solid innings in
muggy conditions. They added
three homers in the nightcap,
running their baseball-high
total to 133. They’re on a pace
for a club-record 255. The 1997
Seattle Mariners hold the ma-
jor league record with 264.
Tigers 8, Royals 7
DETROIT — Prince Fielder
hit a two-run, game-tying
homer in the first, Delmon
Young had a two-run home run
to pad the lead in the seventh
inning and the Detroit Tigers
held on to beat the Kansas City
Royals.
Detroit closer Jose Valverde
started the ninth with a four-
run lead and almost lost it.
Valverde walked Alex Gor-
don on four pitches to lead off
the inning, gave up a double to
Alcides Escobar and walked
Eric Hosmer to load the bases.
All-Star Billy Butler hit a two-
run single to pull Kansas City
within two runs. Yuniesky
Betancourt nearly hit a go-
ahead, three-run homer on a
fly center fielder Austin Jack-
son tracked down near the wall
in left-center. Jackson charged
to make an underhanded catch
on Mike Moustakas sacrifice
fly for the second out and Jeff
Francoeur struck out.
White Sox 2, Blue Jays 0
CHICAGO — Gavin Floyd
pitched 7 2-3 innings of four-hit
ball and Kevin Youkilis hit a
two-run homer to lead the
Chicago White Sox to a victory
over the Toronto Blue Jays.
Indians 7, Rays 3
CLEVELAND — Ubaldo
Jimenez struck out eight over
six innings and Shelley Duncan
hit a two-run homer to help the
Cleveland Indians beat the
Tampa Bay Rays.
A M E R I C A N L E A G U E R O U N D U P
Ciriaco, Gomez lead
Red Sox to DH split
The Associated Press
STANDINGS/STATS
F R I D A Y ’ S
L A T E B O X E S
Yankees 10, Red Sox 8
New York Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 5 1 2 0 Nava lf 4 2 1 0
Grndrs cf 4 3 2 0 Kalish cf 4 0 1 1
AlRdrg dh 4 2 3 1 Ortiz dh 4 1 3 1
Cano 2b 4 1 1 1 C.Ross rf 4 2 1 1
Teixeir 1b 4 2 2 4 Lillirdg pr-rf 0 0 0 0
Swisher rf 4 0 0 1 AdGnzl 1b 5 2 3 1
Wise rf 0 0 0 0 Sltlmch c 5 1 1 3
Ibanez lf 5 1 2 1 MGomz 3b 5 0 2 1
DMcDn lf 0 0 0 0 Aviles ss 5 0 1 0
ErChvz 3b 3 0 2 2 Punto 2b 4 0 1 0
RMartn c 3 0 0 0
Totals 36101410 Totals 40 814 8
New York......................... 510 000 400 — 10
Boston.............................. 510 010 100 — 8
E—Er.Chavez (4). DP—Boston2. LOB—NewYork
6, Boston 9. 2B—Cano (24), Ibanez (13), Nava (17),
Ad.Gonzalez (25), Punto (4). 3B—Granderson (2),
Teixeira (1). HR—C.Ross (13), Saltalamacchia
(17). SB—Al.Rodriguez 2 (9), Teixeira (2). SF—
Swisher, Er.Chavez, Kalish.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
Kuroda...................... 5
2
⁄3 10 7 6 1 3
Logan W,4-0............
2
⁄3 2 1 1 0 1
Eppley H,6...............
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
D.Robertson H,9..... 1 1 0 0 1 2
R.Soriano S,20-21.. 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
Boston
Beckett ..................... 5 8 6 6 2 5
Albers H,4................ 1 1 0 0 1 0
A.Miller L,2-1 H,11..
1
⁄3 1 2 2 1 1
Padilla BS,2-3 .........
1
⁄3 2 2 2 0 1
Atchison ...................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
Melancon ................. 2 1 0 0 0 2
HBP—by Kuroda (Nava), by Beckett (Al.Rodri-
guez). WP—Kuroda 2.
Umpires—Home, Mark Carlson;First, Ed Hickox-
;Second, Tim Timmons;Third, Angel Hernandez.
T—3:59. A—38,066 (37,495).
Orioles 3, Angels 2
Baltimore Los Angeles
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Andino 2b 4 0 0 0 Trout cf 4 1 1 1
Hardy ss 4 0 0 0 TrHntr rf 4 0 2 0
AdJons cf 4 0 2 0 Pujols 1b 3 0 0 0
Wieters c 4 0 1 0 KMorls dh 4 0 0 0
Betemt 3b 4 1 1 0 Trumo lf 2 1 1 1
Flahrty 3b 0 0 0 0 Callasp 3b 4 0 1 0
MrRynl 1b 2 1 0 0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 0 0
Pearce rf 3 1 1 3 Aybar ss 3 0 0 0
RPauln dh 3 0 0 0 Hester c 2 0 0 0
Avery lf 2 0 0 0 MIzturs ph 1 0 0 0
BoWlsn c 0 0 0 0
Totals 30 3 5 3 Totals 31 2 5 2
Baltimore............................ 000 030 000 — 3
Los Angeles....................... 000 100 010 — 2
DP—Baltimore 1. LOB—Baltimore 3, Los Angeles
5. 2B—Ad.Jones (19). 3B—Tor.Hunter (1). HR—
Pearce (3), Trout (11), Trumbo (21). CS—Mar.Rey-
nolds (2), Avery (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Baltimore
Mig.Gonzalez
W,1-0........................ 7 3 1 1 2 6
O’Day H,4 ................
2
⁄3 2 1 1 1 1
Patton H,5 ................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Ji.Johnson S,26-27 1 0 0 0 0 0
Los Angeles
C.Wilson L,9-5 ........ 7 4 3 3 3 4
Jepsen...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Walden..................... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Umpires—Home, Gary Cederstrom;First, Cory
Blaser;Second, Lance Barksdale;Third, Adrian
Johnson.
T—2:47. A—42,716 (45,957).
Athletics 4, Mariners 1
Seattle Oakland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
ISuzuki dh 5 0 0 0 Crisp cf 4 0 0 0
C.Wells lf 5 1 1 0 JWeeks 2b 5 0 2 1
MSndrs cf 4 0 1 0 Reddck rf 4 1 2 0
Olivo c 5 0 1 0 Cespds lf 4 0 0 0
Seager 3b 5 0 2 1 S.Smith dh 4 1 2 0
Smoak 1b 4 0 0 0 Moss 1b 4 0 0 0
Peguer rf 4 0 1 0 Carter ph 1 1 1 3
Ackley 2b 4 0 0 0 DNorrs c 3 0 0 0
Ryan ss 2 0 1 0 Inge 3b 4 0 0 0
Jaso ph 1 0 0 0 Pnngtn ss 2 0 0 0
Kawsk ss 0 0 0 0 Hicks ph-ss 1 1 1 0
Totals 39 1 7 1 Totals 36 4 8 4
Seattle......................... 100 000 000 00 — 1
Oakland...................... 000 000 010 03 — 4
One out when winning run scored.
DP—Seattle 2. LOB—Seattle 7, Oakland 7.
2B—Hicks (3). 3B—Peguero (1). HR—Carter (3).
SB—M.Saunders (13), Cespedes (5). CS—Ryan
(4), S.Smith (2). S—Crisp.
IP H R ER BB SO
Seattle
Millwood................... 7 3 0 0 2 7
Kelley H,3 ................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Furbush H,3.............
1
⁄3 1 1 1 0 0
Wilhelmsen BS,2-9. 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 2 0
League ..................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
O.Perez L,0-1..........
1
⁄3 2 2 2 0 0
Delabar..................... 0 1 1 1 0 0
Oakland
Milone....................... 7 6 1 1 1 9
Doolittle.................... 1 0 0 0 1 0
R.Cook ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Balfour ...................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Norberto W,1-1 ....... 1 0 0 0 0 3
Delabar pitched to 1 batter in the 11th.
Umpires—Home, TimTschida;First, Bill Welke;Se-
cond, Jeff Nelson;Third, Chris Guccione.
T—3:16. A—10,819 (35,067).
Brewers 7, Astros 1
Milwaukee Houston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
CGomz cf 5 1 1 1 Schafer cf 4 0 0 0
Aoki rf 4 2 2 2 Altuve 2b 4 0 0 0
Braun lf 4 1 1 1 SMoore rf 4 1 1 1
Morgan lf 0 0 0 0 JDMrtn lf 4 0 0 0
ArRmr 3b 5 0 2 1 Lowrie ss 3 0 0 0
Hart 1b 4 1 2 0 CJhnsn 1b 3 0 1 0
RWeks 2b 4 1 1 2 JCastro c 3 0 2 0
Ransm ss 4 0 0 0 Dmngz 3b 4 0 1 0
LHrndz p 0 0 0 0 Happ p 1 0 0 0
Mldnd c 3 1 1 0 DelRsr p 0 0 0 0
Gallard p 2 0 0 0 Bixler ph 1 0 0 0
Loe p 0 0 0 0 R.Cruz p 0 0 0 0
CIzturs ss 1 0 0 0 Bogsvc ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 36 710 7 Totals 32 1 5 1
Milwaukee.......................... 200 002 300 — 7
Houston.............................. 100 000 000 — 1
LOB—Milwaukee 6, Houston 8. 2B—Ar.Ramirez 2
(27), Hart 2 (24). 3B—C.Gomez (4). HR—Aoki (5),
Braun (24), R.Weeks (7), S.Moore (2). SB—Aoki
(11). S—Gallardo.
IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,7-6........ 6 4 1 1 3 6
Loe............................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
L.Hernandez............ 2 1 0 0 0 1
Houston
Happ L,6-9............... 6
1
⁄3 9 7 7 1 4
Del Rosario..............
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
R.Cruz ...................... 2 0 0 0 1 3
HBP—by L.Hernandez (J.Castro), by R.Cruz
(Braun). WP—Gallardo.
Umpires—Home, Rob Drake;First, Joe West;Sec-
ond, Sam Holbrook;Third, Mike Estabrook.
T—2:55. A—23,430 (40,981).
Marlins 3, Cardinals 2
Miami St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Reyes ss 4 0 1 1 Furcal ss 5 0 2 1
HRmrz 3b 4 1 0 0 Greene pr 0 0 0 0
Ca.Lee 1b 3 0 0 0 Jay cf 3 0 1 0
Morrsn lf 2 1 1 1 Hollidy lf 4 0 1 0
Cousins cf 0 0 0 0 Beltran rf 5 0 1 0
Ruggin cf-lf 4 0 2 0 Craig 1b 4 1 1 0
Dobbs rf 4 1 1 0 Freese 3b 4 0 3 1
Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 Descals 2b 4 0 1 0
J.Buck c 4 0 1 0 T.Cruz c 3 0 0 0
Nolasco p 2 0 0 0 Schmkr ph 1 1 1 0
Kearns ph 0 0 0 0 Westrk p 2 0 1 0
MDunn p 0 0 0 0 VMarte p 0 0 0 0
Cishek p 0 0 0 0 Cleto p 0 0 0 0
Stanton ph 1 0 0 0 Salas p 0 0 0 0
H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 MCrpnt ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 31 3 6 2 Totals 36 212 2
Miami .................................. 000 001 110 — 3
St. Louis............................. 010 000 001 — 2
E—Reyes (10), Westbrook (3), Freese 2 (7). DP—
Miami 2, St. Louis 3. LOB—Miami 6, St. Louis 11.
2B—Furcal (13), Jay (5), Holliday (21), Freese (14),
Schumaker (9), Westbrook (1). HR—Morrison (11).
S—Infante, Jay.
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
Nolasco W,8-6 ........ 6 9 1 0 1 4
M.Dunn H,6 .............
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Cishek H,11............. 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
H.Bell S,19-24......... 1 2 1 1 0 0
St. Louis
Westbrook L,7-7 ..... 6
2
⁄3 5 2 1 2 2
V.Marte.....................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Cleto ......................... 1 1 1 1 0 2
Salas......................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
HBP—by Nolasco (Jay), by H.Bell (Holliday), by
Westbrook (Morrison, Morrison).
Umpires—Home, Greg Gibson;First, Gerry Davis-
;Second, Phil Cuzzi;Third, Manny Gonzalez.
T—3:11. A—46,721 (43,975).
Dodgers 4, Diamondbacks 1
Los Angeles Arizona
ab r h bi ab r h bi
EHerrr lf 4 1 1 1 GParra cf 4 0 1 0
M.Ellis 2b 4 1 2 0 Blmqst 3b 4 0 0 0
HrstnJr 3b 4 1 1 0 J.Upton rf 4 0 2 0
JRiver 1b-rf 4 0 1 1 Kubel lf 3 0 0 0
L.Cruz ss 4 0 2 1 Gldsch 1b 4 1 1 0
A.Ellis c 4 0 0 0 MMntr c 1 0 0 0
VnSlyk rf 3 1 1 1 A.Hill 2b 3 0 0 0
Loney 1b 1 0 1 0 Drew ss 3 0 1 1
GwynJ cf 2 0 0 0 Miley p 2 0 0 0
Eovaldi p 2 0 0 0 Ziegler p 0 0 0 0
Uribe ph 1 0 0 0 RRorts ph 1 0 0 0
Elbert p 0 0 0 0 Breslw p 0 0 0 0
Belisari p 0 0 0 0
Abreu ph 1 0 0 0
Jansen p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 4 9 4 Totals 29 1 5 1
Los Angeles....................... 200 100 100 — 4
Arizona............................... 010 000 000 — 1
DP—Los Angeles 3, Arizona 2. LOB—Los Angeles
7, Arizona4. 2B—M.Ellis (5), J.Rivera(7), Goldsch-
midt (23). HR—E.Herrera (1), Van Slyke (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Los Angeles
Eovaldi W,1-5.......... 6 5 1 1 3 3
Elbert H,8................. 1 0 0 0 0 1
Belisario H,10.......... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Jansen S,15-18....... 1 0 0 0 0 3
Arizona
Miley L,9-5............... 6
2
⁄3 8 4 4 2 4
Ziegler ...................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 2
Breslow.................... 1 1 0 0 1 0
Umpires—Home, Chad Fairchild;First, Alfonso
Marquez;Second, Brian O’Nora;Third, Jordan Bak-
er.
T—2:45. A—23,002 (48,633).
Reds 6, Padres 0
Cincinnati San Diego
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Cozart ss 4 1 2 1 Amarst 2b 4 0 0 0
Stubbs cf 5 1 1 0 Kotsay rf 4 0 0 0
Votto 1b 3 0 2 1 Headly 3b 4 0 1 0
BPhllps 2b 5 0 0 0 Quentin lf 4 0 0 0
Bruce rf 5 1 1 0 Grandl c 3 0 1 0
Ludwck lf 4 0 1 0 Alonso 1b 2 0 0 0
Frazier 3b 3 2 2 2 Venale cf 3 0 1 0
Hanign c 4 1 2 2 EvCarr ss 3 0 0 0
Arroyo p 4 0 1 0 K.Wells p 2 0 0 0
Brach p 0 0 0 0
Hinshw p 0 0 0 0
Mikolas p 0 0 0 0
Forsyth ph 1 0 0 0
Ohlndrf p 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 612 6 Totals 30 0 3 0
Cincinnati ........................... 100 000 221 — 6
San Diego.......................... 000 000 000 — 0
DP—San Diego1. LOB—Cincinnati 8, San Diego 4.
2B—Cozart (20), Stubbs (9), Votto(35), Bruce(20).
HR—Cozart (9), Frazier (9), Hanigan (2).
IP H R ER BB SO
Cincinnati
Arroyo W,4-5........... 9 3 0 0 1 8
San Diego
K.Wells L,1-2........... 6 7 3 3 3 3
Brach........................
2
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
Hinshaw.................... 0 0 0 0 1 0
Mikolas..................... 1
1
⁄3 2 2 2 0 1
Ohlendorf ................. 1 2 1 1 0 1
K.Wells pitched to 2 batters in the 7th.
Hinshaw pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP—Brach.
Umpires—Home, Brian Knight;First, Mike Winters-
;Second, Mark Wegner;Third, Wally Bell.
S T A N D I N G S
All Times EDT
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
New York ....................................... 51 33 .607 — — 5-5 L-1 25-16 26-17
Baltimore........................................ 45 38 .542 5
1
⁄2 — 4-6 W-1 22-20 23-18
Tampa Bay..................................... 44 41 .518 7
1
⁄2 2 4-6 L-1 24-19 20-22
Boston............................................ 43 42 .506 8
1
⁄2 3 3-7 W-1 22-23 21-19
Toronto........................................... 42 43 .494 9
1
⁄2 4 4-6 L-3 23-19 19-24
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Chicago.......................................... 47 37 .560 — — 8-2 W-5 24-21 23-16
Cleveland....................................... 44 40 .524 3 1
1
⁄2 7-3 W-1 24-20 20-20
Detroit............................................. 43 42 .506 4
1
⁄2 3 7-3 W-4 21-20 22-22
Kansas City ................................... 37 46 .446 9
1
⁄2 8 3-7 L-2 14-23 23-23
Minnesota...................................... 36 48 .429 11 9
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 17-25 19-23
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Texas ............................................. 51 34 .600 — — 5-5 W-1 28-16 23-18
Los Angeles .................................. 46 38 .548 4
1
⁄2 — 5-5 L-1 23-18 23-20
Oakland.......................................... 42 42 .500 8
1
⁄2 3
1
⁄2 6-4 W-5 23-19 19-23
Seattle ............................................ 35 50 .412 16 11 4-6 L-3 16-25 19-25
NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Washington ................................... 49 33 .598 — — 7-3 W-1 24-15 25-18
New York ....................................... 46 39 .541 4
1
⁄2 — 7-3 W-1 26-19 20-20
Atlanta............................................ 45 39 .536 5
1
⁄2 5-5 W-3 20-22 25-17
Miami .............................................. 41 43 .488 9 4
1
⁄2 7-3 L-1 22-22 19-21
Philadelphia................................... 37 49 .430 14 9
1
⁄2 1-9 L-3 17-26 20-23
Central Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Pittsburgh..................................... 47 37 .560 — — 8-2 W-1 28-14 19-23
Cincinnati...................................... 45 38 .542 1
1
⁄2 — 4-6 W-1 23-16 22-22
St. Louis ....................................... 45 40 .529 2
1
⁄2 1 5-5 W-1 22-20 23-20
Milwaukee .................................... 39 45 .464 8 6
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 22-21 17-24
Houston........................................ 33 52 .388 14
1
⁄2 13 1-9 W-1 24-20 9-32
Chicago ........................................ 32 52 .381 15 13
1
⁄2 6-4 L-1 19-20 13-32
West Division
W L Pct GB WCGB L10 Str Home Away
Los Angeles................................. 47 38 .553 — — 4-6 L-1 27-16 20-22
San Francisco.............................. 46 39 .541 1 — 4-6 L-1 26-16 20-23
Arizona ......................................... 40 43 .482 6 5 3-7 W-1 21-21 19-22
San Diego..................................... 34 51 .400 13 12 7-3 L-1 17-25 17-26
Colorado....................................... 32 52 .381 14
1
⁄2 13
1
⁄2 4-6 L-1 18-25 14-27
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Detroit 4, Kansas City 2
Tampa Bay 10, Cleveland 3
N.Y. Yankees 10, Boston 8
Minnesota 5, Texas 1
Chicago White Sox 4, Toronto 2
Baltimore 3, L.A. Angels 2
Oakland 4, Seattle 1, 11 innings
Saturday's Games
N.Y. Yankees 6, Boston 1, 1st game
Detroit 8, Kansas City 7
Chicago White Sox 2, Toronto 0
Cleveland 7, Tampa Bay 3
Texas 4, Minnesota 3, 10 innings
Boston 9, N.Y. Yankees 5, 2nd game
Baltimore at L.A. Angels, (n)
Seattle at Oakland, (n)
Sunday's Games
Kansas City (Teaford 1-1) at Detroit (Scherzer 7-5),
1:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 8-5) at Cleveland (McAllister
3-1), 1:05 p.m.
Toronto (Cecil 2-1) at Chicago White Sox (Axelrod
0-1), 2:10 p.m.
Baltimore (W.Chen 7-4) at L.A. Angels (Mills 0-0),
3:35 p.m.
Seattle (F.Hernandez 6-5) at Oakland (B.Colon
6-7), 4:05 p.m.
Minnesota (De Vries 2-1) at Texas (Oswalt 2-1),
7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (Nova 9-3) at Boston (Lester 5-5),
8:05 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at Kansas City, MO, 8:15 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Friday's Games
Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 0
Colorado 5, Washington 1
San Francisco 6, Pittsburgh 5
Chicago Cubs 8, N.Y. Mets 7
Milwaukee 7, Houston 1
Miami 3, St. Louis 2
Arizona 5, L.A. Dodgers 3
Cincinnati 6, San Diego 0
Saturday's Games
Washington 4, Colorado 1
Houston 6, Milwaukee 3
Pittsburgh 3, San Francisco 1
N.Y. Mets 3, Chicago Cubs 1
St. Louis 3, Miami 2
Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 3
Cincinnati at San Diego, (n)
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, (n)
Sunday's Games
Chicago Cubs (Dempster 3-3) at N.Y. Mets (Niese
7-3), 1:10 p.m.
Atlanta (Jurrjens 2-2) at Philadelphia (Worley 4-5),
1:35 p.m.
Colorado (Guthrie 3-8) at Washington (Zimmer-
mann 5-6), 1:35 p.m.
San Francisco (Lincecum 3-9) at Pittsburgh
(A.J.Burnett 9-2), 1:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Estrada 0-3) at Houston (Lyles 2-5),
2:05 p.m.
Miami (A.Sanchez 4-6) at St. Louis (J.Kelly 1-1),
2:15 p.m.
Cincinnati (Cueto 9-5) at San Diego (Marquis 1-4),
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 9-3) at Arizona (Bauer 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
Monday's Games
No games scheduled
Tuesday's Games
All-Star Game at Kansas City, MO, 8:15 p.m.
N A T I O N A L
L E A G U E
Mets 3, Cubs 1
Chicago New York
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DeJess cf 4 0 1 1 Tejada ss 4 1 2 0
SCastro ss 4 0 1 0 DnMrp 2b 4 0 1 0
Rizzo 1b 4 0 2 0 DWrght 3b 3 0 1 0
ASorin lf 4 0 0 0 I.Davis 1b 4 1 1 2
LaHair rf 4 0 1 0 Duda rf 3 0 1 0
Clevngr c 4 0 0 0 Vldspn lf 3 1 2 1
Barney 2b 3 0 1 0 Hairstn ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Valuen 3b 3 1 2 0 Thole c 3 0 0 0
Smrdzj p 2 0 0 0 Niwnhs cf 3 0 1 0
RJhnsn ph 1 0 0 0 Gee p 3 0 0 0
Maine p 0 0 0 0 Parnell p 0 0 0 0
Corpas p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 1 8 1 Totals 31 3 9 3
Chicago.............................. 000 001 000 — 1
New York ........................... 012 000 00x — 3
DP—Chicago 2, New York 1. LOB—Chicago 5,
New York 6. 2B—Rizzo (4), Valbuena (7). HR—
I.Davis (12), Valdespin(4). SB—D.Wright (9). CS—
S.Castro (10).
IP H R ER BB SO
Chicago
Samardzija L,6-8..... 7 7 3 3 2 4
Maine........................
2
⁄3 2 0 0 0 0
Corpas......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
New York
Gee W,6-7 ............... 8 7 1 1 0 4
Parnell S,2-5............ 1 1 0 0 0 1
Umpires—Home, Paul Nauert;First, DougEddings-
;Second, Dana DeMuth;Third, Angel Campos.
T—2:33. A—26,096 (41,922).
Pirates 3, Giants 1
San Francisco Pittsburgh
ab r h bi ab r h bi
GBlanc rf 4 1 2 0 Sutton lf 4 0 1 0
Theriot 2b 4 0 2 1 Grilli p 0 0 0 0
MeCarr lf 4 0 0 0 Hanrhn p 0 0 0 0
Posey c 4 0 0 0 Walker 2b 4 0 2 1
Sandovl 3b 3 0 0 0 AMcCt cf 4 1 1 0
Pagan cf 3 0 0 0 GJones rf 4 0 0 0
Belt 1b 3 0 0 0 McGeh 1b 4 0 0 0
BCrwfr ss 3 0 1 0 PAlvrz 3b 3 0 1 1
Vglsng p 1 0 0 0 McKnr c 3 1 2 1
Schrhlt ph 1 0 0 0 Barmes ss 3 0 0 0
Hensly p 0 0 0 0 JMcDnl p 1 1 1 0
GHrndz
ph-lf 1 0 0 0
Totals 30 1 5 1 Totals 31 3 8 3
San Francisco.................... 000 001 000 — 1
Pittsburgh .......................... 001 101 00x — 3
E—McKenry (1). DP—San Francisco 1, Pittsburgh
1. LOB—SanFrancisco3, Pittsburgh5. 2B—Sutton
(6), Walker 2 (20), P.Alvarez (15), McKenry (7).
HR—McKenry (7). S—Vogelsong.
IP H R ER BB SO
San Francisco
Vogelsong L,7-4...... 7 8 3 3 1 5
Hensley .................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Pittsburgh
Ja.McDonald W,9-3 7 4 1 1 0 10
Grilli H,21................. 1 0 0 0 0 3
Hanrahan S,23-26 .. 1 1 0 0 0 0
WP—Ja.McDonald.
Cardinals 3, Marlins 2
Miami St. Louis
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Reyes ss 4 0 0 0 Furcal ss 4 0 0 0
HRmrz 3b 4 0 0 0 Jay cf 4 0 1 0
Ca.Lee 1b 3 0 0 0 Hollidy lf 3 0 1 0
Stanton rf 1 1 1 0 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0
Cousins ph-cf 2 0 0 0 Craig 1b 4 1 3 0
LeBlnc p 0 0 0 0 Freese 3b 1 1 1 0
Kearns ph 1 0 0 0 Schmkr 2b 3 1 1 1
Morrsn lf 4 0 1 0 Descals 2b 1 0 0 0
Ruggin
cf-rf-cf 4 1 2 2 T.Cruz c 4 0 1 2
DSolan 2b 4 0 0 0 Lohse p 3 0 0 0
Hayes c 3 0 1 0 Boggs p 0 0 0 0
Zamrn p 2 0 0 0 SRonsn ph 1 0 0 0
Dobbs rf 1 0 1 0 Motte p 0 0 0 0
Totals 33 2 6 2 Totals 32 3 8 3
Miami .................................. 020 000 000 — 2
St. Louis............................. 000 300 00x — 3
E—Zambrano (2), Craig (3). LOB—Miami 5, St.
Louis 9. 2B—Dobbs (4), Craig 2 (13). 3B—T.Cruz
(1). HR—Ruggiano (6).
IP H R ER BB SO
Miami
Zambrano L,4-7....... 5 7 3 3 2 4
LeBlanc .................... 3 1 0 0 0 4
St. Louis
Lohse W,9-2............ 7 3 2 2 1 4
Boggs H,13.............. 1 1 0 0 0 1
Motte S,20-24.......... 1 2 0 0 0 1
HBP—by Zambrano (Freese, Freese).
Umpires—Home, Gerry Davis;First, Phil Cuzzi;Se-
cond, Manny Gonzalez;Third, Greg Gibson.
T—2:29. A—41,312 (43,975).
Astros 6, Brewers 3
Milwaukee Houston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
CGomz cf 4 0 0 0 Schafer cf 4 2 2 0
Ishikaw ph-1b 1 0 0 0 Altuve 2b 4 0 3 1
Aoki rf-cf 5 0 1 0 SMoore 3b 4 1 1 1
Braun lf 4 1 1 0 Lyon p 0 0 0 0
ArRmr 3b 5 1 2 0 MDwns 1b 0 0 0 0
Hart 1b-rf 3 1 1 0 JDMrtn lf 4 1 3 0
RWeks 2b 3 0 0 1 Lowrie ss 4 2 2 1
Mldnd c 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 1b 3 0 1 0
CIzturs ss 4 0 1 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0
Greink p 0 0 0 0 DelRsr p 0 0 0 0
LHrndz p 1 0 0 0 Myers p 0 0 0 0
Veras p 0 0 0 0 JCastro c 2 0 0 2
Morgan ph 1 0 0 0 Bogsvc rf 4 0 1 0
Wolf p 0 0 0 0 WRdrg p 3 0 0 0
Green ph 0 0 0 0 FRdrgz p 0 0 0 0
Dillard p 0 0 0 0 Wrght p 0 0 0 0
MParr p 0 0 0 0 Dmngz 3b 1 0 0 0
Kottars ph 0 0 0 0
Ransm ph 1 0 1 1
Loe p 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 3 7 2 Totals 33 613 5
Milwaukee.......................... 000 002 010 — 3
Houston.............................. 103 110 00x — 6
E—R.Weeks (11), M.Maldonado (2), S.Moore 2 (2).
DP—Milwaukee 1. LOB—Milwaukee 10, Houston
8. 2B—Ransom (8), Lowrie (16), C.Johnson (15).
3B—Schafer (2). HR—S.Moore (3). SB—Schafer
(20), Altuve (15). S—Schafer. SF—J.Castro 2.
IP H R ER BB SO
Milwaukee
Greinke L,9-3 .......... 0 2 1 1 0 0
L.Hernandez............ 3 5 3 3 1 2
Veras ........................ 1 1 1 0 1 1
Wolf........................... 2 3 1 1 0 1
Dillard .......................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
M.Parra ....................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 2
Loe............................ 1 1 0 0 0 1
Houston
W.Rodriguez W,7-6 5
1
⁄3 4 2 0 2 5
Fe.Rodriguez H,8 ...
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
W.Wright ..................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Lyon.......................... 1 2 1 1 0 1
Abad ......................... 0 1 0 0 0 0
Del Rosario H,1.......
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Myers S,18-20......... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Abad pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Greinke pitched to 2 batters in the 1st.
HBP—by Lyon (R.Weeks). WP—Fe.Rodriguez.
PB—J.Castro.
Umpires—Home, Joe West;First, Sam Holbrook-
;Second, Mike Estabrook;Third, Rob Drake.
T—3:17. A—23,027 (40,981).
Nationals 4, Rockies 1
Colorado Washington
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Fowler cf 4 0 3 0 Espinos 2b 4 1 1 0
Scutaro 2b 3 0 0 0 Harper cf 4 1 1 0
CGnzlz lf 4 0 0 0 Zmrmn 3b 3 1 1 1
Cuddyr 1b 3 1 1 0 Morse rf 4 0 1 0
Colvin rf 3 0 0 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 0 0
Pachec 3b 2 0 0 1 Dsmnd ss 3 1 2 1
Roenck p 0 0 0 0 TMoore lf 3 0 1 0
MtRynl p 0 0 0 0 Matths p 0 0 0 0
Ottavin p 0 0 0 0 SBurntt p 0 0 0 0
EYong ph 1 0 1 0 Clipprd p 0 0 0 0
WRosr c 4 0 1 0 Flores c 3 0 0 0
JHerrr ss 3 0 0 0 GGnzlz p 2 0 0 0
Giambi ph 1 0 0 0 Berndn lf 0 0 0 0
Francis p 2 0 0 0
Lmrdzz
ph-lf 0 0 0 0
Nelson 3b 2 0 0 0
Totals 32 1 6 1 Totals 29 4 7 2
Colorado ............................ 000 100 000 — 1
Washington ....................... 010 003 00x — 4
E—Cuddyer (5), Nelson (7), Roenicke (1), W.Rosa-
rio (9). DP—Colorado 3. LOB—Colorado 8, Wash-
ington 4. 2B—Fowler (11), Cuddyer (25), Espinosa
(20). HR—Desmond (16). SB—Scutaro (7). S—
Lombardozzi. SF—Pacheco.
IP H R ER BB SO
Colorado
Francis L,2-2............ 5 6 3 3 1 5
Roenicke.................. 1 1 1 0 1 0
Mat.Reynolds........... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Ottavino.................... 1 0 0 0 0 3
Washington
G.Gonzalez W,12-3 6 3 1 1 3 6
Mattheus H,8 ........... 1 0 0 0 0 3
S.Burnett H,17 ........ 1 1 0 0 0 1
Clippard S,14-15..... 1 2 0 0 0 2
Francis pitched to 2 batters in the 6th.
Roenicke pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
WP—Roenicke.
Umpires—Home, Mike DiMuro;First, Jim Rey-
nolds;Second, James Hoye;Third, Jim Joyce.
A M E R I C A N
L E A G U E
Yankees 6, Red Sox 1
First Game
New York Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter dh 5 1 3 0 Nava lf 4 0 1 0
Teixeir 1b 4 0 0 0 Ciriaco 2b 4 0 0 0
AlRdrg 3b 5 0 1 0 Ortiz dh 1 1 1 0
Cano 2b 4 1 1 0 AdGnzl 1b 4 0 1 0
Swisher rf 3 1 2 3 MGomz 3b 4 0 2 1
Grndrs cf 0 0 0 0 Kalish cf 4 0 0 0
AnJons lf 5 2 2 2 Aviles ss 4 0 0 0
J.Nix ss 3 1 1 1 Shppch c 3 0 1 0
DMcDn cf 2 0 0 0 Lillirdg rf 3 0 1 0
Wise ph-cf-rf 2 0 0 0
CStwrt c 4 0 1 0
Totals 37 611 6 Totals 31 1 7 1
New York ........................... 400 200 000 — 6
Boston................................ 000 100 000 — 1
E—M.Gomez (1). DP—New York 3. LOB—New
York 9, Boston 6. 2B—Cano (25), Shoppach (10).
HR—Swisher (13), An.Jones 2 (9), J.Nix (3). SB—
Jeter (7).
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
F.Garcia W,3-2........ 6
2
⁄3 6 1 1 2 5
Eppley ...................... 1
1
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Qualls ....................... 1 1 0 0 0 0
Boston
F.Morales L,1-2....... 3
1
⁄3 6 6 6 2 2
Germano.................. 5
2
⁄3 5 0 0 2 7
HBP—by F.Morales (Cano). WP—Germano.
Umpires—Home, Ed Hickox;First, Lance Barrett-
;Second, Angel Hernandez;Third, Mark Carlson.
T—3:07. A—38,170 (37,067).
Tigers 8, Royals 7
Kansas City Detroit
ab r h bi ab r h bi
AGordn lf 4 1 2 0 AJcksn cf 5 1 3 1
AEscor ss 4 3 3 0 Berry lf 4 0 1 0
Hosmer 1b 3 2 1 0 MiCarr 3b 3 1 0 1
Butler dh 5 0 3 3 Fielder 1b 2 1 1 2
Bourgs pr 0 0 0 0 DYong dh 4 1 1 2
YBtncr 2b 4 0 0 1 Raburn rf 4 0 0 0
Mostks 3b 4 1 2 3 D.Kelly rf 0 0 0 0
Francr rf 4 0 0 0 JhPerlt ss 4 1 1 0
S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 RSantg 2b 3 2 2 0
JDyson cf 4 0 0 0 Laird c 3 1 3 1
Totals 36 711 7 Totals 32 812 7
Kansas City ....................... 200 010 103 — 7
Detroit................................. 230 100 20x — 8
E—J.Dyson (6), Moustakas (9). DP—Kansas City
1. LOB—Kansas City 9, Detroit 6. 2B—A.Gordon
(26), A.Escobar (21), R.Santiago 2 (7), Laird 2 (6).
HR—Moustakas (15), Fielder (14), D.Young (9).
SB—A.Escobar (13), Bourgeois (2). CS—A.Jack-
son (3). S—Berry. SF—Y.Betancourt, Moustakas,
Mi.Cabrera.
IP H R ER BB SO
Kansas City
B.Chen L,7-8........... 3
1
⁄3 9 6 6 2 3
Adcock ..................... 4
1
⁄3 3 2 0 2 3
Collins.......................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Detroit
Fister W,2-6............. 6 8 4 4 3 2
D.Downs H,1...........
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Villarreal H,5............
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Coke H,15................
1
⁄3 0 0 0 0 1
Benoit ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Valverde................... 1 2 3 3 2 1
Fister pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
Umpires—Home, CB Bucknor;First, Bill Miller;Se-
cond, Vic Carapazza;Third, Dan Iassogna.
T—3:00. A—39,392 (41,255).
White Sox 2, Blue Jays 0
Toronto Chicago
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Lawrie 3b 3 0 1 0 De Aza cf 4 0 0 0
KJhnsn 2b 1 0 0 0 Youkils 3b 3 1 1 2
Rasms cf 3 0 0 0 A.Dunn dh 3 0 1 0
Bautist rf 4 0 1 0 Konerk 1b 4 0 1 0
Encrnc dh 3 0 1 0 Rios rf 2 0 0 0
Lind 1b 3 0 0 0 Przyns c 2 0 0 0
YEscor ss 3 0 1 0 Viciedo lf 3 0 0 0
RDavis lf 3 0 0 0 AlRmrz ss 3 1 1 0
Vizquel 2b-3b 3 0 0 0 OHudsn 2b 2 0 0 0
Arencii c 3 0 1 0
Totals 29 0 5 0 Totals 26 2 4 2
Toronto............................... 000 000 000 — 0
Chicago.............................. 000 020 00x — 2
DP—Toronto 1, Chicago 2. LOB—Toronto 4, Chi-
cago 5. 2B—Bautista (11). HR—Youkilis (7). SB—
Encarnacion (9). S—O.Hudson.
IP H R ER BB SO
Toronto
R.Romero L,8-4 ...... 6 4 2 2 3 2
Frasor ....................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Oliver ........................ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Chicago
Floyd W,7-8............. 7
2
⁄3 4 0 0 2 3
Thornton S,2-5........ 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 2
HBP—by R.Romero (Pierzynski).
T—2:25. A—25,399 (40,615).
Indians 7, Rays 3
Tampa Bay Cleveland
ab r h bi ab r h bi
DJnngs lf 4 0 0 0 Choo rf 4 0 1 0
C.Pena 1b 4 0 0 0 ACarer ss 3 1 0 0
Zobrist rf 3 1 1 0 JoLopz 2b 4 1 1 0
BUpton cf 4 1 2 1 Brantly cf 4 1 1 1
Kppngr 3b 4 0 0 0 CSantn 1b 2 1 1 1
Scott dh 4 1 2 2 Ktchm 1b 0 0 0 0
JMolin c 4 0 0 0 Duncan dh 3 2 1 2
Conrad 2b 3 0 0 0 Marson c 3 1 1 1
SRdrgz ss 2 0 1 0 Hannhn 3b 4 0 1 1
EJhnsn ph-ss 0 0 0 0 Cnghm lf 3 0 1 1
Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 30 7 8 7
Tampa Bay......................... 000 200 001 — 3
Cleveland........................... 032 000 02x — 7
E—S.Rodriguez (11). DP—Tampa Bay 2, Cleve-
land 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 5.
2B—Zobrist (18), Jo.Lopez (13), Brantley (23),
C.Santana (13), Marson (6), Cunningham(4). HR—
B.Upton (7), Scott (11), Duncan (8). CS—Choo (4),
Cunningham (3).
IP H R ER BB SO
Tampa Bay
M.Moore L,5-6......... 4
2
⁄3 5 5 5 5 3
Badenhop................. 1 1 0 0 0 0
Howell....................... 1
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 1
W.Davis.................... 1 1 2 2 1 1
Cleveland
Jimenez W,8-7........ 6 5 2 2 1 8
Sipp H,9 ................... 1 0 0 0 0 1
Pestano H,22........... 1 0 0 0 1 1
Rogers...................... 1 1 1 1 0 2
Umpires—Home, Scott Barry;First, Jerry Meals-
;Second, Gary Darling;Third, Paul Emmel.
T—2:53. A—20,658 (43,429).
Braves 6, Phillies 3
Atlanta Philadelphia
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Bourn cf 4 2 3 0 Rollins ss 4 0 0 1
Prado lf 5 0 2 2 Victorn cf 4 0 0 0
Heywrd rf 4 0 0 0 Utley 2b 4 0 0 0
C.Jones 3b 3 1 1 0 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0
FFrmn 1b 4 1 1 0 Pence rf 3 1 2 0
McCnn c 4 1 2 2 Polanc 3b 3 1 0 0
Uggla 2b 4 0 0 0 Pierre lf 3 1 1 1
Smmns ss 3 1 1 1 Mayrry 1b 2 0 1 0
Hanson p 2 0 0 0 Blanton p 2 0 1 1
OFlhrt p 0 0 0 0 Diekmn p 0 0 0 0
M.Diaz ph 1 0 0 0 Pridie ph 0 0 0 0
Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Wggntn ph 1 0 0 0
Horst p 0 0 0 0
Totals 34 610 5 Totals 30 3 6 3
Atlanta ................................ 011 200 200 — 6
Philadelphia....................... 030 000 000 — 3
E—Pence (5). DP—Atlanta 2. LOB—Atlanta 5, Phi-
ladelphia 1. 2B—Prado (23), Ruiz (21), Pierre (6).
HR—McCann (12). SB—Bourn 2 (25), Prado 2 (11).
CS—Bourn (8), Rollins (4). S—Hanson. SF—Sim-
mons.
IP H R ER BB SO
Atlanta
Hanson W,10-5....... 7 6 3 3 1 6
O’Flaherty H,15....... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Kimbrel S,24-25...... 1 0 0 0 0 2
Philadelphia
Blanton L,7-8........... 6
1
⁄3 9 6 5 1 6
Diekman................... 1
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Horst ......................... 1 1 0 0 0 2
Hanson pitched to 1 batter in the 8th.
Umpires—Home, Bob Davidson;First, Dan Bellino-
;Second, Mike Muchlinski;Third, Jerry Layne.
T—2:47. A—44,797 (43,651).
Red Sox 9, Yankees 5
Second Game
New York Boston
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Jeter ss 5 1 0 0 Nava lf 5 0 1 0
Grndrs cf 4 1 1 0 Punto 2b-3b 3 0 2 1
Teixeir dh 4 1 1 3 Ortiz dh 4 0 2 0
Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 Sltlmch c 5 0 0 0
Swisher
1b-rf-1b 2 0 0 0 AdGnzl 1b 5 2 3 0
AnJons lf-rf 4 1 1 1 C.Ross rf 4 1 0 0
J.Nix 3b 3 0 0 0 Sweeny cf 5 1 1 1
Ibanez ph-lf 1 0 0 0 MGomz 3b 4 2 3 1
RMartn c 2 0 1 0 Aviles pr-ss 1 1 1 0
AlRdrg ph 1 0 0 0
Ciriaco
ss-2b 5 2 3 3
DMcDn rf 2 0 0 0
ErChvz
ph-1b-3b 2 1 1 1
Totals 34 5 6 5 Totals 41 916 6
New York ........................... 300 000 101 — 5
Boston................................ 001 013 40x — 9
E—Jeter (7), D.McDonald (2), J.Nix (2), R.Martin
(5), Mitchell (1), M.Gomez 2 (3). DP—New York 2.
LOB—New York 6, Boston 12. 2B—R.Martin (11),
Punto (5), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (27), M.Gomez 2 (3),
Aviles (21), Ciriaco (1). 3B—Sweeney (2). HR—
Teixeira (15), An.Jones (10), Er.Chavez (7). SB—
Ciriaco (1). SF—Punto.
IP H R ER BB SO
New York
P.Hughes L,9-7....... 5
1
⁄3 10 5 3 1 3
Logan........................
2
⁄3 1 1 1 2 1
Wade........................
2
⁄3 3 3 1 0 0
Rapada.....................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 0 0
Mitchell ..................... 1 1 0 0 0 1
Boston
Doubront W,9-4 ...... 6
1
⁄3 4 4 3 1 6
Albers H,5................
2
⁄3 0 0 0 1 1
Mortensen................
1
⁄3 1 0 0 2 1
Padilla H,19.............
2
⁄3 0 0 0 0 0
Aceves ..................... 1 1 1 1 0 1
Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th.
PB—Saltalamacchia.
Umpires—Home, Tim Timmons;First, Angel Her-
nandez;Second, Mark Carlson;Third, Lance Bar-
rett.
T—3:36. A—37,791 (37,495).
T H I S D A T E I N
B A S E B A L L
1912 — Rube Marquard’s 19-game winning streak
was stopped as the NewYork Giants lost 7-2 to the
Chicago Cubs.
C M Y K
PAGE 6C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
serves as host. American will
play the D32 champion at 7:30
p.m. next Saturday. The D32 title
game is Monday night, with un-
defeated Green Ridge hosting.
District 31 Major Baseball Championship
Back Mtn. American 14, Wyo./West Wyo. 0
Wyo./West Wyo Back Mtn. American
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Hindmarsh c 2 0 0 0 Mathers cf 3 2 0 0
Williams 1b 2 0 0 0 Hadsall ss 2 2 1 1
Silinskie p 1 0 0 0 Barrett p 2 3 2 3
Gonzales ss 1 0 0 0 Roberts c 2 2 1 2
Hawk 2b 1 0 0 0 Holdrdge 1b 1 1 0 1
Kosco 3b 2 0 0 0 Schuster 2b 3 1 1 2
Mapes cf 1 0 0 0 Robbins rf 2 1 2 1
Tarnalicki rf 1 0 0 0 Kaleta rf 1 0 0 0
DePietro lf 1 0 0 0 Pertl 3b 1 1 0 0
Mrkwski 3b 0 0 0 0
Kovalick lf 0 1 0 0
Lydon lf 1 0 1 0
Totals 12 0 0 0 Totals 1814 8 10
Wyoming/West Wyoming.......... 000 0 — 0
Back Mountain American............ 374 x — 14
E – WWW 1. LOB – WWW 3, BMA 3. 2B – Barrett.
IP H R ER BB SO
Wyo./West Wyo.
Silinskie (L) ............... 3 5 10 8 6 2
Gonzales................... 1 3 4 4 2 0
Back Mtn. Amer.
Barrett (W)................. 4 0 0 0 3 5
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
Back Mountain
American’s Josh
Lydon gets hung
up on Wyoming/
West Wyoming’s
Matt Silinskie,
who was trying to
make the play.
Back Mountain
American won the
game, 14-0. Back
Mountain Amer-
ican pitcher J.D.
Barrett threw a
four-inning no-
hitter.
SPECIAL
Continued fromPage 1C
TUNKHANNOCK – Tunk-
hannock swept a doubleheader
from Hazleton on Saturday in
Wyoming Valley American Le-
gion League play winning 4-3 in
the first game and 7-5 in the
second.
In the process, Tunkhannock
also cleared up a cloudy playoff
picture by securing a spot in the
tournament – which begins on
Friday – and eliminating Back
Mountain, Nanticoke and
Swoyersville.
Josh McClain pitched a com-
plete-game in the opener, while
Ryan Goodwin and Rich Con-
deelis each had two hits and
scored a run.
Rich Gawel paced Hazleton’s
offense going 3-for-4 with a run
scored and an RBI.
In the nightcap, Tunkhannock
plated runs in the second and
fifth innings to pull out the
victory. Condeelis laced a pair of
doubles scoring a run and driv-
ing one in, while Lance Sherry
drove in two runs.
Anthony Zaloga went 2-for-3
for Hazleton.
There are just two games
remaining on the league sched-
ule and the playoffs are set with
Greater Pittston (13-5), Moun-
tain Post-B (12-5), Hazleton
(12-6) and Tunkhannock (11-7)
securing the berths. GP has the
top seed and will play Tunk-
hannock at 3 p.m. Friday at the
Mountain Post field in Rice,
Twp.
Mountain Post and Hazleton
will also play each other, but the
second and third seed will be
decided after Mountain Post
plays Swoyersville this after-
noon. That game is slated for
5:30 p.m. Friday as the double-
elimination tournament gets
underway.
Game 1
Tunkhannock 4, Hazleton 3
Hazleton Area Tunkhannock
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Cara 2b 3 0 0 0 Zaner ss 4 0 0 0
Klein ss 3 2 1 0 Goodwin 3b 4 1 2 0
Gawel c 4 1 3 1 Custer c 2 1 1 1
Seach lf 4 0 0 1 McClain p 3 0 1 0
Zaloga rf 2 0 1 2
Condeelis
1b 3 1 2 1
Yance p 0 0 0 0 Lee rf 2 0 0 0
Johnson ph 3 0 0 0 Soltysiak lf 0 0 0 0
Pevac 2b 0 0 0 0 Sick dh 3 0 1 1
Chirico 1b 1 0 0 0 T. Weiss 2b 3 0 1 0
Sullivan 3b 3 0 0 0 Sherry cf 2 1 0 0
Hrwath cf 3 0 0 0
Totals 26 3 5 3 Totals 26 4 8 3
Hazleton Area ......................... 102 000 0 — 3
Tunkhannock........................... 101 110 x — 4
2B – Goodwin, Condeelis, Klein 3B – Goodwin,
Zaloga
IP H R ER BB SO
Hazleton Area
Yance (L)................... 5 8 4 3 3 5
Klein ........................... 1 0 0 0 0 0
Tunkhannock
McClain (W).............. 7 5 3 2 2 5
Game 2
Tunkhannock 7, Hazleton 5
Hazleton Area Tunkhannock
ab r h bi ab r h bi
C Cara ss 2 0 1 2 Zaner p 3 0 0 0
DCara rf 4 0 1 0 R Weiss dh 0 0 0 0
Gawel c 4 0 0 0 Goodwin 3b 4 1 0 1
Seach lf 4 1 0 0 T. Weiss p 0 0 0 0
Chirico 1b 3 1 1 0 Custer dh 3 0 0 0
Zaloga 2b 3 1 2 0 Lee rf 2 1 1 0
Pevac 2b 1 0 0 0 Holton rf 2 0 0 0
Johnson p 2 0 0 0 Soltysiak lf 2 1 1 0
Karmonic ph 0 0 0 0 Sick lf 1 0 1 0
Klein cf 4 1 1 0 Bernoski c 2 0 0 0
Sullivan 3b 3 1 1 1 Swilley ph 1 1 1 0
Sherry cf 1 0 1 2
Thompson
cf 2 1 1 0
Totals 30 5 7 3 Totals 30 7 9 4
Hazleton Area ......................... 000 203 0 — 5
Tunkhannock........................... 030 031 0 — 7
2B – Condeelis (2), Zaloga, Sullivan 3B – Seach
IP H R ER BB SO
Hazleton Area
Johnson (L)............... 7 9 7 5 1 3
Tunkhannock
T. Weiss .................... 3.1 3 2 2 2 0
Zaner (W).................. 2.2 4 3 3 1 2
Condeelis.................. 1 0 0 0 2 1
Swoyersville 7, Nanticoke 2
Joseph Pechulis went 2-for-3
with two RBI in Swoyersville’s
win.
Richard Stayer, Robert Po-
lachek, Michael Leonard, and
Chandler Yakimowicz all had
one RBI each.
Dominick Policare went 1-
for-3 with a run scored while
Kevin Volkel and Anthony Ionna
each had an RBI for Nanticoke.
Nanticoke Swoyersville
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Briggs 2b 3 1 1 0 Stayer cf 4 1 2 1
Youngblood
ph 1 0 0 0 Zielan p 4 1 1 0
Jezewski lf 3 0 0 0 Sabecky ph 0 0 0 0
Policare 3b 3 1 1 0 Pechulis 3b 3 0 2 2
Ionna ss 3 0 1 1 Polachek 1b 4 1 2 1
Volkel rf 2 0 1 1
Roccograndi
2b 0 0 0 0
Higgs ss 1 0 0 0
Yakimowicz
dh 3 0 1 1
Yudichak c 3 0 0 0 Leonard ss 3 0 2 1
Hauer cf 3 0 0 0 McCue lf 2 0 0 0
Ivan 1b 0 0 0 0 Potoski c 3 1 0 0
Deno dh 2 0 1 0 Reyes c 0 0 0 0
Tsvedos p 2 0 0 0
Labashosky
ph 0 0 0 0
Stashik rf 0 0 0 0 Flaherty rf 1 1 1 0
Hogan lf 1 1 1 0
Totals 26 2 5 2 Totals 28 612 6
Nanticoke................................. 000 101 0 — 2
Swoyersville ............................ 310 003 x — 7
2B – Ionna 3B – Policare
IP H R ER BB SO
Nanticoke
Verbados (L)............. 4 7 4 4 2 4
Ionna .......................... 2 5 3 2 0 2
Swoyersville
Zielen (W) ................. 7 5 2 2 2 9
A M E R I C A N L E G I O N B A S E B A L L
Tunkhannock sweep
clears up playoffs
Senior Division
W L Pct. GB
Greater Pittston ........... 13 5 .722 --
Mountain Post-B ......... 12 5 .706 .5
Hazleton....................... 12 6 .667 1.0
Tunkhannock ............... 11 7 .611 2.0
Back Mountain............. 10 8 .556 3.0
Nanticoke ..................... 9 9 .500 4.0
Swoyersville................. 8 8 .500 4.5
Plains............................ 7 10 .412 5.5
Mountain Post-B ......... 3 15 .167 10.0
Wilkes-Barre ................ 3 15 .167 10.0
Youth Division
W L Pct. GB
Greater Pittston ........... 13 2 .867 --
Swoyersville................. 12 2 .857 .5
Nanticoke ..................... 12 3 .800 1.0
Plains............................ 10 6 .625 3.5
Back Mountain............. 7 7 .500 4.5
Mountain Post ............. 5 8 .385 6.5
Wilkes-Barre ................ 4 11 .267 8.5
Tunkhannock ............... 3 13 .188 10.5
Old Forge ..................... 0 14 .000 12.5
Prep League
W L Pct. GB
Swoyersville ..................... 6 1 .857 --
Mountain Post .................. 4 5 .444 1.0
Nanticoke.......................... 3 5 .375 3.5
Back Mountain ................. 2 4 .333 4.5
Senior Remaining Schedule
Today
Swoyersville at Mountain Post-B
Tuesday
Plains at Swoyersville
Playoff Schedule
(all games at Mountain Post)
Friday
Game 1: Greater Pittston (13-5) vs.
Tunkhannock (11-7), 3 p.m.
Game 2: Mountain Post-B (12-5) vs.
Hazleton (12-6), 5:30 p.m.
Saturday
Game 3: Game 2 winner vs. Game 1
winner, 1 p.m.
Game 4: Game 2 loser vs. Game 1
loser, 4 p.m.
Sunday
Game 5: Game 3 loser vs. Game 4
winner, 1 p.m.
Game 6: Game 5 winner vs. Game
3 winner, 4 p.m.
Monday
Game 7: Game 6 rematch if neces-
sary, 5:30 p.m.
W VA L L S TA N D I N G S The Times Leader staff
PITTSTON TWP. – Nanti-
coke forced a championship
game with Pittston Township
in the District 16 9-10 baseball
tournament with a 9-0 win on
Saturday.
Devland Heffron earned the
win and Dylan Szychowski
went 4-for-4 with a home run,
two RBI and scored three runs.
Austin Norton had a two-run
home run for the winners,
while Jacob Krupinski singled
and doubled.
For Pittston Twp., Mike
Nocito, Josh Dairia, Tyler
Cebula and Tony Gorey all had
hits.
The teams will play for the
title today at 2 p.m.
DISTRICT 31 10-11
BASEBALL
Kingston/Forty Fort 19, Bob
Horlacher 3
Mykolas Bozentka had a
home run while Danny Po-
lachek, Jake Malia, and Mi-
chael Kane all had three hits
each.
Mike Lee had two hits, and
Tommy Traver, Cole Cool-
baugh and Lenny Kelly all had
one hit each.
West Side 12, Exeter 7
Dave Wildey doubled and
knocked in two runs, while
Mathew Bobeck singled,
Adam Detwiler had two sin-
gles and Aaron Bennett sin-
gled for West Side.
For Exeter, Cory Murk tri-
pled, Caleb Graham singled
and Jeremy Harman doubled.
DISTRICT 1610-11
BASEBALL
Mountain Top 8, South
Wilkes-Barre 2
A.J. Kovalchick struck out
seven in five innings to lead
Mountain Top past South
Wilkes-Barre.
David Wickiser pitched the
final inning for Mountain Top.
Sean Murphy had two dou-
bles on offense for the win-
ners, while Josh Specla and
Michael Palmero made nice
defensive plays in the field.
South Wilkes-Barre was led
by pitcher Jared O’ Day, who
had a double, and Anthony
Macko, who was 3-for-3 at the
plate and scored both his
team’s runs.
Mountain Top moves on to
Wednesday’s finals.
DISTRICT 16 SENIOR
BASEBALL
Nanticoke 4, North
Wilkes-Barre/Plains 2
Aaron Scott was the winning
pitcher striking out seven
batters while Jimmy Strick-
land went 2-for-2 with a dou-
ble, a triple and three RBI.
Aaron Scott contributed
with three hits and two RBI.
SECTION 511-12
SOFTBALL
Carbino Club 14, Nanticoke
Area 5
Winning Pitcher Quinn
Kelly struck out five, while
Flynn Jones, Kira Sebastianel-
li, and Jenna Lipowski had two
hits each.
Kierra Brown hit a single
and a double and Nicole Cal-
pin had two singles and one
double.
DISTRICT 16 MAJOR
BASEBALL
South Wilkes-Barre 9,
Mountain Top 6
South Wilkes-Barre’s offense
was led by Noah Edwards with
a three run homer run in the
third inning to secure the win.
Paul Fox also contributed
offensively driving in four runs
at the plate while Colin Pasone
and Kenny Macko combined
on the mound for South
Wilkes-Bare in the win.
Corey Chalk led the Moun-
tain Top offense driving in two
runs in the loss.
The deciding game will be
held today at Miner Park in
South Wilkes-Barre.
DISTRICT 16 TEENERS
Duryea/PT 11, Avoca/Dupont 7
Mark Prebish won going five
innings and striking out six.
Andrew Mies (2-for-4), Josh
Kramer (2-for-2), Michael
Antal (2-for-2) and Carmen
Lobrutto (1-for-3) helped the
winners offensively.
For Avoca/Dupont, Tim
Allen tripled and Dave Pa-
cousky was 4-for-4 with three
runs scored.
HANOVER 8-9
TOURNAMENT
Wyoming/West Wyoming 13,
Hanover 2
Nick Belles pitched a com-
plete-game, two-hitter, striking
out six, for Wyoming/West
Wyoming.
Belles also singled and
knocked in two runs. Christian
Esposito singled and had three
RBI. Thad Erzar had two RBI.
Esposito, John O’Brien, Tyler
Harden, Anthony Nelson and
Jacob Nelson all scored twice.
Zachary Murphy had a two-
run single for Hanover. Bobby
Sabecky also singled.
Mountain Top Grey 5,
Mountain Top Black 4
Logan Arnold and Nick
Ruggeri both pitched Moun-
tain Top Grey over Mountain
Top Black.
Leading the Grey offense
was Jimmy Hawley with a
triple, Nick Ruggeri with an
RBI and Tyler Shedlock with
two hits including the eventual
game winning inside-the-park
home run.
Aiden Murphy and Chase
Govin had two hits a piece in
leading the Black team.
PENNSYLVANIA12U
SOFTBALL TOURNAMENT
Luzerne County Chaos 14,
Methacton 0
Meg Armstrong was the
winning pitcher allowing one
hit and striking out nine.
Audi Wells had three hits to
lead the offense.
Stonersville 3, Luzerne
County Chaos 0
Cassy Novakowski and Ja-
den Belles led the offense for
Luzerne County Chaos.
Kristian Coffey and Emily
Elick each had one hit in the
effort as well.
DISTRICT 16 TEENERS
SOFTBALL
Mountain Top 8, Plains 6
Ashley Casem pitched six
strikeouts and had two hits
while Mel Snyder and Kiera
Mongeon both had two hits
including a double each.
Kaitlyn Kalucny had two
hits including a double and
Marissa Ross had one hit and
two runs scored for Plains.
Mountain Top advances to
the state tournament in Mans-
field.
YO U T H B A S E B A L L A N D S O F T B A L L
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Nanticoke relief pitcher Austin Norton, center, is swarmed by teammates after a 9-0 victory
over Pittston Township in Saturday’s District 16 9-10 baseball game to force a rematch today.
Nanticoke wins to stay alive
The Times Leader staff
SYRACUSE, N.Y. – The Scran-
ton/Wilkes-Barre Yankees blewa
four-run lead through four in-
nings in dropping a 7-6 decision
toBuffaloonSaturday at Alliance
Bank Stadium.
The Yankees held a 5-1lead en-
tering the top of the sixth inning,
but the Bisons scoredthree inthe
sixth off starting pitcher Ramon
Ortiz to pull to within 5-4.
Buffalo then added two more
in the seventh off reliever Chase
Whitley to take a 6-5 advantage.
Jack Cust doubled in Ronnier
Mustelier in the bottom of the
seventh to even the score at 6-6.
But Whitley couldn’t hold the Bi-
sons in check in the next inning
as Brad Emaus singled in Val Pas-
cucci to give Buffalo a 7-6 lead.
Mustelier crushed his eighth
home runof the seasoninthe bot-
tomof the first as the Yankees an-
swered a first-inning run by the
Bisons to even the score at 1-1.
SWB opened its 4-1 lead in the
bottom of the third scoring three
runs when Cust singled in a pair
and Brandon Laird added a sacri-
fice fly. The Yankees added to
their leadinthe fourthtackingon
a tally on a Chris Dickerson RBI-
single.
Whitleywas hit withtheloss as
his record fell to 4-5 this season.
Ortiz threw six innings allowing
four runs (three earned ) on six
hits. He fanned six and walked
just one.
Bisons 7, Yankees 6
Buffalo Yankees
ab r h bi ab r h bi
Lewis lf 5 0 1 0 Dickerson cf 4 1 1 1
Rodriguez ss 3 1 0 0 Joseph 2b 5 0 1 0
Loewen 1b 4 1 2 2 Mustelier lf 4 3 2 1
Satin 2b 4 1 0 1 Cust dh 4 0 2 3
DanDekker cf 4 1 1 3 Laird 1b 3 0 0 1
Pascucci dh 3 1 0 0 Cervelli c 4 0 1 0
Tuiasosopo
3b 4 0 1 0 Garner rf 4 0 1 0
Reyes rf 3 1 2 0 Pena 3b 4 1 2 0
Emaus ph 1 0 1 1 Bernier ss 4 1 1 0
May c 4 1 1 0
Totals 35 7 9 7 Totals 36 611 6
Buffalo.................................. 100 003 210 — 7
Yankees............................... 103 100 100 — 6
E– Tuiasosopo (8), Pena (8); LOB– BUF 6, SWB6;
2B – Garner (9), Joseph (11), Mustelier (15), Cust
(11), Loewen (3), Tuiasosopo (9), May (14); HR –
DanDekker (5), Mustelier (8); SF–Satin, Laird; CS–
Rodriguez (3), Pena (2)
IP H R ER BB SO
Buffalo
Olson ......................... 4 8 5 5 2 2
Schwinden................ 2 1 0 0 0 1
Edgin (BS, 2), (W,
3-2)............................. 1 2 1 1 0 0
Acosta (H, 4) ............ 1 0 0 0 0 2
Hampson (S, 3)........ 1 0 0 0 0 1
Yankees
Ortiz ........................... 6 6 4 3 1 6
Whitley (BS, 1) (L,
5-4)............................. 1.1 2 3 3 3 2
Cedeno...................... .2 1 0 0 0 1
WP: Whitley
Time: 3:03
Attendance: 2,114
B A S E B A L L
SWB Yanks
watch lead
slip away
The Times Leader staff
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Bryce Harper and Michael
Bourn are headed to the All-
Star game after all.
Harper and Bourn were
added to the NL roster for
Tuesday’s game in Kansas
City after two players drop-
ped out due to injuries. Both
outfielders had lost to David
Freese in online voting for
one of the final spots.
The 19-year-old Harper, a
budding star with the Wash-
ington Nationals, becomes
the youngest position player
in the history of the game
and third youngest All-Star
ever.
Bourn, Atlanta’s dynamic
leadoff hitter, made the NL
All-Star team for the second
time.
He entered Saturday’s game
at Philadelphia with a .305
batting average, seven home-
rs, 32 RBIs and 23 stolen
bases.
Harper, Bourn are
added to NL roster
INGLEWOOD, Calif. — Ken-
tucky Derby and Preakness win-
ner I’ll HaveAnother paradedbe-
tween races at Betfair Holly-
wood Park on Saturday, giving
fans at the colt’s home track a
chance to cheer him one last
time before he heads off to stud
duty in Japan.
I’ll Have Another made his
way from the paddock, where
jockey Mario Gutierrez got on
wearing purple-and-white silks,
through the tunnel and onto the
track as fans applauded and
waved signs. He walked briefly
on the track before entering the
winner’s circle for the last time.
“He is the local boy made
good,” track announcer Vic
Stauffer saidas I’ll Have Another
bucked.
“Thinks he’s running again.
He’s all pumped up,” a male fan
said.
I’ll Have Another’s bid to be-
come racing’s first Triple Crown
winner in 34 years ended with
his sudden retirement on the eve
of the June 9 Belmont Stakes be-
cause of tendinitis in his left
front leg.
“I thinkhewouldhavewonthe
Belmont if he had the chance,”
said Gina Romero, a 45-year-old
fan fromPorter Ranch. “I’mglad
they put his safety first, that’s the
most important thing.”
Last month, owner J. Paul
Reddam sold the colt to Japa-
nese breeders. I’ll Have Another
will enter quarantine on Sunday
for 30 days before going to his
new home at Big Red Farm on
the island of Hokkaido.
“It’s sad,” trainer Doug O’Neill
said. “We all wanted so badly for
himtostayintheUnitedStates. I
was actually pushing for him to
stay in California, but there was
just very little interest.”
O’Neill plans to take his family
to visit the colt in Japan next
spring.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Derby winner I’ll Have Another bids farewell at Hollywood Park
The Associated Press
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 7C
kë|| · |êk\CK| · Hkl|k · \W
kêë!| II |kkK\\||||, |k · JIê.l!!.I1II
KHW
J!! HkkK|! \!. K|8â\!ê8, |k · JIê.l!I.IIII
K|k · \ëKkkë
Jtê |||kC| \!. K|8â\!ê8, |k · JIê.II1.11l1
!J,111.êê · !1,111.êê
03 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport
êJ C|er¡ Ce|±l| \e1±r
02 VW Jetta
êt |er1 |etat
êI C|er¡ Ce|±l| |\
êl \a|±ra |mpret± WkI
êJ C|er¡ !r±il|l±ter |!
ê1 K¡ar1±i \±r|± |e |I
êJ C|r¡tler \e|rir¡ Cerrer|i|le !earir¡
êI ka1i k1 êa±||re
êt Hi|ta|it|i |±rter |\
ê! C|er¡ Ce|±l| |!
ê! C|er¡ H±li|a |\
ê1 C±1ill±t C!\
ê1 |er1 |lJê I|! 1t1 |I C±|
êê H±t1± |re|e¡e 1êK milet
êt !e¡e|± Cerell± ||
êI \±|arr kel±¡ Hiri \±r
!Iê,êêê.êê · !II,111.êê
êl Herte1et Kert |Ilê 1m±|it
êJ \a|±ra |mpret± k\
êJ Ker1± Cirit \e1±r
ê! !e¡e|± I±rit \e1±r
ê1 Ker1± Cirit |I
ê! K¡ar1±i |l±r|r± â|\
êI \a|±ra êa||±t|
êI |er1 |tplerer \per| !r±t
ê1 8itt±r \er|r± ||
ê! |er1 |etat \|
ê1 C|er¡ \ilrer±1e |! |t|. C±|. 1t1
ê! K¡ar1±i kter±
êJ ka1i k1 êa±||re
êI \a|±ra êa||±t| \per|
ê1 KHW IlJi
ê1 C|er¡ \ilrer±1e IJêê 1t1
êt 8itt±r kl|im± \|
ê! \W Ie||± \|
ê! \W Ie||± \
09 Toyota Corolla S
êt \W â!i
ê1 KHW IlJti
êt H±t1± J
êI \W Kee|le
ê! H±t1± Ii
!I1,êêê.êê · !It,111.êê
êt Herte1et Cl!ê 1m±|it
ê! Ki± \e1er± |I
ê1 \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ |imi|e1
Iê |e1¡e krer¡er \I!
êt \a|±ra |eret|er || Ke±r
Iê H±t1± Ii !earir¡
êJ I±¡a±r \·!¡pe
ê1 \a|±ra |mpret±
ê1 8itt±r kea¡e (l)
êt ka1i k1 C±|riele| \·|ire
ê1 \a|±ra |eret|er I
ê! |e1¡e krer¡er k!
ê! \a|±ra êa||±t|
ê1 KHW IlJti
êt \a|±ra êa||±t| |!|
ê! \W Kee|le \|
êt ka1i k1 êa±||re
êI ka1i k1 êa±||re (l)
ê1 \a|±ra |mpret±
êJ ka1i k1 kr±r| I.l
êt \W !ea±re¡
ê1 \W Ie||± \|
ê! Ieep |i|er|¡
êJ âHC IJêê 1t1 \|±|e Ke1
êI KHW tI I.
!II,êêê.êê · !I1,111.êê
êt Herte1et t1Iê 1m±|it
ê! K¡ar1±i \±r|± |e â|\
ê1 \a|±ra |e¡±t¡
Iê Ki± \eal
II Ki± \eal °W|i|e !i¡er"
ê1 \a|±ra |mpret± W±¡er
II !e¡e|± C±mr¡ \|
Iê 8itt±r kea¡e °Kreme"
ê1 \W |±tt±| Kem|er|
ê1 Ker1± Ck\ |I
Il Ie||± \| (l)
ê! Ki± \erer|e |I
ê! \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ |!|
ê1 \a|±ra êa||±t| \per|
ê1 \a|±ra |eret|er |imi|e1
ê1 |er1 |tt±pe |imi|e1
ê1 !e¡e|± r±r1
ê1 8itt±r Har±re \|
II K¡ar1±i \±r|± |e â|\
Iê \W |±tt±| Kem|er|
II H±t1± ti \per| (I)
ê1 H±t1± !ri|a|e |I
ê1 Ieep |i|er|¡
Iê Ieep |i|er|¡
II !e¡e|± r±r1
ê! \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ â! |imi|e1
êJ âHC t1Jêê 1t1
!lê,êêê.êê · !lI,111.êê
II Ki± \erer|e |I
Iê \W tt \per| (l)
ê! C|er¡ Celer±1e |! Crew C±| 1t1
II \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ |remiam
Iê \a|±ra |eret|er |imi|e1
Iê \a|±ra êa||±t| |remiam
êI KHW JIêti
êI KHW tI I.êti
12 VW Jetta GL
11 VW Jetta TDi
12 VW Jetta TDi
!l1,êêê.êê · !lt,111.êê
Iê \a|±ra êa||±t| |imi|e1
II \a|±ra êa||±t| |remiam
ê1 H±t1± tt1 âr±r1 !earir¡
ê1 Ker1± |ile| |I·|
ê! KHW Il!ti
êI KHW tI I.êti
êI C|er¡ Cerre||e krrirert±r¡ |1i|ier
II \W kea|±r \|
ê1 ka1i k1 êa±||re (I)
ê1 Herte1et tIêê 1m±|it |atar¡
II \a|±ra êa||±t| I.t |imi|e1 (l)
Il \a|±ra êa||±t| |remiam
Iê ka1i k1 êa±||re (l)
ê! ka1i kt êa±||re
ê1 ka1i k1 kr±r|
!lI,êêê.êê · !l1,111.êê
êI ka1i k!|
ê1 KHW Il!ti (1)
II Ki± êp|im± \I
ê1 ka1i êJ I.l
Il Ieep Wr±r¡ler ka|iter
Iê ka1i k1 |remiam |lat êa±||re
ê1 ka1i k1 Cerrer|i|le \peti±l |1i|ier
II ka1i k1 |remiam |lat, 8±r
!Iê,êêê.êê · !II,111.êê
ê1 KHW Il! ti Ceape
Iê KHW Il!ti (1)
ê1 ka1i k1 êa±||re C±|riele| \peti±l
|1i|ier
ê1 KHW Jl!i
ê1 ka1i kt |remiam |lat, 8±r (l)
ê1 ka1i êJ |remiam |lat, 8±r
ê1 KHW IIJti
II KHW Il!ti (1)
ê1 ka1i êJ |remiam |lat
Iê ka1i kJ
!I1,êêê.êê · !I!,111.êê
Il ka1i kI !|i |remiam |lat, 8±r
Il ka1i k1 |remiam, wl t|¡le p|¡ (1)
II ka1i k1 kr±r| |remiam |lat (1)
II KHW IIJi \per|
II KHW Il!ti
ê1 KHW tJ I.êi (l)
ê1 ka1i êJ |remiam |lat, 8±r
Iê ka1i êJ |remiam |lat, 8±r (I)
ê1 KHW JIJti
!I1,êêê.êê -
II ka1i êJ I.l |remiam |lat, 8±r
Il ka1i k1 kr±r| |rem iam |lat, 8±r
Il ka1i êJ l.ê |remiam |lat, 8±r
Iê ka1i êI |remiam |lat
Il KHW IIJti
II KHW tJ I.Ji |remiam
Il ka1i êJ I.l \·|ire !i|±riam
II ka1i êI |remiam |lat
Il ka1i kt |remiam |lat
Il ka1i kt |ret|i¡e
Il KHW Jl!ti
ê1 KHW tJêi Cerrer|i|le
Iê C±1ill±t |tt±l±1e |I!
Il KHW tJ I.J |remiam
Il ka1i êI !|i |remiam |lat
II KHW tt J.êi
Il ka1i kI |ret|i¡e
II ka1i k!|
Il ka1i k!|
Il |ertt|e |±r±mer± 1
II |ertt|e |±r±mer± 1t
II |ertt|e 1IIt C±|riele|
II |ertt|e 1II !ar|e
II |ertt|e \pee1t|er
Iê ka1i êI \·|ire
êI \±|arr kel±¡ Hiri \±r ê! \
09 09 T
êt ê \
ê1 ê1 K K
êt HH
êI \
ê! H
â|! k l |kI l I 8|âK! \kCk!|ê8
WK|8 Iêë !kK| k !|\! |k|\| W|!K k8I ê| êëk \|K|C||\|
K|âK|\! |k|C|\
|k||
|êk Iêëk !kk|||
Kk| Ck|||!?
8ê |kêK||H|
8ê Ck|||! k|| W|||
K| k||ë\|||
Kë8|k||\ ê| ë\|| \|K|C||\ k! âk|k! |k|C|\| CêH| |êW8 !ê|kI k8| !kK| k !|\! |k|\||
k|| C|k!||||| \W'\ Kk\| k8 k|||!|ê8k| l1 Hê8!K, l1,êêê H||| ||H|!|| Wkkkk8!I.
lêê !!êêê CCKKKêêêê\\\|| |||kkkêêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!||888ââ kk!!! !!!II,1111J
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ I.1W k|k
1111 I|!!k\ 2 CC'\ 2 K||!||\ 22 |k\\k!\
11 RABBIT 11 GTI 1 ROUTAN
k|| C|k!||||| kë||'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| k t I|kk Iêê,êêê H||| Wkkkk8!I.
11JJ !!êê CCKKêêêêêê\\||| |||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!||888âââ kkk!! !!111,,1111JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ ê.1W k|k
119 k1'\ (\||k8\, Wkâê8\ & Cê8\|k!|K||\) 12 êJ'\
I kt'\ 33 k!'\ 3 êI'\ 222 kI'\
k|| C|k!||||| Hkl|k'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| k I I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| Wkkkk8!I.
11 !!êê CCKKêêêêê\\||| |||kkkêêêHHH \\!!!kkkkk!!!||888ââ kk!!! !!!11,11111JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ ê.1W k|k
3 Hkl|k t'\ 22 Hkl|k I'\ 2 CI1'\
1 Hkl|k J 11 CII
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
IIII !!êê CCKKKêêêêê\\||| ||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!!||888ââ kk!! !!!IIII,,1111JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ ê.11W k|k
Ittt I \|k||\ J J \|k||\
11 IJ'\ 1 II'\ 1 It 11 t \|k||\
IIII !!êê CCKKêêêêêê\\||| ||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!!||888âââ kkk!! !!!!!,,!!!!!!!
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ I.11W k|k
J \êk|8!ê\ 3 \||ê8k\
2 SOULS 2 ê|!|Hk\ 1 \||C!kk
II11 !!êê CCKKêêêêêê\\||| |||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!!||888âââ kkk!! !!!!,,11!!JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ I.11W k|k
12 êë!KkCK\ ! ||âkCI\
II |H|k|lk\ I |êk|\!|k\
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
k|| C|k!||||| KHW'\ Kk\| k Kk|k8C| ê| t I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| Wkkkk8!I. k|| C|k!||||| K|k'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| k Iê I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| ||H|!|| Wkkkk8!I. k|| C|k!|||||\ëKkkë'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| kt I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| ||H|!||Wkkkk8!I.
|êk Hêk| ||!k||\ \|\|!:
WWW.WIêH|8â\k|||IHê!êk\.CêH
C M Y K
PAGE 8C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
LA PLANCHE DES BELLES
FILLESSKI STATION, France —
Bradley Wiggins gave Britain its
first Tour de France leader in 12
years on Saturday, wresting the
yellowjersey fromFabianCancel-
lara after being helped by a pow-
erful escort in the race’s moun-
tain debut.
In the Tour’s first big shake-up,
the Sky squad was dominant up
the first summit finish to allow
Christopher Froome to win the
seventh stage from Tomblaine to
La Planche des Belles Filles ski
station.
The198-kilometer trekintothe
Vosges range went a long way to-
wardshapingthethree-weekrace
as experts predicted before the
start — a showdown between
Wiggins and defending cham-
pion Cadel Evans.
Ina five-rider breakaway group
on the final climb, Evans tried an
attack just before the super-steep
climb in the last kilometer, but
Froome beat himby two seconds
as Wiggins stayed close to the
Australian’s back wheel.
After the finish, compatriots
Wiggins and Froome hugged,
with Wiggins becoming the first
Briton since David Millar in 2000
to wear the yellow jersey.
Cancellara, the Swiss time-
trial specialist who had worn the
jerseysincewinningtheprologue
a week ago, is 1 minute, 52 sec-
onds behind Froome —but more
importantly1:50backof Wiggins.
The Sky leader, who began the
day seven seconds behind Can-
cellara in second place overall,
leads Evans by 10 seconds. Vin-
cenzoNibali of Italywas fourthto
climb to third overall, 16 seconds
behind.
“It’s a great day for the team,
we won the stage and took the
yellow jersey,” Wiggins said.
“This is my first time in the yel-
low jersey. It’s incredible — it’s
been a dream of mine since I was
a kid.”
Wiggins has more breathing
room than Cancellara had over
the199 kilometers, with only five
riders withinaminuteof his time,
including Denis Menchov of Rus-
sia, who wonthe 2009 Giro d’Ital-
ia andSpanishVuelta in2005 and
2007. The Swiss rider, by con-
trast, had had 22 riders within 48
seconds of his time before Satur-
day’s ride.
Wiggins, a three-time Olympic
track gold medalist, became the
pre-race favorite after winning
the Paris-Nice, Tour de Roman-
die and Criterium du Dauphine
stage races this year.
With two time trials and more
climbing days in the Alps and Py-
renees still to come, Wiggins
played down speculation that he
might’ve taken the lead too early
withthe finishinParis onJuly 22.
“You can’t get too cocky in this
race and choose when you take
the yellowjersey. I’d much rather
be in yellow than in hospital —
like half the peloton,” he said, re-
ferring to crashes on Friday that
forcedat least12riders toquit the
race.
Wiggins crashed out of the
2011Tour becauseof abrokencol-
larbone and said he felt “lucky”
he has beentrouble-free this year.
Froome was part of the Team
Sky phalanx that powered up the
final climb. With most rivals fall-
ingaway, the Kenyan-bornBriton
overcame Evans’ late surge to
burst ahead to the finish.
“He was really strong. He con-
trolled the last two to three ki-
lometers well,” Evans said of
Froome. “I thought I could antici-
pate it thanks tothe turnandgain
some speed to launch the sprint,
but he had the legs and overtook
me.”
The 35-year-old Australian
senses he’s infor a challenge from
Sky.
“With Wiggins on a team like
that, it’s going to be difficult,”
Evans said.
T O U R D E F R A N C E
Wiggins takes yellow jersey after 7th stage
AP PHOTO
Christopher Froome of Britain crosses the finish line ahead of
Cadel Evans of Australia, center, and Bradley Wiggins of Britain,
right, to win the seventh stage of the Tour de France.
Sky teammate Froome won
the stage, but Wiggins’ solid
finish earns the overall lead.
By JAMEY KEATEN
Associated Press
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. —
NASCARtemporarily suspended
driver AJ Allmendinger for a
failed drug test, forcing Penske
Racing officials to scramble to
get Sam Hornish Jr. to the track
before Saturday night’s race at
Daytona International Speed-
way.
Allmendinger’s suspension
was announcedabout 90minutes
before the race by NASCAR se-
nior vice president of racingoper-
ations Steve O’Donnell.
Allmendinger’s “A” sample tak-
en last weekend at Kentucky
Speedway came back positive,
and the driver has 72 hours to re-
quest his “B” sample be tested.
“NASCAR has a strict drug
testing programthat Penske Rac-
ing fully supports. Penske Racing
will work with NASCAR through
this process and its next steps,”
the team said in a statement.
Penske Racing President Tim
Cindric said NASCAR notified
the organization Saturday after-
noon, and the immediate focus
became getting Hornish back
from North Carolina, where he
was about to do a live television
show on the Speed Channel.
Hornish finished10th in Friday
night’s Nationwide Series race,
and the team sent a plane to get
him back to Daytona, where All-
mendinger was scheduled to
start eighth.
Hornish arrived about eight
minutes before he neededtobe in
the car, and was aided by a police
escort onthe short drive fromthe
Daytona airport.
“It’s really been a whirlwind
since we were notified, andwe re-
ally just needed to get Sam back
toDaytona,” Cindric toldThe As-
sociated Press in a telephone in-
terview. “We spoke briefly with
AJ before he left, and we agreed
we’d talk when we get back.”
Cindric didn’t reveal details of
the conversation with Allmend-
inger, andsaidthe organizationis
still trying to digest the informa-
tion.
“Certainly there’s no closure,
and it’s just not that simple of a
situation,” Cindric said. “We
need to let the process take care
of itself. It’s a situation we’ve nev-
er been in before, and when we
were notified he failed the test,
the next step really became get-
ting Sam to Daytona and agree-
ing to table everything else until
we’re all back.”
Cindric is in Toronto for Sun-
day’s IndyCar Series race, and
team owner Roger Penske has
been on a European vacation.
Bud Denker, senior vice presi-
dent of Penske Corp., also wasn’t
in Daytona.
Allmendinger was hired in late
December by Penske to fill the
seat that opened when Kurt
Busch split with the organiza-
tion. It’s the most prolific ride of
Allmendinger’s career, and both
driver and team seemed thrilled
withthepairingevenas Allmend-
inger has had his struggles in the
No. 22 Dodge.
He was 23rd in the Sprint Cup
Series standings heading into
Daytona, wherehewontheRolex
24 Hours of Daytona sports car
race in January shortly after his
hiring at Penske.
He’s the most prolific driver
since Jeremy Mayfield in 2009
was suspended for a failed drug
test. Mayfield has fought NAS-
CAR over the test since, and has
not raced a NASCARevent since.
Asked if Penske Racing is sup-
porting Allmendinger, Cindric
indicated the team is behind its
first-year driver.
“He’s our driver and that why
it’s important to understand all
the facts,” Cindric said. “It’s very
difficult to speculate on how it
should be handled. On one side,
we have personal relationships,
and on the other, well, it’s a busi-
ness side. We’ve not been
through this before, and we just
really want to understand this
some more.”
N A S C A R
Failed drug tests
stops Allmendinger
NASCAR driver is suspended,
leaving his team scrambling
to find replacement.
EDITOR’S NOTE
Due to an early press start,
results from Saturday night’s
NASCAR race at Daytona were
unavailable. For complete
results, go to
www.timesleader.com.
AP PHOTO
Sam Hornish Jr. prepares to get in AJ Allmendinger’s car as a
replacement driver at Daytona International Speedway on Sat-
urday in Daytona Beach, Fla. Allmendinger was temporarily sus-
pended after failing a random drug test.
By JENNA FRYER
AP Motorsports Writer
KOHLER, Wis. — Na Yeon
Choi was just a kid when Se Ri
Pak won the U.S. Women’s
Open at Blackwolf Run in
1998.
Today, Choi is living proof
that Pak’s landmark victory 14
years ago really did have the
power to inspire girls in South
Korea to try to make it in pro-
fessional golf. And after post-
ing one of the best rounds in
Open history, Choi is poised to
repeat Pak’s feat in the same
event at the same course.
Choi shot a 7-under 65 on
Saturday in the third round at
Blackwolf Run, taking control
of the tournament.
“I couldn’t believe how I got
eight birdies today,” Choi said.
“But I did. And I’m very happy,
and I’m very satisfied and I’m
very excited.”
The fifth-ranked South Ko-
rean star’s remarkable round
put her at 8 under for the
tournament, giving her a six-
stroke lead over fellow South
Korean Amy Yang. Only four
players ever have posted a
lower round in the Open, and
the 65 tied the lowest third-
round score in the event’s
history.
As Choi surged despite
windy conditions, Michelle
Wie faded, shooting a 6-over
78 to fall to 2 over. Wie shot a
66 in the second round and
came into the day a stroke
behind second-round leader
Suzann Pettersen.
“It was a lot of fun being in
contention,” Wie said. “I’m
still not out of it. Don’t count
me out just yet.”
Pettersen also shot 78 on
Saturday and slid to 1 over, but
still hoped to get back into
contention.
“You know what, there’s
birdies out there,” she said. “I
think the wind is going to be a
little bit less tomorrow from
what I’ve seen. So if you get off
to a hot start, hopefully put a
number down early in the
clubhouse. Who knows?”
Yang had a 69. Choi and
Yang were the only players to
break 70 in the round.
“I’m just going to keep being
patient tomorrow, try to do my
best,” Yang said.
Lexi Thompson, Mika Miya-
zato and Sandra Gal were tied
for third at 1 under. The 17-
year-old Thompson had a 72,
Miyazato shot 73, and Gal had
a 74.
“Seven under at an Open is
pretty good, I would say,”
Thompson said about Choi’s
round. “So she’s leading by a
good amount, but I’m still
going to go for it.”
Top-ranked Yani Tseng
struggled, shooting a 78 and
fading to 8 over.
Tseng said she had trouble
feeling comfortable with her
club selection at times as she
tried to deal with the wind and
tough pin placements.
And Tseng said she didn’t
see too many opportunities for
low scores out there, adding,
“Except Na Yeon.”
Choi has five career LPGA
Tour victories. She tied for
second in the 2010 U.S. Wom-
en’s Open.
And she credits Pak for
helping to inspire those ac-
complishments.
Choi recalls watching the
1998 Open on television. At
the time, she said she already
was thinking about trying to
make it as a golfer in South
Korea — but when Pak won,
her conceptions of what might
possible changed dramatically.
“I changed my goal: ‘I have
to go to the LPGA Tour and I
want to win on the LPGA
Tour,”’ Choi said.
And given the source of her
inspiration, winning at Black-
wolf Run would be extra spe-
cial.
Choi came into Saturday at 1
under for the tournament and
started posting low numbers
right away.
She had only 26 putts, and is
optimistic she’ll be able to
continue putting well.
“I have a good feeling about
my putting speed and putting
strokes,” Choi said. “So I hope
to get good results tomorrow.”
Choi had four birdies on the
front nine, including back-to-
back birdies to start the round.
She made y 20-foot putt to
birdie No. 7.
Then Choi birdied the first
three holes on the back nine,
draining a birdie putt on the
12th hole to go to 7 under on
the day.
Choi’s only slip-up of the day
was a three-putt on the 13th,
her only bogey of the day. Choi
then made a 15-foot putt to
birdie the par-3 17th, going
back to 7 under for the day
and 8 under for the tourna-
ment.
The lowest round in U.S.
Women’s Open history was a
63 by Helen Alfredsson in
1994. Three other players have
shot a 64 in the Open.
With another low number
Sunday, she could run away
with the tournament.
Webb Simpson leads
Greenbrier Classic
WHITE SULPHUR
SPRINGS, W.Va. — U.S. Open
champion Webb Simpson shot
a 5-under 65 on Saturday to
take a two-stroke lead into the
final round of the Greenbrier
Classic.
Simpson had his second
straight bogey-free round to
reach 14 under on the The
Greenbrier Resort’s Old White
TPC course. Last year in the
event, he briefly led entering
the final nine holes, but faded
to a tie for ninth.
Troy Kelly was second after
a 62. He had hip-replacement
surgery in September 2010
after being diagnosed with
arthritis.
Rookie Charlie Beljan, J.B.
Holmes and Ken Duke were 11
under. Beljan had a 67, Holmes
a 66, and Duke a 65.
Holmes had part of his skull
removed in September 2011,
four months after he started
having vertigo symptoms. He
returned to the tour in Janu-
ary.
P R O G O L F
AP
South Korea’s Na Yeon Choi reacts after sinking a putt for birdie on the eighth green during the
third round of the U.S. Women’s Open golf tournament on Saturday, July 7, 2012, in Kohler, Wis.
Choi in control at Women’s Open
The Associated Press
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) —
Ohio State Coach Urban Meyer
dismissed senior linebacker
Storm Klein from the football
team on Saturday following his
arrest on domestic violence and
assault charges.
Klein pleaded not guilty to the
charges on Saturday after being
arrested by Columbus police on
Friday.
A message seeking comment
was left Saturday.
Meyer said in a statement that
the charges against Klein“violate
the core values of the Ohio State
Football Program.”
“As a result, Stormhas been re-
movedfromthe team. It has been
made very clear that this type of
charge will result in dismissal. If
there are any changes in the
charges, we will re-evaluate his
status,” Meyer said.
Klein appeared in Franklin
County Municipal Court on Sat-
urday represented by a public de-
fender. The senior who started10
games last year was told to stay
away fromthe person who filed a
complaint against him.
Kleinis one of several lineback-
ers vying for a starting job with
the Buckeyes.
C O L L E G E F O O T B A L L
Ohio State
boots LB
after arrest
NORWALK, Ohio (AP) —Vin-
cent Nobile became the youngest
driver to win the K&N Horse-
power Challenge, the special Pro
Stock race-within-a-race bonus
event Saturday at the Summit
Racing Equipment NHRA Na-
tionals.
The 21-year-old Nobile drove
his Dodge Avenger toa 6.750-sec-
ondrunat 205.94mphinthe final
round to hold off Jason Line for
the $50,000 prize.
Johnny Gray, Steve Torrence,
Allen Johnson, and Andrew
Hines alsoracedtothe No. 1qual-
ifying spots in the NHRA Full
Throttle Drag Racing Series
event.
In Top Fuel, Torrence re-
mained on top of the field. Tor-
rence drove toa 3.829-secondrun
at 319.98 mph to take his second
No. 1 qualifying position of the
season. Gray took the top spot in
Funny Car, driving his Dodge
Charger to a 4.094 run at 306.33.
It’s Gray’s second No. 1of the sea-
son and third of his career.
Johnson topped the Pro Stock
field. He drove his Dodge Aven-
ger to a 6.663 run at 207.34 to
earn him his sixth No. 1 qualify-
ing position of the season and
24th of his career. He has two
wins this season.
InProStockMotorcycle, Hines
had a run of 6.961at 192.85 on his
Harley-Davidson.
N H R A
Vincent Nobile wins
Horsepower Challenge
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 9C
7
4
6
7
4
8
Social Security
Disability
Claimants represented by
attorneys are more successful
in obtaining benefits. Call me
for a FREE CONSULTATION.
I can help.
Janet A. Conser
Attorney At Law
1575 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort
283-1200
Get The Benefits
You Deserve!
Member of the National
Organization of Social Security
Claimants’ Representatives
Over 25 Years Experience
7
6
5
4
9
4
THE MUSIC BOX
DINNER PLAYHOUSE
196 HUGHES ST, SWOYERSVILLE, PA
Call: 283-2195 or 800-698-PLAY
JULY 20 TO 22, 27 TO 29,
AUGUST 3 TO 5
Dinner & Show and
Show-Only Tickets Now
On Sale Special Group
Rates and Student
Show Only Tickets
2
HOUSTON — Minnesota Vik-
ings star running back Adrian Pe-
terson was arrested on a charge of
resistingarrest afteranearlymorn-
ing incident where police say it
took three officers to subdue him.
Houston Police Department
spokesperson Kese Smith said Pe-
terson was at a downtown night-
clubearly Saturday morningwhen
an off-duty Houston police officer
working security asked Peterson
and a group of people he was with
toleave because it was closed. The
man, whoKesesaididentifiedhim-
self asapoliceofficer, lefttotell oth-
er patrons to leave the club before
returning to Peterson’s group to
againtell themto leave.
Kese said Pe-
terson turned
around and told
the officer that
heheardhimthe
first time and
pushed him in
the shoulder,
causing him to
stumble. The officer told Peterson
he was under arrest and to put his
hands behind his back. Peterson
beganyelling, pulledawayand“as-
sumedanaggressivestance” soan-
other off-duty officer came tohelp.
Peterson continued to struggle
withthemboth.
The 27-year-oldplayer was final-
ly handcuffed with the help of a
third off-duty officer. Peterson
complained of shortness of breath
after hewas takentoaHoustonjail
andwasexaminedbyHoustonFire
Department personnel, who said
that he was OK.
Peterson, who is fromPalestine,
Texas, was releasedfromjail Satur-
dayona$1,000bond. Thechargeis
a misdemeanor.
Team spokesman Bob Hagan
said Saturday the Vikings “are
awareof thesituationandaregath-
ering more information.”
Petersonranfor970yardsand12
touchdowns last season before
tearing the anterior cruciate and
medial collateral ligaments in his
left knee Dec. 24. The injury-short-
ened season broke a streak of four
straight seasons withat least 1,200
yards rushing for the former Okla-
homa standout.
N F L
RB Peterson arrested in Houston
By KRISTIE RIEKEN
AP Sports Writer
Peterson
C M Y K
PAGE 10C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ S P O R T S
OUTDOORS
STATE REP. ED STABACK will host
his 20th annual Junior Shooting
Competition on Sept. 22 at the
State Game Lands 300 Shooting
Range on Archbald Mountain. In
case of rain, the competition will
be held on Sept. 23.
Held in conjunction with the Rich-
mondale Hunting Club and the
Scranton Chapter of the NRA, the
competition is for youths 10
through 18 years of age, with the
following divisions: 10, 11-13, 14-16
and 17-18. Ten-year-olds will be in a
separate division and shoot from a
sitting position only.
Trophies will be awarded for the top
three competitors from each age
group in the iron sight and scope
categories. The high scorer in the
iron sight competition will be
awarded the Frank Tedesco Memo-
rial Trophy. The high scorer in the
scope competition will be awarded
the Mike Rinaldi Memorial Trophy.
Pre-registration is required as the
competition is limited to 250
children. To register or for more
information, call Staback’s office at
876-1111 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.
THE PENNSYLVANIA FISH AND
BOAT COMMISSION will host a
Family Fishing Program on July 11
from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the River
Common in Wilkes-Barre.
This program is being offered in
partnership with the Riverfront
Parks Committee (www.river-
frontparks.org) and the Luzerne
County Keystone Active Zone
(KAZ) Passport program
(www.kazpassport.org). The pro-
gram is free, open to the public
and a fishing license will not be
required.
The program is designed for families
with children ages eight and older
with little or no fishing experience.
Families will learn about safety,
fishing tackle, regulations and
basic techniques like casting and
knot tying. Participants will also be
given the opportunity to fish
together as a family.
Equipment and bait will be provided.
Participants are encouraged to
bring a chair and drinking water.
Meet at the River Common fishing
pier located along the Susquehan-
na River in Wilkes-Barre. A map
and directions are available at the
Riverfront Parks Committee web-
site at: www.riverfrontparks.org.
Registration is required and available
online by visiting the Family Fish-
ing Program schedule at: www.fish-
andboat.com/fish_fundamen-
tals.htm. Participants can also
register by contacting Andy Fedor,
Northeast Region Education Spe-
cialist at 477-2206.
Join Hickory Run State Park nat-
uralist Megan Taylor at 9 a.m. on
July 18 for a difficult (some gentle
uneven terrain) 4.5 mile hike.
Meet at the Hickory Run State Park
Office located on Route 534. Come
out to get some exercise while
exploring your natural areas,
learning about the natural history
along the trail, and relaxing in the
fresh air.
This hike is the seventh in the 2012
Hickory Run State Park Hiking
Series. Please contact Megan
Taylor for more information and
detailed directions at hickoryru-
nenvedsp@pa.gov or 403-2006.
The Red Rock Chapter of the Na-
tional Wild Turkey Federation is
once again preparing for its annual
hunting heritage banquet and
auction. This year, the event was
moved from February to July, and
to a new location.
The event will be held July 14 at
Konefals Grove on Chase Road in
the outdoor facility, complete with
a picnic style dinner, casual dress
and relaxing atmosphere.
The event will begin at 5 p.m., and
attendees will have a chance to
visit and play the raffles before
dinner. Several guns will be auc-
tioned, including a Milnium .40
cal., a Mossberg .308 Night Train
and several others. A women’s
table, silent auction, and the live
auction and sportsman raffle will
also be held.
Cost for the event is $60 per person,
which includes one meal and
membership, or $85 per couple,
which includes two meals and one
membership. A sponsor price is
also available.
If you cannot attend and would like to
renew a membership, you may
also do that. For more information,
contact Chris at 696-2406 or
bowhuntergirl@frontier.com.
Donations are also being sought for
ads for the program, underwrites
and items to be used as door
prizes, for the silent auction or the
women’s table. Money raised at the
event goes toward preserving our
hunting heritage, scholarship
program, JAKES events, planting
projects for wildlife and much
more.
The Greater Hazleton Astronomical
Society will host a “Night Out With
the Stars” on Saturday, July 28 at
8:30 p.m. at Nescopeck State Park.
The program will begin inside with
a brief introduction to interpreting
the night sky and then continue
outdoors to look through tele-
scopes. This program is family
oriented and there is no cost to
attend. Please bring a flashlight for
returning to the car after the
program. Registration is required
by calling the park office at 403-
2006.
Bulletin Board items will not be
accepted over the telephone. Items
may be faxed to 831-7319, dropped off
at the Times Leader or mailed to
Times Leader, c/o Sports, 15 N, Main
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA18711-0250.
BUL L E T I N BOARD
It has been state Rep. Ed Staback’s pet
project for 20 years, and even though
the veteran legislator is retiring this
November, the upcoming Junior Shoot-
ing Competition that he hosts each
September likely won’t be the last.
The competition began in 1992 when
the term “assault rifle” became popular
and semi-automatic sporting arms
were lumped into the same category as
military rifles.
Staback, who is an avid hunter,
didn’t agree with the broad label and
he got together with other sportsmen
to change the image.
“We wanted to do something to shed
light on what semi-auto sporting arms
are all about,” Staback said. “We decid-
ed to have a competition for young
people to teach them about proper
firearm handling and safety.”
The first year of the event, which is
held at the shooting range on State
Game Lands 300 on Archbald Moun-
tain, 30 children ages 10 to 18 participa-
ted (See Outdoor Notes for more in-
formation).
Staback said he hoped the event
would eventually attract 100 youth
annually, and as more organizations
got involved so did more kids.
Groups such as the Scranton Chapter
of the National Rifle Association
signed on to help, as did Jerry’s Sports
Center in Forest City. Later, firearm
manufacturers jumped on board and
donated .22’s, 20-gauge shotguns and
other small caliber rifles suitable for
children.
Trophies were handed out to the
winners in each age category, plenty of
prizes were given away and tons of
homemade food was donated to feed
everybody.
Best of all, it didn’t cost the kids or
their families a penny to participate.
Soon, the competition grew each
year until Staback finally had to limit it
to 250 children.
“We could get more than 300 easily,
but we just can’t handle more than
250,” he said. “By August it’s filled.”
Staback himself became so involved
in the event that, outside of many of
the bills he drafted during his 28 years
serving the 115th District, the competi-
tion was his “pet project.”
“I would do whatever I had to to
make sure it was held every year,” he
said.
Counting parents, Staback said more
than 600 people turn out for the event
each year. It started out as a way to
educate youth about firearms and has
evolved into a tradition.
And there’s more to it than letting
the kids punch holes in targets.
Each child is supervised one-on-one
by a certified shooting instructor. Gun
checks are conducted multiple times
before the shooting begins, and Sta-
back himself even gives a presentation
on gun safety at the start of the day.
At the end, after all the trophies and
prizes are handed out, Staback said
that’s when the true benefit of the
competition sets in.
“If some of these kids take this expe-
rience and decide they want to try
hunting or stay involved in shooting
sports, they will be well-schooled in
proper firearm handling and safety,”
Staback said. “That’s key.”
Although Staback will retire this
November from the state legislature,
he will continue to be involved in the
annual competition.
“I’ve been at it for 20 years and I
enjoy it more each year,” Staback said.
“I love the feeling you get when a child
wins one of the prizes or a trophy.
They take it seriously and learn about
gun safety in the process.
“That’s why we’ll continue to keep it
going as long as we can.”
Two hundred and fifty kids are glad
to hear that.
TOM VENESKY
O U T D O O R S
Junior shooting
event will go
on after 2012
Tom Venesky covers the outdoors for The
Times Leader. Reach him at tvenesky@time-
sleader.com.
With less than 10 minutes to fish
in the first week of the Wednesday
Night Bass Tournament at Harveys
Lake on June 20, Brad Rinehimer
wasn’t ready to give up.
He already had one bass in the
livewell but knew it wasn’t big
enough to win the tournament, so
Rinehimer made a few more casts
toward the docks.
And that’s when it struck.
“At first I just felt weight and
wasn’t sure if it was a fish,” the Ply-
mouth resident said. “I set the hook,
reeled in and when he came out of
the water with his mouth open, I
knew I had a tournament winner.”
But Rinehimer wasn’t in the clear
just yet. The fish hit at 8:54 p.m.
and the weigh-in was in six minutes.
If Rinehimer didn’t make it back to
the boat launch by 9 p.m., he
wouldn’t qualify.
“My heart started pounding and
the fish began diving under the boat
and really fighting. I was so nervous
it was going to get off,” he said.
Rinehimer was able to get the fish
in the boat and make it back to the
launch at 8:59 p.m.
The largemouth weighed in at
5.75 lbs. and was nearly a pound
heavier than the second place bass,
which weighed 4.81 lbs.
“It was the biggest fish I ever
caught and to do it in a tournament
at Harveys Lake, it was a moment
I’ll never forget,” Rinehimer said.
During the first three weeks of the
Harveys Lake tournament, the win-
ning bass has either pushed or ex-
ceeded the five-pound mark each
time.
Greg Mikulski Jr. of Sweet Valley
finished second to Rinehimer in the
first week with a 4.81-pound large-
mouth.
“It’s really off to a good start and
there are a lot of nice fish in this
lake,” Mikulski said. “Even the
smallmouth bass can get big and
quite often they’ll win the tourna-
ment.”
Last Tuesday, the hot start to the
tournament season at the lake con-
tinued with a 4.87 lb. largemouth
caught by George Hogan taking first
place. The tournament was shifted
from its customary Wednesday night
slot due to the July 4 holiday.
Duke Dalley, who coordinates the
tournament with John Niezgoda,
isn’t surprised with the size or the
number of fish brought in to the
weigh-in each week.
“I fish the lake a lot at night and
in the early morning, and I’ve been
catching a lot of nice fish so far,”
Dalley said.
Niezgoda said the tournament
traditionally gets off to a hot start,
especially with lunker largemouths,
then changes after the fourth or fifth
week.
“Then you’ll start to see small-
mouth bass winning each week,”
Niezgoda said. “That’s what makes
fishing here interesting. You have
both largemouth and smallmouth
bass in this lake, so it’s unique.”
Dalley and Niezgoda took over the
tournament after it was close to
coming to an end before the start of
this summer. They’ve attracted close
to 20 boats each week, and as word
gets out that the tournament is up
and running, Dalley and Niezgoda
expect the numbers to increase.
“This is a tradition and guys really
like to fish this tournament,” Niez-
goda said. “You really have some
dedicated anglers fishing this lake
who know what they’re doing, and
that makes for good competition.”
Mikulski has fished the Wednes-
day night tournament – which has
been organized by different individu-
als over the years, for the last 10
years. He is joined by family mem-
bers Greg Mikulski Sr., Gary Mikul-
ski and friends Mike and Steve Phil-
lips.
“We all come out every week,” he
said. “It’s something to do on a
Wednesday and it’s a chance to fish
and win a couple of bucks.”
It’s also an opportunity to experi-
ence an exceptional bass fishery that
is close to home, Rinehimer added.
“The anglers in this tournament
are so dedicated and it’s great hav-
ing a lake this close where you can
catch quality fish,” he said. “People
travel to Tennessee to catch small-
mouths that are five pounds or
more, and we have them right here
in Harveys Lake.”
Niezgoda said the lake offers a
variety of structure for different
types of bass fishing, and most an-
glers focus on casting around docks
or fishing the weedlines, deep or
shallow.
While he hopes interest grows and
attracts more anglers, Niezgoda said
the tournament has caught the at-
tention of the locals who live around
the lake.
“We get spectators at the weigh-
ins and people come out on the
docks all the time to ask how we’re
doing and what we’re catching,”
Niezgoda said. “They want to see
the quality of fish that are found in
Harveys Lake.”
Anglers reel in prizes at Harveys Lake event
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Savannah Coombs, Dallas, finally gets a handle on this 2.38 lb. smallmouth bass she caught in her first tournament at
Harveys Lake on Tuesday night. Helping her is her boyfriend Dave Harrison of Shavertown.
That’s a big bass
Mike Peranto, Wilkes-Barre, brings in a bag with the bass he caught to be weighed
at the Harveys Lake tournament last week.
RESULTS
PA BassCasters (open tournaments
held throughout the year; watch this
section for future dates):
June 20 at Harveys Lake results (22
teams, 81 total fish caught for a total of
164 lbs.):
1. Joe Linsburg and Mark Diehl – 15.36
lbs.
2. Dave Bogart and Kevin Novackowski
– 15.06 lbs.
3. Rich Gabriesheski and Scott Kuzma –
14.41 lbs.
4. Andrew Johnson and Jen Kreise –
14.20 lbs.
5. George Bowers and Dave Andrews –
13.24 lbs.
Lunker award – Ron Kirkutis Sr. and Ron
Kirkutis Jr. with a 4.93 lb. largemouth.
Suskie Bassmasters (every Wednesday,
6 to 9 p.m. at the Nesbitt Park Boat
Launch in Wilkes-Barre;
www.suskiebassmasters.com):
July 5 results (32 anglers):
1. John Chimola – 1.88 lbs.
2. Richard Gabnesoski – 1.82 lbs.
3. John Centak – 1.63 lbs.
4. Scott Francis – 1.61 lbs.
5. Jeremy Miller – 1.60 lbs.
Top 10 Standings (total weight):
1. Donnie Parsons III 4.76 lbs.
2. Hunter Lacomis 4.75 lbs.
3. John Centak 4.70 lbs.
4. Jim Lacomis 4.43 lbs.
5. Chris Ostrowski 4.32 lbs.
6. Dave Searfoss 4.31 lbs.
7. Dan Byorick Jr 4.24 lbs.
8. Andy Nealon 4.24 lbs.
9. Dan Byorick 4.18 lbs.
10. Lynda Morris 4.11 lbs.
Harveys Lake Bass Tournament
(every Wednesday, 6 to 9 p.m. at the
state boat launch; for more information
call Duke Dalley at 991-0080):
July 3 results (15 boats, 26 anglers):
1. George Hogan – 4.56 lb. largemouth
2. Chris O’Conner – 2.72 lb. largemouth
3. Tommy Gunns – 2.56 lb. largemouth
4. Savannah Coombs – 2.38 lb.
smallmouth
5. Jim Roberts – 2.31 lb. largemouth
Top 10 Standings (total weight):
1. Greg Mikulski Jr .........................7.70 lbs.
2. David Brill ..................................7.66 lbs.
3. Gary Mikulski ............................6.75 lbs.
4. Jim Roberts..............................6.22 lbs.
5. Joe Koslowski ..........................6.09 lbs.
6. Brad Rineheinmer....................5.75 lbs.
7. David Harrison ........................-5.02 lbs.
8. George Hogan .........................4.56 lbs.
9. Greg Mikulski Sr. ......................4.38 lbs.
10. John Niezgoda........................4.30 lbs.
By TOMVENESKY
tvenesky@timesleader.com
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 11C
➛ S P O R T S
1757 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township
Wilkes-Barre, PA • (570) 824-3050
200 yds. South Of Hanover Area High School
Joe Lasecki Proprietor
Your Bass Fishing Your Bass Fishing Your Bass Fishing
KOSMALA ASSOCIATES
Financial Services
400 Third Ave.
Suite 311, Park Building
Kingston • 287-2197
• Life & Disability • IRA
• Annuities • Mutual Funds
*JD and LL.M are educational degrees and holder does not provide legal services
on behalf of the companies of the Principal Financial Group. t120409016r
Securities offered through Princor
Financial Services Corporation,
800/247-1737, member SIPC, Des
Moines, IA 50392. Thomas Kosmala,
Agent, Princor Registered
Representative. Kosmala Associates is
not an affiliate of Princor
®
.
KOSMALA AS
Fin

• A
Thomas J. Kosmala, JD
7
0
1
8
6
2
7
0
1
8
6
2
OURLADY OF VICTORY
HARVEYS LAKE ANNUAL MEMORIAL
GOLF TOURNAMENT
Friday, August 24, 2012
At Mill Race Golf Course in Benton. $80.00 per
person includes: Green Fee, Golf Cart, Open Bar,
Lunch. Hors D’oeuvres, Dinner, Beer and Soda
back at the Church Hall.
Grand Cash Prize $5,000,
and many other cash
prizes and raffes.
ALL ARE WELCOME!
For further information, please call
Mike or Merry Ann at (570) 639-5426,
or Helen at (570) 639-1535.
AreYou Suffering With Pain, Tingling, or
Numbness inYour Feet or Ankles?
Have you been diagnosed
with Peripheral/Diabetic Neuropathy?
You May Be A Candidate For
Our Newest Treatment...
Increasing blood flow to the nerves and feet allows
the nerves to heal...returning the feet to normal!
NEUROPATHY CENTER
250 PIERCE STREET • SUITE 108 • KINGSTON • (570) 287-5560
Michele Holincheck, MSPT • Dane Kozlevcar, MSPT
www.nervetreatmentcenter.com
FREE
Neuropathy Consultation
NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT!
WIMBLEDON, England — The
Brits know how to stage a corona-
tion, and they’ll do so Sunday for ei-
ther regal Roger Federer or one of
their own, Andy Murray.
Queen Elizabeth II has another
commitment, but the former Kate
Middleton and the British prime
minister will be on hand to see who
reigns at Wimbledon.
Plenty of history will be written in
the men’s final at tennis’ most tradi-
tion-rich tournament. Federer can
add to his record 16 Grand Slam
championships, and he would tie a
record by winning Wimbledon for a
seventh time. He also would claim
the ATP’s top ranking for the first
time since June 2010, and match Pete
Sampras’ record of 286 weeks at No.
1.
“There’s a lot on the line for me,”
Federer said.
Murray, meanwhile, is merely try-
ing to become the first British man to
win a Grand Slam title since Fred
Perry took Wimbledon and the U.S.
Championships in 1936.
“It has been a great tournament so
far,” Murray said. “I’ve just got to try
to keep it together for the final.”
Britain’s abuzz. Even without the
queen, the Royal Box is certain to be
packed, along with the rest of Centre
Court. Tickets are going for more
than 2,600 pounds ($4,000). Thou-
sands have bought 8-pound ($12.40)
grounds passes to picnic near Wim-
bledon’s practice courts on the grassy
hill known these days as Murray
Mount, watching the match on a
huge video screen.
Loyalties will be divided. Brits love
Federer, the celebrated Swiss whose
graceful game is so well suited to the
All England Club. He’ll receive senti-
mental support because he has en-
dured a reign delay, going 2
1
⁄2 years
without a major title while being
eclipsed by Novak Djokovic and Ra-
fael Nadal. Now, at 30, he could be-
come the first thirtysomething man
to win Wimbledon since Arthur Ashe
in 1975.
Allegiance for the stolid Murray is
more a matter of geography, and even
then it’s complicated. He’s a native of
Scotland, where there’s a campaign
afoot to break away from Britain.
Whenever Murray loses, the English
tend to call him Scottish, not British.
But for the moment, when it comes
to lawn tennis, the United Kingdom
is united.
Brits invented the game and, in
1877, started Wimbledon. They’ve
won the men’s title 35 times, more
than any other country, but not since
before World War II.
And no British woman has won
Wimbledon since Virginia Wade in
1977.
Londoners have accepted the
championship drought with good hu-
mor, especially where Murray is con-
cerned. Waitresses at restaurants in
Wimbledon village roll their eyes at
the mention of his name. Last Sun-
day at the village’s Emmanuel
Church, when the pastor noted from
the pulpit that Brits are rooting for
Murray, the congregation responded
with groans and giggles.
It doesn’t help that he has been
beaten in the semifinals each of the
past three years, nor that he has lost
every set in his three Grand Slam fi-
nals, including against Federer at the
2008 U.S. Open and 2010 Australian
Open.
A breakthrough victory came Fri-
day versus Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, mak-
ing the 25-year-old Murray the first
British man to reach the final since
Bunny Austin in 1938.
“People have been talking for 10
years that finally he was going to be
the one to do it,” three-time Wimble-
don champion John McEnroe said.
“There were starting to be questions.
He shut that talk down. It’s rather
amazing, because some people were
starting to wonder, including myself,
whether this day would actually
come.”
A part-time resident of Miami,
Murray said he draws inspiration
from Miami Heat star LeBron James,
who was much maligned before win-
ning his first NBA title last month.
Murray has also benefited from the
help of Ivan Lendl, his coach since
the start of the year. Lendl lost the
first four Grand Slam finals he
played, then won eight major titles.
The Scotsman speaks in a mum-
bling monotone, and on court he
tends to go about his business like a
condemned man. At the French Open
in May, Wade described him as “a
drama queen.”
But while Murray’s no Federer
when it comes to style, some find ap-
peal in his broad repertoire of shots.
“I love watching Andy play, be-
cause I think it’s so exciting,” said
Serena Williams, who won her fifth
women’s title Saturday. “You never
know what he’s going to do. He’s run-
ning every ball down. He looks tired,
and then he comes back. I think it’s
awesome. He’s really one of my favor-
ite people to watch. If that’s being a
drama queen, it’s really exciting.”
Murray’s accustomed to carrying
the weight of a skeptical country’s
hopes. Shouts from the stands of
“Come on, Andy” have been common
for years at Wimbledon, and are occa-
sionally heard at matches where
Murray’s not even a contestant.
“There is obviously a lot of pres-
sure and stress around this time of
year,” he said.
There will also be pressure on Fe-
derer, who’s mindful of his place in
history. He beat defending champion
Djokovic on Friday to reach the final
for the first time since 2009, and now
he has a chance to tie the tournament
record of seven titles set in the 1880s
by William Renshaw — an English-
man — and tied in 2000 by Sampras.
“It’s a big match for me, and I hope
I can keep my nerves,” Federer said.
“I’m sure I can.”
Like London bookmakers and most
other observers, Sampras considers
Federer the favorite.
“But if Andy serves well and gets
aggressive and can get the crowd be-
hind him and use a little bit of desti-
ny, he can pull it off,” said Sampras,
speaking by phone from his home in
Los Angeles. “Too bad it’s on at 5 in
the morning. I’m going to have to Ti-
Vo it.”
WI MBL EDON: MEN’ S F I NAL
Murray and Federer are looking for epic victories
AP PHOTO
Andy Murray is trying to become the first British man to
win a Grand Slamsince Fred Perry in 1936.
AP PHOTO
A win today for Roger Federer will make himthe first winner
over the age of 30 since Arthur Ashe in 1935.
A historic matchup
UP NEXT
Andy Murray vs. Roger Federer
9 a.m. today, ESPN
By STEVEN WINE
AP Sports Writer
court trophy ceremony. And why
Williams squeezed tight during
post-victory hugs with her par-
ents and older sister Venus, who
has five Wimbledon titles of her
own — meaning that one pair of
siblings who learned to play ten-
nis on public courts in Compton,
Calif., now accounts for 10 of the
past 13 trophies.
A few days after winning Wim-
bledonforthefourthtimein2010,
Serena Williams cut both feet on
broken glass while leaving a res-
taurant in Germany. She needed
two operations on her right foot.
Then she got blood clots in her
lungs, for which she needed to in-
ject herself with a blood thinner.
Those shots ledto a pool of blood
gathering under her stomach’s
skin, requiring another proce-
dure.
“That made her realize where
her life was, really, and where she
reallybelongedandthatshereally
loved the game,” said Williams’
mother, Oracene Price. “You nev-
er appreciate anything until you
almost lose it.”
Against Radwanska, who was
trying to be the first PolishGrand
Slamsingles champion, Williams
was streaky at times, but also su-
perb. She wonthe first five games
and the last five. She compiled a
58-13 landslide of winners. She
swatted17 aces, including four at
114 mph, 107 mph, 115 mph, 111
mph in one marvelous game to
pull even at 2-all in the third set.
That was part of a momentum-
swinging run when Williams
claimed 15 of 18 points, and that
quartet of aces raisedher total for
the fortnight to a tournament-re-
cord 102, surpassing her own
mark of 89 in 2010; it’s also more
than the top number for any man
this year at Wimbledon.
“So many aces,” said Radwan-
ska, whosetwo-weektotal was16,
“andI couldn’t domuchabout it.”
Therehadbeenamoment, ever
so brief, when it appeared Wil-
liams might let Saturday’s match
slip away. After she breezed
throughthefirstsetonadaywhen
the wind whipped and the tem-
perature was in the mid-50s, rain
arrived, causing a delay of about
20 minutes betweensets.
Radwanska, who’s been fight-
ing a respiratory illness and blew
her nose at a changeover, quickly
fell behind 3-1 in the second set.
Right there is where she made a
stand.
Williams was playing in her
18th major final; Radwanska in
her first. Actually, she’d never
won a match beyond the fourth
round at a Grand Slam tourna-
ment until this week. So she ac-
knowledged being “a little bit
nervous inthe beginning.”
But the interruption let her
“cool down a little bit,” explained
Radwanska, who would have ris-
entoNo.1intherankingsbybeat-
ing Williams but instead will be
No. 2, behind Victoria Azarenka.
“When I was going on the court
the second time, I just felt like a
normal match. Didn’t seemlike a
final anymore, so there was not
that muchpressure.”
Radwanska played her usual
steady game, andWilliams began
making more and more errors. A
string of mistakes — swinging
volley into the net, double-fault,
backhandlong, backhandintothe
net — let Radwanska break to
even the match at one set apiece.
What appearedtobearather drab
final, bereft of anydrama, sudden-
ly became interesting.
“She got a little nervous out
there, in my opinion. In the sec-
ond set, I think she might have
thought, ‘Well, I got this here,”’
saidWilliams’ father, Richard.
He alsosuspectedhis daughter
might have been feeling a twinge
of self-doubt connected to her
quick exit in late May at the
French Open against a woman
ranked111th, Williams’ only first-
roundlossin48careermajortour-
naments.
Williams’ explanation for her
dip against Radwanska?
“I just got too anxious,” she
said, “andIshouldn’thavebeenso
anxious.”
SERENA
Continued fromPage 1C
At a glance
WIMBLEDON, England — A look
at Wimbledon on Saturday:
Weather: Brief rain. Low of 57
degrees.
Women’s Final: No. 6 Serena
Williams beat No. 3 Agnieszka
Radwanska 6-1, 5-7, 6-2 for her
14th Grand Slam championship.
Stat of the Day: 102 — Aces hit
by Williams at Wimbledon this
year, breaking her tournament
record of 89, set in 2010.
Quote of the Day: “Growing up,
I copied Venus, everything she
did. She was a real big
influence for me. So when she
started winning, I wanted it so
bad. When she became No. 1, I
had to be No. 1.” — Williams,
after matching her older sister
with five Wimbledon singles
titles.
On Court Sunday: No. 3 Roger
Federer vs. No. 4 Andy Murray.
Sunday’s Forecast: Chance of
rain. High of 68 degrees.
AP PHOTO
Serena Williams defeated Agnieszka Radwanska of Poland during
the women’s final match at the All England Lawn Tennis Cham-
pionships at Wimbledon, England, Saturday.
C M Y K
PAGE 12C SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ W E A T H E R
1
9
6
6
0
0
Find the car you want fromhome. timesleaderautos.com m
TV AND APPLIANCES
639 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston • 287-9631
1313 Wyoming Avenue, Exeter • 655-8801
Visit us on the web at www.voitektv.com
Locally Owned and Operated
Home
Grown
Super Capacity Washer
• ExtrAction ribbed basket removes
more moisture
• Dual-action agitator provides gentle,
dual-wash action
• 3 water levels
• 8 wash cycles
• 3 wash/rinse temperature settings
HTWP1200DWW
$
399
95
50 Pint Dehumidifier
with Auto De-Icer
DDR5011
• Auto-Sensing Humidity Control
• Removable Air Filter
• Quiet Operation
• Covers Approximately 3,000 Sq. Ft.
• Direct Drain Option For Continuous
Operation
TOP RATED!
$
179
95
On purchases of $999
or more on select
Sony BRAVIA
®
HDTVs,
Internet TVs and other
home entertainment
product purchases.
Offer ends 10/31/12
18 Months No Interest
Sony Bravia HDTVs
10,000 BTU
Portable Air Conditioner
DPA100A1GD
• Electronic Controls with Remote
and LED Display
• Automatic On/Off
• On Casters For Easy Movement
• 3 Fan Speeds
• Cool, Dehumidify or Use As Fan
$
349
95
5000 BTU Room
Air Conditioner
$
99
95
SBRAC5KWG
• 2 Cooling Speeds for Individual
Comfort
• Easy Access Filter for Quick
Cleaning and Replacement
• Easy to Install Window Kit
A
l
l
A
C
s
O
n
S
a
l
e
18.0 Cu. Ft.
Refrigerator with
Glass Shelves
$
529
95
• Adjustable Glass Shelves
• Bright Interior Lighting
• Full Width Freezer Shelf
• Humidity Controlled Crisper
• Five HD Inputs
• SRS Theatre sound
for outstanding sound
quality
• USB port for videos,
music, or pictures
FRT18G2NW
FREE DELIVERY
43” Plasma TV
$
449
95
Free
Assembly
Free LP Tank
Fill Up
STEP UP TO QUALITY!
with purchase of any Weber grill
Up To $500
In Rebates
H
u
r
r
y
I
n
R
e
b
a
te
s
E
n
d
7
/
1
1
8.2 Cu. Ft. Energy Star
Upright Freezer
$
399
95
DUF808WE
• Energy Star rated.
• 3 quick freeze shelves and 4 door shelves
• Easy-to-program mechanical thermostat.
• Scratch resistant worktop is perfect for
storing extra accessories.
• Reversible door hinge for left or right
hand opening.
FREE DELIVERY
FREE DELIVERY
ALMANAC
REGIONAL FORECAST
NATIONAL FORECAST
For more weather
information go to:
www.timesleader.com
National Weather Service
607-729-1597
Forecasts, graphs
and data ©2012
Weather Central, LP
Yesterday 92/68
Average 82/61
Record High 98 in 1988
Record Low 44 in 1979
Yesterday 15
Month to date 84
Year to date 303
Last year to date 254
Normal year to date 192
*Index of fuel consumption, how far the day’s
mean temperature was above 65 degrees.
Precipitation
Yesterday trace
Month to date 0.17”
Normal month to date 0.78”
Year to date 16.63”
Normal year to date 18.61”
Susquehanna Stage Chg. Fld. Stg
Wilkes-Barre 0.24 -0.02 22.0
Towanda 0.18 -0.03 21.0
Lehigh
Bethlehem 3.07 0.75 16.0
Delaware
Port Jervis 2.71 0.03 18.0
Today’s high/
Tonight’s low
TODAY’S SUMMARY
Highs: 81-88. Lows: 57-62. Look for
decreasing clouds and milder conditions
today. Tonight will be mostly clear.
The Poconos
Highs: 81-92. Lows: 68-74. Showers and
thunderstorms will be possible today,
then clouds will decrease overnight.
The Jersey Shore
Highs: 77-85. Lows: 52-61. Expect partly to
mostly sunny skies today. Tonight will be
clear and cooler.
The Finger Lakes
Highs: 90-94. Lows: 68-72. Scattered
strong thunderstorms will be possible
today. Tonight will be partly cloudy.
Brandywine Valley
Highs: 90-99. Lows: 72-75. Expect hot
conditions with strong to severe thun-
derstorms today. Partly cloudy tonight.
Delmarva/Ocean City
Anchorage 59/52/.00 57/47/sh 60/46/c
Atlanta 98/74/.00 93/74/pc 91/73/t
Baltimore 102/76/.00 96/72/t 86/69/pc
Boston 85/73/.00 88/64/pc 85/60/s
Buffalo 83/68/.09 80/59/pc 77/59/s
Charlotte 98/73/.00 100/74/pc 94/72/t
Chicago 98/77/.00 83/67/pc 86/67/s
Cleveland 97/76/.00 82/62/pc 79/62/s
Dallas 99/79/.00 96/76/t 93/74/t
Denver 83/61/.01 76/58/t 78/59/t
Detroit 100/78/.00 82/64/pc 80/64/s
Honolulu 80/73/.00 86/73/s 87/73/pc
Houston 94/75/.00 91/76/t 91/76/t
Indianapolis 105/81/.00 90/67/t 86/65/t
Las Vegas 106/81/.00 107/86/s 109/88/s
Los Angeles 67/59/.00 72/65/s 73/65/s
Miami 91/81/.00 90/78/t 90/80/t
Milwaukee 86/68/.00 77/66/pc 81/66/s
Minneapolis 85/64/.00 87/65/pc 83/63/s
Myrtle Beach 91/77/.00 95/78/pc 89/76/t
Nashville 102/74/.00 96/74/pc 90/72/t
New Orleans 88/75/.00 90/75/t 88/76/t
Norfolk 98/78/.00 104/76/t 90/73/t
Oklahoma City 97/74/.00 97/72/t 88/69/t
Omaha 88/73/.00 87/70/t 85/65/pc
Orlando 95/73/.00 94/74/t 93/75/t
Phoenix 109/86/.00 110/90/pc 111/90/pc
Pittsburgh 97/68/.00 86/62/t 82/61/pc
Portland, Ore. 84/57/.00 89/61/s 83/59/pc
St. Louis 106/83/.00 96/70/t 88/68/t
Salt Lake City 93/66/.00 97/71/pc 98/73/s
San Antonio 96/77/.00 95/75/t 92/74/t
San Diego 71/64/.00 75/65/s 74/66/s
San Francisco 75/53/.00 69/53/pc 67/54/pc
Seattle 79/56/.00 84/58/s 82/58/pc
Tampa 91/78/.00 92/78/t 91/77/t
Tucson 100/76/.00 102/77/t 104/79/pc
Washington, DC 105/82/.00 97/74/t 85/69/pc
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
Amsterdam 73/57/.00 67/58/r 68/57/sh
Baghdad 108/82/.00 110/81/s 82/80/s
Beijing 88/73/.00 81/73/sh 88/73/sh
Berlin 75/61/.24 84/62/pc 77/55/pc
Buenos Aires 55/32/.00 54/37/pc 51/38/s
Dublin 66/55/.00 57/52/sh 64/50/sh
Frankfurt 81/61/.00 76/62/t 72/55/sh
Hong Kong 90/82/.00 90/80/t 86/81/pc
Jerusalem 85/65/.00 86/64/s 87/65/s
London 64/55/.00 73/55/r 72/58/sh
Mexico City 75/54/.00 72/55/sh 73/54/t
Montreal 84/72/.00 79/61/pc 76/55/s
Moscow 79/64/.00 80/62/pc 83/66/t
Paris 72/57/.00 64/57/sh 70/61/sh
Rio de Janeiro 84/68/.00 75/59/sh 76/57/pc
Riyadh 106/79/.00 110/86/s 109/85/s
Rome 84/68/.00 88/69/s 90/70/pc
San Juan 90/80/.00 88/78/t 90/79/t
Tokyo 77/70/.00 72/65/sh 79/71/t
Warsaw 90/66/.00 87/69/s 83/64/t
City Yesterday Today Tomorrow City Yesterday Today Tomorrow
WORLD CITIES
River Levels, from 12 p.m. yesterday.
Key: s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sn-snow, sf-snowflurries, i-ice.
Philadelphia
94/72
Reading
92/67
Scranton
Wilkes-Barre
85/59
85/59
Harrisburg
91/68
Atlantic City
90/73
New York City
89/69
Syracuse
81/58
Pottsville
87/63
Albany
84/56
Binghamton
Towanda
80/56
84/56
State College
84/61
Poughkeepsie
89/59
96/76
83/67
76/58
94/75
87/65
72/65
65/53
91/70
95/64
84/58
89/69
82/64
93/74
90/78
91/76
86/73
60/47
57/47
97/74
Sun and Moon
Sunrise Sunset
Today 5:39a 8:38p
Tomorrow 5:40a 8:38p
Moonrise Moonset
Today 11:20p 11:07a
Tomorrow 11:48p 12:09p
Last New First Full
July 10 July 19 July 26 Aug. 1
We have a "cool-
er" week with
much needed
rainfall in our
forecast for this
upcoming work
week. Rain show-
ers and thunder-
storms should
clear out this
afternoon and
the high will only
reach 85 as skies
turn partly
cloudy. Morning
lows will even
dip into the
upper 50s.
Monday looks
pleasant with a
high of 84 and
partly cloudy
skies. Expect to
see some scat-
tered showers
on Tuesday and
Wednesday as
another cold
front moves
through.
Thursday will be
partly sunny and
83. There is a
chance for show-
ers and thunder-
storms as we
look to next
weekend with
temperatures in
the mid 80s.
- Michele Rotella
NATIONAL FORECAST: Showers and thunderstorms will accompany a slow-moving cold front into the
Ohio Valley and Mid-Atlantic states today. Thunderstorms will also be likely from the Rockies into the
Central and Southern Plains. Expect more isolated thunderstorms over the rest of the Intermountain
West. Very hot temperatures are in store for the Southeast and much of the West.
Recorded at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Int’l Airport
Temperatures
Cooling Degree Days*
Precipitation
TODAY
Partly cloudy, a.m.
rain and T-storms
MONDAY
Partly
sunny
84°
58°
WEDNESDAY
Partly
cloudy,
showers
83°
60°
THURSDAY
Partly
cloudy
83°
60°
FRIDAY
Partly
cloudy,
showers
85°
62°
SATURDAY
Partly
cloudy
85°
65°
TUESDAY
Partly
cloudy,
showers
80°
59°
85
°
65
°
C M Y K
BUSINESS S E C T I O N D
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012
timesleader.com
SO YOU WALKED
into the store hoping
to take advantage of
the advertised half-
price sale on the
Perdue chicken nug-
gets. But when you
got to the freezer the
shelf was empty.
Your first thought may have been,
“darn it. That was a great deal I’m
going to miss out on.”
But think positive; that empty shelf
can be a blessing.
Continue shopping and before you
leave the building, head to the courte-
sy counter and request a rain check.
Yes, a rain check. Get them, use
them, love them.
The little slips of paper are better
than a coupon and grow in value when
you can combine them with a coupon.
Rain checks have been around for a
long time, but many shoppers aren’t
aware of them or don’t know how to
get them.
Each store has different rules and
expiration dates for their slips.
Usually they’re offered only for ad-
vertised items, not just on-sale items
that aren’t in the circular or regular
price items that are out of stock. Some
stores will offer to substitute items
instead of issuing a rain check.
Grocers may require that rain checks
be used within as little as a month.
The terms are always listed clearly on
the checks. Some stores, like CVS and
Walgreens, offer rain checks that never
expire.
So if you see an empty shelf for an
advertised item at a CVS or Walgreens,
grab a rain check. That bottle of Liste-
rine that’s typically $4.99 but on sale
for $2.99, in five years it may cost
$8.99. But that rain check will entitle
you to the $2.99 rate.
If you don’t want to wait years, you
can save more money if you search for
coupons. If later you come across a $2
off coupon it’s only going to set you
back 99 cents.
My personal rule when it comes to
rain checks is simple: “If you can get
one, get one.”
Three other rain check notes of
interest:
• You must present your rain check
to the cashier before your purchase.
• Some stores reserve the right to
not issue rain checks on some bonus
buys, limited quantity items and other
merchandise. Each store has a cou-
pon/rain check policy on hand. Review
it before accepting a refusal.
• Some stores will substitute an
equivalent item of equal or higher
price. For example, Rite Aid was allow-
ing customers to get a larger Dove
Body Wash in place of a smaller bottle
when it ran out a few weeks back. The
larger bottle was worth $3 more. I took
the deal, not the rain check. My rea-
soning? I wasn’t going to find a $3 off
coupon in the next few weeks and the
body wash isn’t going to expire in a
few months.
A look at how long rain checks are
good for at area retailers:
CVS, Walgreens: No expiration
Giant: 60 days
Target: 45 days
Price Chopper, Rite Aid, Gerrity’s,
Weis, Wegmans, Thomas’ Hometown
Market: 30 days
Walmart and Kmart: Varies by item
ANDREW M. SEDER
S T E A L S & D E A L S
Has your store run out of that special? Then take a rain check
Andrew M. Seder is a Times Leader staff
writer. Follow him on Twitter @TLAndrew-
Seder and send any local steals or deals to
him at aseder@timesleader.com
WORKERS ARE
about to get valuable
information about
their 401(k) -- specifi-
cally, how much they
pay for it.
The fee information
has been around for
years, plan experts say, but to find it,
employees often must dig through
prospectuses or plan documents. Most
don’t bother.
But thanks to a new federal regu-
lation, 401(k) participants must receive
an annual fee disclosure statement by
the end of August. Between this new
statement and additional mandated
disclosures that will start appearing in
quarterly statements this year, workers
should be able to calculate how much
of their nest egg is eaten up by fees.
"Costs do matter," said Joseph Vallet-
ta with HR Investment Consultants in
Towson, Md., and co-author of the
"401k Averages Book," a fee compari-
son guide. "They aren’t the only driv-
ing force ... but you have to make sure
your fees are reasonable."
The disclosure statement could be
an eye-opener for workers, particularly
those who don’t realize they pay a plan
provider to maintain their account --
and 7 in 10 workers don’t know this,
according to a study last year by the
AARP.
Of course, these workers will be
surprised only if they read the new
disclosure. Workers too often ignore
paperwork, and some industry experts
suggest that will happen in this case,
too.
But this could be a costly mistake.
You can end up with tens of thousands
of dollars less in your account by retire-
ment because you didn’t notice that the
mediocre funds you chose were the
most expensive in the plan. Or you
might be out big bucks because you
didn’t know enough to lobby your
employer to switch to a plan provider
with lower fees.
Consider the case of two workers
with $30,000 in a 401(k), according to
T. Rowe Price’s calculations. One pays
1.75 percent in annual fees; the other
0.75 percent. They make no more con-
tributions and earn a 7 percent average
annual return.
After 35 years, the worker paying the
higher fee would accumulate $179,844.
But the other worker’s account would
be worth $250,400, or $70,556 more.
Plan experts say some workers have
been getting fee information even be-
fore the new federal mandate. But
participants in smaller plans are the
least likely to get this information --
and they are the workers most likely to
pay high fees.
The new federal regulations require
service providers to tell employers by
July 1 how much they receive from
401(k)s. The information is now being
simplified into an annual statement
provided to workers. Later this year,
quarterly statements will reveal how
much the worker paid during the quar-
ter for administrative expenses.
The disclosure statement is designed
to help workers make investment
choices.
Let’s say you invest in a large-cap
value fund with a 1.8 percent annual
fee. But you see from the disclosure
statement that a similar fund with
comparable performance charges only
0.8 percent. In that case, why not
switch to the cheaper fund?
Of course, you need a diversified
portfolio, so don’t put all your money
in one fund with only one type of asset
just because it’s the cheapest.
Be aware that small plans with few
workers and modest assets will be
more expensive than a giant plan that
can negotiate lower fees and spread
costs among thousands of employees.
The average total plan cost for small
plans -- with 100 participants who have
an average balance of $50,000 -- is 1.3
percent, according to the "401k Averag-
es Book." The typical cost for large
plans with 1,000 workers is 1.08 per-
cent.
If the total cost of your plan is higher
than the average, you should ask your
employer how your fees compare to
other plans’, Valletta said.
PERSONAL FINANCE
E I L E E N A M B R O S E
Take the time
to understand
401(k) fees
Eileen Ambrose is a personal finance colum-
nist at the Baltimore Sun. Send her email at
eileen.ambrosebaltsun.com. She cannot give
individual advice.
AUSTIN, Texas -- Thirty years ago,
around the time Keith Glass walked
into his first semiconductor manu-
facturing facility, most of the oper-
ators wore lab coats.
As microchips grew smaller -- and
their fabrication grew more complex
-- Glass and his colleagues traded
their lab coats for ultra-clean “bun-
ny” suits. Even then, in these facto-
ries that rode on the cutting edge of
manufacturing technology, it still
took humans to move wafers -- slices
of semiconductor materials -- from
one machine to the next.
Today, even the bunny suits are
dwindling. Glass gets the same ques-
tion virtually every time he leads a
tour of Samsung Austin Semiconduc-
tor’s factory: Where are all the peo-
ple?
“All those old entry-level positions
have been replaced by robots,” said
Glass, the facility’s curriculum strat-
egist. “An operator position is much
higher and more technically ad-
vanced than it used to be. That per-
son now sits in front of computer in-
stead of moving wafers by hand.”
Samsung rarely hires anybody with
less than an associate’s degree, he
said.
The same workforce changes Glass
has witnessed in the past three dec-
ades have become increasingly symp-
tomatic of a deeper transformation
across the country’s middle-tier oc-
cupations.
The swath of middle-skills jobs
that once supported a robust Amer-
ican middle class has thinned, lead-
ing to more polarization of the job
market. In the past three decades,
middle-skills occupations have drop-
ped from nearly 60 percent of total
U.S. employment to about 45 per-
cent, according to research by Mas-
sachusetts Institute of Technology
economics professor David Autor.
The real bulk of job growth is bub-
bling up at the ends of the spectrum--
in low-pay, low-skill jobs and in high-
er-wage, highly skilled occupations
that more and more often require at
least a four-year college degree.
Particularly in comparison with
Midlevel jobs go missing as market changes
By DAN ZEHR
Austin American-Statesman
See MISSING, Page 2D
ATLANTA -- Those smartphones
andBlackBerrys that enable workany-
time, anywhere are increasingly blur-
ring the lines between work life and
personal life — and introducing the
sticky issue of when overtime is owed
to workers.
The always-connected worker and
the pressures of the uncertain econo-
my have led many to feel they should
always be working — because they
can, thanks to the
growing use of
smartphones.
That’s allowing
work to bleed into
evenings, weekends
and even sleep, with
some people taking
their phones and
BlackBerrys to bed
with them.
The situation be-
comes tricky for
hourly employees,
whoqualifyfor over-
time.
“We’ve gotten in-
to a place in our cul-
ture where the more
you work, the better
it is, and the more
you should be proud
of it,” said attorney
Amanda Farahany. “And so people
don’t want to assert their overtime
right.”
Overtime laws are abused by com-
panies “on a daily basis,” she said.
But in some cases, that has led to
lawsuits, seekingpayfor what is some-
times called “BlackBerry overtime” or
“electronic overtime.”
For employers, “that’s an area of ex-
posure and it’s coming like a freight
train,” said attorney David Long-Da-
niels. By giving hourly employees
BlackBerrys or access through iCon-
nect or Citrix, “you’ve implicitly told
them to work,” he said.
Long-Daniels advises companies
not to allow hourly employees and
others who qualify for overtime to use
BlackBerrys or remote access to their
work computers, unless they’re toldto
record time when using the devices
andthe company has a systeminplace
to record the hours.
Overtime
problems
popping up
By KELLY YAMANOUCHI
Atlanta Journal-Constitution
See OVERTIME, Page 2D
The always-
connected
worker and
the pressures
of the un-
certain econ-
omy have led
many to feel
they should
always be
working —
because they
can, thanks to
the growing
use of smart-
phones.
M
ONTPELIER, Vt. —Consumers will pay a little
more for coffee and chocolate to ensure the
farmers who produce those foods get a fair
wage, so why not ask them to pay more for milk?
That is the notion behind a program designed to raise
money for struggling NewEngland dairy farms while edu-
cating consumers about those family businesses. Keep Lo-
cal Farms urges colleges, universities and other institu-
tions in NewEngland to charge a little more for milk, with
the extra money going to farmers in the region.
It is among a number of nongov-
ernment programs being set up to
try to preserve small, family-operat-
edfarms as consolidationcontinues
in the dairy industry. While Ver-
mont is best known for its milk and
cheese products, dairy farms
stretch across New England. But
two-thirds haveclosedinthepast 30
years because low milk prices have
made it hard for farmers to cover
their feed, fuel and labor costs.
Some supporters are trying to
help save the rest by borrowing a
page from the fair trade movement.
Consumers who buy products la-
beled as fair trade pay a little bit
more to provide workers with de-
cent wages and sound environmen-
tal practices. Coffee and chocolate
are among the most common fair
trade items.
Keep Local Farms — set up in
2009, a year of record lowmilk pric-
es paid to farmers — figured the
same idea could work in the dairy
industry
Six colleges and universities
signed up, including Harvard and
the University of Vermont, which
contribute10 cents for every single-
serving container of milk sold. Bos-
ton Medical Center, Ski Vermont,
someBen&Jerry’s scoopshops and
others also contribute to the pro-
gram, while others, such as Roche
Brothers and Hannaford supermar-
kets, have displayed signs about the
importance of local dairy farms to
AP PHOTO
The Keep Local Farms program — set up in 2009, a year of record low milk prices paid to farmers —urges
colleges, universities and other institutions in New England to charge a little more for their milk, with the
proceeds going to dairy farmers in the region.
More for milk?
Program designed to help save dairy farms
By LISA RATHKE Associated Press
See MILK, Page 2D
C M Y K
PAGE 2D SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
FIRST STEP: STARTING YOUR
OWN BUSINESS: Wednesday,
8:30-10:30 a.m., Small Business
Development Center, 7 S. Main
St., Suite 200, Wilkes-Barre.
Wilkes University SBDC consult-
ants will answer questions about
starting a business. Free; pre-
registration is required. Call
408-4340.
WOMEN IN BUSINESS LUN-
CHEON: Thursday, noon-1 p.m.,
Vanderlyn’s, 239 Schuyler Ave.,
Kingston. Speaker will be Heidi
Vandermark. Greater Wilkes-
Barre Chamber members $14.50;
non-members $16.50. Call 823-
2101, ext. 1 13 for information or
reservations.
NETWORKING MIXER: Thursday,
5-7 p.m., Sand Springs Country
Club model home, 108 Fairway
Dr., Drums. Complimentary hors
d’oeuvres, beer and wine, prizes.
Free for Greater Hazleton Cham-
ber members, their employees
and guests. Reservations re-
quired; call 455-1509 or email
jferry@hazletonchamber.org.
LUNCH N LEARN ENERGY PRO-
GRAM: July 17, noon-1 p.m., Mea’s
Restaurant, 8 W. Broad St.,
Hazleton. Learn how to shop for
lower-cost energy suppliers.
Bring two most recent electric
bills. Free, includes lunch. Reser-
vations required; call 455-1509
or email jferry@hazletoncham-
ber.org.
RED CARPET BREAKFAST: July
25, 7:45-9 a.m., Damon’s Grill,
120 Route 93, Hazleton. Featur-
ing Hazleton Area School Dis-
trict administrators. Greater
Hazleton Chamber members
$20; non-members $25. To
reserve, call 455-1509 or email
jferry@hazletonchamber.org.
BUSINESS AGENDA
Send announcements of upcoming
events by e-mail to tlbusiness@time-
sleader.com; by mail to Business
Agenda, Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18711 or by fax to
829-5537. Include a contact phone
number and e-mail address. The
submission deadline is Wednesday
for publication on Sunday.
THE NORTHEASTERN
PENNSYLVANIA
INDUSTRIAL RESOURCE
CENTER
Kathleen Bolinski has been
added to the professional staff
as a youth
apprentice
program
coordinator.
Bolinski holds
a bachelor’s
degree in
psychology
from Wilkes
University, a
master in social work degree
from Marywood University and
a master certificate in human
resource management from
Villanova University. She is a
Pennsylvania licensed social
worker.
PENNSTAR BANK
Thomas J. Sunick has been hired
as branch manager of the
bank’s East
Stroudsburg
office. Sunick
has a degree
in marketing
from Miser-
icordia Uni-
versity and
studied real
estate man-
agement at the University of
Scranton.
The following employees have
been promoted to assistant
vice president: Matthew Col-
gan, commercial banking ac-
count representative; Laura
Santelli, financial consultant;
Elizabeth Nagy, marketing and
communications manager;
Karen Decker, branch manag-
er; Tammy Jackson, branch
manager; and Jeffrey Witts,
branch manager.
WYOMING SEMINARY
COLLEGE PREPARATORY
SCHOOL
The Board of Trustees has elected
Richard M. Goldberg, Wilkes-
Barre, as chairman of the Board
of Trustees. Goldberg gradu-
ated from Wyoming Seminary
in 1955 and attended Dickinson
College and
Dickinson
School of
Law. He holds
a master of
laws degree
from Temple
University
Law School.
Mary A. Lopatto, Washington,
D.C., has been elected vice-
chairman. Originally from
Plymouth,
Lopatto grad-
uated from
Wyoming
Seminary in
1972 and
received her
undergradu-
ate degree
from Prince-
ton University
and her law degree from Ca-
tholic University.
AMERICAN GENERAL LIFE &
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
COMPANY
Mark A. Pensero, LUTCF, has
recently joined the Wilkes-Barre
office as career sales agent,
having more than 15 years
insurance experience in the
personal lines market.
HONESDALE NATIONAL BANK
William Schweighofer, president
and CEO, has
been elected
to the Penn-
sylvania
Bankers
Association
board of
directors
and will
serve as the
board’s
second vice chairman.
The Times Leader publishes an-
nouncements of business promo-
tions, hirings and other noteworthy
events on Sundays. Photographs
may be included as space allows.
Submit an announcement by email
to tlbusiness@timesleader.com, by
mail to 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre,
PA18711; or by fax to 829-5537.
Photos in jpeg format may be at-
tached to e-mails.
Bolinski
Sunick
Goldberg
Lopatto
Schweighofer
CORPORATE LADDER
David E. Schwager, a partner
with Chariton, Schwager &
Malak, Wilkes-Barre, has been
elected to serve a three-year
term on the board of directors
of the Pennsylvania Bar In-
stitute. Schwager received his
juris doctorate from The
Dickinson School of Law of
the Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity and his A.B. from
Lafayette College.
Quandel Enterprises, Inc.,
Scranton, ranked 70th in the
national industry publication
Engineering News-Record’s
current edition of the Top 100
Construction Management
For-Fee Firms. Quandel was
also recently ranked as a Top
400 General Contractor by
ENR.
Andrea Caladie, a partner with
ParenteBeard LLC, has re-
ceived the
2012 Dis-
tinguished
Leadership
Alumni
Award from
Leadership
Wilkes-Barre.
Caladie is a
graduate of
Parent-
eBeard’s internal leadership
development program, Lead-
ership, Entrepreneurism and
Achievement at ParenteBeard.
Geisinger Health System has
been presented with a Gold
Award from the National
Business Group on Health, a
non-profit association of large
U.S. employers, for their com-
mitment and dedication to
promoting a healthy work-
place and encouraging its
employees and families to
support and maintain healthy
lifestyles.
Paul Cwalina, of the financial
services firm Edward Jones,
Wilkes-Barre, won the firm’s
exclusive Spirit of Partnership
Award for
outstanding
performance
during 2011.
Cwalina was
one of 1,100
financial
advisers out
of the firm’s
more than
12,000 to
receive the award.
Jeffrey R. Alves, dean of the
J.S. Sidhu School of Business
and Leadership at Wilkes
University, has achieved the
highest honor given within
SIFE USA by being inducted
into the Sam M. Walton Free
Enterprise Fellow Hall of Fame.
A graduate of the Air Force
Academy,
Alves re-
ceived his
doctorate
from the
University of
Massachu-
setts and his
master of
business
adminis-
tration degree from Southern
Illinois University.
Adelle Zavada, Harveys Lake, a
Widener Law alumni, has been
admitted to the Supreme
Court Bar. Zavada is a staff
attorney with North Penn
Legal Services in Scranton.
Jim Smith, Chief Executive
Officer of Bear Creek Commu-
nity Charter School, was
recently elected to the Penn-
sylvania Coalition of Public
Charter Schools Leader’s
Council. Smith will serve as
the elected representative of
public charter schools in
Eastern Pennsylvania.
HONORS &
AWARDS
Caladie
Cwalina
Alves
Submit announcements of busi-
ness honors and awards to Busi-
ness Awards by email to tlbusi-
ness@timesleader.com; by mail to
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711-0250; or by fax to (570)
829-5537. Photos in jpg format
may be attached to email.
local economies, tourism and in
providing land for recreation.
“It’s really from whole cloth.
This didn’t exist. There isn’t re-
ally an example of this kind of
program for dairy at least,” said
Diane Bothfeld, deputy secreta-
ry of the Vermont Agency of
Agriculture, which worked with
the New England Family Dairy
Farms Cooperative and the New
EnglandDairy PromotionBoard
to launch the program.
In Wisconsin, another top
dairystate, FamilyFarmDefend-
ers sells fair trade cheese for
about $6 a pound, guaranteeing
that the farmers whoprovide the
milk get paid $3 for every pound
sold. The farmers set the price to
cover the cost of productionplus
a living wage.
The group sells $30,000 to
$50,000 worth of cheese each
year, providing about 30 farms
withanestimated$500to$1,000
a year, executive director John
Peck said. The challenge is ex-
panding the sales, he said.
In Vermont, where farming is
tied to tourism, residents want
to help farmers, said Marie Au-
det, who with her husband owns
Blue Spruce Farm in Bridport.
Their farmwas one of the first in
the state to produce electricity
from methane gas from cow ma-
nure.
Green Mountain Power cus-
tomers who want to support
such renewable energy projects
pay a premium on their electric-
itybills, withthe moneygoingto
help dairy farmers buy genera-
tors that run on methane.
“They don’t have to do that,
but they knowthat part of being
in Vermont is the open working
landscape,” Audet said.
Still, Robert Cropp, a dairy
marketing specialist and profes-
sor emeritus at the University of
Wisconsin, Madison, doubted
most people would pay more for
milk or other products to sup-
port family farms.
“Most consumers are far re-
moved from the farm,” Cropp
said. “They don’t understand
agriculture and how food is pro-
duced and things of this sort.”
Keep Local Farms raised
$220,000 over two years. After
paying taxes, it sent $100 checks
to 1,370 farms — or about 75
percent of the dairies left in New
England. It’s rethinking that ap-
proach after hearing from farm-
ers, and might provide grants
that could help multiple farms
rather than individual pay-
ments.
“We hadfar more success than
we expected, and yet it wasn’t
enough to be meaningful to the
pockets of dairy farmers on a
long-term basis,” said Gary
Wheelock, executive director of
the New England Dairy Promo-
tion Board.
He added, “What we heard
over and over ... was we want to
enhance public understanding
about who we are and what we
do. The money’s great, but if we
don’t have a license to farm, if
people don’t understandwho we
are, andour abilitytofarminour
local communities is reduced, it
threatens the viability of our
farms.”
MILK
Continued from Page 1D
the wide and growing cross-
section of the population who
possess low- or midlevel skills,
the country faces a “hollowing
out” of the job market’s middle
tier, as MIT’s Autor described
it. Though economists debate
the severity of the changes,
few argue that a mismatch ex-
ists -- a mismatch that presents
a critical economic, social and
political challenge.
Definitions of this middle
tier can vary, in part because
“middle-skills” and “middle-
wage” don’t always refer to the
same set of occupations.
Broadly speaking, though,
middle-skills jobs require more
than high-school diplomas --
whether that’s specialized on-
the-job training or formal cer-
tifications, such as associate’s
degrees. High-skill jobs typi-
cally require four-year college
degrees.
“It’s a different middle now,
and we have to change our
thinking about what constitu-
tes the middle,” said Harry
Holzer, public policy professor
at Georgetown University.
“Middle-wage jobs almost all
require some sort of post-sec-
ondary training, like an associ-
ate’s degree.”
Holzer doesn’t see as much
hollowing-out as Autor, but he
agreed that technology might
be the biggest culprit in the
contraction of middle-tier jobs.
According to Autor’s research,
computers and robots have re-
placed many “routine” tasks,
many of them clerical (re-
placed by information technol-
ogy) or manufacturing (re-
placed by robotic technolo-
gies).
Employment at the ends of
the skills and wages range
grew from 1979 to 2009, Autor
found. But over the same peri-
od, middle-skills jobs dipped
to 45.7 percent of total U.S.
employment -- down from 57.3
percent.
Economic downturns have
been especially hard on this
middle tier, according to eco-
nomics associate professors
Nir Jaimovich at Duke Univer-
sity and Henry Siu at the Uni-
versity of British Columbia.
Since the mid-1980s, they
found, 92 percent of the job
loss in middle-skills occupa-
tions occurred within 12
months of a recession. And job-
less recoveries, such as the one
the nation is in now, are almost
solely due to the disappear-
ance of midtier jobs, they said.
MISSING
Continued from Page 1D
Among the lawsuits over elec-
tronic overtime is one filed last
year in U.S. District Court in At-
lanta against Amerisave Mort-
gage Corp. by former employ-
ees. In the case, which has been
granted conditional class-action
status, senior mortgage proces-
sors claimthey routinely worked
more than 40 hours a week with-
out getting overtime, and that
Amerisave was aware employ-
ees used their phones and other
devices to answer calls and
email but did not track the time.
Amerisave denies those allega-
tions. The discovery period just
ended in that case.
Jason Zulauf and his brother,
Jeffrey Zulauf, who are among
the workers suing Amerisave,
saidtheyworkedoncommission
and didn’t realize they could
qualify for overtime.
Jason Zulauf said the comput-
er system Amerisave employees
used to work from home would
automatically clock themout af-
ter 40 hours, but they were told
by managers to “back down”
their hours — or adjust them
downward—sotheycouldwork
more hours to make more com-
mission.
An attorney representing
Amerisave, Jeff Mokotoff, said
the company has “clear, une-
quivocal written policies that re-
quire the employees to recordall
the time that they work.”
The Zulaufs said they worked
as many as 15 to 16 hours a day,
sixdays a week. “We hadnolife,”
Jason Zulauf said. “It took a lot
of time away from our families.”
Farahany, who is the Zulaufs’
attorney, said that “most people
don’t realize the rights they have
under the overtime laws.”
The overtime law, part of the
Fair Labor Standards Act, was
enacted during the Great De-
pressionto“make it more expen-
sive for anemployer tomake one
person work more than to sim-
ply hire another person,” Faraha-
ny said. “Over time, companies
have simply erodedthat law, and
we’re back in a place now where
employees are out of work.”
Companies call that increased
productivity, a driver of econom-
ic growth.
Farahany contends that if
companies follow the overtime
law, “It will bring people back to
work. It worked in the Great De-
pression.”
The Amerisave case follows
similar cases in other parts of
the country, including one filed
against T-Mobile USA Inc. in
2009, in which employees and
former employees alleged they
were given company BlackBer-
rys or smart phones and “re-
quired to review and respond to
T-Mobile-relatedemails andtext
messages at all hours of the day,
whether or not they were
punched into T-Mobile’s com-
puter-based timecard system.”
In a complaint filed against
commercial real estate firm CB
Richard Ellis, an employee
claimed he and other employees
were given BlackBerrys and oth-
er devices to access work-related
emails.
OVERTIME
Continued from Page 1D
MCT PHOTO
Fred Karlinsky, 44, right, is a workaholic and constantly on his
PDA, Blackberry, or both. He is shown with his wife Autumn,
center, and children Spencer, 4, left, and Allie.
“We’ve gotten into a place in our culture where
the more you work, the better it is, and the more
you should be proud of it. And so people don’t
want to assert their overtime right.”
Attorney Amanda Farahany
Q.: I share an office with a
woman who makes all kinds
of irritating noises. She is
constantly coughing, burping
and clearing her throat. I
have mentioned this problem
in a nice way, but she contin-
ues to do it. Our supervisor
has not been helpful at all.
I know I should not let this
get to me, but these sounds
are so disruptive that I can’t
concentrate on my work. Af-
ter listening to her for eight
hours, I go home stressed and
angry every day. I am about
to lose my mind. What can I
do?
A.: While these ongoing
physical rumblings could cer-
tainly be annoying, I’m afraid
the real issue is your overre-
action to them. If you are al-
lowing this rather minor is-
sue to make you “stressed
and angry every day,” then
you are really blowing it out
of proportion.
You may not realize that
one contributing factor in
this situation is your own
sensitivity to sound. Physio-
logically, people vary quite a
bit in their ability to screen
out background noise. Some
can easily ignore it, while
others, such as yourself, are
acutely aware of every sound
in the room.
If your office mate was
playing a radio or using a
speakerphone, you could rea-
sonably ask her to reduce the
volume, but these bodily re-
sponses are largely beyond
her control. The key to seren-
ity, therefore, is learning to
manage your own emotional
reactions, because right now
you are primed to be angry at
the first hint of a cough.
To distract yourself, try us-
ing headphones or playing a
radio at low volume. When
you hear noises emanating
from the other side of the
room, just shift your atten-
tion to the music. If you keep
this up, it will eventually be-
come a habit, and you will be
able to go home in a calmer
state of mind.
Q: I work for a temporary
service, but I’m often over-
looked for the best assign-
ments. Many of my co-work-
ers get full-time positions,
while I usually work only a
couple of days a week. Some-
times the placement supervi-
sor says there are no jobs
available, then I later find out
this wasn’t true.
I have been with this ser-
vice a long time, but senior-
ity doesn’t seem to matter. A
new employee was recently
given a great assignment that
would have been perfect for
me. How can I get them to
give me more work?
A: While you may be fo-
cused on seniority, your
agency is only concerned
with performance. Because
pleasing customers is their
primary goal, the most highly
rated employees are likely to
receive the prime positions.
Your lack of work may indi-
cate that management has
concerns about your compe-
tence, your attitude, or your
work habits.
Since management’s opin-
ion of you will be based on
both customer feedback and
their own observations, you
must be consistently pleas-
ant, professional and depend-
able in all your business
transactions. But if you feel
that you have no problems in
this regard, then you should
simply ask what you can do
to get better assignments and
pay close attention to the an-
swer.
OFFICE COACH
Control overreaction to noisy office mate
Marie G. McIntyre is a workplace
coach and the author of “Secrets to
Winning at Office Politics.” Send in
questions and get free coaching tips
at http://www.yourofficecoach.com.
If you are allowing this rather minor issue to
make you “stressed and angry every day,” then
you are really blowing it out of proportion.
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3D

➛ B U S I N E S S
MarketPulse
STAYING STILL
Big swings in the market
tested investors last year,
and many retirement
investors reacted by doing
nothing.
Among those with
401(k) plans at Vanguard,
for example, only 11
percent made a trade in
their account. That’s the
lowest level since
Vanguard began tracking
the data in 1999.
One reason may be that
more investors are opting
for target-date retirement
funds that gradually shift
from stocks to bonds as
retirement nears.
DEEP IMPACT
JPMorgan Chase (JPM) wasn’t the worst stock in the Standard & Poor’s
500 index last quarter, but it caused the most damage. That’s because
of the way the index is calculated, where changes in a company’s mar-
ket size carry more weight than its stock price. So even though Alpha
Natural Resources (ANR) plunged 43 percent, the most in the index, it
had a minor impact on investors of S&P 500 index funds. The company’s
small size meant it lost $1.5 billion in market value, just 0.3 percent of
the index’s drop last quarter. JPMorgan Chase, meanwhile, fell by $40
billion. It alone accounted for 9 percent of the index’s drop.
AP
RICH SPENDING
Financial analysts are getting
more doubtful that the wealthy
will keep spending.
Volatile stock markets
mean wealthy shoppers are
more cautious, and Europe’s
economic troubles could mean
fewer tourists visiting U.S. de-
partment stores, says Citi ana-
lyst Deborah Weinswig. She
recently downgraded Saks
(SKS), Bloomingdale’s parent
Macy’s (M) and Nordstrom
(JWN) on worries about slow-
ing spending.
Sales at luxury retailers,
though, did perform better
than others during June. Saks’
revenue at stores open more
than a year rose 6 percent. Source: Birinyi Associates Source: Vanguard
Procter & Gamble (PG)
Qualcomm (QCOM)
Cisco Systems (CSCO)
Citigroup (C)
ConocoPhillips (COP)
JPMorgan Chase (JPM)
Stocks with the biggest impact on the S&P 500 last quarter (billions)
Vanguard 401(k) assets
percent invested in target-date retirement funds
-18.8%
-18.1%
-8.9%
-22.3%
-26.5%
-25.0%
0
3
6
9
12
15%
’11 ’10 ’09 ’08 ’07
-$40.0
-$29.8
-$25.4
-$23.0
-$20.4
-$17.4
Charles de Vaulx is a value-ori-
ented mutual fund manager who
invests in stocks that he believes
are priced at a discount relative
to a company’s prospects. Much
of Europe is in a recession, so
the continent might not seem an
obvious place to find strong earn-
ings. But the co-manager of IVA
Worldwide and IVA International
is finding opportunities in stocks
of small- to mid-sized European
companies that generate plenty
of their sales outside of Europe.
Here’s de Vaulx’s take on invest-
ing in Europe as its leaders strug-
gle to contain the continent’s debt
crisis.
Where does a value inves-
tor find opportunity in Europe
these days?
You must be very selective. What
has been striking around the world
and in Europe is how the markets
have recently been efficient at dis-
criminating between high-quali-
ty defensive stocks versus more
mediocre or cyclical business-
es. Examples of such defensive
stocks include global food compa-
nies, such as Nestle and Sodexo,
and Diageo, the United Kingdom-
based liquor producer.
The prices of some of these
stocks have risen so much that
they’re at or near all-time highs. At
IVA, we have a bias toward high-
quality businesses. We’d rather
pay up for quality than try to pay
as little as possible at the risk of
buying into mediocre business-
es. So unfortunately, we haven’t
been able to buy the highest-qual-
ity businesses in Europe because
they haven’t come down in price
enough for us.
So what’s a good alternative to
large-cap, high-quality Europe-
an stocks?
We’ve been looking at small-
and mid-cap stocks. Those stocks
are less liquid and traded less fre-
quently, and they’ve declined to
the point where they’ve become
cheaper than the larger names.
One that we like is Teleperfor-
mance, a French-based glob-
al company that operates call
centers. The bulk of their profits
come from the U.S. Then there’s
a French conglomerate called
Lagardere Groupe, and Cap Gem-
ini, an information technology ser-
vices company. Some of these
names have come down in price
enough that we find them quite at-
tractive.
What about European bank
stocks, which have struggled
during the debt crisis?
We bought very small position
late last year in Switzerland-based
UBS. It’s a very well-capitalized
bank, especially with its strong pri-
vate wealth business. But we’ve
looked at Spanish banks like Ban-
co Santander, and the French and
German banks, and they strike us
as grossly undercapitalized. We
are appalled by how slowly Euro-
pean regulators and policymak-
ers have moved since early 2009.
They forgot to force banks to re-
capitalize. American policymakers
did much better in early 2009 forc-
ing many U.S. banks to recapital-
ize.
Where to find value
in European stocks
InsiderQ&A
AP
Who he is:
Chief investment officer of Interna-
tional Value Advisers.
What he suggests: Stocks
of many small- to mid-sized
European companies
Answers edited for content and
clarity.
Charles de Vaulx
What separates the winners from the rest of the
pack in the Standard & Poor’s 500 index, or the
losers for that matter? It’s all about profits, or at
least expectations for the strength of future profits.
In the second quarter, the three biggest winners all
rose more than 40 percent because the companies
are enjoying, or are expected to experience greater
product demand. The losers all fell 40 percent or
greater on worries that previous earnings expecta-
tions were overly optimistic.
AP Source: FactSet Data through 6/29/12
winners &losers
Second
quarter
30
40
$50
April May June
66
88
$110
April May June
10
15
$20
April May June
5
10
15
$20
April May June
60
90
120
$150
April May June
60
80
100
$120
April May June
Expedia (EXPE)
Alpha Natural Resources (ANR) Fossil (FOSL) Netflix (NFLX)
Edwards Lifesciences (EW) Dean Foods (DF)
2Q change: 44%
Shares of the website operator rose
28 percent in one day on news of
higher profits from Hotels.com.
2Q change: 42%
Shares climbed in June after a
FDA panel approved wider use of
the company’s artificial heart valve.
2Q change: 41%
Shares began to move up in May
after the dairy processor raised its
full-year profit forecast.
2Q change: -43%
The mining company reported weak
demand and rising costs, saying that
it would cut production in response.
2Q change: -42%
The watchmaker faced a one-day
plunge of 38 percent after European
sales hurt its first-quarter results.
2Q change: -40%
In April, doubts surfaced about the
company’s goal of adding 7 million
streaming video customers this year.
$33
$103
$73 $12
$48
$15
$9
$132
$77
$115
$69
$17
TOPOF THE S&P500
BOTTOMOF THE S&P500
Air Products APD 72.26 3 98.01 79.82 -0.91 -1.1 s t -6.3—15.02 3 2.1 14 3.2
Amer Water Works AWK 25.39 0 35.00 34.71 0.68 2.0 s s 8.9+19.56 126.4a 19 2.9
Amerigas Part LP APU 36.76 5 46.47 41.24 0.49 1.2 s s -10.2 —3.31 3 8.8 38 7.8
Aqua America Inc WTR 19.28 0 25.93 25.87 0.91 3.6 s s 17.3+17.50 1 5.0 24 2.6
Arch Dan Mid ADM 23.69 5 33.98 28.39 -1.13 -3.8 t t -0.7 —5.45 3 -2.3 14 2.5
AutoZone Inc AZO 266.25 8399.10 364.52 -2.65 -0.7 t t 12.2+22.42 1 21.1 17 ...
Bank of America BAC 4.92 5 11.07 7.66 -0.52 -6.4 s t 37.8—28.31 4-25.5 ... 0.5
Bk of NY Mellon BK 17.10 6 26.43 21.79 -0.16 -0.7 s t 9.4—14.03 3 -11.3 11 2.4
Bon Ton Store BONT 2.23 7 10.75 7.95 0.14 1.8 s t 135.9—15.72 3-25.7 ... 2.5
CVS Caremark Corp CVS 31.30 0 48.32 48.12 1.39 3.0 s s 18.0+28.96 1 6.3 18 1.4
Cigna Corp CI 38.79 3 52.95 42.54 -1.46 -3.3 t t 1.3—18.18 4 -4.7 9 0.1
CocaCola KO 63.34 0 79.36 78.15 -0.04 -0.1 s s 11.7+16.90 1 10.5 21 2.6
Comcast Corp A CMCSA 19.19 0 32.50 31.36 -0.61 -1.9 s s 32.3+25.19 1 3.0 19 2.1
Community Bk Sys CBU 21.67 8 29.47 27.22 0.10 0.4 s t -2.1+12.10 1 9.7 13 3.8
Community Hlth Sys CYH 14.61 9 28.79 27.18 -0.85 -3.0 s s 55.8 +4.02 2 -7.9 11 ...
Energy Transfer Eqty ETE 30.78 7 45.42 40.75 -0.27 -0.7 s t 0.4 —3.52 3 3.6 24 6.1
Entercom Comm ETM 4.61 4 9.27 6.28 0.26 4.3 s t 2.1—27.31 4-21.0 8 ...
Fairchild Semicond FCS 10.25 5 17.75 13.96 -0.14 -1.0 s t 15.9—18.22 4 -6.8 16 ...
Frontier Comm FTR 3.06 2 8.23 4.01 0.18 4.7 s t -22.1—43.67 5 -11.5 24 10.0
Genpact Ltd G 13.37 7 18.16 16.53 -0.10 -0.6 s s 10.6 —7.29 313.3a 21 1.1
Harte Hanks Inc HHS 7.00 7 10.24 9.05 -0.09 -1.0 s s -0.4+13.29 1-16.7 13 3.8
Heinz HNZ 48.17 0 55.48 54.85 0.47 0.9 s s 1.5 +5.35 2 6.1 19 3.8
Hershey Company HSY 53.83 0 72.73 72.24 0.21 0.3 s s 16.9+27.62 1 9.1 25 2.1
Kraft Foods KFT 31.88 9 39.99 38.98 0.36 0.9 s s 4.3 +11.97 1 5.5 19 3.0
Lowes Cos LOW 18.07 7 32.29 27.85 -0.59 -2.1 t t 9.7+22.14 1 -0.8 18 2.3
M&T Bank MTB 66.40 8 90.00 83.88 1.31 1.6 s t 9.9 —1.99 2 -2.1 13 3.3
McDonalds Corp MCD 82.01 4102.22 89.66 1.13 1.3 s t -10.6 +7.58 2 14.5 17 3.1
NBT Bncp NBTB 17.05 7 24.10 21.88 0.29 1.3 s s -1.1 +.38 2 2.6 13 3.7
Nexstar Bdcstg Grp NXST 5.53 3 10.28 6.55 -0.19 -2.8 t t -16.5—20.89 4-15.2 ... ...
PNC Financial PNC 42.70 8 67.89 60.70 -0.41 -0.7 s t 5.3 +3.96 2 -1.5 11 2.6
PPL Corp PPL 25.00 6 30.27 27.91 0.10 0.4 s s -5.1 +4.94 2 -6.0 10 5.2
Penna REIT PEI 6.50 9 16.55 15.40 0.42 2.8 s s 47.5 -.93 2-13.8 ... 4.2
PepsiCo PEP 58.50 0 70.89 70.22 -0.44 -0.6 s s 5.8 +3.04 2 3.7 17 3.1
Philip Morris Intl PM 60.45 0 91.05 89.45 2.19 2.5 s s 14.0+35.59 130.2a 18 3.4
Procter & Gamble PG 57.56 4 67.95 61.28 0.03 0.0 t t -8.1 —1.98 2 2.7 16 3.7
Prudential Fncl PRU 42.45 3 65.30 47.80 -0.63 -1.3 t t -4.6—23.00 4 -11.6 6 3.0
SLM Corp SLM 10.91 9 17.11 16.28 0.57 3.6 s s 21.5 —.48 2-21.9 15 3.1
SLM Corp flt pfB SLMBP 39.00 4 57.24 44.95 0.45 1.0 s t 15.3 ... 0.0 ... 4.9
TJX Cos TJX 25.07 0 44.63 44.43 1.50 3.5 s s 37.7+67.04 1 26.7 21 1.0
UGI Corp UGI 24.07 8 32.68 30.25 0.82 2.8 s s 2.9 —3.37 3 4.8 18 3.6
Verizon Comm VZ 32.28 0 45.07 44.42 0.48 1.1 s s 10.7+23.65 1 6.7 48 4.5
WalMart Strs WMT 48.31 0 71.30 71.36 1.64 2.4 s s 19.4+35.68 1 9.8 15 2.2
Weis Mkts WMK 36.52 0 45.91 45.82 1.30 2.9 s s 14.7+16.81 1 4.5 16 2.6
52-WK RANGE FRIDAY $CHG%CHG %CHG%RTN RANK %RTN
COMPANY TICKER LOW HIGH CLOSE 1WK 1WK 1MO 1QTR YTD 1YR 1YR 5YRS* PE YLD
Notes on data: Total returns, shown for periods 1-year or greater, include dividend income and change in market price. Three-year and five-year returns
annualized. Ellipses indicate data not available. Price-earnings ratio unavailable for closed-end funds and companies with net losses over prior four quar-
ters. Rank classifies a stock’s performance relative to all U.S.-listed shares, from top 20 percent (far-left box) to bottom 20 percent (far-right box).
LocalStocks
Sources: S&P Indices; FactSet Data through July 3
Dividends keep rising, and payouts increased by a
net of $12 billion last quarter, according to S&P Dow
Jones Indices.
That’s good news for yield-hungry investors who are
getting scant interest from their bonds. Dividend stocks
are more volatile than bonds, but many now carry high-
er yields. A10-year Treasury note yields about 1.6 per-
cent, down from 5.2 percent five years ago.
This screen shows the companies in the Standard
& Poor’s 500 index that have at least doubled their divi-
dends so far this year. Leading the list is software com-
pany CATechnologies, which announced in January
that it would quintuple its dividend as part of a program
that also authorized up to $1.5 billion in stock buybacks.
CA’s hike is part of a growing dividend culture
among technology stocks. The industry contributes
13.8 percent of all the dividends paid by S&P 500
companies. That’s second only to consumer staples
companies at 14.4 percent.
CA Technologies (CA) $27.18 $0.20 $1.00 400% 3.7% 17.7%
Fidelity Nat. Inform. Srvs. (FIS) 34.80 0.20 0.80 300 2.3 12.6
Gannett (GCI) 14.82 0.32 0.80 150 5.5 0.8
Mosaic (MOS) 55.67 0.20 0.50 150 0.9 -18.4
Cliffs Natural Resources (CLF) 50.43 1.12 2.50 123 5.0 -47.4
Southwest Airlines (LUV) 9.28 0.02 0.04 122 0.4 -20.1
Macy’s (M) 33.36 0.40 0.80 100 2.3 16.3
MasterCard (MA) 441.47 0.60 1.20 100 0.3 39.8
Ralph Lauren (RL) 144.57 0.80 1.60 100 1.1 9.6
CLOSE
1-YR
STOCK
CHANGE
FORMER
ANNUAL
DIVIDEND
NEW
ANNUAL
DIVIDEND
DIVIDEND
GROWTH
DIVIDEND
YIELD COMPANY
The biggest dividend hikes StockScreener
American Funds BalA m ABALX 19.34 -.07 +3.0 +4.7/A +2.4/A
American Funds BondA m ABNDX 12.85 +.06 +1.1 +7.3/C +4.2/E
American Funds CapIncBuA m CAIBX 51.21 +.05 +3.8 +2.9/A +.3/C
American Funds CpWldGrIA m CWGIX 33.64 -.22 +3.9 -6.8/B -2.2/B
American Funds EurPacGrA m AEPGX 36.69 -.33 +3.1 -14.1/B -3.2/A
American Funds FnInvA m ANCFX 37.55 -.26 +2.9 -2.4/D -.7/B
American Funds GrthAmA m AGTHX 31.41 -.13 +2.2 -1.9/C -1.0/D
American Funds IncAmerA m AMECX 17.32 -.04 +3.4 +4.1/A +1.3/C
American Funds InvCoAmA m AIVSX 28.99 -.11 +3.1 +1.1/C -1.2/C
American Funds NewPerspA m ANWPX 28.29 -.22 +2.9 -5.0/B -.2/A
American Funds WAMutInvA m AWSHX 29.94 -.15 +3.8 +4.1/A -.5/A
BlackRock GlobAlcA m MDLOX 18.77 -.02 +2.1 -4.6/C +2.5/B
BlackRock GlobAlcI MALOX 18.88 -.02 +2.2 -4.3/C +2.8/B
Dodge & Cox Income DODIX 13.68 +.07 +1.1 +6.1/D +7.2/B
Dodge & Cox IntlStk DODFX 29.80 -.41 +3.0 -16.9/D -5.6/B
Dodge & Cox Stock DODGX 109.09 -1.38 +3.6 -3.0/D -4.2/D
Fidelity Contra FCNTX 74.92 +.11 +2.2 +3.9/A +2.5/A
Fidelity GrowCo FDGRX 91.76 +.20 +2.8 +1.1/B +4.2/A
Fidelity LowPriStk d FLPSX 38.42 +3.2 -2.2/A +1.3/A
Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg x FUSVX 48.01 -.52 +3.2 +3.4/A -.3/B
FrankTemp-Franklin Income A m FKINX 2.14 -.02 +3.4 +2.1/C +2.7/D
FrankTemp-Franklin Income C m FCISX 2.16 -.02 +3.4 +1.6/D +2.2/D
FrankTemp-Mutual Euro Z MEURX 19.66 -.02 +4.7 -9.2/A -3.2/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBond A mTPINX 12.89 +.04 +3.8 -1.3/E +9.0/A
FrankTemp-Templeton GlBondAdv TGBAX 12.85 +.04 +3.8 -1.0/E +9.3/A
Harbor IntlInstl d HAINX 55.22 -.49 +3.0 -12.8/B -2.8/A
Oakmark EqIncI OAKBX 28.06 -.11 +1.5 -2.2/D +3.4/A
PIMCO AllAssetI PAAIX 12.04 +.05 +3.0 +3.0/A +6.2/A
PIMCO LowDrIs PTLDX 10.52 +.04 +.9 +3.2/A +5.7/A
PIMCO TotRetA m PTTAX 11.37 +.07 +1.4 +6.9/C +9.0/A
PIMCO TotRetAdm b PTRAX 11.37 +.07 +1.4 +7.0/C +9.2/A
PIMCO TotRetIs PTTRX 11.37 +.07 +1.4 +7.3/C +9.5/A
PIMCO TotRetrnD b PTTDX 11.37 +.07 +1.4 +7.0/C +9.2/A
Permanent Portfolio PRPFX 46.84 -.25 -.1 -2.5/E +7.6/A
T Rowe Price EqtyInc PRFDX 24.54 -.14 +3.5 +1.3/B -1.3/B
T Rowe Price GrowStk PRGFX 36.06 +2.2 +4.0/A +1.5/B
T Rowe Price HiYield d PRHYX 6.72 +.02 +3.0 +5.6/C +7.1/B
T Rowe Price MidCpGr RPMGX 56.69 -.09 +2.0 -2.5/B +3.5/A
T Rowe Price NewIncome PRCIX 9.85 +.05 +1.3 +7.1/C +7.3/B
Vanguard 500Adml VFIAX 124.93 -.62 +3.2 +3.4/A -.2/B
Vanguard 500Inv VFINX 124.93 -.62 +3.2 +3.3/A -.3/B
Vanguard GNMAAdml VFIJX 11.09 +.04 +.4 +6.2/C +7.3/A
Vanguard InflaPro VIPSX 14.71 +.11 +.4 +12.1/A +8.5/B
Vanguard InstIdxI VINIX 124.13 -.61 +3.2 +3.4/A -.2/B
Vanguard InstPlus VIIIX 124.14 -.61 +3.2 +3.4/A -.2/B
Vanguard InstTStPl VITPX 30.61 -.08 +3.3 +2.1/B +.3/A
Vanguard MuIntAdml VWIUX 14.23 +.02 +.3 +8.6/B +5.7/B
Vanguard STGradeAd VFSUX 10.77 +.02 +.7 +2.7/B +4.5/B
Vanguard Tgtet2025 VTTVX 13.02 -.02 +2.8 -.1/B +.8/A
Vanguard TotBdAdml VBTLX 11.15 +.05 +.9 +7.7/B +7.1/B
Vanguard TotBdInst VBTIX 11.15 +.05 +.9 +7.8/B +7.1/B
Vanguard TotIntl VGTSX 13.43 -.10 +3.8 -15.5/C -5.6/B
Vanguard TotStIAdm VTSAX 33.82 -.09 +3.3 +2.0/B +.2/A
Vanguard TotStIIns VITSX 33.83 -.08 +3.3 +2.0/B +.2/A
Vanguard TotStIdx VTSMX 33.82 -.08 +3.3 +1.9/B +.1/A
Vanguard WellsIAdm VWIAX 57.67 +.17 +2.5 +9.3/A +6.6/A
Vanguard Welltn VWELX 32.76 -.15 +2.6 +4.0/A +3.2/A
Vanguard WelltnAdm VWENX 56.58 -.25 +2.6 +4.1/A +3.3/A
Vanguard WndsIIAdm VWNAX 49.06 -.32 +3.6 +3.0/A -1.8/B
Vanguard WndsrII VWNFX 27.64 -.18 +3.6 +2.9/A -1.9/C
MutualFunds
FRIDAY WK RETURN/RANK
GROUP, FUND TICKER NAV CHG 4WK 1YR 5YR
Dow industrials
-0.8%
+1.7%
Nasdaq
+0.1%
+2.8%
S&P 500
-0.6%
+2.2%
Russell 2000
+1.1%
+4.9%
LARGE-CAP
SMALL-CAP
q
p
p
p
p
p
q
p
p
p
p
p
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
MO
YTD
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
WEEKLY
+4.5%
+12.8%
+7.7%
+8.9%
Yields, mortgage rates sink again
Worries about the weakening global economy
keep pulling Treasury yields lower, which drags
down rates on various types of consumer loans
and savings accounts. The average rate on a 30-
year fixed mortgage, for example, fell to 3.62 per-
cent last week from 3.66 percent. It has fallen to a
new record, or matched a previous one, in 10 of
the last 11 weeks, according to Freddie Mac.
InterestRates
MIN
Money market mutual funds YIELD INVEST PHONE
3.25
3.25
3.25
.13
.13
.13
PRIME
RATE
FED
FUNDS
Taxable—national avg 0.01
Direxion US Govt MMF/Cl A 0.11 $ 25,000 min (800) 851-0511
Tax-exempt—national avg 0.01
Invesco Tax-Exempt Cash Fund/Cl A0.09$ 1,000 min (800) 659-1005
Broad market Lehman 1.94 -0.01 t t -0.87 2.88 1.94
Triple-A corporate Moody’s 3.61 0.05 t t -1.47 5.16 3.54
Corp. Inv. Grade Lehman 3.21 -0.04 t t -0.54 4.03 3.21
FRIDAY
6 MO AGO
1 YR AGO
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
U.S. BOND INDEXES YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
Municipal Bond Buyer 4.43 0.05 s t -0.82 5.25 4.35
U.S. high yield Barclays 7.22 -0.25 t t -0.02 10.15 6.96
Treasury Barclays 0.90 -0.07 t t -1.10 2.00 0.86
FRIDAY CHANGE 52-WK
TREASURYS YIELD 1WK 1MO 3MO 1YR HIGH LOW
3-month T-Bill 0.07 -0.01 t r 0.06 0.12
1-year T-Bill 0.23 -0.01 s r 0.03 0.25 0.07
6-month T-Bill 0.14 -0.01 s s 0.08 0.15 0.01
2-year T-Note 0.27 -0.03 r t -0.19 0.46 0.16
5-year T-Note 0.65 -0.07 t t -1.08 1.73 0.62
10-year T-Note 1.55 -0.10 t t -1.59 3.14 1.45
30-year T-Bond 2.66 -0.09 t t -1.71 4.39 2.52
Money fund data provided by iMoneyNet Inc.
Rank: Fund’s letter grade compared with others in the same performance group;
an A indicates fund performed in the top 20 percent; an E, in the bottom 20 percent.
C M Y K
PAGE 4D SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ B U S I N E S S
No Sales To Dealers • Not Responsible For Typographical Errors • Quantity Rights Reserved
Family Owned & Operated Since 1997
101 S. Mountain Blvd.
(Rt. 309) MountainTop
(570) 474-1640
STORE HOURS:
Sunday-Saturday
7am - 9pm
400 Front St.
Freeland
(570) 636-2000
STORE HOURS:
Sunday-Saturday
7am - 9pm
Fresh Lean
80% Ground Beef
1
99
LB.
with Gold Card
Boneless & Skinless
Chicken Breast
1
88
LB.
with Gold Card
No Other Discount Applies
Shurfne Deli Gourmet
American Cheese
2
99
LB.
Sahlen’s
Ham Off The Bone
3
99
LB.
Fresh Picked New Jersey
Blueberries
1
98
PINT
with Gold Card
Fresh Express
Garden Salad
1
28
12 oz.
with Gold Card
Pepsi
24 Packs/12 oz. Cans
Assorted Varieties
3
99
with Gold Card
Tastykake
Family Packs
1
99
FAMILY PACK
with Gold Card
Silver Farms
Large Eggs
88
¢
DOZEN
with Gold Card
Schneider Valley
Iced Teas
GALLON with Gold Card
2 4
FOR
Nabisco Chips
Ahoy
9.5 - 15.25 oz.
1
88
with Gold Card
Martins Kettle Cooked
Potato Chips
8 oz.
FREE
BUY ONE,
GET TWO
with Gold Card
with Gold Card
with Gold Card
WIC GLADLY ACCEPTED
LIMIT 2
Name That Company
l'm a diversilied qlobal indusLrial
company, buL you're mosL likely
Lo know me by my dominance in Lhe
deaLh·care business. My BaLesville
name, more Lhan ¹00 years old, is Lhe
Lop caskeL seller, by lar. l lead in cre·
maLion producLs, Loo, and l've recenLly
enLered Lhe vaulL business. l pioneered
meLal caskeLs, which were cheaper Lhan
wood ones, and lor a while made hospiLal beds
as well. My Process LquipmenL Croup serves
indusLry wiLh machines LhaL convey, screen, silL,
reduce, vibraLe, separaLe and more. 1he brands in
Lhis qroup include RoLex, K·1ron, Cundlach, Jellrey
Rader and Pennsylvania Crusher. Who am l?
Know the answer? Send it to us with Foolish Trivia on the top and you’ll be
entered into a drawing for a nifty prize!
too harshly with various creditors, its
plan isn’t likely to be approved.
In most cases, the company will
have to sell off assets to raise money
to pay creditors. The proceeds usu-
ally won’t be enough to pay all
prioritized creditors in full, so credi-
tors might accept a reduced amount
of money, and/or some stock in the
new, reorganized company.
Meanwhile, holders of common
stock in the company are not any-
where near the front of the line.
They’re behind debt holders, mer-
chant creditors, trustees, employees,
the IRS and even preferred-stock
shareholders, and their shares usu-
ally end up worthless. Even insid-
ers’ stock stakes usually do.
Some companies in Chapter 11
do emerge from it and survive
(such as Western Union and Delta
Airlines) — but many don’t (think
Enron, Worldcom and Polaroid).
And with those that do, it’s rare
for shareholders to benefit. Some
of those that survive, like Lehman
Brothers, just end up in trouble
again. Steer clear of companies in
trouble. (Motley Fool newsletters
have recommended General Motors
and Western Union.)
K_\ Dfkc\p =ffc KXb\
Invest With
Warren Buffett
When you hear “Berkshire Hatha-
way” (NYSE: BRK-B), you’ll prob-
ably think “Warren Buffett.” Buffett
is only one part of why Berkshire
Hathaway might be a key compo-
nent of your portfolio, though.
At its core, Berkshire Hathaway is
an insurance company, owning the
gecko-fronted GEICO, as well as
more specialized insurance opera-
tions. But it’s also a railroad opera-
tor, having bought BNSF. And it’s
a chocolatier, with See’s Candies.
It’s also an energy utility, a paint
company, an underwear manufac-
turer, a furniture seller, a modular-
home builder, a fine-jewelry seller,
a boot maker and much more.
(You’ll find a list of its subsidiaries
at berkshirehathaway.com.)
It’s also an asset manager,
with a massive stock portfolio
that includes some big positions.
Indeed, it owns 8.8 percent of the
whole Coca-Cola company, 7.6
percent of Wells Fargo, 5.5 percent
of IBM and 13 percent of American
Express. (By the way, The Motley
Fool owns shares of these compa-
nies — and Berkshire Hathaway
itself — and/or has recommended
them in its newsletters.)
Despite all his stock holdings,
Buffett greatly prefers to buy entire
companies and let their talented
managers keep running them,
sending the cash they generate to
Omaha, for him to invest elsewhere.
Berkshire offers high-quality diver-
sity with great long-term promise.
The Motley Fool
®
To Educate, Amuse & Enrich
8jb k_\ =ffc
Dp ;ldY\jk @em\jkd\ek
No Revenue, Either
I read a short article in some
publication about how White
Smile Global was going to hit the
$2 range within the next couple
of weeks, when it was trading for
roughly 90 cents per share. Like
an idiot, I succumbed to my greed
and bought in without really doing
my homework. Well, the stock fell
to less than 25 cents per share and
has recently been around 50 cents.
There seems to be something fishy
here — S., online
The Fool Responds: Not doing
your homework cost you a lot here.
First off, know that penny stocks
— those trading for less than about
$5 per share, tend to be extremely
risky, offering hopes and promises
instead of solid track records. They
can be easily manipulated some-
times, too, by hypers and scammers.
This tooth-whitening company’s
latest earnings report discusses
many plans, but also notes, “We
have not generated any revenues
since inception.”
Yikes! Companies without earn-
ings are risky enough, but this
one has no revenue, either. Why
take such chances when there are
healthy, growing companies out
there that are undervalued?
Do you have an embarrassing
lesson learned the hard way?
Boil it down to 100 words (or
less) and send it to The Motley Fool c/o My
Dumbest Investment. Got one that worked?
Submit to My Smartest Investment. If we
print yours, you’ll win a Fool’s cap!
C8JK N<<BËJ KI@M@8 8EJN<I
l beqan as OuanLum CompuLer Services in ¹985, ollerinq an online ser·
vice called O·Link on Lhe Commodore 6^. By ¹995, l had a million mem·
bers. l inLroduced Buddy LisLs and provided an early home lor 1he MoLley
Fool. 1oday l'm a key web services company, ollerinq premium and niche
conLenL. My adverLisinq neLwork reaches more Lhan ¹80 million people
monLhly. l merqed wiLh 1ime Warner in 200¹, buL we've since spliL up. l
bouqhL Lhe HullinqLon PosL in 20¹¹. My brands include Movielone, Map·
OuesL, 1echCrunch and PaLch, which covers more Lhan 850 Lowns. l oller
¹,500 lree qames online. Who am l? (Answer: AOL)
Write to Us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smart-
est) Investments (up to 100 words), and your Trivia entries to
Fool@fool.com or via regular mail c/o this newspaper, attn: The
Motley Fool. Sorry, we can’t provide individual financial advice.
A Hard Pill
to Swallow
Q
What does it mean if a
company has a “poison pill”
strategy? — B.L., Hartford, Conn.
A
A company may employ
such a strategy to avoid being
taken over. In one version of it,
shareholders (but not a would-be
acquirer) are permitted to buy more
shares of company stock at a dis-
count. This dilutes the value of the
stock, including those shares held
by the acquirer, making a buyout
more difficult and expensive to
pull off. Another poison-pill tactic
is to permit shareholders to buy the
would-be acquirer’s stock at a dis-
count in the event of a merger.
Shareholders have sometimes
protested poison pills because they
dilute the voting power of shares
and because sometimes a takeover
would actually be good for the
company and shareholders.
Some companies with poison
pill plans have gotten rid of them,
as Time Warner did in 1991.
***
Q
How long must I keep financial
records for tax purposes? —
R.B., Adrian, Mich.
A
Keep copies of all your
tax returns forever. Keep
canceled checks, bank statements
and receipts for at least three
years, ideally seven — printing
out copies if you receive them
electronically. (Hang on
to checks related to next
year’s tax return for an
extra year.)
Retain stock trade confirma-
tion receipts and statements for as
long as you own the stock and for
at least three years (ideally seven)
after you close out your position
(usually by selling).
Keep proof of improvements to
property for at least three years
after the sale of the property.
Keep escrow closing documents
(for both the purchase and sale
of property) for at least three
years (again, ideally seven) after
the property is sold. Think twice
before you throw anything out.
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
— see Write to Us
=ffcËj JZ_ffc
Bankruptcy 101
Companies in or near bankruptcy
may look like can’t-lose investments
due to their often very low prices,
but they’re usually best avoided.
A company typically files for
Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection
only when it’s having trouble paying
its bills and has little choice. Under
Chapter 11, it can continue to oper-
ate while it reorganizes. With any
luck, it will get its act together and
become stronger than before,
as General Motors has done.
If the company cannot gener-
ate enough capital to pay off
its creditors, it will likely end up in
Chapter 7 — getting liquidated.
In Chapter 11, the company
remains in possession of its assets,
under the administration of a court-
appointed trustee. It must file a plan
of reorganization with the bank-
ruptcy court. If any creditors are to
receive less than full value for their
claims, they can vote on the matter.
After the vote, the court can accept
or reject the plan. Thus, the company
has some flexibility, but if it deals
©2012 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK (FOR RELEASE 7/5/2012)
Write to us! Send questions for Ask the Fool, Dumbest (or Smartest)
Investments (up to100 words) and your trivia entries to Fool@fool.comor
via regular mail to The Motley Fool, Foolish Trivia, 2000 Duke St., Alex-
andria, VA 22314. Sorry, we can’t provide individual financial advice.
C M Y K
VIEWS S E C T I O N E
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012
timesleader.com
CAMDEN – SOUTH
CAROLINA politics
never fails to amuse
– and bemuse.
A recent ethics
imbroglio between
Republican Gov.
Nikki Haley and GOP activist John
Rainey is a case in point.
The squabble would be of passing
provincial interest if Haley weren’t a
rising star often mentioned on lists of
potential vice presidential candi-
dates.
And had she not called Rainey, a
nationally recognized philanthropist
and community bridge-builder, a
“racist, sexist bigot.”
Such charges deserve clarification
and context.
Haley made the remarks during a
state House Ethics Committee hear-
ing that was prompted by a com-
plaint Rainey filed alleging that Ha-
ley had lobbied illegally while she
was a legislator. Haley has been clear-
ed of any wrongdoing and there’s no
need to re-litigate here, though Rain-
ey promises that the issue is not
dead.
Meanwhile, her invectives toward
Rainey, though perhaps understan-
dable given an exchange between
them (about which more anon), are
contradicted by his record. Rainey is
anything but racist, sexist or bigoted.
Haley’s feelings apparently had
been hurt during her one meeting
with Rainey while she was a guberna-
torial candidate. She had sought the
meeting, doubtless hoping for fi-
nancial and political support, but
Rainey was skeptical. He knew noth-
ing about her at the time, he told me,
and couldn’t find anyone who did.
Everyone he spoke to said the same
thing in so many words: “I don’t
know anything about her, but I know
she’s the party’s candidate and I sup-
port her.”
“That,” Rainey told me, “is the
kind of thing that makes me want to
throw up.” Party loyalty over all
other considerations is what ails
American politics, he said.
In questioning Haley at the meet-
ing, Rainey indicated that all cards
needed to be on the table, that he
didn’t want to find out at some point
that her family had ties to terrorists.
Haley, who is of Sikh Indian descent,
clearly took offense.
Nevertheless, she wrote a nice note
to him, Rainey said, remarking that
she never showed any indication of
offense during their meeting until he
raised questions about her lobbying
activities. “That was the end of the
meeting,” Rainey said, but his curi-
osity was further piqued. He began
probing her past and raised questions
about what he viewed as ethical
transgressions.
Rainey doesn’t recall making the
specific “terrorist” remark, but takes
the word of others present that he
did. Any such comment, he insists,
would have been in a “jocular, expan-
sive fashion,” rather than mean-spirit-
ed.
Rainey is known to be outspoken
and irreverent, but also as a scrapper
for fairness and reconciliation. Com-
ments offered in jest or offhandedly
nonetheless can be wounding, which
Rainey acknowledges and now has
experienced.
Inarguably, the governor’s charges,
made publicly and aimed at a citizen,
albeit a powerful one, are far more
damaging than whatever Rainey said
during a private meeting. Judge as
you might, but consider the following
facts before accepting Haley’s in-
dictment of Rainey.
For no personal gain, Rainey fre-
quently has raised money and orga-
nized groups in common cause
across party lines. He and wife, Anne,
marched in 2000 with 46,000 others
to protest the Confederate flag,
which then flew atop the South Car-
olina Capitol dome. He personally
hosted several private meetings with
NAACP and legislative leaders to find
a compromise for the flag’s removal.
He served as executive producer
COMMENTARY
K A T H L E E N P A R K E R
Judge based
on deeds,
not words
See PARKER, Page 2E
CAN YOU
say why
America is
the greatest
country in
the world?
The ques-
tion proceeds of course,
from an assumption, i.e.,
that America is, indeed, the
greatest nation on Earth.
When it is posed by a chip-
per college student to Will
McAvoy, the dyspeptic cable
news anchor played by Jeff
Daniels in the new HBO
series “The Newsroom,” he
gores that assumption with
acid glee.
By no standard – or at
least, no standard he cares
to acknowledge – does McA-
voy believe America is still
the world’s greatest nation.
Freedom? That’s hardly
unique, he says, noting that
Canada, the United King-
dom, France, Germany and
Japan are all free. And he
ticks off a number of other
measures – literacy, life
expectancy, math, exports,
infant mortality – by which,
he says, America now lags
much of the world.
Therefore, he says, Amer-
ica is, in fact, not the great-
est nation on the planet.
There is something telling
and true in the crestfallen
expressions with which the
audience greets that declara-
tion. It’s as if someone has
switched off the sun.
America believes in noth-
ing quite so deeply as its
own greatness.
There is something quin-
tessentially us about that
belief. The Japanese, we
might presume, love Japan.
Surely the Canadians feel a
swelling pride at the sight of
their flag and the Spanish
stand a little straighter at
the playing of their national
anthem. But does any other
nation feel the need to so
routinely assure itself and
remind others that it is the
most excellent of them all?
“America,” says Sean Han-
nity with numbing regu-
larity, is “the best, greatest
nation God has ever given
man on the face of the
Earth.” It might be said, that
the seed of American great-
ness lies in the very need to
be great, to raise the foam
index finger and chant
“USA! USA!” – to live up to
our own self-image.
Unfortunately, the seed of
American self-delusion lies
in the same place. To read
the test scores, to watch the
clown show that passes for
TV news, to walk the board-
ed up streets of downtown
Wherever, USA., to talk to a
father about his kids’ future,
is to take the fictional news
anchor’s point:
Namely, that there is
something sad about yelling,
“We’re number one!” when
you are, in fact, not.
But – and a character on
the show reminds McAvoy of
this – we can be, always.
The potential of it lies in
America’s endless capacity
for reinvention, the path to
it in America’s matchless
sense of mission. The nation
always has risen to the chal-
lenge of greatness when it
had a goal, a purpose to
unite behind, a thing to get
done. That is the story of
the Revolution, the Union
victory, the Great Depres-
America the greatest? Not without a mission.
COMMENTARY
LEONARD PI TTS J R.
See PITTS, Page 2E
F
orget that image of a hos-
pice worker sittingnext toa
hospital bed in a dimly lit
room. Today, hospice care is deliv-
ered everywhere from the golf
course tothe casino. As they brace
for the eventual needs of the aging
baby boom generation, hospice
providers are working to diversify
their services and dispel miscon-
ceptions about what they do.
Chief among those myths
is the notion that hospice
consists of friendly visitors
who sit in a darkened room
and hold Grandma’s hand
while she dies, says Robin
Stawasz, family services di-
rector at Southern Tier Hos-
pice and Palliative Care in
upstate New York.
“It’s just not what we do.
We come in and help people
go golfing or go snowbird
down to Florida, or go out to
dinner several nights a
week. We help them get to
the casinos on weekends,”
she said. “This is not getting
ready todie. This is living —
living now, living tomorrow,
making the best possible life
with what you have.”
According to the National
Hospice and Palliative Care
Organization, an estimated
1.58 million patients re-
ceived hospice care from
more than 5,000 programs
nationwide in 2010, more
than double the number of
patients serveda decade ear-
lier. More than 40 percent of
all deaths in the United
States that year were under
the care of hospice, which
provides medical care, pain
management, and emotion-
al and spiritual support to
patients with terminal ill-
nesses.
Both figures have grown
steadily and are expected to
rise as baby boomers — the
“This is not getting ready to die.
This is living — living now, living tomorrow, making the
best possible life with what you have.”
— Robin Stawasz, family services director at Southern Tier Hospice and Palliative Care
AP PHOTO
Liz Murphy sits in her room at the Hospice House in Concord, N.H. As they brace themselves for the eventual needs of the aging baby
boom generation, hospice providers are working to both diversify their services and dispel misconceptions about what they do.
Taking back the
END OF LIFE
With boomers coming, hospice industry diversifies
By HOLLY RAMER Associated Press
See HOSPICE, Page 2E
C M Y K
PAGE 2E SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ V I E W S
TRACE is a unique
two-year workforce
development pilot
program designed
to assist individuals
• If you are 18+, a Luzerne County resident and want to learn
more about how TRACE can help you to successfully enter
the workforce ... schedule to attend an information session.
• Program start date is September 10, 2012
• Contact Karla Porter
at (570) 970-7739, ext. 303/
info@thearcofluzernecounty.org
TRACE is developed with support from the Centers for Medicare and
Medicaid Services (CMS) Medical Infrastructure Grant (CFDA #93.768).
with intellectual and developmental disabilities
and autism to successfully enter the workforce.
7
6
5
1
4
7
One Piece Fiberglass Pools
POOL SALE
S
A
V
E
T
O
$
3
,
0
0
0
NO LINER TO
REPLACE-EVER!
America’s #1
Pool Water Systems
PA# 059809 - www.aqualeisurepoolsandspas.com
185 N. Wilkes-Barre Blvd., Wilkes-Barre • 822-1188
July 10th 2012 – 11:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
July 11th 2012 – 11:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
July 12th 2012 – 11:00a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Hanover Green Elementary
561 Main Road
Hanover Township, Pa. 18706
(570) 824-3941
Kindergarten Registration:
1. Birth Certifcate
2. Immunization Record
3. Proof of Residency
4. Custody/Court Orders that pertain directly to child.
5. Please bring your child to kindergarten registration, they must be present as part of the
enrollment process.
6. Registration will involve initial paperwork for parents to complete, vision/hearing/academics screenings for
each child. The registration process will take approximately an hour.
7. Children must be 5 years old on or before September 1
st
2012 to register for kindergarten.
1
st
- 12
th
Grade Enrollment:
1. Birth Certifcate
2. Immunization
3. Proof of Residency
4. Custody/Court Orders that pertain directly to child.
5. Transcripts/Last Report Card/Grade (Preferred)
Hanover Area School District
Kindergarten & District
(1
st
- 12
th
Grade) Registration
78 million Americans born be-
tween1946 and1964 —get older.
“It’s a complicated time and an
exciting time, but it’s also, in
many ways, going to be a very
daunting time for hospices to try
to find ways to take care of all
these people,” said Donald Schu-
macher, president and CEOof the
national hospice group.
For the vast majority of pa-
tients, hospice means periodic
visits at home froma teamof hos-
pice workers. Amuchsmaller per-
centage receives continuous nurs-
ing care at home or inpatient care
at a hospice house.
Hospice is covered under Medi-
care, Medicaid, and most private
healthinsuranceplans. According
to the National Hospice and Palli-
ative Care Organization, 84 per-
cent of patients receiving hospice
care in 2010 were covered by
Medicare. The vast majority of
those patients received routine
home care — visits from hospice
workers as opposed to around-
the-clock nursing care or inpa-
tient care — and at that level of
care, the Medicare reimburse-
ment was about $126 per day, ac-
cording to the organization.
Medicare covers hospice care if
a doctor determines someone has
fewer than six months to live and
if the patient forgoes any further
life-prolongingtreatment, though
under the new federal health care
overhaul law, it will experiment
with covering both curative and
supportive care at a number of
test sites nationwide.
In the meantime, hospice pro-
grams are growing in number and
scope. Recognizing that people
are living longer and with com-
plex illnesses, they’ve been
branchingout intoother “pre-hos-
pice” areas for patients who are
not terminally ill. For example,
some centers have become certi-
fied as so-called PACE providers,
an acronym that stands for “pro-
gram of all-inclusive care for the
elderly.”
“Hospices are trying to throw a
broader net out to provide servic-
es to people before they become
eligible for hospice,” Schumacher
said.
Another trendis focusingonpa-
tients with specific diagnoses.
While hospices for decades over-
whelmingly cared for people with
cancer, by 2010, cancer diagnoses
had dropped to 36 percent of pa-
tients served, prompting some
centers to develop programs
geared toward heart disease, de-
mentia and other diagnoses.
“We are realizing that while our
roots were really in oncology, that
model is not the best response for
all patients,” Stawasz said. “We
neededto really look againat how
we were doing things. It is not a
one-size-fits-all kind of treatment
plan,” she said.
After working with providers
and patients to figure out where
traditional hospice had been mis-
sing the mark, Stawasz’s agency
launched its specialized program
for patients who have suffered
heart failure in 2009. While
there’s usually a clear line be-
tween medical treatment and
comfort care for cancer patients,
things get blurry with other con-
ditions, she said. So the agency
started focusing on the reason be-
hind each service, rather than the
service itself.
“If the real focus is to help
someone stay comfortable, then
that’s hospice, even if it’s tradi-
tionally something a little bit
more aggressive, such as IV anti-
biotics or IV diuretics or that sort
of thing, or hospitalizations,” she
said. “So if the goal is for comfort
and the treatment has a reasona-
ble expectation to provide mea-
ningful comfort, then that’s hos-
pice.”
Though he praises such pro-
grams, one expert in end-of-life is-
sues says the hospice industry
and American society as a whole
are far fromreadyfor the agingba-
by boom generation. Unless car-
ing for people at the end of life be-
comes a larger part of the national
agenda, the rising tide of elders is
bound to result in a flood of un-
met needs, said Dr. Ira Byock, di-
rector of palliative medicine at
New Hampshire’s Dartmouth-
Hitchcock Medical Center.
He points out that while the
number of people using hospice
has grown, the average length of
stay actually dipped slightly in
2010 compared with the previous
year, raising concerns that provid-
ers aren’t reaching patients and
their family caregivers in a timely
manner.
“We often quip that in hospice
care these days, we’re doing
brink-of-death care rather than
end-of-life care,” Byock said.
When it comes to illness, dy-
ing, and death, the American
mindset is “I don’t want to think
about it.” But Byock hopes baby
boomers will “take back” the
end of life in the same way they
took charge of the beginning by
pushing for the natural child-
birth movement and efforts to
bring fathers into the delivery
room.
“It was driven by the boomers
as citizens and consumers; it
was an advocacy movement. A
very similar thing needs to hap-
pen now,” he said.
Hospice workers say they are
more ready than other health
care providers to deal with baby
boomers and whatever changes
health care reform brings be-
cause they’ve been working
with limited budgets for years.
“We’ve been meeting that
triple threat of providing bet-
ter care with higher patient
satisfaction for less money,”
Stawasz said. “I think hospice
is perhaps standing as a model
for others as we are dealing
with the challenges of the in-
creased needs that baby boom-
ers represent.”
Laurie Farmer of the Concord
Regional Visiting Nurse Associ-
ation agrees. And she adds that
hospice is all about providing
individualized care, something
that baby boomers likely will
demand.
“The baby boom generation
comes as very educated con-
sumers, and so we are feeling
that we have been meeting that
challenge,” she said.
At age 70, Liz Murphy, of
Deerfield, N.H., is a fewyears ol-
der than the oldest baby boom-
ers. But like many of the baby
boomers served by the Concord
hospice program, she did her
homework before deciding sev-
eral weeks ago to move into the
program’s hospice house.
Murphy, a longtime State-
house lobbyist, was found sev-
eral years ago to have an ex-
tremely rare cancer of the con-
nective tissue that settled main-
ly in her bones but also has
spread to her brain, liver and
other organs. She started con-
sidering hospice after a spate of
surgeries just weeks apart re-
sulted in no improvements.
Murphy said she knew where
the hospice house was, but be-
yond that, knew little about it
before she started looking into
it. But once she did, she made
her decision quickly.
“I talked it through with my
husband and my children and
anybody else who I thought
would have an interest in it, and
I feel as though I got informa-
tion from as many people as I
needed. I came and looked at it,
and I’m very happy with it,” she
said.
“It’s been great. I love the
place. I’ve been very fortunate
that the people who are here are
people who are happy to work
with me, and are interested in
working together with my fam-
ily, my husband and me to give
us the program we’re interested
in.”
HOSPICE
Continued from Page
“I love the place. I’ve been very fortunate that the people who are here are
people who are happy to work with me, and are interested in working together with
my family, my husband and me to give us the program we’re interested in.”
— Liz Murphy, who lives at the Hospice House in Concord, N.H.
sion, the Second World War,
the Marshall Plan, the Ber-
lin airlift, the Civil Rights
Movement, the moon land-
ing.
So what is our mission
now? What is the goal to-
ward which we strive in
2012? And therein lies the
problem: you don’t know
either, do you? Bill Clinton
did mention something
about a bridge to some-
where or other. George W.
Bush was handed a mission
– fighting terrorism – on a
golden tray and bungled it.
President Obama, unlike
candidate Obama, has yet to
articulate a goal that excites
and unites.
Like a knife’s blade, great-
ness requires a whetstone to
sharpen itself against. No
whetstone presents itself in
a nation where, as McAvoy
notes, people define them-
selves by who they voted
for in the last election, a
nation whose depth of divi-
sion and lack of unifying
principle now poison the
very air, a nation where, to
speak of greatness is, in-
creasingly, to speak of histo-
ry.
But what of the future?
That will require mission
and purpose, the realization
that who we are is bound up
in the things – audacious
and spectacular things – we
come together to get done.
We ought to spend more
time deciding what those
things will be, and less
reassuring ourselves of our
own wonderfulness.
True greatness, after all,
is not declared. It is
achieved.
PITTS
Continued from Page 1E
Leonard Pitts Jr., winner of the
2004 Pulitzer Prize for com-
mentary, is a columnist for the
Miami Herald, 1 Herald Plaza,
Miami, FL 33132. Readers may
write to him via email at
lpitts@miamiherald.com.
and raised funds to finance
Bud Ferillo’s documentary
“Corridor of Shame” about
the dismal condition of pub-
lic schools along the I-95
corridor through South Car-
olina. Candidate Barack
Obama visited one of those
schools and cited the corri-
dor in campaign speeches.
In 1999, Rainey chaired the
fundraising committee for
the African-American History
Monument on Statehouse
grounds. In 2002, while
chairman of Brookgreen
Gardens, he raised funds to
erect a World War I dough-
boy statue in Columbia’s
Memorial Park and spon-
sored a bust of a 54th Mas-
sachusetts Infantry African-
American soldier. He re-
ceived the sixth annual I.
DeQuincey Newman Human-
itarian Award in 2004, named
for the United Methodist
minister and first African-
American elected to the
South Carolina Senate fol-
lowing Reconstruction.
Latest to the roster is a
sculpture Rainey has com-
missioned honoring two
Camden natives, financier
Bernard Baruch and baseball
great Larry Doby. Baruch
was a philanthropist, states-
man and consultant to presi-
dents (Woodrow Wilson and
Franklin D. Roosevelt). Doby
was the first African-Amer-
ican in the American League
and was inducted into the
National Baseball Hall of
Fame in 1998.
The sculpture, which will
be unveiled next April, is a
monument not only to two
local heroes, but also to the
sort of reconciliation Rainey
represents. His record speaks
louder than words.
PARKER
Continued from Page 1E
Kathleen Parker’s email address
is kathleenparker@washpost.com.
K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3E
➛ S E RV I NG T HE P UB L I C T RUS T S I NC E 1 8 81
Editorial
“We should all bet on the country,
but we shouldn’t double down on
Barack Obama.”
TimPawlenty
The former Minnesota governor, and potential
Republican vice presidential nominee, trailed
President Obama’s campaign through Ohio last week, contending the
country can’t afford four more years of ineffective economic recovery
efforts.
THE BAND broke up.
We hit the final chord.
We heard sweet applause.
And then, after 20 years
together, we walked away.
There was no fighting.
No “musical differences.”
You need to be musical to have musical
differences.
We were not really musical.
We were writers. Novelists. Memoirists.
Humorists. Stephen King was in the band.
So was Matt Groening, who created “The
Simpsons.” So was Amy Tan, Dave Barry,
Ridley Pearson, Scott Turow, Greg Iles, Roy
Blount Jr., James McBride – many others
over the years.
We were called the Rock Bottom Remain-
ders, and when they write the penultimate
history of rock ’n’ roll, we will not be in it.
Not even a footnote. But we performed all
over the country and we brought people to
their feet, even if those feet were headed
toward the door.
We sang old rock ’n’ roll, stuff from the
1950s and ’60s. We played it on guitars, bass,
guitars, keyboards, more guitars, and when I
say “played,” I mean we moved our hands
around in the way that real musicians do
when they are making, you know, music.
Only with us, the discussions went like this:
“Hey, what key were we just in?”
“A.”
“Oh. That explains it.”
But we laughed. We made feedback. We
broke strings. We dressed in costumes. Tan
wore a dominatrix outfit for “These Boots
Are Made for Walkin’” that would make
“Fifty Shades of Grey” turn 50 shades of red.
I donned a gold lamé jacket and did a very
bad Elvis Presley imitation, wearing a wig
whose sideburns, by the end, more closely
resembled a Hasidic rabbi’s than the King’s.
We played for charity, and our audiences
were charitable. They laughed. They sang
along. We filled nightclubs and ballrooms
and outdoor stages. Now and then, someone
would throw underwear. Sometimes it was
men’s underwear. Once, a Stephen King fan
lit her fingernails on fire.
Over the years, some real musicians
hopped on stage with us. Bruce Springsteen.
Darlene Love. Judy Collins. Lesley Gore.
Warren Zevon was a frequent member. Rog-
er McGuinn toured with us for years. I don’t
know why. Maybe pity.
Or maybe this: It was fun.
And we felt young.
And nobody talked shop.
People form bands for lots of reasons. To
make music, sure. But also to meet girls. To
rebel. To wear Spandex.
We did it, I think, to remember. Lives get
complicated. Fun becomes a luxury. The
Remainders got together each year and, in a
way, it was like summer camp. We left be-
hind the trappings of everyday life. We wore
T-shirts and sneakers. We rode buses. We
curled up and napped in tiny dressing
rooms. We ate pizza at 1 a.m. We sang sim-
ple songs from our youth, with lyrics like,
“Da doo ron ron” and “Papa oom mow
mow.”
We made noise.
It was beautiful noise, the sound of happy
adults not taking themselves too seriously.
Springsteen told us: “You’re not that bad,
but don’t get any better. Otherwise, you’ll
just be another lousy band.” So we aspired
to “lousy.”
That’s OK. We knew our place. As Barry
often said, “We play music as well as Metal-
lica writes novels.” We were not quite a
garage band. More like a shed band.
But life goes on. We used to call ourselves
the ever-expanding band because pretty
much anyone who ever wrote a word wound
up onstage with us. But then Frank
McCourt, who played harmonica, passed
away. And Zevon passed away. King battled
injuries from a terrible accident. Greg Iles
lost a leg.
Then, five weeks ago, the woman who
invented the band, Kathi Kamen Goldmark,
died from breast cancer.
And for the first time, the crowded stage
felt a little empty.
We discussed it. Everyone agreed. The
winds were blowing. The band would end.
We played two final shows recently in
southern California, and fittingly, the clos-
ing number, the easiest song we do – and in
this band, that means pretty damn easy – we
screwed up. It was “Wild Thing.” How do
you screw up “Wild Thing”? We blew the
open, and then Blount was supposed to
sing, “I love you.” Instead, he crooned, “You
love me.”
I think it was the band talking through
him. You love me. We did. Two decades.
Never made a record. And we had a blast.
You think about the groups you join in life,
the ones with instruments and the ones
without, and you’ll conclude what could,
essentially, be an epitaph for the Rock Bot-
tom Remainders; as long as you are in tune
with one another, you don’t really need to be
in tune.
Among friends, we can find a certain kind of harmony
Mitch Albomis a columnist for the Detroit Free
Press. Readers may write to him at: Detroit Free
Press, 600 W. Fort St., Detroit, MI 48226, or via
email at malbom@freepress.com.
COMMENTARY
M I T C H A L B O M
NOTICE TO appear for
jury duty arrives in your
mailbox mixed among
utility bills and advertise-
ments. Printed in dis-
tinctive red and black ink
on folded white paper
stock, it contains questions the answers
to which must be returned to the court
after detaching the notice along a perfo-
rated line for your records.
Jury duty gets a bad rap and for many
people is less popular than a trip to the
dentist. They lament over having been
notified and are determined to escape the
civic responsibility.
Being summoned to become a prospec-
tive juror requires you show up at the
courthouse on consecutive days and oc-
cupy a metal folding chair with no guar-
antee of ever seeing the inside of a cour-
troom.
I remember being called to serve in the
1980s. I had to explain that my work
responsibilities required me to be out of
town for extended periods of time. They
were very understanding. I was never
called again, until May of this year.
There in the mailbox was the official
notice for jury duty bearing my name and
the seal of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania.
According to the notice I was to report to
the Jury Assembly Room on the second
floor of the courthouse, North River
Street in Wilkes-Barre, at 8:30 a.m. on
Monday, June 11, 2012.
Without an excuse, I was prepared to
serve and would make up for the time I
was unable to do so.
I arrived in the Jury Assembly Room at
the appointed hour, equipped with my
newspaper, two sailing magazines and a
large Bakehouse coffee. I was handed a
red and white “juror” badge, signaling to
everyone outside the assembly room that
as prospective jurors we may not engage
in conversation.
Inside, I sat quietly among the other
179 residents of Luzerne County sum-
moned for duty that week. As employees
of the Court Administrator’s Office called
the roll, we completed very detailed
questionnaires helpful to the court and
the attorneys representing their clients at
trial.
President Judge Thomas Burke soon
entered the room to address his audience
of potential jurors. Cloaked in his black
robe and using a wonderful combination
of wisdom, humor and experience, he
spoke of the seriousness of the task be-
fore us, the profound impact our deci-
sions might have on individual lives and
the overriding importance of juries in our
American judicial system.
His flowing robes followed him closely
as he quickly exited the room. The polite
chatter that filled the previous half hour
subsided as the weight of Burke’s words
and the written questions being answer-
ed began to register.
As attorneys, plaintiffs, prosecutors,
defendants, families and judges began to
populate the ornate courtrooms on the
third floor, a presiding judge would ask
for a panel of jurors, 40 people from
which 12 and two alternates were to be
selected to hear a case. Prospective jurors
not selected then returned to the assemb-
ly room and waited to be randomly called
again. And so it went.
Over the course of three days I was
twice part of a panel sent for possible
selection on two civil cases. In each in-
stance, Judge Michael Vough presided
and his knowledge and firm guidance
seemed to command the respect of every-
one present. There, the panel undergoes
further in-depth questioning during voir
dire (speak the truth) as attorneys so
impressive worked deftly to seat a fair
and impartial jury.
I seemed to make it to “the finals” on
each case before being among the last
three eliminated.
No, I wasn’t seated on a jury, but
throughout the process I felt the heavy
responsibility owed to defendants, plain-
tiffs, their superb lawyers, Judge Vough
and our Constitution to be fair and im-
partial.
Tomorrow I’ll check the mailbox again.
So should you. Jury duty is an awesome
experience. Don’t miss it.
Don’t miss the awesome chance to fulfill duty of juror
Kevin Blaum’s column on government, life and
politics appears every Sunday. Contact him at
kblaum@timesleader.com.
KEVIN BLAUM
I N T H E A R E N A
O
LYMPIC DREAMS WILL crystallize, or crumble, lat-
er this month in London as the Games of the XXX
Olympiad get under way. Inspired by the pending ar-
rival of this international sporting contest, we fancied
in what athletic event each of the following individuals or
things would compete – were they so gifted with the talent.
• Gov. Mitt Romney, the presumptive Republican nominee
for president.
Fencing. He seems perpetually en garde and poised to stick it
to his opponent at every opportunity. But he’s way too refined
for boxing.
• The city of Scranton, which this month reportedly lacks
enough money to pay its employees more than minimumwage.
Diving. It spends most of its time underwater.
•Wilkes-Barre Mayor TomLeighton, who recently admitted
to frequenting the city’s fuel tanks without ever logging how
much he dispensed into his personal vehicle.
Marathon. This guy never runs out of gas.
• Wilkes-Barre Parking Authority members, whose recent
closed-door meeting with the mayor apparently will trigger a
sequence of events leading to the removal of certain members
andpossible reorganizationof the city’s parkingassets: garages,
meters and lots
Water polo. You know there’s lots of bruising action taking
place in the pool; but most of it occurs belowthe surface, out of
public view.
• Laureen Cummings, the little-known Republican candi-
date for U.S. Senate in Pennsylvania’s 17th Congressional Dis-
trict, who faced no opponent in the primary.
Equestrian. She’ll need lots of cash just to compete.
•Wilkes-Barre City Council, some of whose current and for-
mer members were in the spotlight earlier this year for collect-
ing generous, taxpayer-funded meal allowances (sans receipts)
after attending conferences.
Rhythmic gymnastics. Theymight not medal, but whocares?
Pack your bags, dude! Free lodging in London!
• Scranton Mayor Chris Doherty.
Synchronized swimming. When is this guy not treading wa-
ter? (See above: “The city of Scranton.”)
• President Obama.
Triple jump. Health care. Immigration. Jobs. Any one could
trip him up.
• Paige Selenski, 24, a former Luzerne County resident and
Dallas High School alumna.
Field hockey. The real deal. She’s expected to be part of the
squad when it takes on Germany on July 29. Go, USA!
OUR OPINION: MEDAL WORTHY?
Pick contenders
from pretenders
PRASHANT SHITUT
President and CEO/Impressions Media
JOSEPH BUTKIEWICZ
Vice President/Executive Editor
MARK E. JONES
Editorial Page Editor
Editorial Board
QUOTE OF THE DAY
T
HE BIG PHYSICS
news last week was
not the announce-
ment of the Higgs bo-
son, which could explain how
the universe began, but some-
thing closer to home: the
speed of light with which Har-
risburg lawmakers passed 60
bills in their frenzy to make
the governor’s budget dead-
line.
As reported in the Inquirer,
the General Assembly fast-
tracked bills that few mem-
bers actually had time to read.
Some were complex, like a
moratorium on gas drilling in
southeastern Pennsylvania.
More egregiously, they
passed these bills by forgoing
their own rule that prohibits
debate after 11 p.m.
That rule was a cornerstone
in a set of reforms following
the scandal in 2005 over legis-
lative pay raises that effective-
ly were passed in the middle
of the night, with no hearings.
The state’s gaming law also
was the result of such mid-
night madness.
As a result of the public out-
rage over this practice, then-
House Speaker Dennis
O’Brien convened a legisla-
tive reform committee that
held hearings on rules reform
that included rules like the 11
p.m. cutoff, a waiting period
for votes onamendedbills and
more transparency on Senate
and House votes. At the time,
such reforms were called “the
first step down a long road of
restoring faith in govern-
ment.”
That road to reformis clear-
ly on the list of the roads and
bridges in this state that are
overdue for repair. And that
faith in government?
Gov. Tom Corbett cam-
paigned on legislative reform,
and promised to make it a pri-
ority. But aside fromtinkering
around the edges on a few fix-
es, the governor has retreated
from that promise.
Laws that will have impact
on the lives of many Pennsyl-
vanians should not be done at
warp speed, in the middle of
the night, no matter how
much the governor wants to
beat a budget deadline. It’s
time to push for real reform –
and real respect for the peo-
ple.
Philadelphia Daily News
OTHER OPINION: PA. LEGISLATURE
Fast-track gov’t
leaves us in dark
An company
C M Y K
PAGE 4E SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ V I E W S
Please call Anne 570.823.2191 ext. 148, or email at
anne.lenahan@wbymcs.org for details.
The John A. McCole &
Connie Umphred
Charity Golf Classic
will be held
Monday, July 16th, 2012
at the
Wyoming Valley Country
Club, Wilkes-Barre.
Proceedes send
underprivileged children to
the summer camp program
at the Wilkes-Barre
Family YMCA
SPONSOR A CAMPER
• One (1) week Day Camp at Frances Slocum
State Park @ $100/camper
• One (1) week Day Camp at Camp Kresge @ $100/camper
• One (1) week Sleep-Awasy Camp at Camp Kresge
@ $350/camper
CONSIDER A DAY OF GOLF!
• Captain & Crew or Callaway Format
• 11:00 AM Start (Ind. Scoring System)
• FEE: $170.00 per golfer (Soft Spikes A MUST!)
Entry Fee Includes Green Fee, Cart, and Lunch & Refreshments
on the Course, Cocktail Hour, and Dinner & Prizes
TOURNAMENT LIMITED TO (32) FOURSOMES
PLEASE REGISTER EARLY
Proudly Made in the U.S.A.
Veteran
Owned
Business
PLUS
many unadvertised specials to choose from! pp
FINANCING AVAILABLE!!! O.A.C.
HARDWOOD
FLOORING!
NO-WAX VINYL
FLOORING!
Financing Plans Available To Fit Any Budget!
431 Market Street, Kingston
Store Hours: Mon., Wed., 9 a.m.–6 p.m. Thur. 9 a.m.–8 p.m.
Tue., Fri. 9 a.m.–5 p.m. • Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m.
570-287-4354
Yes, Jared and Jeff...there’s no need to worry and Mom, you don’t have to
worry either, because this carpet is made of 100% Mohawk SmartStrand SILK
fiber. We know the stains will be removed or we’ll pay for the carpet.
• Lifetime Stain Resistance Warranty
• Lifetime Soil Resistance Warranty
• Lifetime Full Pet Warranty
• Lifetime Anti-Static Warranty
• 25Year Abrasive Wear Warranty
• 25Year Texture Retention Warranty
• 25Year Fade Resistance Warranty
• 25Year Manufacturing Defects Warranty
• 60 Day Satisfaction Warranty
See Us Today and View
The Best New Carpets Around.
Even the choosiest experts will agree that carpets made
from SmartStrand fibers are the sofest around.
They’re so soft and luxurious, Plus they’re strong enough
to take all the abuse even 2 rhinoceroses can dish out!!
SmartStrand has all the best warranties available!!
$
2
49
SALE!
sq. ft.
TEXTURED
Durable
Styling In
Many
Up-To-Date
Colors!
FREIZE
A Highly
Twisted Fiber
In Many
Decorative
Colors!
$
3
59
SALE!
sq. ft.
MULTI-TONE
A Perfect
Mix Of Colors
And Styles!
$
2
29
SALE!
sq. ft.
PRINTED
Add Design
To Your Room
With This
Beautiful
Printed Carpet!
$
3
29
SALE!
sq. ft.
SAXONY-PLUSH
Perfect For
Any Room
In Your
Home!
$
2
99
SALE!
sq. ft.
$
3
99
SALE!
sq. ft.
THICKPLUSH
A Beautiful
Carpet
Constructed
For Elegance!
PINDOT
Contemporary
Styling
and
Colorations!
$
1
79
SALE!
sq. ft.
NEW MOHAWK
1 YEAR SAME AS
CASH AVAILABLE
Two Words Bro...
Diaper
Rash!!
I know it’s the only
thing thats softer than
my behind!!
HE HE HE
Hey Jeff!
How do you like this
hot weather?
Thank God Dad got
this new carpet!
SmartStrand SILK!
OH BOY!
MOHAWKSMARTSTRAND
TEXTUREDSILK
$
3
39
SALE!
sq. ft.
S.A.
SAXONY
$
1
99
SALE!
sq. ft.
A Great Carpet At
A Great Price!
TL edit ignores
school tax reality
T
hank you, Gov. Tom Cor-
bett! No new taxes in the
just-passed state budget.
However, the editorial writ-
ers at The Times Leader don’t
see it that way.
The Times Leader’s July 1
editorial states, “But the
school boards either can’t or
won’t (find ways to further
reduce their districts’ expens-
es).”
This is referring to the local
school boards that have the
responsibility to maintain
fiscal integrity/reality but
have failed miserably, especial-
ly in the Pittston Area district
where I reside.
Our board raised our taxes
2.4 percent.
Now, Mr. TL Editor, did the
Pittston Area board, as you
say, have any other choice,
hmmm? Let’s see. How about
some of the benefits that the
teachers/administrators re-
ceive and couldn’t, or
wouldn’t, or won’t be touched
by the school board?
By the way, the vote was
9-0.
Gee, do you think the aver-
age taxpayer in Pittston Area
knows that if a teacher turns
down the family plan health
benefit package because he or
she already has health cov-
erage, that teacher gets
$11,000 a year just because he
said no. That’s $917 per
month.
Do they know that a 30-year
teacher, just because he or she
retired, gets a parting gift of
$30,000 spread over five
years?
Administrators get a whop-
ping 70 percent of their final
salary just because they re-
tired.
These benefits would make
a porn star blush. Mr. TL
Editor, look around. People
are really hurting with job
prospects nonexistent and
minimal health care coverage
a daily struggle, and you seem
to defend the Pittston Area
board? Wow.
You should apologize, and
the entire Pittston Area
School Board should resign.
Frank Sciabacucchi
Pittston Township
Healthy solution?
Affordable care
I
have a question for the
politicians and all those
people cheering the Su-
preme Court decision uphold-
ing “Obamacare”: Has it oc-
curred to you that the reason
so many Americans lack
health insurance is that they
cannot afford the premiums?
The most obnoxious provi-
sion of “Obamacare” is the
individual mandate, which
forces everyone to buy health
insurance coverage from pri-
vate carriers. It is a huge gift
from the politicians to the
insurance companies.
I was laid off from my job in
November. I had to dump my
COBRA coverage when it
became a choice between
having health insurance or
having a roof over my head
and food on my table. Those
$430 monthly premiums (sin-
gle man living alone with no
dependents) could buy a lot of
groceries and pay a lot of
utility bills.
Or would the “Obamacare”
supporters have me eating cat
food in the dark?
The rallying cry of the Re-
publican Party is the repeal of
“Obamacare.” Lest the Repub-
licans become too self-righ-
teous here, might I remind
them that their darling boy,
Mitt Romney, pushed through
an “Obamacare”-type law,
including an individual man-
date, when he was governor of
Massachusetts?
If this country is to have
universal health care, as most
other developed countries do,
we need to go to a single-
payer system. How do we pay
for it?
How about ending the war
in Afghanistan, ending all
foreign aid, especially to such
so-called “allies” as Pakistan,
and bringing our troops home
from Germany and all the
many other countries where
they do not belong, and then
using the money saved to pay
for universal health care?
Philip E. Galasso
Shickshinny
Coal still kingly
resource for U.S.
I
am writing to thank U.S.
Senate candidate Tom
Smith for his June 11 com-
mentary (“Job-killing regu-
lations are hiking your electric
bill”) that shed light on the
Environmental Protection
Agency’s war against coal.
No other fuel in America is
as abundant or affordable as
coal. Pennsylvania relies on
coal to power 2.7 homes and
145,000 businesses. As far as
jobs are concerned, coal pro-
duction employs 52,000 peo-
ple statewide, with a com-
bined payroll of $3.5 billion
annually.
However, the EPA has plans
to force utilities to cut back on
coal use.
In these economic times, we
have to be conscious of the
looming potential energy
crisis. If the EPA continues to
succeed with its plans, we will
see increased electricity prices
and thousands of layoffs.
Recently, U.S. Sen. Bob
Casey, along with 53 law-
makers in Washington, voted
to continue the harsh regu-
lations being implemented on
coal by the EPA. Senator
Casey’s vote is a vote against
the most reliable way to gener-
ate electricity and create jobs
for Pennsylvanians. This is
another example of the Oba-
ma-Casey agenda of overregu-
lation and war on coal.
Our leaders in Washington
must stand strong against the
EPA’s anti-coal regulations to
allow Pennsylvania’s coal
industry to keep providing
jobs and reasonable electricity
costs.
Doug McLinko
Towanda
Mundy challenged
on her tax claims
T
here are a few statements
in state Rep. Phyllis Mun-
dy’s letter (June 24) about
House Bill 1776, the Property
Tax Independence Act, that
need to be challenged.
Representative Mundy
states that HB1776 is “terribly
flawed” but gives no evidence
to support the claim.
HB1776 was conceived in
full cooperation with 72 mem-
ber groups of the grassroots
Pennsylvania Coalition of
Taxpayer Associations and has
been fully vetted by its mem-
bers. I would like to hear spe-
cifically in what way the legis-
lation is flawed.
Representative Mundy was
the person at the HB1776
House Finance Committee
hearings who made a claim of
a $3.5 billion funding gap.
Rep. Jim Cox, the prime spon-
sor of the legislation to elim-
inate school property taxes,
patiently attempted to explain
to Mundy why her number
was incorrect.
All the numbers used to
craft HB1776 were supplied
by the House Appropriations
Committee’s staff and are
accurate.
Representative Mundy
vigorously opposed similar
versions of property tax elim-
ination legislation in the past.
She states she has worked for
property tax relief for 30
years. But her solutions for
property taxes have failed.
Could Representative Mun-
dy’s sudden shift to nominally
support HB1776 be due to
having a challenger for her
seat who pledges to work for
enactment of HB1776?
Time for a change. Vote
Aaron Kaufer for state repre-
sentative.
Therese Mistretta
West Wyoming
Real solutions for
real problems
S
oon after Rev. Michael
Brewster of Mount Zion
Baptist Church comment-
ed about the shooting death of
local youth Tyler Winstead –
appealing to God to stop the
violence in this community
and talking about “employ
(ing) the weapon of uncondi-
tional and radical love for
humanity” – I called these
comments vapid and a failure
because they did not offer
earthly solutions to earthly
problems.
As an atheist, and more
specifically a humanist, I view
these comments as contrib-
uting nothing to combat very
real problems that ought to be
addressed by human action.
Humanists and atheists
don’t look to “supernatural
solutions” for earthly prob-
lems, but rather look to earth-
ly solutions for earthly prob-
lems. Real action from people
on their feet, rather than those
in prayerful kneeling, is re-
quired for change. We find no
good reason to believe that
prayer solves any problems or
that any gods – if they exist –
intervene in human affairs.
It is wonderful that Rev.
Brewster recently has taken
action by holding community
meetings in conjunction with
the “Building Bridges” initia-
tive. It seems that many peo-
ple in this community have
realized that prayer is not
sufficient to deal with our
earthly problems.
For those who believe that
God only helps those who
help themselves, it seems
evident that people helping
themselves can’t be distin-
guished from God helping
people. And we all know
which one is the more reason-
able explanation.
Justin Vacula
Exeter
Client happy with
cited nail salon
T
wo very fine women run a
nail salon in Wilkes-Barre,
at which I have been a
customer for quite a number
of years.
Recently, The Times Leader
printed an article relating to
information provided from the
Pennsylvania Department of
State that indicated this small
business “practiced nail tech-
nology in a grossly incompe-
tent and/or unethical man-
ner.”
I would like to bring to your
attention that this incident
occurred more than a year
ago, and it has not deterred
me from remaining a faithful
customer.
The salon was undergoing a
facelift, as provided by the
owner of the building, which
included replacing the door
and windows. Prior to that,
the front window displayed
quite well that, in fact, this
business was known as “Get
Nailed.” Was this fact taken
into consideration by the
inspector?
Second, the tool that alleg-
edly was utilized supposedly
had been purchased at a local
beauty-supply business, which
sells only to licensed cosme-
tologists. Has that business
been cited?
It is my opinion as a cus-
tomer of this newspaper for
years that it should now do a
positive story on this small
business and the two lovely
women who run it!
Edie Williams
Wilkes-Barre
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and
daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
ers to one published letter every 30 days.
• Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
• Fax: 570-829-5537
• Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA1871 1
SEND US YOUR OPINION
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 5E
➛ V I E W S
THOUGH
overshadowed
by the shock-
ing Supreme
Court deci-
sion on health
care, the
court’s Arizo-
na immigration decision, is-
sued three days earlier, remains
far more significant than appre-
ciated.
It generally was viewed as
mixed or ambiguous because
the Justice Department suc-
ceeded in striking down three
of the law’s provisions. Howev-
er, regarding the law’s central
and most controversial element
– requiring officers to inquire
into the immigration status of
anyone picked up for some
other violation – the ruling was
unanimous.
Not a single justice found
merit in the administration’s
claim that this “show me your
papers” provision constituted
an impermissible pre-emption
of federal authority.
On what grounds unconstitu-
tional? Presumably because
officials would be asking about
the immigration status of all,
rather than adhering to the
federal enforcement priorities
regarding which illegal im-
migrants would not be subject
to deportation.
Under the Obama adminis-
tration’s newly promulgated
regulations, there’ll be no more
deportation of young people
brought here illegally as chil-
dren. Presumably, the Arizona
law is invalid because an officer
might be looking into the sta-
tus of a young person the feds
now classify as here legally.
Beyond being logically ridic-
ulous – if a state law is uncon-
stitutional because it’s out of
sync with the federal govern-
ment’s current priorities, does
it become constitutional again
when federal policy changes? –
this argument is “an astound-
ing assertion of federal exec-
utive power,” wrote Justice
Samuel Alito in a concurrence.
The Obama Justice Depart-
ment is suggesting that “a state
law may be pre-empted, not
because it conflicts with a
federal statute or regulation,
but because it is inconsistent
with a federal agency’s current
enforcement priorities. Those
priorities, however, are not law.
They are nothing more than
agency policy.”
And there’s the rub: the
Obama administration’s in-
ability to distinguish policy
from law. This becomes partic-
ularly perverse regarding im-
migration when, as Justice
Antonin Scalia points out,
what the administration del-
icately calls its priorities is
quite simply a determination
not to enforce the law as
passed.
Consider this breathtaking
cascade: An administration
violates its constitutional duty
to execute the law by deliber-
ately refusing to enforce it. It
then characterizes its non-
enforcement as simply estab-
lishing priorities. It then tries
to strike down a state law on
immigration on the grounds
that it contradicts federal law –
by actually trying to enforce it!
The logic is circular, ox-
ymoronic and the very defini-
tion of executive overreach.
During the Bush-43 years, we
were repeatedly treated to
garment-rending about the
imperial presidency, to major
hyperventilation about the
“unitary executive.” Yet the
current administration’s impe-
riousness has earned little
comparable attention.
Perhaps because Obama has
been so ineffective. It’s hard to
call someone imperial who’s
failed so consistently. Or may-
be not. You can surely be impe-
rial and unsuccessful.
Regardless of results, howev-
er, Obama’s presumption is
Olympian. He takes America
into a war in Libya with United
Nations approval, but none
from Congress. Yet that awful
Bush had the constitutional
decency to twice seek and gain
congressional approval before
he initiated hostilities.
The U.S. Department of
Health and Human Services
issues “Obamacare” regula-
tions treading so heavily on the
free-exercise rights of Catholic
institutions that Obama’s own
allies rebel. The new regulation
concocted to tame the fire-
storm blithely orders private
insurers to provide free contra-
ceptives to employees of the
objecting religious institutions.
And now immigration. Oba-
ma adopts a policy of major
non-enforcement of the im-
migration law – a variant of the
very DREAM Act he could not
get through even a Democratic
Congress – and promulgates it
unilaterally, while his Justice
Department claims the right to
invalidate state laws that might
in some way impinge on that
very non-enforcement.
The GOP presidential cam-
paign centers on the ineffec-
tiveness of this administration:
failure at home, passivity
abroad. A fine electoral strate-
gy. But as citizens we should
be grateful. Given the adminis-
tration’s extravagant ambitions,
incompetence is its saving
grace.
Obama’s egregious
executive overreach
COMMENTARY
C H A R L E S
K R A U T H A M M E R
Charles Krauthammer’s email
address is letters@charleskrauth-
ammer.com.
T
he finale’s concussions not yet faded
reverberate still in the inner ear,
leaving one to wonder whether
the light show continues –
boom-boom-boom, vroom-vroom, vroom
– as we go gently streaming
through the taillights’ red glare.
ANOTHER VIEW
A photograph by Don Carey and
words by Mark E. Jones
I SAW an as-
tounding poll
result that 41
percent of
Americans had
no idea the
Supreme Court
had made an
important ruling last month on
health care.
This concurs with other stud-
ies that say more than 60 per-
cent of Americans know little or
nothing about what is con-
tained in the Affordable Care
Act, or “Obamacare.”
And then it hit me.
The problem in America isn’t
the progressive version of
health care, or the conservative
version of health care, it is the
“I don’t care” version of being
an American.
I am an American progres-
sive. But I respect conservatives
who believe that their path is
the best road ahead. And I real-
ly respect independents, people
who make the effort to see the
different sides of an issue and
then judge what they believe is
best for our country.
But I have no respect for
people who just don’t care. To
me, they have a lot of nerve
calling themselves American. If
you ever have known immi-
grants to America, whether
they be our own parents or
grandparents, or new immi-
grants, they yearn for the self-
governance that America has to
offer. It is a disgrace that Amer-
icans who have been born into
this great legacy do not have
the decency to be informed, to
care.
Of course, they have a “right”
not to care. And I have a right
not to respect them.
It is because of selfish Amer-
icans such as these that the
leading category targeted by
politicians today is the “unin-
formed” voter.
It is because of these people
that our political dialogue has
been lowered to the level of an
amoeba.
It is because of careless
Americans that powerful forces
can take the tragedy of Sept. 11,
2001 and invade a country that
had nothing to do with it.
It is because of the intellec-
tually numb that we can ignore
science and the destruction of
our environment and that legis-
lators can remove from our
dialogue phrases such as “rising
sea levels” and “global warm-
ing.”
It is because of the perpetu-
ally vacuous that international
bankers, nothing more than
glorified criminals, can take
billions of dollars in salaries and
bonuses in the same year that
they nearly destroyed the
world’s financial system. Simi-
larly, it is because of the un-
concerned that the top 1 per-
cent of Americans, an insulated
oligarchy, is allowed to control
90 percent of its assets.
It is the careless who allow
Neanderthals in Congress to
question a woman’s use of con-
traception under the guise of
“freedom of religion.”
It is because of the disen-
gaged that a Supreme Court can
make a ruling such as Citizens
United that is infecting our
politics with legalized bribery
of historic proportions.
It is because of those derelict
in their duty as citizens, who
dare to call themselves “adults”
– the people who can name all
of the Kardashian sisters but
can’t tell you how many mem-
bers are in the U.S. Senate –
that the Senate can misuse the
filibuster rule to thwart major-
ity rule in the U.S. Congress.
It is because of the growing
ranks of crass, self-absorbed
Americans that 40 million peo-
ple don’t have health coverage;
that 23 percent of children in
America are living in poverty
and that our educational system
continues to crumble.
So happy Independence week
to all you liberal, conservative,
libertarian and independent
Americans who care enough
about your country to care.
The rest of you really don’t
deserve the title of American.
If you don’t care, don’t call yourself an American
JOHN WATSON
C O M M E N T A R Y
John Watson is the former editor of
the Sunday Dispatch in Pittston. He
lives in Seattle. Contact him via email
at jwatson@timesleader.com.
It is because of those derelict
in their duty as citizens, who
dare to call themselves
“adults” – the people who can
name all of the Kardashian
sisters but can’t tell you how
many members are in the U.S.
Senate – that the Senate can
misuse the filibuster rule to
thwart majority rule in the U.S.
Congress.
IF Pennsylvanians
have learned anything
from the Jerry Sand-
usky pedophilia case
it’s this: When adults
suspect child sexual
abuse and don’t take
action, it is children
who pay the unthinkable price.
So, as millions point the finger at
Penn State University and vent their
outrage to co-workers over inmate
Sandusky, many people also are asking
themselves, “Do I know any child who
might be a victim of abuse, a child
who needs help right now?”
To ask that question is to contem-
plate a heroic act: lifting an unbearable
weight from a child’s shoulders and
stepping in to be a protector.
Once we’ve examined our lives and
cleared our own consciences, there’s
another question every citizen has a
moral right to ask: “Does my govern-
ment know about any children who
are being hurt and need to be rescued
right now?”
The answer to that question is yes.
Shortly after the Sandusky case
made national headlines, I was con-
tacted by a young woman in my dis-
trict named Alicia Kozakiewicz. At age
13, Alicia was abducted from her Pitts-
burgh home by a child predator and
held for four days. Alicia said she was
alive today only because law enforce-
ment zeroed in on evidence coming
from the house where she was held
captive. They tracked that evidence
back through the Internet to her loca-
tion, freeing Alicia from a basement
dungeon.
Here’s what else Alicia told me:
There are thousands of Pennsylvania
children suffering sexual abuse, and
law enforcement is in possession of
electronic evidence that could lead
directly to their locations. Yet, no
rescue is on the way, because Penn-
sylvania law enforcement is criminally
overwhelmed and underfunded.
If Alicia was right, the Penn State
scandal would pale in comparison.
Alicia and her group, PROTECT, were
telling me that Pennsylvania officials
were failing to act on thousands of
suspected child predators.
My office, together with state Rep.
Mike Sturla, D-Lancaster, began in-
vestigating these charges, and what
we found was shocking.
A national law enforcement nerve
center called Round Up was patrolling
the Internet (just as Alicia’s rescuers
had done), identifying thousands of
criminal suspects a day who were
trafficking in video and photos of chil-
dren being raped, tortured and abused.
Round Up is a national treasure. It has
helped law enforcement investigators
in all 50 states identify and arrest
thousands of child predators.
Every trafficker in the Round Up
database is a dangerous criminal sus-
pect, of course. But an estimated one
in three is a hands-on abuser.
Here was the biggest surprise. The
Round Up national nerve center is
hosted on the computer servers of the
Pennsylvania State Police.
How many Pennsylvania child pred-
ator suspects might be in the Round
Up database? Congressional testimo-
ny, national law enforcement esti-
mates and reports from Round Up
itself indicate the number of unique
suspects in Pennsylvania can be con-
servatively placed between 5,000 and
20,000.
One is too many.
More alarming, we know from arrest
and prosecution data that most of
these suspects are never arrested or
prosecuted. Worse, large numbers of
suspects are never even referred to
local law enforcement agencies, leav-
ing child-sexual predators at large in
communities.
Thanks to Alicia, 37 state House
members from both parties have
joined me in introducing the Attorney
General Mandated Reporter Act, legis-
lation that would require the attorney
general, or the Pennsylvania Internet
Crimes Against Children Task Force
should she delegate it, to report child
predator suspects seen online to local
law enforcement agencies right away,
unless they are being actively investi-
gated.
The bill, to be known as “Alicia’s
Law,” also would provide funding to
train local law enforcement agencies
in this most dangerous of all cyber-
crimes, focusing their efforts on first-
responder activities that might identi-
fy child victims.
Since its introduction in April, Al-
icia’s Law has been bottled up in com-
mittee, and House leaders have re-
fused to hold hearings. Every day the
House leadership delays is another day
that help won’t reach children in peril.
The next time you hear someone
rage against those who kept Sand-
usky’s secret, please remember Alicia
and the children she wants to save
today. I hope that every Pennsylvania
resident will join me in demanding
urgent action to pass and fund Alicia’s
Law.
Is Pennsylvania failing to act on thousands of suspected child predators?
COMMENTARY
S T A T E R E P . D A N
D E A S Y
State Rep. Dan Deasy is a Democrat repre-
senting portions of Allegheny County. For
information, visit www.pahouse.com/deasy.
1. The Attorney General shall notify local
law enforcement agencies electronically,
or by alternate means if that is not pos-
sible, within 24 hours of a suspect being
identified with child abuse video or imag-
es in their district.
2. The Attorney General shall devote such
staff and resources as are necessary to
assist the Pennsylvania Internet Crimes
Against Children Task Force and the Penn-
sylvania State Police in accessing and
providing this data from existing law
enforcement deconfliction databases,
such as the RoundUp system.
3. The Attorney General shall devote such
staff and resources as are necessary to
assist local jurisdictions in conducting
investigations, forensic analysis, child
victim identification and prosecution in
cases arising from this reporting.
Source: Website of PROTECT and the
National Association to Protect Children,
www.protect.org.
A L I C I A’ S L AW P R O V I S I O N S
C M Y K
PAGE 6E SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ V I E W S
Aspire Hvac-r
Po Box 36
Glen Lyon Pa 18617
John P. Russell
jraspire@gmail.com
570.736.HVAC
(4822)
Plumbing Heating Cooling Specialists
Now doing septic systems
sewer and water mains!
Ductless A/C $79.00 per month
JACK CROSSIN
Real Estate Inc.
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
Jay Crossin, Broker
jcross224@aol.com
Selling Your Home?
CALL US FIRST!
Our team is dedicated to giving you
THE BEST POSSIBLE SERVICE
at the LOWEST COST TO YOU!
CALL TODAY! YOU WILL BE GLAD YOU DID!
• Real Estate Sales • Appraisals • Insurance
7
6
4
6
1
1
570-675-3378
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
MIRRA
DRYWALL
7
6
6
0
0
9
Teach flag thieves
to show respect
I
’m writing in regard to the
recent article about thefts of
American flags from a Viet-
nam War Memorial in Ply-
mouth (“Valor dishonored,”
July 3).
These people, when caught,
should be taught respect for
the flag. Draft them into the
Army for three years. They
will learn respect in basic
training, and – after a few
tours of duty in Afghanistan –
they proudly will carry the
flag.
My hat’s off to Clyde Peters
and the American Legion for
doing a great job.
Roger Lane
Mount Pocono
Leighton deserves
balanced coverage
I
am writing in response to
your editorial regarding
Wilkes-Barre Mayor Tom
Leighton’s involvement in the
proposed leasing of the city’s
parking facilities (“City park-
ing plan seems a real wreck,”
June 27).
The city, like many small
and mid-sized cities in the
Northeast, has a shrinking tax
base, increased health care
costs and unsustainable pen-
sion benefit obligations.
Unlike proprietary enter-
prises, municipalities, because
of contractual obligations,
can’t reduce costs by simply
reducing the workforce, re-
quiring a larger contribution
from employees for health
care or eliminating benefits.
I believe the mayor deserves
credit for trying to come up
with a creative solution to
solve the financial problems of
the city.
Instead of an analysis of the
financial validity of the plan,
your coverage focused on the
professional fees of Fox Roth-
schild and former city admin-
istrator J.J. Murphy. I assume
Mr. Murphy and Fox Roth-
schild presented engagement
letters to the Parking Author-
ity enumerating services and
fees. Apparently the authority,
or at least some of its mem-
bers, took issue with Mr. Mur-
phy’s and Fox Rothschild’s
fees. The mayor did not en-
gage either Fox Rothschild or
Mr. Murphy; the Parking
Authority did.
In the future I would hope
for more balanced coverage of
Mayor Leighton. In the in-
terest of full disclosure, the
mayor is a friend of mine.
John Riccetti
Shavertown
Confidentiality
cloaks local gov’t
I
was reading The Times
Leader’s article saying that
Wilkes-Barre might be liable
to pay taxes on the gas for
which it cannot account. The
thing I found most disturbing
is the fact that the investiga-
tion is confidential.
Why is everything regarding
local and county government
considered confidential when
there is a problem?
We, the voters, elect these
people to represent us, and
they hide behind the veil of
confidentiality when some-
thing bad happens. The peo-
ple have a right to know about
anything involving our hard-
earned tax money.
These people get into office
and they are not held account-
able for their actions. When
they do get caught, with their
hand in the proverbial cookie
jar, they resign their offices
and collect big pensions, all
provided by the taxpayers.
After that, their buddies
sweep everything under the
rug, and we never really know
what happened.
All we know is that taxes
will be raised to pay for these
people’s greed and misman-
agement of public funds.
These politicians seemingly
think that the money – and
goods purchased with it –
belong to them. It does not; it
belongs to every taxpaying
citizen, and we demand to be
kept abreast of all investiga-
tions and expenditures.
Confidentiality breeds cor-
ruption! When will it all end?
Maybe on Dec. 21.
Richard Geffert
Plymouth
Use your vote
to make difference
I
am glad to see that many
people are going to be cov-
ered for their medical care
with the passage of “Obama-
care.”
I am not glad to see how we
are going to pay for it.
All of us on Medicare are
going to see increases in the
amount the government takes
out of our Social Security
checks every month for our
Medicare premiums. For
many of us, it will mean a lot
less to spend on other essen-
tials. For others, it could be
disastrous.
I never liked the idea of my
government getting into the
insurance business. It was
enough when it took over the
automobile and banking in-
dustries. This has to stop. The
only defense we have is our
ballot. Together we can and
must make a difference.
Our country is on a collision
course with reality. Our econo-
my is in dire straights. Not
only are many people unem-
ployed, but many of those who
are lucky to have a job are
actually under-employed and
barely making ends meet.
Where does it all end?
Together we must send a
message to Washington with
our vote in November. We
have to tell the politicians that
we are tired of being thrown
under the bus. We need an
alternative to “Obamacare.”
If you are not registered to
vote, please do so. If you can
vote, please get out and vote.
Nick Pucino
Nanticoke
Devious GOP plot
hurting our nation
A
month ago Jeb Bush, the
former Florida governor
and son of President Ge-
orge H.W. Bush, sent a chill
through Republicans when he
asserted that they would no
longer nominate someone like
his father for president. More-
over, he said, they wouldn’t
even select Ronald Reagan.
These former leaders aren’t
conservative enough for to-
day’s Republican Party, he
suggested.
There recently were reports
on several cable news net-
works of a meeting that oc-
curred on the day of Barack
Obama’s inauguration. What
happened at this meeting is
recorded in the prologue of
Robert Draper’s new book,
“Do Not Ask What Good We
Do: Inside the U. S. House of
Representatives.” Fifteen
Republicans (seven congress-
men and five senators, plus
three others) met on the eve-
ning of Jan. 20, 2008. Among
the representatives were de-
vious Eric Cantor, slippery
Kevin McCarthy and conniv-
ing Paul Ryan. Senators in-
cluded demented Jim DeMint,
dull-witted Jon Kyl and adulte-
rous John Ensign. Also on
hand were scheming commu-
nications specialist Frank
Luntz, right-wing “journalist”
Fred Barnes of “The Weekly
Standard” and the hero of past
controversy, omnipresent
Newt Gingrich. (Please par-
don my lack of enthusiasm for
the above characters, but their
deceitfulness has been a mat-
ter of public record.)
The 15 resolved at this
meeting to do everything they
could to block any initiative
President Obama put forward
to Congress.
One of the great fears Re-
publicans must now have is
that another important nation-
al figure will break ranks and
announce it has all been a ruse
from the beginning and that
the party hasn’t acted in good
faith.
Although it’s possible that
the fateful gathering at an
expense-account restaurant
(between the White House
and the Capitol three and a
half years ago) didn’t birth the
angry and wary movement
known as the Tea Party, it
certainly encouraged it. All
the duplicity that character-
izes current conservatives
(especially in Congress) has
had a deleterious effect on
public discourse.
Richard J. Yost
South Abington Township
Regulations crush
our self-sufficiency
M
ary Ann Haas couldn’t be
more correct (“Partisan
gridlock killing econo-
my,” July 1).
I have had a small dental lab
for 25 years. All I wanted to do
was make dental prosthetics
for a few dentists and make a
decent living with dignity. I
didn’t want to grow a huge
conglomerate. Now, govern-
ment regulations want to
micromanage my one-man
operation just the same as
they do a multimillion-dollar
endeavor.
Remember Hillary Clinton’s
words? “We cannot be held
responsible for undercapital-
ized businesses.” That means
if you are a one-person show,
and the regulations are too
expensive to implement, too
bad.
Further, I never dreamed I’d
be competing with China in
the dental lab business. Yes,
ask your dentist where that
crown or denture was made!
Demand a made-in-USA guar-
antee.
There are dental lab brokers
who market Chinese services
to dentists. They seemingly
know nothing about how to
construct a dental appliance.
They undercut the local lab’s
prices, pick up the work from
the dentist’s office and send it
to China. China does not have
to comply with U.S. regu-
lations. When it comes back,
the broker delivers the fin-
ished product to the dentist.
You pay the same fee for your
prosthetics. When all the local
labs go out of business (or
become brokers themselves),
your broken denture will be
sent to China to be repaired.
Will there be some poisonous
material in it when it comes
back?
Look what NAFTA and
GATT did! The liberals in
power do not want individuals
to be self-sufficient. They want
us all to be beholden to them
while they enjoy political
power.
They have turned to people
into “sheeple.” The “sheeple”
bleat for more government
intervention on all levels (wel-
fare, health care, retirement).
Though the country is ripe
for another American Revolu-
tion, there will be none. “The
tree of liberty (shall not) be
refreshed … with the blood of
tyrants and patriots” any time
soon. Prepare to be shackled
and enslaved. You have sacri-
ficed your liberty for a little
security so you “deserve nei-
ther.” (Thomas Jefferson said
the former, Benjamin Franklin
the latter.)
David J. Obaza
Nantego Dental Prosthetics Ltd.
Hughestown
MAIL BAG LETTERS FROM READERS
Letters to the editor must include the writer’s name, address and
daytime phone number for verification. Letters should be no
more than 250 words. We reserve the right to edit and limit writ-
ers to one published letter every 30 days.
• Email: mailbag@timesleader.com
• Fax: 570-829-5537
• Mail: Mail Bag, The Times Leader, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-
Barre, PA1871 1
SEND US YOUR OPINION
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012
C M Y K
timesleader.com
etc.Entertainment Travel Culture S E C T I O N F
WHO: John Phillips, local musician
AGE: 31
HOMETOWN: Scranton
•••
John Phillips has loved music from
a young age.
“My momused to play the piano for
hours and hours and hours on end
when I was a kid,” he said. “I used to
sit up in my room and listen to her
play down in the dining room all the
time, which is what hooked me.”
Since then, the 31-year-oldScranton
resident has made music, of all kinds,
a major part of his life. Phillips is a bu-
sy guy, bouncing fromrunning the an-
nual Steamtown Original Music
Showcase and his business, MCRPro-
ductions, to playing in two bands:
UUUfor 12 years and OurAfter for six.
As a musician, Phillips knows the
accountability he and his peers have.
“As a local musician you have a re-
sponsibility to make your scene bet-
ter, whether you play in a band, pro-
mote bands or are part of any aspect of
the music. You’ve got to be the best
you can be and work at developing it.”
Phillips has seen many changes to
the scene since he began playing.
“I’ve watched it collapse,” he said,
“and this is where the responsibility
aspect comes in. Everybody says ‘Well
the scene isn’t doing great, the clubs
aren’t doing this, radio’s not doing
that,’ which is fine, but the fact is that
whenit comes downtoit, theonlyper-
son to blame is yourself.”
Phillips said this is why he’s gone
“on the aggressive,” pushing the focus
tolocal andregional acts insteadof na-
tional ones. One such way is through
the Steamtown Original Music Show-
case, now in its seventh year, which
will take place fromAug. 31to Sept. 2.
“Local music is just as good, if not
better, than national music, and no-
bodyreallyknows about thesebands,”
he said. “This is a way to expose new
styles and genres to a lot of people.”
The event is being expanded upon
with the Steamtown Music Awards,
which will happen Sept. 1.
“It’s a waytoget more recognitionfor
local artists,” Phillips said. “Voting for
bands is a big part of the process, yes,
but there are still going to be rules and
stipulations looked at by a committee.”
Phillips hopes that through fun-
draising, as well as money made
through the Steamtown Showcase, he
and his event colleagues can present a
music scholarship to a local high-
school student in the thousands-of-
dollars range.
Phillips refers to his company MCR
Productions, run with his wife, Jennif-
er, as “the glue for everything.” The
business is made up of several local
professionals and has photographers,
videographers, musicians, event plan-
ners, lighting installers – everything
to make a party work.
“We’re taking themed weddings and
events and making them a reality for
people,” Phillips said. “We lookat every
aspect of the event andsee what we can
dowithit tomakeit that muchbetter.”
He sees music as always being a
part of his life, andhe’s looking for-
ward to pushing a change.
“It’s going to be a lot of time
and effort and I’ma little scared,
I’m a little hesitant, but at the
same time anything that’s
worth doing, well, you’re going
to give it a shot no matter what.”
ON THE SCENE
SUBMITTED PHOTO
John Phillips and his wife, Jennifer,
are co-owners of MCR Productions,
an events business.
He places
local music
in limelight
By SARA POKORNY
spokorny@timesleader.com
On The Scene is an occasional feature
about the people folks are likely to en-
counter when out and about on the local
entertainment scene.
MINNEAPOLIS —Married her
longtime beau: Check. Had a big
hit ballad: Check. Scored a No. 1
country song: Check. Got a Gram-
my: Check. Collected CMAAward
for female vocalist of the year:
Check. Check. Won ACM Award
for album of the year: Check.
Check. Check. Headliningher own
arena tour: Check — finally. (She
was scheduled to play the Toyota
Pavilionat MontageMountainlast
night, but theshowwas postponed
due to illness.)
Miranda Lambert has been on a
roll thepastcoupleof years. Sowhy
is she still singing about anxiety
and agony?
“I’ve always leanedmore toward
the sadsongs andthe angst,” Lam-
bert said. “I feel like that’s what
people want to hear. That’s what I
want to hear. I don’t want to hear a
bunch of happy songs all the time.
Peoplemayhaveexpectedmetobe
a little more happy and upbeat on
this album(the AmericanCountry
Music-winning ‘Four the Record’)
and it just wasn’t like that at all.”
That’s the essence of Miranda
Lambert — telling it like it is,
whether evening the score with an
ex-boyfriend in the 2008 hit “Gun-
powder and Lead” or dissing R&B
star Chris Brown on Twitter after
the Grammys in February.
Lambert felt obligated to vent
because she thought Brown was
greedydoingtwoperformanceson
the Grammys, and she was upset
that hedidn’t apologizefor beating
up his ex-girlfriend Rihanna.
“Ifeel likeit’smyduty,”Lambert,
28, said. “Everything I’ve always
stood for in my career and in my
personal life, I’m a strong woman
and I believe in speaking your
mind. Sometimes I feel like if I
don’t, I’mnot upholding what
I’ve preached.”
Outspoken, to be sure. But
also sensitive. Check out her
current hit ballad“Over You,”
whichshewrotewithherhus-
band, country star Blake
Shelton, who’s on a roll him-
self as a coach on NBC’s
“The Voice.” One day he
opened up about the death
of his older brother ina car
Lambert is hotter than ever
By JON BRAM
Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
See LAMBERT, Page 6F
I
f a tree falls in the forest – or in your yard –
Edward “Sonny” Jones of Pittston doesn’t
care whether it makes a noise. He’d just like
the wood, please.
“Don’t burn it. Turn it,” is the motto for
Jones, an avid wood-turner who is excited
to have one of his pieces, a vessel he crafted
fromNewZealand “red gum” wood, chosen
for theArt of theStateexhibit, whichwill be
on display through Sept. 9 at the State Mu-
seum in Harrisburg.
Many more examples of Jones’ artistry canbe found
at the Arts Seen Gallery on North Main Street in
downtown Pittston. But lest you linger too long ad-
miring his bowls, platters, candlesticks, ink pens and
bottle-stoppers, he quickly points out the work of oth-
er local artists.
“I love being here. There are so many talented peo-
“I feel validated. The judges were from all across the country,
and I’m flattered that I fell within the range of artists who were there.”
— Brien Keller
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Wood turner Sonny Jones explains how he uses a sharp tool and a lathe to create all sorts of crafts from wood.
The pride of Pa.
By MARY THERESE BIEBEL mbiebel@timesleader.com
What: Art of the State
When: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednes-
days through Saturdays and
noon to 5 p.m. Sundays
through Sept. 9
Where: State Museum of Penn-
sylvania, adjacent to the State
Capitol, at 300 North St., Har-
risburg
Admission: $5 for adults, $4
for children and senior citizens
More info: 717-787-4980
IF YOU GO
See ART, Page 4F
Sonny Jones uses a sharp tool and a
lathe to create his crafts.
Photographer Brien Keller of Fairview Township shot
this photo of a dinghy when he was in Block Island, R.I.
Stephen Ruch of Dallas captured this San
Francisco Ferry Building in graphite pencil.
Area imagination on display at Art of the State
C M Y K
PAGE 2F SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3F
➛ D I V E R S I O N S
SUBMITTED ART
Brien Keller of Fairview Township is pleased that his photograph
of a dinghy, which he spotted in Rhode Island, is part of the Art of
the State exhibit in Harrisburg.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
When he’s not turning wood,
he’s thinking about it, Sonny
Jones said.
ple in this area,” he said, spread-
ing his arms to encompass
paintings and drawings, cloth-
ing and jewelry.
Jones also wants to make sure
people know he wasn’t the only
Luzerne County artist whose
work was chosen for the state
show.
Stephen Ruch, 19, of Dallas,
contributed an image of a “San
Francisco Ferry Station.”
He is majoring in education
and minoring in art at Wilkes
University, with an eye toward
becoming a math teacher, and
he drew the ferry freehand in
graphite pencil based on a pic-
ture at Sue Hand’s Imagery in
Dallas.
The third Luzerne County
artist, Brien Keller, 37, from
FairviewTownship, submitted a
photograph of a vintage dinghy
that a grandfather had crafted
by hand for his grandson in the
late 1800s.
“I like single, solitary, inani-
mate objects that stand out just
because they’re beautiful,” said
Keller, who noticed the dinghy
in the water off Block Island,
R.I.
Like Jones, Keller is honored
that his work was chosen for the
juried show.
“I feel validated. The judges
were from all across the coun-
try, and I’m flattered that I fell
within the range of artists who
were there. Lots of them do art
for their day jobs,” said Keller,
whose ownday job is ininforma-
tion technology for the medical
field.
The state exhibit includes 129
works of art by 115 artists from
30 counties, museum spokes-
man Howard Pollman said.
They were chosen from 1,836
entries submitted by 680 art-
ists.
After attending the exhibit’s
opening reception last month,
Jones said, “I didn’t know there
were so many different kinds of
art.”
Jones, too, has a day job, as a
test-kitchen chef for Aramark
Corp.
When he’s cooking or baking
at home, he just might use some
of his hand-crafted wood.
“What could be more aesthet-
ically pleasing than making an
apple pie with a rolling pin
made from the wood of a local
apple tree?” he wrote in his art-
ist statement.
Still, he admits, some of his
creations are more likely to re-
tain their sanded-and-polished
good looks if they aren’t used
quite so hard.
“I tell people, if they want a
bowl to stay nice, they can put
apples in it but not applesauce.”
Jones has worked with wood
as diverse as tiger maple, myr-
tle, yellowheart, purpleheart
and yew.
Some of his most satisfying
projects, Jones said, are when
he creates decorative memen-
tos from the wood of a beloved
old tree that had to come
down.
“One lady had me make snow-
men for everyone in her family,”
he said.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Stephen Ruch of Dallas drew this freehand with graphite pencil.
PETE G. WILCOX/THE TIMES LEADER
Candlesticks, platters and bowls are examples of Sonny Jones’
wood-turning.
ART
Continued from Page 1F
C M Y K
PAGE 4F SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ E T C .
THE TIMES LEADER Welcomes
THE TIMES LEADER
timesleader.com
For home delivery, call 829-5000 or toll free 1-800-252-5603 Monday through Friday 6:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 7:00 a.m.- 12:00 noon
Joe Lipinski and John Weaver, Somerville Construction • Kim Rosentel,
Murray Jay Miller Architecture • Eric Lee, Peking Chef Owner • Richard Yeninas and
Glenn Ellsworth, Project Manager, Somerville Construction
United Penn Plaza | Wyoming Avenue | Kingston • 283-1288 | 283-1188
Come enjoy a New Dining Experience at Peking Chef Express in the United Penn Plaza, Kingston, where
you can eat in, take out or have your quality Chinese food delivered.
Eric Lee, owner of Peking Chef, employed only local contractors in designing and building the restaurant.
Somerville Construction Services, Forty Fort, was his general contractor and Kim Rosentel from Murray J.
Miller, Wilkes-Barre, was his architect.
Peking Chef Express will serve the same dishes as Dallas as well as other dishes prepared with healthy
eating in mind.
Hours: Mon. 3pm-9pm, Tues.-Sat. 11am-9pm, closed Sunday
THE AMAZING
SPIDERMAN
NO PASSES
AMAZING SPIDERMAN, THE
(XD-3D) (PG-13)
12:45PM 4:05PM 7:25PM 10:45PM
ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER
(DIGITAL) (R)
1:55PM 7:35PM
AMAZING SPIDERMAN, THE (3D) (PG-13)
1:25PM 2:45PM 4:45PM 8:05PM 9:25PM
AMAZING SPIDERMAN, THE (DIGITAL)
(PG-13)
10:45AM 11:25AM 12:05PM 2:05PM 3:25PM
5:25PM 6:05PM 6:45PM 8:45PM 10:05PM
BRAVE (3D) (PG)
12:25PM 2:55PM 5:20PM 7:55PM 10:25PM
BRAVE (DIGITAL) (PG)
10:35AM 11:35AM 1:15PM 2:05PM 3:45PM
4:30PM 6:10PM 7:05PM 8:40PM 9:35PM
KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (3D) (PG)
1:40PM 4:35PM 7:00PM 9:30PM
KATY PERRY: PART OF ME (DIGITAL) (PG)
11:15AM
MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST
WANTED (DIGITAL) (PG)
10:50AM 1:10PM 3:35PM 5:55PM 8:15PM
10:35PM
MAGIC MIKE (DIGITAL) (R)
11:30AM 2:10PM 4:50PM 7:30PM 10:10PM
MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (DIGITAL)
(PG-13)
4:10PM 9:55PM
MOONRISE KINGDOM (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
12:20PM 2:40PM 5:00PM 7:20PM 9:40PM
PEOPLE LIKE US (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
1:00PM 7:15PM
PROMETHEUS (DIGITAL) (R)
11:05AM 4:40PM 10:40PM
SAVAGES (2012) (DIGITAL) (R)
10:45AM 12:15PM 1:45PM 3:15PM 4:45PM
6:15PM 7:45PM 9:15PM 10:45PM
TED (DIGITAL) (R)
10:25AM 11:40AM 12:55PM 2:25PM 3:40PM
5:05PM 6:20PM 7:40PM 9:00PM 10:20PM
TO ROME WITH LOVE (DIGITAL) (R)
10:55AM 1:35PM 4:15PM 7:10PM 9:50PM
TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S WITNESS
PROTECTION (DIGITAL) (PG-13)
11:20AM 2:00PM 4:55PM 7:50PM 10:30PM
You must be 17 with ID or accompanied by a parent to attend R rated features.
Children under 6 may not attend R rated features after 6pm
**Savages - R - 140 min.
(1:45), (4:35), 7:25, 10:15
**Katy Perry: Part of Me - (PG) -
105 min.
(1:15)
***Katy Perry: Part of Me in RealD 3D -
(PG) - 105 min.
(3:45), 7:00, 9:15
**The Amazing Spider-Man - (PG13) -
140 min.
(1:25), (2:30), (4:25), (5:30), 7:30, 9:00,
10:25
***The Amazing Spider-Man in RealD
3D - (PG13) - 140 min.
(1:05), (4:05), 7:10, 10:05
The Amazing Spider-Man in 3D/DBOX
Motion Seating - (PG13) - 140 min.
(1:05), (4:05), 7:10, 10:05
**Ted - R - 115 min.
(1:10), (2:00), (3:30), (4:00), (4:30), 7:00,
7:50, 9:30, 10:20
**Moonrise Kingdom - PG13- 105 min.
(1:50), (4:15), 7:45, 10:00
**People Like Us - PG13- 125 min.
(1:40), (4:20), 7:15, 9:50
**Magic Mike - R- 120 min.
(1:40), (4:10), 7:30,10:00
**Madea’s Witness Protection - PG13
- 120 min.
(2:15), (4:45), 7:45, 10:15
Brave - PG - 105 min.
(1:15), (3:30), 7:20, 9:35
***Brave in RealD 3D - PG
(2:10), (4:30), 7:45, 10:00
Madagascar 3 - PG - 100 min.
(1:00), (3:10), (5:20), 7:30, 9:50
Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 • rctheatres.com
• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
•Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
Free Family Film Festival
JULY 10 & 11 AT 10:00AM WITH:
Kung Fu Panda 2 - PG - 90 min
For a full schedule of movies for the
Free Family Film Festival please visit
RCTHEATRES.COM
ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW FOR:
The Dark Knight Rises
The Dark Knight Marathon
MOVIE LISTINGS @ WWW.GARDENDRI VEIN.COM
OPEN FRI, SAT, &SUN
2 SCREENS WITH DOUBLE FEATURES
MOVIE ADMISSION: $6 ADULTS - $3 CHILDREN
FLEA MARKET SUNDAYS 6AM-3PM
FIND US ON FACEBOOK OR FOLLOW US ON TWITTER
DRIVE-IN
RT. 11 HUNLOCK CREEK
(570) 735-5933
RT. 11 HUNLOCK CREEK (570) 735-5933
SCREEN 1
The Amazing Spiderman (PG-13)
Men In Black 3 (PG-13)
SCREEN 2
Brave (PG)
Madagascar 3 (PG)
$7 Adults - $4 Children
FLEA MARKET SUNDAYS 6AM-3PM
FIND US ON FACEBOOK OR FOLLOWUS ON TWITTER
7
4
6
1
3
1
Doors open at 9:00am • EARLY BIRDS Start at Noon
Super Bingo Starts at 1:00pm
Regular Bingo Starts at 7:00pm
UP
TO
$
100
,
000
SUPER BINGO
Saturday, August 4th
Progressive
TIP JAR
ALL YOU CAN EAT
BUFFET
ONLY $6.99
NEW LOWER
Package Prices
(No Coupon Needed)
Small - $20
Medium - $35
Large - $55
X-Large - $85
Area’s
ONLY
Smoking Bingo Hall with
Non-Smoking Section
Contact Misty Davidson
at 1-304-279-5685 or email:
misty@bigbucksbingobc.com
BUS COORDINATORS
NEEDED
(Separate Entrance)
For Upcoming Games, Events, Specials
Visit our Website at
www.bigbucksbingobc.com
COUPON SPECIAL
$1.00 OFF
BUFFET DINNER
1 per person with coupon
Coupon good only on August 4, 2012
BUS
COORDINATOR
Martha Steidinger
570-310-1274 (hm)
570-855-6216 (cell)
or Gayle Patla
570-406-7292 (cell)
PA – Wilkes-Barre, Pittston,
Dickson City, Back Mountain,
Hazleton
Must Call To Reserve Seats.
$$$$
$
15,000
$10,000 Guaranteed
JACKPOT
215 Monroe Street • Martinsburg, WV 25404
Berkeley Plaza • 304-262-0022
Not responsible for printing errors. Some restrictions apply.
Must purchase one game package.
2012 SUPER GAME DATES
$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $
$ $
Aug. 4 - Oct. 6
Sept. 8 - Nov. 3
Dec. 8
EXPERTS IN HEARING
EXPERTS IN CARE
AUDIOLOGY & HEARING
CENTERS
Serving the
community for
over 60 years
in the Hearing
Health Care feld.
Call today to
schedule a
hearing
screening.
WILKES-BARRE
34 S. MAIN ST
PROVINCIAL TOWERS
822-6122
PECKVILLE
1339 MAIN ST
BESEN MEDICAL BLDG
383-0500
SCRANTON
321 SPRUCE ST
BANK TOWER
343-7710
www.audiologyhearing.com
Denise T. Prislupski, Au. D
C M Y K
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 5F
BOOKS
➛ timesleader.com
In Ben H. Winters’ new mystery,
“The Last Policeman,” a massive aste-
roid named Maia will hit Earth in six
months. The human race is reacting
badly to the lack of a future.
So who cares about a suicide in the
restroom of the local
McDonald’s in Con-
cord, N.H.?
Detective Hank Pal-
ace cares. Palace has a
tidy streak in him that
keeps himworking de-
spite the inevitability
of extinction, and
something in this
death doesn’t add up here.
“What I’m really dealing with here is
the fact that all of us will die,” Winters
says. “How would we behave under
those circumstances — behave ethical-
ly, behave morally. What is the way to
behave knowing that our days are limit-
ed?”
In the mystery, some have already
killed themselves in mass immolations
or walk off their jobs to fulfill their “be-
fore-I-die” bucket list or dreamed of es-
caping to non-existent moon colonies.
Unfortunately, our modern world
doesn’t run by all by itself. Technology
is breaking down. The cell phone grid
is failing. Only the authorities have gas-
oline for their cars. Even the McDo-
nald’s isn’t the familiar Golden Arches
we know now.
“Many of these, like the one we’re
now standing in, on Concord’s Main
Street, have subsequently been trans-
formed into pirate restaurants: owned
and operated by enterprising locals like
my new best friend over there, doing a
bustling business in comfort food and
no need to sweat the franchise fees,”
thinks Palace.
He’s been assigned to clean up the
case of Peter Zell, an insurance man
found hanging by an expensive belt
that doesn’t belong to him. Delving in-
to Zell’s life, Palace tracks down family
and friends to find the reason for the
death all the while knowing — it really
doesn’t matter.
Winters made his mark writing liter-
ary mash-up such as “Sense and Sensi-
bility and Sea Monsters” — Jane Aus-
ten meets Jules Verne and others —
and a Tolstoy parody, “Android Kareni-
na.” He started writing “The Last Po-
liceman” in February 2011. It is planned
to be a trilogy, the second book being
three months before Maia hits, and the
last on the day of reckoning.
So how does much of humanity cope
in Concord knowing they are doomed?
“People in the main are simply mud-
dling along. Got to work, sit at your
desk, hope the company is still around
come Monday. Got to the store, push
the cart, hope there’s some food on the
shelves today. Meet your sweetheart
for lunch for ice cream.”
“What I’m dealing with here is the
fact all of us will die,” says Winters.
“That is the human condition — peri-
od. (That is) the one thing that links
every human being to the other. What
I’ve simply done in the novel is to accel-
erate the timetable.”
‘Policeman’
on job as
doomsday
approaches
“The Last Policeman” by Ben H. Winters;
Quirk Books, Philadelphia ($14.96)
By TISH WELLS
McClatchy Newspapers
HARDCOVER FICTION
1. Gone Girl. Gillian Flynn. Crown,
$25.
2. Wicked Business. Janet Eva-
novich. Bantam, $28.
3. Bloodline: A Sigma Force Nov-
el. James Rollins. William Mor-
row, $27.99.
4. Summerland. Elin Hilderbrand.
Reagan Arthur, $26.99.
5. Calico Joe. John Grisham.
Doubleda, $24.95.
6. The Age of Miracles. Karen
Thompson Walker. Random
House, $26.
7. The Storm. Clive Cussler. Put-
nam, $27.95.
8. Mission to Paris. Alan Furst.
Random House, $27.
9. Porch Lights. Dorothea Benton
Frank. William Morrow, $25.99.
10. 11th Hour. Patterson/Paetro.
Little, Brown, $27.99.
HARDCOVER NONFICTION
1. Cowards. Glenn Beck. Threshold
Editions, $28.
2. Wild. Cheryl Strayed. Knopf,
$25.95.
3. The Amateur. Edward Klein.
Regnery Publishing, $27.95.
4. Killing Lincoln. Bill O’Reilly.
Henry Holt, $28.
5. The Skinny Rules. Bob Harper.
Ballantine Books, $26.
6. An American Son. Marco Rubio.
Sentinel, $26.
7. It Worked for Me. Colin Powell.
Harper, $27.
8. Leading Culture Change...
Daniel Denison. Jossey-Bass,
$34.
9. What Really Happened: John
Edwards... Rielle Hunter. Benbel-
la, $24.95.
10. The Great Destroyer. David
Limbaugh. Regnery Publishing,
$29.95.
B E S T S E L L E R S
In the years since Vinnie
Red Sky LeBlanc’s father
killed three people in a
drunken driving accident
and got himself banned from
the Bay Mills reservation,
the young Ojibwa tribal
member has never once
picked up a drink.
So Vinnie’s best friend,
Alex McKnight, is under-
standably
concerned to
learn Vinnie
has been
knocking
back scotch-
es at a local
bar.
The con-
cern turns to alarm when
Vinnie suddenly disappears.
Meanwhile, five bodies are
discovered at a deserted air-
strip nearby, the result of a
drug deal gone bad.
At first, Alex, a former De-
troit cop who moved to Mi-
chigan’s remote Upper Pen-
insula a few years ago to get
away from trouble like this,
cannot imagine the two mys-
teries are related.
But when Buck, Vinnie’s
slacker cousin, also goes
missing, Alex suspects Buck
may have somehow drawn
Vinnie into the drug deal.
Soon it becomes clear that
Alex isn’t the only one look-
ing for the cousins.
Some big-time drug deal-
ers, convinced that Vinnie
and Buck betrayed them at
the airstrip, are hunting the
pair.
As the story unfolds, Alex
races up and down the
length of Michigan, follow-
ing leads, trying to stay one
step ahead of the drug deal-
ers and trying to convince
suspicious tribal members
that he’s really on Vinnie’s
side.
Soon he’s joined by Vin-
nie’s long-missing father,
who shows up to help with
the search.
“Die a Stranger” is the
ninth crime novel by Steve
Hamilton, a two-time Edgar
Award winner.
As usual, he creates an en-
semble of strong, believable
characters and spins his sus-
penseful tale in crisp, hard-
boiled prose.
The result is a taut, fast-
paced story with lots of gun-
play and unexpected twists,
along with a poignant sub-
plot about the strained rela-
tionship between father and
son.
‘Die a Stranger’ a suspenseful tale
“Die a Stranger: An Alex McKnight
Novel” (Minotaur Books), by Steve
Hamilton
By BRUCE DeSILVA
For The Associated Press
M
ichelleObamacanre-
call a time when she
“had no idea that to-
matoes didn’t come in green
plastic trays, covered by cello-
phane and that they could be
any color other than pale red.”
She’s come a long way, and
now she is working to bring
the rest of us with her.
Her efforts to garden on the
White House lawn and to involve
people all over the country in
growingfoodare the subject of her
first book, “American Grown.”
(All author proceeds go to the Na-
tional Park Foundation.)
Full of pictures of gorgeous gar-
dens and produce, “American
Grown” tells the story of the White
House kitchen garden. There are
recipes, advice on gardening and
stories of successful community
gardensfromaroundthecountry—
as well as alittlehistoryabout grow-
ing food at the White House.
Ground was broken for the cur-
rent garden on March 20, 2009,
and it has become popular with
staff volunteers, school groups
and tourists. Even White House
events have changed: “Since we
planted the garden, I’ve noticed a
change in what we cook,” observ-
es Cris Comerford, the White
House executive chef. “No longer
are the meals we serve driven by
the protein on the plate and gar-
nished with a few baby carrots or
other accent vegetables. Vegeta-
bles are now equal partners.”
About a third of the harvest is
donated to Miriam’s Kitchen,
which provides meals for home-
less people.
“American Grown” has many
warm and fuzzy moments, both in
photos — Obama holding just-
picked tomatoes, elementary
school children and first dog Bo
among the plants —and in words.
Gardens, the first lady points
out, are good at “reminding us of
all we have in common and help-
ing us grow stronger, more con-
nected communities.”
Obama also addresses some se-
rious questions about the Amer-
ican diet, noting that “millions of
American families are living in
so-called food deserts, communi-
ties without a single grocery store
andnoconvenient access tofresh,
nutritious food.”
Obesity-related health problems,
she writes, cost $150 billion a year.
And she offers startling details
about the effect of diet on the mil-
itary, from an interview with Lt.
Gen. Mark Hertling: Not only can
about half the recruits not pass a ba-
sic fitness test, but more than 62
percent of new recruits needs den-
tal care before they can deploy and
many have bone density issues that
make them prone to fractures.
Those problems are the result
of a decades-long change in how
we eat and exercise, Obama
notes, acknowledging that she
too struggled over decisions
about buying the right foods
when she shopped for her family.
In her book, as elsewhere, her
great charmis her ability to seem
like the rest of us.
She recalls a conversation with
the Obamas’ pediatrician and a de-
cision to improve the family’s eat-
ing habits. “We started small, emp-
tyingour pantryof unhealthyfoods
and filling our glasses with water
and skim milk instead of sugary
drinks,” she writes. “We ate at
home more often. We began to add
more vegetables to our meals.”
The problems Obama saw as
first lady “alarmed” her and led to
the “Let’s Move” programand her
campaign against childhood
obesity. “Rarely in the history of
this country have we encountered
a problemof such magnitude and
consequence that is so eminently
solvable,” she declares.
Her garden — the White House
garden —is part of the solution: “I
hoped this garden would help be-
gin a conversation about the food
we eat, the lives we lead, and how
all of that affects our children.”
“American Grown: The Story of the White House Kitchen Garden and Gardens Across America” by Michelle Obama; Crown ($30)
By MARY MACVEAN
Los Angeles Times
Australian author Sara Foster
uncovers a rich vein of atmo-
sphere in the North Yorkshire
moors for her intense psycholog-
ical thriller about a womantrying
to rebuild her life after her hus-
band disappears.
A touch of the supernatural
and family ghost tales add to the
already spooky landscape that
blankets Foster’s debut. But Fos-
ter’s dabbling in the occult
doesn’t subtract from the realis-
tic fears and down-to-earth prob-
lems explored in “Beneath the
Shadows.” Foster uses the sub-
genre of the quiet, non-violent
English village mystery to grace-
fully weave in the themes of loss,
grief and abandonment in “Be-
neath the Shadows.”
Grace and Adam Lockwood
have just moved from London
with Millie, their 10-week-old
daughter, to the remote village of
Rosebywhere he has aninherited
a cottage from his grandparents.
Adam spent a little time in Rose-
by as a teenager after his mother
diedandhe has fondmemories of
Hawthorn Cottage, the village
and the surrounding moors. One
week after the move, Adamtakes
Millie for a walk while Grace con-
tinues to unpack. Afewhours lat-
er, Grace finds Millie inher stroll-
er, unharmed, at their doorstep,
but Adam has disappeared.
A year later, Grace finally finds
the strength to return to Roseby.
She needs to settle matters about
the cottage and try to find out
what happened to Adam, who
has never been found. The police
and many Roseby residents be-
lieve he just left, unable to handle
the responsibilities of father-
hood. Grace becomes friendly
with Meredith Blakeney, a leader
in the tight-knit community, and
handyman named Ben, who
works on the cottage while Grace
sorts through the boxes left by
Adam’s grandparents, “disman-
tling the last traces of their lives.”
Family secrets andtales of ghosts
haunt Grace’s attempts to find
out what happened to her hus-
band.
Foster skillfully uses the vil-
lage’s isolation and the moors
where “the raw, untouched vistas
hadthe power tostopyour mind”
as a metaphor for Grace’s own
isolation. Grace’s grief influences
each of her actions, and her par-
ents, her sister and an old friend
worry that she may verge on a
mental breakdown. Grace is ob-
sessive about finding out if Adam
left or if something more sinister
happened and the reader em-
pathizes with her emotional
state.
Theabsorbingplot of “Beneath
the Shadows” shows that a quiet,
non-violent mystery can pack a
lot of punch.
Dark plot in
‘Shadows’
“Beneath the Shadows” by Sara
Foster; Minotaur ($24.99)
By OLINE H. COGDILL
Sun Sentinel
C M Y K
PAGE 6F SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
➛ T R A V E L
7
4
3
2
0
3
7
4
4
9
9
2
7
3
2
9
5
9
570-474-6771 ext. 4
www.auto-bus.com
AUTO-BUS
Call For a 2012 Brochure
• NYC (Times Sq.) $30
• NYC Canal St. Shops $35
• Ocean City, NJ $40
• Rehoboth Beach, DE $55
• Wildwood, NJ $45
• Pt. Pleasant Beach, NJ $35
• IKEA Shopping $30
• Cape May, NJ $45
• King of Prussia Shopping $30
• Baltimore Harbor $45
• NYC San Gennaro Fest $35
• Sands Casino $20 incl. $30 slot,
$5 food
• Atlantic City Resorts Casino
$35 incl. $30 slot
Group Bus Rental • To & From Florida
You & Your Car
Bu yingGoldJewelry
D ia m onds,Pla tinu m ,
Pu reS ilver,S terling,
Indu stria l & Coin S ilver
A ntiqu eJewelry(Brok en OK)
Dental Gold,Gold Filled
Eyeglasses,Etc.
K IN G T U T ’S
G O L D R E PA IR H U T
824-4150
322 N. PENN A VE. W -B
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
7
5
6
5
0
2
60 Month Fixed Rate
2.49
%
Home Equity Loan
*APR(Annual Percentage Rate). Subject to credit approval, other rates
& terms available. $10,000 new money, must be auto-debited from a
FKCB checking account. The monthly payment for $10,000 borrowed
at an APR of 2.49% for 60 months would be $177.26. Offer subject to
be terminated without notice.
APR*
A Home Equity Loan from First Keystone Community
Bank opens the door to anything that life brings your
way. Use the equity in your home to finance home
improvements, a vacation, debt consolidation and more.
If you have questions about home equity loan terms and
payment requirements, stop by any First Keystone office.
888-759-2266 | www. FKCBank. com
ToAGreat Home Equity Rate
S
TILLWATER, N.Y. —
Ranger Megan Stevens
sets a leisurely pace as
she leads about a dozen
bicyclists along the paved tour
road at Saratoga National Histor-
ical Park, scene of one of history’s
most important battles.
About midway up one of the
steeper inclines, it becomes ap-
parent why the Americans made
sure they held the high ground
whenthe redcoats finally showed
up — on foot — in 1777.
“You can see how impressive
the valley is,” Stevens said after-
ward about some of the park’s
hilltop views of the upper Hud-
son River in Stillwater, 20 miles
north of Albany.
Fromsuchscenic spots she and
other National Park Service rang-
ers regale groups of bicyclists
with stories of the two battles
fought here in September and
October 1777, their outcomes,
and how the Continental Army’s
defeat of the world’s best army
led to the eventual American vic-
tory in the Revolutionary War.
The free guided bike tours are
conducted every other Wednes-
day in the summer beginning in
June at the park, also known as
the Saratoga Battlefield.
Other guided bike tours are
scheduled for July 11 and 25, and
Aug. 1, 15 and 29. They begin at 6
p.m. in the park’s parking lot and
last until about 8 p.m. Participa-
nts must bring their own bicy-
cles.
The bike tours offer an oppor-
tunity to learn about a battle con-
sidered one of the most signifi-
cant in history, while getting a
not-too-strenuous workout at the
same time. An added bonus:
Plenty of panoramic views along
the 5-mile route, with mountain-
tops in neighboring Vermont and
even some in western Massachu-
setts visible when conditions are
right.
While giving a boiled-down
version of the Saratoga battles is
necessitated by the brevity of the
stops during the bike tours, the
rangers manage to include of
some of behind-the-scenes dra-
ma, such as the personality clash-
es between American Maj. Gen.
HoratioGates andArnold, a Sara-
toga hero who was still three
years away from turning traitor.
“You can talk forever about the
battle, but not everyone is inter-
ested in military things,” Stevens
said. “You connect more on per-
sonal level if you can talk about
the individuals and what they
went through.”
Bicycle tours offered at N.Y.’s Saratoga Battlefield
AP PHOTOS
Casey Boynton, center, his wife Irene Boynton, left, and son Caz Boynton, of Toms River, N.J., stop near the Neilson Farm during a bike
tour of Saratoga National Historical Park in Stillwater, N.Y.
Pedaling through history
By CHRIS CAROLA
The Associated Press
Victor Soto of Carlisle, N.Y., takes in the view on a bike tour of
Saratoga National Historical Park.
For more information, call the
park’s visitor center at 518-664-
9821, extension 1777, or check the
park’s website: www.nyps.gov/sara.
CONTACT
accident when they were teen-
agers.
“We wrote it about his broth-
er,” Lambert said. “Ironically, it
was my single in January, and
welosthisdad(then)andIlosta
reallygoodchildhoodfriend. So
it was kind of weird that we
wrote about something that
happened16yearsagobut it was
very fitting to our lives today.”
Not only did they compose
“Over You” together, but they
duet on “Better in the Long
Run” on “Four the Record” (it’s
herfourthalbum)andtheysang
“America the Beautiful” togeth-
er at the Super Bowl in Febru-
ary. How about touring togeth-
er?
“We’ve decided it’s not the
right time,” Lambert said. The
couple will celebrate their first
wedding anniversary May 9 by
hanging out at their farmin Ok-
lahoma — which is what they
did for half their honeymoon.
“I’m trying to build on this mo-
mentum I’m having, and he
doesn’t have time to do it with
back-to-back seasons of ‘The
Voice.’ ” (The showalready has
begun filming its third season,
expectedto air this fall.)
Not only has Lambert been a
guest mentor on “The Voice,”
but she’s an avid fan who texts
her husband unsolicited advice
during the show.
“He probably gets annoyed.
Hehashisphonewithhiminthe
chair,”sheexplained. “He’ll text
me: ‘How was it?’ because he
can only hear what he hears in
the building. I’m the back-seat
driver, bad.”
Lambert knows quite a bit
about TV talent shows. She got
her career break after finishing
third on “Nashville Star” in
2003. And the show’s 2006 win-
ner, Chris Young, is opening for
her current OnFire Tour.
Despite the moniker, the tour
does not include pyrotechnics
—nothing like the giant ring of
fire in which she performed
“Kerosene,” her first hit, at the
2005 Country Music Associ-
ationAwards.
“I figure I’m fiery enough on
my own,” she said.
Lambert made her markwith
feisty he-done-me-wrong songs
such as “Kerosene” (“He’s out
there holding on to someone/
I’m holding up my smoking
gun”) and “Crazy Ex-Girl-
friend.” She grewup in Linden,
Texas, where her parents were
private investigators, often
working with women who were
abusedor cheatedon.
Buthercareerdidn’treallyex-
plodeuntil the2010ballad“The
House That Built Me.” Shelton
was going to record it, but she
talkedhimoutof it. Thesongbe-
cameherfirst No.1hit andledto
a Grammyfor best female coun-
try vocal performance and a
CMAprize for song of the year.
With her elevated profile,
Lambert landeda spot inFebru-
ary on NBC’s “Law & Order:
SVU,” her favorite TVshow. Ac-
tually, when she met the pro-
gram’s showrunner, she said: “I
know you want me on your
show.” He warmed to the idea
but she said had a little advice
for her: “ ‘You need to be a little
less confident.’ OK, no one’s ev-
er toldme that.”
Lambert is confident she
doesn’t want to be an actress.
She’s too busy with music, in-
cluding her side project the Pis-
tol Annies, a country girl group
with songwriting partners Ash-
leyMonroeandAngaleenaPres-
ley. Theyreleasedaloose, spirit-
ed collection of harmony-heavy
country ditties called “Hell on
Heels” last August.
The two singers will join her
tour in May and do five Pistol
Annies songs as part of her set.
In September, there will be a
separate Pistol Annies tour, fol-
lowed by the recording of the
trio’s secondalbum.
LAMBERT
Continued from Page 1F
Miranda Lambert and Blake
Shelton join a select group of
country couples who have
enjoyed musical success while
married. We asked her to com-
ment on some of her famous
predecessors.
• Johnny Cash and June Car-
ter:
“They set the stage for what it is
to be a couple in the spotlight
because they had such an amaz-
ing relationship.”
• George Jones and Tammy
Wynette:
“Legendary.”
• Waylon Jennings and Jessi
Colter:
“They’re the coolest of them all.”
• Rodney Crowell and Rosanne
Cash:
“Oh, gosh. They’re like rene-
gades that were a couple.”
• Tim McGraw and Faith Hill:
“Hot.” (Then she giggled.)
• Garth Brooks and Trisha
Yearwood:
“I think they’re very real and
very down to earth. I don’t know
them, but they seem that way.”
C O U N T R Y C O U P L E S
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 1G
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
of Scranton - NEPA
of Scranton - NEPA
2013 XTS Luxury Collection
White DiamondTricoat, Navigation, Sunroof
48 MONTHS
DOWN
PAYMENT
$
2,999
48
Per Month + Tax*
LEASE IT!
$
599
$
599
2012 Cadillac CTS
All Wheel Drive
MSRP $40,360
27 MONTHS
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
$
0
Per Month + Tax*
LEASE IT!
$
249
$
249
2012 Cadillac SRX
Luxury Edition
MSRP $41,740
24 MONTHS
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
$
0
Per Month + Tax*
LEASE IT!
$
379
$
379
R.J. BURNE
1205-1209 Wyoming Avenue, Scranton
(570) 342-0107 • 1-888-880-6537
www.rjburne.com Mon-Thurs 9-8 • Sat 9-4
1205 Wyoming Ave. RJ Brune Cadillac
From Wilkes-Barre to Scranton
Expressway 8 Blocks on
Wyoming Avenue
*TAX & TAGS EXTRA NC + Non-Certified
E
X
P
W
A
Y
WYOMING AVE.
8
1
Lease price based on a 2012 SRX AWD Luxury Edition $41,740 MSRP-$379 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $414 per month. 24 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 24 monthly payments total $9,912. $.25/mile penalty over 20,000 miles. $2,000 down payment plus $379 first payment
plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2,593 plus tag fees. Lease price based on a 2012 CTS SDN AWD $40,360 MSRP-$249 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $279 per month. 27 month lease 10,000 miles per year. 27 monthly payments total $7,344. $.25/mile penalty
over 21,500 miles. $2,000 down payment plus $249 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $2,452 plus tag fees. Lease price based on a 2012 XTS FWD Luxury Edition $53,200 MSRP-$599 per month plus 9% PA sales tax total $652 per month. 48 month
lease 10,000 miles per year. 48 monthly payments total $31,296. $.25/mile penalty over 40,000 miles. $2,999 down payment plus $599 first payment plus tax and tags due at delivery. Total due at delivery $3,921 plus tag fees. MUST BE A CURRENT LESSEE OF A 1999 OR NEWER NON-GM
LEASE. (Only applicable for SRX and CTS) Lessee responsible for excessive wear and tear. Must take delivery by 9/4/12. Requires ALLY Bank Tier S Credit approval. Please see sales person for complete details. Example per thousand $16.67 per month. Example down payment 29%.
9 3 9
7
6
6
2
6
8
PAGE 2G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
150 Special Notices
135 Legals/
Public Notices
THE DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT SURPLUS VEHICLES
AND EQUIPMENT SALE
REQUEST FOR SEALED BIDS
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT SURPLUS VEHICLES
AND EQUIPMENT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, the Dallas School District is
requesting sealed bids on the following items which have been
determined to be surplus to the needs of
the District:
Item Description Minimum Bid
#1 1984 International dump /w plow
Vin#1HTL8EGM7EHA49594
25,000 GVWR $1,000.00
#2 1992 Dodge Caravan
VIN#2B4GH2532NR757479 No reserve
#3 1998 24’x 66’ modular classroom
(2 classrooms) Double wide $10,000.00
#4 (2) Oven – Garland model
ICO-E-10 208 volt multi phase No reserve
#5 (2) Oven – Marathon Gold model
1160199–208 volt No Reserve
#6 Powermatic wood lathe Model 90
Ser # 990309 No Reserve
#7 Powermatic wood lathe Model 90
Ser# 990262 No Reserve
Items may be viewed at the Dallas School District Maintenance
Building located at 2000 Conyngham Ave, Dallas Pa 18612
between the hours of 10 am and 11am July 26, 2012.
Each bid must be submitted in a sealed envelope clearly marked
“Surplus Vehicle & Equipment Bid - Item # (designated num-
ber)” and delivered to Mr. Grant S. Palfey, Business Manager
Administrative office Conyngham Ave Dallas, Pa 18612 BY 1:00
p.m. on July 30, 2012, at which time they will be publicly opened
and read. All items will be sold to the highest bidder upon pay-
ment to the Dallas School District in the form of, money order or
certified check; personal checks or credit cards will not be
accepted. The high bidder will be given until 3:30 p.m. on Tues-
day, July 31, 2012 to submit payment and take possession of the
item. If the highest bidder defaults on the bid, the item will be
offered to the next highest bidder until the transaction is com-
plete. Bidders submitting bids on more than one item must sub-
mit a separate sealed bid on each individual item. Any bid not
properly submitted or submitted after the above stated date and
time will be returned to the bidder and will not be considered by
the District.
The Dallas School District reserves the right to reject any bid the
District deems unreasonable. All items will be sold “as-is” with no
warranty or guarantee implied.
Anyone desiring more information regarding the bidding process
may contact Mr. Mark D. Kraynack, Supervisor of Buildings &
Grounds, Dallas School District Dallas, Pa 18612 570-674-7255.
Octagon Family
Restaurant
375 W Main St, Plymouth, PA 18651
570-779-2288
W Weekend S eekend Special pecial
$13.95 $13.95 for a Large Plain
Pie & a Dozen Wings
Dine in only. Valid Saturday & Sunday.
One coupon per party/table.
Cannot be combined with any other offers.
Home of the Original ‘O-Bar’ Pizza
LAW
DIRECTORY
Call 829-7130
To Place Your Ad
Don’t Keep Your
Practice a Secret!
310 Attorney
Services
BANKRUPTCY
FREE CONSULT
Guaranteed
Low Fees
Payment Plan!
Colleen Metroka
570-592-4796
B A N K R U P T C Y
DUI - ARD
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY BENEFITS
WORKERS’ COMP
Free Consultation
25+ Years Exp.
Joseph M.
Blazosek
570-655-4410
570-822-9556
blazoseklaw.com
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
AUTO
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
EMISSIONS
& SAFETY
INSPECTION
SPECIAL
$39.95 with
this coupon
Also, Like
New, Used
Tires & Bat-
teries for
$20 & up!
Vito’s &
Gino’s
949 Wyoming
Avenue
Forty Fort, PA
574-1275
Expires 6/30/12
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
FOUND male cat -
black, brown and
grey coloring. West
Pittston. Very friend-
ly, comes right to
people. 407-0844.
FOX HOUND LOST
near Harveys Lake.
Male. Answers to
Obi. Reward. Call
570-704-0364
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vitos & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
LOST. Camera,
Canon, silver, digi-
tal, in navy zipper
case, with memory
card. Near Kirby
Park on July 4th.
Reward.
570-885-3265
LOST: MALTESE/SHIH
Tzu mix, black &
white female an-
swers to Oreo.
Northampton St.
area on July 4th .
REWARD.
570-822-6412
MINIATURE PINSCHER
LOST
Last seen in Moun-
tain Top area in the
Memorial park vicin-
ity & Kirby Estates.
Recently Neutered.
Very shy. If seen,
call 570-332-5438
or 570-474-5273
120 Found
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Found adult female
cat, white and gray,
friendly, found on
Main Street behind
Cooks Pharmacy in
Shavertown. Please
call 570-696-4289
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
Estate of PATRICK
FRANK RUTKOSKI
Letters Testamen-
tary on the Estate of
PATRICK FRANK
RUTKOSKI,
deceased, late of
122 Beaver Slide Dr,
Drums,PA 18222
have been granted
to the undersigned
by the Register of
Other County, notice
is hereby given to all
persons indebted to
said Estate to pay
the same at once,
and all persons hav-
ing claims against
said estate are
requested to pres-
ent the same to the
undersigned.
SCOTT PATRICK
RUTKOSKI 9683
Sycamore Lane
Painted Post, NY
14870 Or to: Brian S.
Duff, Esquire Owlett
& Lewis, P.C
One Charles Street
P.O Box 878
Welsboro, PA 16901
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
DEADLINES
Saturday
12:30 on Friday
Sunday
4:00 pm on
Friday
Monday
4:30 pm on
Friday
Tuesday
4:00 pm on
Monday
Wednesday
4:00 pm on
Tuesday
Thursday
4:00 pm on
Wednesday
Friday
4:00 pm on
Thursday
Holidays
call for deadlines
You may email
your notices to
mpeznowski@
timesleader.com
or fax to
570-831-7312
or mail to
The Times Leader
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
For additional
information or
questions regard-
ing legal notices
you may call
Marti Peznowski
at 570-970-7371
or 570-829-7130
150 Special Notices
A loving couple
wishes to adopt
their 1st child,
our home is filled
of love and
wonderful
opportunities for
your baby!
Expenses paid.
Liz/Anthony
1-800-359-6937
LizAnthonyAdopt.com
ADOPT
A happily married
couple searching
for a precious
baby to help us
become a family.
Ready to provide
a home filled with
love. Call
Denise & Steve @
(888)757-7463
ADOPT: A fun, lov-
ing couple wants to
adopt your baby.
We promise endless
love & happiness.
We are financially
secure and can pro-
vide a good home.
We are adoption
ready. Bella & Nick
800-210-8763www.
adoptionislove.com
ADOPTION
A baby is our dream!
We are a happily
married couple who
long to provide your
baby with a lifetime
of happiness, edu-
cational opportuni-
ties & close extend-
ed family. Expenses
paid. Call
1-888-370-9550 or
www.SusanAnd
BruceAdopt.com
ADOPTION
A financially secure
married couple
embraces the
chance to adopt.
We promise a won-
derful life for your
baby. A loving family
and endless oppor-
tunities await. All
Expenses paid.
Patti/Dan. Toll Free
1-855-692-2291
Nothing but the
best is good
enough for me!
Oyster
Weddings at
Genetti’s, call
570-820-8505
today!
bridezella.net
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
BUYING BUYING
JUNK
VEHICLES &
Heavy
Equipment
NOBODY PAYS MORE! NOBODY PAYS MORE!
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
570-542-2277
6am to 9pm
150 Special Notices
SPECIAL NOTICE
Laid off, retired,
stay at home
parents?
WANTED:
Men and women
to serve on a
focus group
panel,
July 26, 2012 in
Wilkes-Barre.
One day only
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
$100.00
Please send
name, address
and phone # to
Box 4090
c/o Times Leader
Attn: Mary
15 N. Main St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
< < < < < < <
ADOPTION:
A teacher wife and
loving husband wish
to adopt newborn.
Will provide a safe
home & a happy life
Please call
Adele & Andy
1-866-310-2666
< < < < < < <
ADOPTION:
Loving couple
hopes to adopt a
baby. We
promise a lifetime
of love & security
for a newborn.
Please call
Lori and Mike at
1-888-499-4464
330 Child Care
DAYCARE
In my Kingston
home. Licensed.
Ages 15 months to 6
years.
570-283-0336
340 Health Care
Services
RN Available
For private duty.
Per diem. Refer-
ences are available
per request. Years
of experience.
5+ years of psych
and med surge.
Please call
570-696-5182
360 Instruction &
Training
Certified Personal Certified Personal
T Trainer seeking rainer seeking
part-time position part-time position.
Also certified in
older adult training,
CPR and AED.
contact
Mryc426@aol.com
EARN COLLEGE
DEGREE ONLINE.
*Medical, *Business,
*Criminal Justice.
Job placement
assistance. Com-
puter available.
Financial Aid if quali-
fied. SCHEV Certi-
fied. Call 888-220-
3984. www.Centu-
raOnline.com
MUSIC LESSONS
Violin and Viola
Beginner to
Advanced. Experi-
enced teacher in
Plymouth. Call Kelli
570-719-0148
380 Travel
BROADWAY
SHOW
BUS TRIPS
JERSEY BOYS
Wed. July 18
$150
FRONT MEZZ
ONCE
Wed. Sept. 12
$160
ORCHESTRA SEATS
WICKED
Wed. Oct. 10
$169
ORCHESTRA SEATS
RADIO CITY
XMAS SHOW
Also available
ALL SHOWS
INCLUDE BUS
& SHOW
CALL ROSEANN
@ 655-4247
To Reserve
Your Seats
380 Travel
paulsontours.com
570-706-8687
Yankees
Indians 6/27
White Sox 6/30
White Sox 7/1
Old Timers Day
Angels 7/14 & 7/15
Phillies
Pirates 6/28
Giants 7/22
Reds 8/22
Nationals 8/25
Mets
Phillies 7/04
Dodgers 7/21
New York City
Dinner Cruise
7/28, One Day
7/28-29, Overnight
9/11 Memorial
6/30, 7/18, 8/18
Finger Lakes
Wine Tour
7/14 or 7/15
Overnight 8/4-8/5
SPORTING EVENTS
Yankees Baseball
Indians 6/27 $69
White Sox 6/29
$65*
White Sox 6/30
$109, 200 Level
Seating
@ Cleveland 8/24th,
25th, 26th $349.00
Phillies Baseball
Rays 6/24 $79
Giants 7/21 $89
Mets Baseball
Cubs 7/7
$85 or $99
Dodgers 7/21 $85
NASCAR 9/30 @
Dover. Seats in
Turn 1, $144,
includes breakfast
& post race buffet
COOKIE’S
TRAVELERS
570-815-8330
570-558-6889
*includes ticket,
transportation,
snacks, soda & water
cookiestravelers.com
Take
Advantage
of
Fall
Cruises
ALL
INCLUSIVE
SPECIALS
TO
MEXICO AND
CARIBBEAN
THAT ARE
COMING IN NOW!
Call
Tenenbaum’s
Travel
First Come
First Served
288-8747
406 ATVs/Dune
Buggies
HAWK `11 125CC
Auto, key start, with
reverse & remote
control. $700. OBO
570-674-2920
409 Autos under
$5000
BUICK `96 REGAL
Runs good, asking
$1,000. Call
570-212-2003
CADILLAC `94
DEVILLE SEDAN
94,000 miles,
automatic, front
wheel drive, 4
door, air condi-
tioning, air bags,
all power, cruise
control, leather
interior, $3,300.
570-394-9004
CHEVROLET `90
CELEBRITY
STATION WAGON
3.1 liter V6, auto,
A/C. Excellent con-
dition, new tires.
66K. $2,795.
570-288-7249
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner. 91K.
4.8 engine, auto.
Runs great. New
paint, stake body
with metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
$4990.
GRAND MARQUIS
‘99 GS
Well maintained,
Smooth riding,
4.6L, V8, RWD,
Auto, Power
windows, power
locks, New
Inspection,
Serviced,
Silver over blue.
Good tires
$3,750
Call 823-4008
JEEP `99 CHEROKEE
99,500 miles, 5
speed, $3,700,OBO
(570)752-5229
409 Autos under
$5000
LEO’S AUTO SALES
93 Butler St
Wilkes-Barre, PA
570-825-8253
Kia Sedona ‘04
7 Passenger Van
Leather, air, CD,
sunroof, 6 cylinder,
auto, very good
condition. $4,250
Mercury Tracer
‘98 4 cyl, 4 door,
auto. $1,550
Jeep Grand ‘96
Cherokee Laredo
4 door, 6 cylinder,
auto, leather, sun-
roof, CD. $2,500
Jeep Cherokee
‘98 Sport.
4 door 6 cylinder,
auto, 4WD. $2,350
Current Inspection
On All Vehicles
DEALER
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
SUZUKI ‘06
SWIFT RENO
4 cylinder. Automat-
ic. 4 door. $4,800
(570) 709-5677
(570) 819-3140
412 Autos for Sale
ACME AUTO SALES
343-1959
1009 Penn Ave
Scranton 18509
Across from Scranton Prep
GOOD CREDIT, BAD
CREDIT, NO CREDIT
Call Our Auto Credit
Hot Line to get
Pre-approved for a
Car Loan!
800-825-1609
www.acmecarsales.net
11 AUDI S5 CONV.
Sprint blue, black
/ brown leather
int., navigation,
7 spd auto turbo,
AWD
08 CHEVY AVEO
red, auto, 4 cyl
07 BUICK LACROSSE
CXL, black, V6
07 BUICK LUCERNE
CXL, silver, grey
leather
06 LINCOLN ZEPHYR
grey, tan leather,
sun roof
06 MERCURY MILAN
PREMIER, mint
green, V6, alloys
05 CHEVY IMPALA
silver, alloys, V6
04 NISSAN MAXIMA LS
silver, auto,
sunroof
03 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
GS blue sunroof
49,000 miles
03 AUDI S8 QUATTRO,
mid blue/light grey
leather, naviga-
tion, AWD
02 CHEVY IMPALA LS
green, tan leather,
sunroof
02 FORD ESCORT SE
red, auto, 4 cyl
01 VOLVO V70 STATION
WAGON, blue/grey,
leather, AWD
00 BMW 323i
silver auto
73 PORSCHE 914
green & black, 5
speed, 62k miles,
$12,500
SUVS, VANS,
TRUCKS, 4 X4’s
08 DODGE NITRO
SXT orange,
auto, 4x4
08 FORD ESCAPE XLT
SILVER, V6, 4X4
07 DODGE GRAND
CARAVAN SXT
Blue, grey leather,
7 passenger mini
van
06 NISSAN PATHFINDER
SE off road, 4x4,
silver, V6
06 INFINITY QX56
Pearl white, tan
leather, Naviga
tion, 3rd seat, 4x4
06 JEEP COMMANDER
white, 3rd seat,
4x4
06 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, Black,
V8, 4x4 truck
06 FORD EXPLORER
XLT, black, 3rd
seat, 4x4
06 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LTD
blue, grey leather
4x4
06 CHEVY TRAILBLZAER
LS, SILVER, 4X4
05 BUICK RENDEVOUS
CXL 3rd seat AWD
05 DODGE DURANGO
LTD Black, grey
leather, 3rd seat,
4x4
05 JEEP LIBERTY
RENEGADE Blue,
5 speed, V6, 4x4
05 DODGE DAKOTA
CLUB CAB SPORT,
blue, auto, 4x4
truck
04 FORD EXPLORER
XLT white,
3rd seat 4 x4
04 NISSAN XTERRA XE
blue, auto, 4x4
04 CHEVY TAHOE LT
4x4 Pewter, grey
leather, 3rd seat
04 CHEVY AVALANCHE
Z71, green, 4 door,
4x4 truck
04 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB SLT SILVER,
4 door, 4x4 truck
04 FORD FREESTAR,
blue, 4 door, 7
passenger mini
van
04 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE OVERLAND
graphite grey,
2 tone leather,
sunroof, 4x4
03 DODGE DURANGO
SXT grey,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPLORER
XLT olive green,
3rd seat, 4x4
03 FORD EXPEDITION
XLT, silver, 3rd
seat, 4x4
02 FORD F150
SUPERCAB XLT
silver, 4x4 truck
01 DODGE RAM 1500
QUAD CAB, white,
V8, 4x4 truck
01 FORD F150 XLT
white, super cab,
4x4 truck
01 FORD F150 XLT
Blue/tan, 4 door,
4x4 truck
00 CHEVY 1500
SILVERADO X-CAB
green, 4x4 truck
99 FORD EXPLORER
SPORT 2 door
black, 4x4
99 NISSAN PATHINDER
gold, V6, 4x4
89 CHEVY 1500,
4X4 TRUCK
412 Autos for Sale
CADILLAC `08 DTS
Fully loaded, 14,000
miles, automatic, all
power, leather
interior, showroom
condition. Silver.
$25,000. Call Mike
570-779-4351
CADILLAC ‘00 DTS
Tan, satellite
radio, leather,
moon roof, loaded
excellent
condition. 136k
miles. $4,995.
570-814-2809
CHRYSLER ‘09 TOWN
AND COUNTRY
LX. All options.
Dual power sliding
doors. 55,200
miles. 4 brand new
tires. DVD system,
Sirius satellite radio
and MP3 Single
Disc. Backup cam-
era. Quad seating
w/table. $14,400.
570-574-6799
‘11 DODGE
DAKOTA CREW
4x4, Bighorn 6 cyl.
14k, Factory
Warranty.
$20,899
‘11 Ford Escape
XLT, 4x4, 26k,
Factory Warranty,
6 Cylinder
$19,499
‘11 E250 Cargo
AT-AC cruise, 15k,
factory warranty
$18,499
‘11 Nissan Rogue,
AWD, 27 k factory
warranty
$18,099
‘11 Chevy Impala
35k alloys, factory
warranty $14,899
‘10 Subaru
Forester Prem.
4WD 30k Factory
warranty, power
sunroof.
$18,499
‘05 HONDA CRV EX
4x4 65k, a title.
$12,799
‘06 FORD FREESTAR
62k, Rear air A/C
$7,999
‘03 F250 XL
Super Duty only
24k! AT-AC,
$8,099
‘01 LINCOLN TOWN
CAR Executive 74K
$5,399
‘11 Toyota Rav 4
4x4 AT
only 8,000 miles,
alloys, power sun-
roof. new condition.
Factory warranty
$22,199
‘03 Mitsubishi
XLS AWD, only 75k
$7,699
CROSSROAD
MOTORS
570-825-7988
700 Sans Souci
Highway
W WE E S S E L L E L L
F O R F O R L L E S S E S S ! ! ! !
TITLE TAGS
FULL NOTARY
SERVICE
6 MONTH WARRANTY
DODGE ‘02
VIPER GTS
10,000 MILES V10
6speed, collec-
tors, this baby is
1 of only 750 GTS
coupes built in
2002 and only 1 of
83 painted Race
Yellow it still wears
its original tires
showing how it
was babied. This
car is spotless
throughout and is
ready for its new
home. This vehicle
is shown by
appointment only.
$39,999 or trade.
570-760-2365
To place your
ad call...829-7130
FORD `07 FOCUS
SES Sedan
Alloy wheels, heat-
ed seats, CD play-
er, rear spoiler, 1
owner, auto, air, all
power, great gas
mileage, priced to
be sold immedi-
ately! $6,995 or
best offer.
570-614-8925
412 Autos for Sale
HONDA ‘04 ACCORD
LX SEDAN. 162k
miles. New battery,
excellent condition.
Auto, single owner,
runs great. Upgrad-
ed stereo system. 4
snow tires and rims
& after market rims.
Air, standard power
features. Kelly Blue
Book $7,800.
Asking $6,800
570-466-5821
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
LEXUS `00 RX 300
White with leather
interior. All available
options. 130K miles.
Excellent Condition.
$7,900 or best offer
570-563-5065
LEXUS `01 ES 300
80,000 miles,
excellent condi-
tion, all options.
Recently serv-
iced. New tires.
$8,800.
570-388-6669
LEXUS `05 RX 330
All wheel drive,
Champagne tan,
navigation, backup
camera, lift gate,
ivory leather with
memory, auto, 3.3
liter V6, regular
gas, garaged,
brand new condi-
tion, all service
records. 6 disc CD.
Private seller with
transferable 1 year
warranty, 96K.
REDUCED to
$16,900.
570-563-5065
LINCOLN `02
TOWN CAR
1 owner, garage
kept, 44,000 miles,
asking $7,500
570-675-1440
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 3 ‘08
Extra clean. 5
speed. 41K miles
$13,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
MERCEDES ‘02 CLK
CONVERTIBLE
Exceptionally nice.
55K. $14,000
570-458-6192
PONTIAC`96 GRAND AM
MUST SELL!
Auto, 4 cylinder with
power windows.
Recently inspected /
maintained. $2,150.
570-793-4700
PORSCHE `01
BOXSTER S
38,500 miles. Black
with beige interior. 6
speed transmission.
Air & CD player.
Excellent condition.
$17,200. Call
570-868-0310
412 Autos for Sale
MARZAK MOTORS
601 Green Ridge St, Scranton
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
‘99 GMC Sierra
Pickup
4x4, extended cab,
bed cap, gray,
132,000 miles
$4,795
‘00 Ford Windstar
Minivan
3rd row seat, rear
A/C, gray, 132,000
miles $2,995
‘98 VOLVO
STATION WAGON
Cross Country, AWD
144,000 miles
$3,695
‘00 FORD WIND-
STAR LX
3rd seat, ice cold
air, 132,000 miles
$2,995
BUICK ‘91 ROAD-
MASTER Station
Wagon, white with
woodgrain exterior,
gold leather interior,
3rd seat. Runs
great, high mileage.
$1800
LINCOLN ‘02
TOWNCAR
Signature series,
Silver, grey leather
interior, 99,000
miles, runs great
$5295
CHEVY ‘05 AVEO
Silver, 4 door, grey
cloth interior, A/C,
re-built transmission
with warranty, 4 cyl.
79,000 miles
$5200
Warranties Avail-
able
9 9 9 9 9 9 9
570-955-5792
SUBARU ‘11 OUTBACK
SW keyless, well
equipped, AWD
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA `05
SCION TC
Manual, AM/FM
stereo, MP3 multi
disc, rear spoiler,
moon roof, alloys,
ground effects,
90,100 miles, Air.
$8,300, negotiable.
570-760-0765
570-474-2182
TOYOTA ‘03 COROLLA LE
5 speed
$4995
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
VOLKSWAGEN ‘00
BEETLE
2.0 automatic, air
67k miles $6400.
570-466-0999
VOLVO `01 V70
Station wagon. Sun-
roof. ABS brakes.
Radio, tape & CD.
A/C. Heated leather
seats. New alterna-
tor. Recently serv-
iced and inspected.
2 extra tires. 161K
miles. $4,600.
570-714-1296
412 Autos for Sale
VW ‘10 JETTA
15,900 miles, stan-
dard transmission.
Garage-kept, white
with sunroof. $15K
570-387-8639
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVROLET `76
PICKUP
4 Cylinder
Very Good
Condition!
NEW PRICE
$2,500.
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
CHEVY ‘30 HOTROD COUPE
$47,000
FORD ‘76 THUNDERBIRD
All original.
JUST REDUCED
$9,000
MERCEDES ‘29
Kit Car $5,500
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
DESOTO `36 AIRSTREAM
2 door, stored 60
years. In very good
condition. All metal,
chrome & head-
lights intact. Highly
restorable. $5,000,
OBO 570-823-2307
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
FORD `70 F350
Dual rear wheels,
360 V8, 4 speed,
standard transmis-
sion, 10 foot cube
box. New tires, runs
good, 52,000 miles.
$1,000 call
570-388-2464
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
$1500.
570-899-1896
421 Boats &
Marinas
SILVERCRAFT
Heavy duty 14’ alu-
minum boat with
trailer, great shape.
$1,000.
570-822-8704 or
cell 570-498-5327
Travel
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 3G
2012N IS S A N P A THFIN DE R
S 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, Allo ys ,
AM / F M / CD, T ilt, Cru is e,
Rea rT in ted Gla s s ,
F lo o rM a ts & M u ch M o re!
*$279 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $15,834.35; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1750 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ca s h in clu d ed .
STK# N22110
M O DEL# 25012
V IN# 622552
M SRP $32,315
B U Y FO R
$
26,795
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $250 N M AC
CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 IN D . B O N U S CAS H
O R
$
279
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FO R
SA VE O VER $5500
O N A LL 2012
P A TH FINDER S!
2 A VA IL A B L E 2 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N M A XIM A
3.5S V S E DA N
V6, CVT , Hea ted S ea ts ,
M o n ito rPkg, Ba ck-Up
Ca m era , L ea ther, S u n ro o f,
F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
*$279 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $20,063.70; m u s t
b e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1725 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ca s h.
STK# N21743
M O DEL# 16212
V IN# 837460
M SRP $37,155
B U Y FO R
$
29,995
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC
CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 IN D . D AY B O N U S CAS H
O R
$
279
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FO R
SA VE
O VER $7000
O FF M SR P !!!
3 A VA IL A B L E 3 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N L E A FS L
A L L E L E CTRIC HYBRID!
80K W AC S yn c M o n ito r,
Re-Gen Bra kin g S ys tem ,
XM , Blu eto o th, Ho m elin k,
CD, Hea ted F ro n t& Rea r
S ea ts , F lo o rM a ts
& M u ch M o re!
*$319 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,221.50;
m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $2999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $3,196.50. $7500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te in clu d ed .
STK# N21439
M O DEL# 17212
V IN# 017671
M SRP $38,270
B U Y FO R
$
36,995
*
+ T/T
O R
$
319
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FO R
Y O U R
FIR ST
ELEC TR IC
C A R
A W A ITS!
THE NUM BER 1DEAL ER IN N.E.AND
C ENTRAL PENNS YL VANIA**
K E N P OL L OCK N IS S A N
www.ke n polloc kn is s a n .c om
229M UN DY S TRE E T
W IL K E S -BA RRE , P A .
1-8 66-70 4-0 672 K E N P OL L OCK
N IS S A N
Th e #1 N is s a n De a le rin N .E. PA
*Ta x a nd Ta g a d d itio na l. Prio rSa les Ex c lu d ed . N o tR es po ns ib le fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . All reb a tes & inc entives a pplied . **0 % APR in lieu o f reb a tes . As k fo rd eta ils .
**As perN is s a n M o nthly Sa les V o lu m e R epo rta s o f April 2 0 12 . All Pric es b a s ed o n im m ed ia te d elivery in s to c k vehic le o nly. All o ffers ex pire 7/9 /12 .
®
END S
7/9/12
P ER
M O.
P L U S TAX
L EAS E FO R :
*
2012N IS S A N A L TIM A 2.5S S E DA N
+ T/T
B U Y FO R
$
19,495
* O R
STK#N22173
M O DEL# 13112
V IN# 580672
M SRP $24,145
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
Ala rm , F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC
CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 IN D . D AY B O N U S CAS H
*$169 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er
yea r; Res id u a l= $12,555.40; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC @
T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n
fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1475 Nis s a n L ea s e
Reb a te & $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ca s h In clu d ed .
H U R R Y O NLY 15
2012 A LTIM A S LEFT!!
6 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS P R IC E!
2012N IS S A N ROGUE S FW D
STK#N21750
M O DEL# 22112
V IN# 282868
M SRP $23,050
4 Cyl, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL , Cru is e,
T ilt, F lo o rM a ts & S p la s h Gu a rd s
18 A VA ILA B LE
A T TH IS P R IC E!
R IDIC U L O U S R IDIC U L O U S
R O G U E R O G U E
R EDU C TIO N! R EDU C TIO N!
A L L A L L
2012’S 2012’S
M U ST M U ST
G O ! G O !
O VER 75 2012
R O G U ES A VA ILA B LE!!
*
P ER
M O.
P L U S TAX
L EAS E FO R :
O R
+ T/T
B U Y FO R
$
18 ,995
*
W / $50 0 N M AC CAP TIVE CAS H
& $10 0 0 IN D . D AY B O N U S CAS H
*$189 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p er
yea r; Res id u a l= $12,677.50; m u s tb e a p p ro ved thru NM AC
@ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s
regis tra tio n fees ; to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000
Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ca s h.
2012N IS S A N FRON TIE R
S V V -6CRE W CA B 4X4
V6, Au to , Prem Utility
Pkg, IPo d In terfa ce, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts & M u ch M o re!
*$219 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $18,498; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $125 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ap p lied .
STK# N22053
M O DEL# 32412
V IN# 451247
M SRP $30,830
B U Y FO R
$
24,8 30
*
+ T/T
W / $20 0 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC
CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 IN D . B O N U S CAS H
O R
$
219
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FO R
SA VE
$6000 O N
A LL 2012
FR O NTIER
C C SV’S
& SL’S
9 A VA IL A B L E 9 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N M URA N O
S A W D
V6, CVT , A/ C, PW , PDL ,
Cru is e, T ilt, F lo o r
M a ts , Ca rgo Co ver&
S p la s h Gu a rd s
*$259 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $17,563.50; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1500 Nis s a n L ea s e Reb a te & $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ca s h In clu d ed .
STK# N21472
M O DEL# 23212
V IN# 211509
M SRP $32,525
B U Y FO R
$
26,995
*
+ T/T
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC
CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 IN D . D AY B O N U S CAS H
O R
$
259
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FO R
SA VE
O VER
$5500 O N
A LL 2012
M U R A NO S
2 A VA IL A B L E 2 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
2012N IS S A N X-TE RRA
X 4X4
V6, Au to , A/ C, PW ,
PDL , Cru is e, T ilt,
S tep Ra ils & F lo o r
M a ts , M u ch M o re!
*$269 p erm o n th p lu s ta x, 39 m o n th lea s e; 12,000 m iles p eryea r; Res id u a l= $14,638; m u s tb e
a p p ro ved thru NM AC @ T ier1; $1999 ca s h d o w n o rtra d e eq u ity. (+) p lu s regis tra tio n fees ;
to ta l d u e @ d elivery= $2202.50. $1000 In d . Da y Bo n u s Ca s h Ap p lied .
STK# N21462
M O DEL# 24012
V IN# 508885
M SRP $28,150
B U Y FO R
$
23,995
*
+ T/T
W / $150 0 N IS S AN R EB ATE, $50 0 N M AC
CAP TIVE CAS H & $10 0 0 IN D . D AY B O N U S CAS H
O R
$
269
*
P ER
M O.
+ T/T
L EAS E FO R
SA VE
O VER
$4000 O N
A LL 2012
XTER R A S
3 A VA IL A B L E 3 A VA IL A B L E
A T TH IS P R IC E A T TH IS P R IC E
H U G E SA VING S O N H U G E SA VING S O N
A L L 2012 M U R A NO ’S A L L 2012 M U R A NO ’S
LL
O O
WW
PP
AA
YY
MM
E E
NN
T T
SS
PAGE 4G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
FORD - LINCOLN
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
Automatic, 16” Steel
Wheels, Pwr. Windows,
Pwr. Door Locks,
Air, Keyless Entry
with Remote,
Safety Canopy,
Side Air Bags
24
Mos.
%
XLT, Safety Canopy, Side Impact Safety
Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s Seat, Auto., PDL, PW,
Air, Fog Lamps, Privacy Glass,
Roof Rack, 16” Alum. Wheels,
Sirius Satellite Radio, CD,
Keyless Entry, Rear
Cargo Convenience
Pkg., ,
APR
PLUS
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank
Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
XLT, Safety Canopy,
Side Impact Safety Pkg., Pwr. Driver’s
Seat, Air, Auto., PDL, Fog Lamps,
Privacy Glass, Roof Rack, CD,
16” Alum. Wheels, PW, Sirius
Satellite Radio, Rear
Cargo Convenience
Pkg., Keyless Entry,
APR
PLUS
Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL,
Pwr. Seat, Safety Pkg., Side Impact
Air Bags, Message Center,
1st & 2nd Air Curtains,
Anti-Theft Sys., Keyless
Entry, Sirius Satellite Radio,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
APR
PLUS Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd
Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite
Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
Message Center
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
24
Mos.
CD, Alum
Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd
Air Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry with
Keypad, Message Center,
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 7/31/12.
2.5L I4 Engine, Rain Sensor Wipers, Pwr. Moonroof,
Sony Sound Sys., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL,
Safety Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air
Curtains, Anti-Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite
Radio, Keyless Entry with Keypad,
Message Center,
APR
PLUS
APR
PLUS
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 5G
kë|| · |êk\CK| · Hkl|k · \W
kêë!| II |kkK\\||||, |k · JIê.l!!.I1II
KHW
J!! HkkK|! \!. K|8â\!ê8, |k · JIê.l!I.IIII
K|k · \ëKkkë
Jtê |||kC| \!. K|8â\!ê8, |k · JIê.II1.11l1
!J,111.êê · !1,111.êê
03 Chevy Cavalier LS Sport
êJ C|er¡ Ce|±l| \e1±r
02 VW Jetta
êt |er1 |etat
êI C|er¡ Ce|±l| |\
êl \a|±ra |mpret± WkI
êJ C|er¡ !r±il|l±ter |!
ê1 K¡ar1±i \±r|± |e |I
êJ C|r¡tler \e|rir¡ Cerrer|i|le !earir¡
êI ka1i k1 êa±||re
êt Hi|ta|it|i |±rter |\
ê! C|er¡ Ce|±l| |!
ê! C|er¡ H±li|a |\
ê1 C±1ill±t C!\
ê1 |er1 |lJê I|! 1t1 |I C±|
êê H±t1± |re|e¡e 1êK milet
êt !e¡e|± Cerell± ||
êI \±|arr kel±¡ Hiri \±r
!Iê,êêê.êê · !II,111.êê
êl Herte1et Kert |Ilê 1m±|it
êJ \a|±ra |mpret± k\
êJ Ker1± Cirit \e1±r
ê! !e¡e|± I±rit \e1±r
ê1 Ker1± Cirit |I
ê! K¡ar1±i |l±r|r± â|\
êI \a|±ra êa||±t|
êI |er1 |tplerer \per| !r±t
ê1 8itt±r \er|r± ||
ê! |er1 |etat \|
ê1 C|er¡ \ilrer±1e |! |t|. C±|. 1t1
ê! K¡ar1±i kter±
êJ ka1i k1 êa±||re
êI \a|±ra êa||±t| \per|
ê1 KHW IlJi
ê1 C|er¡ \ilrer±1e IJêê 1t1
êt 8itt±r kl|im± \|
ê! \W Ie||± \|
ê! \W Ie||± \
09 Toyota Corolla S
êt \W â!i
ê1 KHW IlJti
êt H±t1± J
êI \W Kee|le
ê! H±t1± Ii
!I1,êêê.êê · !It,111.êê
êt Herte1et Cl!ê 1m±|it
ê! Ki± \e1er± |I
ê1 \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ |imi|e1
Iê |e1¡e krer¡er \I!
êt \a|±ra |eret|er || Ke±r
Iê H±t1± Ii !earir¡
êJ I±¡a±r \·!¡pe
ê1 \a|±ra |mpret±
ê1 8itt±r kea¡e (l)
êt ka1i k1 C±|riele| \·|ire
ê1 \a|±ra |eret|er I
ê! |e1¡e krer¡er k!
ê! \a|±ra êa||±t|
ê1 KHW IlJti
êt \a|±ra êa||±t| |!|
ê! \W Kee|le \|
êt ka1i k1 êa±||re
êI ka1i k1 êa±||re (l)
ê1 \a|±ra |mpret±
êJ ka1i k1 kr±r| I.l
êt \W !ea±re¡
ê1 \W Ie||± \|
ê! Ieep |i|er|¡
êJ âHC IJêê 1t1 \|±|e Ke1
êI KHW tI I.
!II,êêê.êê · !I1,111.êê
êt Herte1et t1Iê 1m±|it
ê! K¡ar1±i \±r|± |e â|\
ê1 \a|±ra |e¡±t¡
Iê Ki± \eal
II Ki± \eal °W|i|e !i¡er"
ê1 \a|±ra |mpret± W±¡er
II !e¡e|± C±mr¡ \|
Iê 8itt±r kea¡e °Kreme"
ê1 \W |±tt±| Kem|er|
ê1 Ker1± Ck\ |I
Il Ie||± \| (l)
ê! Ki± \erer|e |I
ê! \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ |!|
ê1 \a|±ra êa||±t| \per|
ê1 \a|±ra |eret|er |imi|e1
ê1 |er1 |tt±pe |imi|e1
ê1 !e¡e|± r±r1
ê1 8itt±r Har±re \|
II K¡ar1±i \±r|± |e â|\
Iê \W |±tt±| Kem|er|
II H±t1± ti \per| (I)
ê1 H±t1± !ri|a|e |I
ê1 Ieep |i|er|¡
Iê Ieep |i|er|¡
II !e¡e|± r±r1
ê! \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ â! |imi|e1
êJ âHC t1Jêê 1t1
!lê,êêê.êê · !lI,111.êê
II Ki± \erer|e |I
Iê \W tt \per| (l)
ê! C|er¡ Celer±1e |! Crew C±| 1t1
II \a|±ra |e¡±t¡ |remiam
Iê \a|±ra |eret|er |imi|e1
Iê \a|±ra êa||±t| |remiam
êI KHW JIêti
êI KHW tI I.êti
12 VW Jetta GL
11 VW Jetta TDi
12 VW Jetta TDi
!l1,êêê.êê · !lt,111.êê
Iê \a|±ra êa||±t| |imi|e1
II \a|±ra êa||±t| |remiam
ê1 H±t1± tt1 âr±r1 !earir¡
ê1 Ker1± |ile| |I·|
ê! KHW Il!ti
êI KHW tI I.êti
êI C|er¡ Cerre||e krrirert±r¡ |1i|ier
II \W kea|±r \|
ê1 ka1i k1 êa±||re (I)
ê1 Herte1et tIêê 1m±|it |atar¡
II \a|±ra êa||±t| I.t |imi|e1 (l)
Il \a|±ra êa||±t| |remiam
Iê ka1i k1 êa±||re (l)
ê! ka1i kt êa±||re
ê1 ka1i k1 kr±r|
!lI,êêê.êê · !l1,111.êê
êI ka1i k!|
ê1 KHW Il!ti (1)
II Ki± êp|im± \I
ê1 ka1i êJ I.l
Il Ieep Wr±r¡ler ka|iter
Iê ka1i k1 |remiam |lat êa±||re
ê1 ka1i k1 Cerrer|i|le \peti±l |1i|ier
II ka1i k1 |remiam |lat, 8±r
!Iê,êêê.êê · !II,111.êê
ê1 KHW Il! ti Ceape
Iê KHW Il!ti (1)
ê1 ka1i k1 êa±||re C±|riele| \peti±l
|1i|ier
ê1 KHW Jl!i
ê1 ka1i kt |remiam |lat, 8±r (l)
ê1 ka1i êJ |remiam |lat, 8±r
ê1 KHW IIJti
II KHW Il!ti (1)
ê1 ka1i êJ |remiam |lat
Iê ka1i kJ
!I1,êêê.êê · !I!,111.êê
Il ka1i kI !|i |remiam |lat, 8±r
Il ka1i k1 |remiam, wl t|¡le p|¡ (1)
II ka1i k1 kr±r| |remiam |lat (1)
II KHW IIJi \per|
II KHW Il!ti
ê1 KHW tJ I.êi (l)
ê1 ka1i êJ |remiam |lat, 8±r
Iê ka1i êJ |remiam |lat, 8±r (I)
ê1 KHW JIJti
!I1,êêê.êê -
II ka1i êJ I.l |remiam |lat, 8±r
Il ka1i k1 kr±r| |rem iam |lat, 8±r
Il ka1i êJ l.ê |remiam |lat, 8±r
Iê ka1i êI |remiam |lat
Il KHW IIJti
II KHW tJ I.Ji |remiam
Il ka1i êJ I.l \·|ire !i|±riam
II ka1i êI |remiam |lat
Il ka1i kt |remiam |lat
Il ka1i kt |ret|i¡e
Il KHW Jl!ti
ê1 KHW tJêi Cerrer|i|le
Iê C±1ill±t |tt±l±1e |I!
Il KHW tJ I.J |remiam
Il ka1i êI !|i |remiam |lat
II KHW tt J.êi
Il ka1i kI |ret|i¡e
II ka1i k!|
Il ka1i k!|
Il |ertt|e |±r±mer± 1
II |ertt|e |±r±mer± 1t
II |ertt|e 1IIt C±|riele|
II |ertt|e 1II !ar|e
II |ertt|e \pee1t|er
Iê ka1i êI \·|ire
êI \±|arr kel±¡ Hiri \±r ê! \
09 09 T
êt ê \
ê1 ê1 KK
êt HH
êI \
ê! H
â|! k l |kI l I 8|âK! \kCk!|ê8
WK|8 Iêë !kK| k !|\! |k|\| W|!K k8I ê| êëk \|K|C||\|
K|âK|\! |k|C|\
|k||
|êk Iêëk !kk|||
Kk| Ck|||!?
8ê |kêK||H|
8ê Ck|||! k|| W|||
K| k||ë\|||
Kë8|k||\ ê| ë\|| \|K|C||\ k! âk|k! |k|C|\| CêH| |êW8 !ê|kI k8| !kK| k !|\! |k|\||
k|| C|k!||||| \W'\ Kk\| k8 k|||!|ê8k| l1 Hê8!K, l1,êêê H||| ||H|!|| Wkkkk8!I.
lêê !!êêê CCKKKêêêê\\\|| |||kkkêêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!||888ââ kk!!! !!!II,1111J
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ I.1W k|k
1111 I|!!k\ 2 CC'\ 2 K||!||\ 22 |k\\k!\
11 RABBIT 11 GTI 1 ROUTAN
k|| C|k!||||| kë||'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| k t I|kk Iêê,êêê H||| Wkkkk8!I.
11JJ !!êê CCKKêêêêêê\\||| |||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!||888âââ kkk!! !!111,,1111JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ ê.1W k|k
119 k1'\ (\||k8\, Wkâê8\ & Cê8\|k!|K||\) 12 êJ'\
I kt'\ 33 k!'\ 3 êI'\ 222 kI'\
k|| C|k!||||| Hkl|k'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| k I I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| Wkkkk8!I.
11 !!êê CCKKêêêêê\\||| |||kkkêêêHHH \\!!!kkkkk!!!||888ââ kk!!! !!!11,11111JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ ê.1W k|k
3 Hkl|k t'\ 22 Hkl|k I'\ 2 CI1'\
1 Hkl|k J 11 CII
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
IIII !!êê CCKKKêêêêê\\||| ||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!!||888ââ kk!! !!!IIII,,1111JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ ê.11W k|k
Ittt I \|k||\ J J \|k||\
11 IJ'\ 1 II'\ 1 It 11 t \|k||\
IIII !!êê CCKKêêêêêê\\||| ||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!!||888âââ kkk!! !!!!!,,!!!!!!!
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ I.11W k|k
J \êk|8!ê\ 3 \||ê8k\
2 SOULS 2 ê|!|Hk\ 1 \||C!kk
II11 !!êê CCKKêêêêêê\\||| |||kkkêêHHH \\\!!!kkkkk!!!||888âââ kkk!! !!!!,,11!!JJ
||8k8C| kk!|\ k\ |êW k\ I.11W k|k
12 êë!KkCK\ ! ||âkCI\
II |H|k|lk\ I |êk|\!|k\
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
|||
kk
||
·
êêê
WW
88
|||
|
k|| C|k!||||| KHW'\ Kk\| k Kk|k8C| ê| t I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| Wkkkk8!I. k|| C|k!||||| K|k'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| k Iê I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| ||H|!|| Wkkkk8!I. k|| C|k!|||||\ëKkkë'\ Kk\| !K| Kk|k8C| ê| kt I|kk, Iêê,êêê H||| ||H|!||Wkkkk8!I.
|êk Hêk| ||!k||\ \|\|!:
WWW.WIêH|8â\k|||IHê!êk\.CêH
PAGE 6G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
AMERICA’S NEW CAR ALTERNATIVE
2011 FORD
MUSTANG PREMIUM
#18785, Leather, Auto,
V6, Shaker Sound
Sale Price
$
19,899*
2004 MERCEDES
BENZ ML350 4X4
#18748B, V6, Leather,
Moonroof, Fresh Trade
Sale Price
$
9,999*
2011 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS
#18796, Auto,
PW, PL, CD
Sale Price
$
15,999*
2009 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS
#18791A, P. Windows, P. Locks,
Auto, Keyless Entry
Sale Price
$
10,998*
1998 DODGE
DURANGO SLT
#18759A, 7 Pass, Low Miles,
A Must See, 4x4
Sale Price
$
4,895*
2003 HONDA
ACCORD EXL
#18794A, V6, Leather,
Moonroof, Keyless Entry
Sale Price
$
8,990*
CARS, TRUCKS
CONVERTIBLES
SUV’S, VANS
*PRICES + TAX & TAGS. ARTWORK FOR ILLUSTRATION ONLY. NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS.
OFFER ENDS 7/31/2012 **UP TO 63 MONTHS WITH BANK APPROVAL
BUY WITH CONFIDENCE
STARTYOUR
SUMMER OFF
RIGHT!
VEHICLES IN
ALL PRICE
RANGES!
OVER 100
VEHICLES
IN STOCK!
WHY
PAY
MORE!
2011
CHRYSLER 200
#18654, Alloys, PW,
PL, CD, Keyless
Sale Price
$
14,999*
2011 HYUNDAI
SANTA FE AWD
#18731, Alloys,
PW, PL, CD
Sale Price
$
18,999*
2007 DODGE
CHARGER SE
#18789, PW, PL,
CD, Keyless
Sale Price
$
7,999*
2010 FORD ESCAPE
LIMITED
#18708, Leather, Heated
Seats, Alloys, PW, AWD
Sale Price
$
17,999*
2011 MAZDA 3
#18621, Auto,
PW, PL, CD
Sale Price
$
13,999*
Sale Price
$
20,999*
2011 DODGE
JOURNEY
#18737, 7 Pass, AWD,
Alloys, Keyless
MANAGER’S SPECIAL!
$
11,898**
#18755A, AWD,
Leather, Moonroof,
Power 3rd Row Seat,
Only 68K Miles
2006 MERCURY
MOUNTAINEER PREMIER
Sale Price
$
12,999*
2008 NISSAN
XTERRA 4X4
#18769A, Alloys, PW,
PL, CD, Keyless
1.74
2011 CHEVY CAMARO
SS
NOW
$
30,850
DON’T MAKE A $8,000 MISTAKE
Sunroof, Leather, Auto,
Heads Up Display, V8,
Orange w/ Black Leather
MSRP When New
$38,850
Sale Price
$
19,999*
2011 BUICK
REGAL CXL
#18732, Leather, Alloys, PW,
PL, Keyless
2004 CHEVY COLORADO
Z71 EXT CAB
#18801, 4X4, Alloys,
PW, PL
Sale Price
$
11,865*
2004 HONDA
ELEMENT AWD EX
#18659A, Sunroof, Alloys,
PW, PL, Very Clean
Sale Price
$
8,965*
2002 CHEVY SILVERADO
Z71 REG CAB 4X4
#18802, PW, PL,
Sport Side
Sale Price
$
6,995*
2011 HONDA
CIVIC LX
#18787, 4 Door, Auto,
PW, PL, CD
Sale Price
$
15,595*
2012 FORD EXPLORER
LIMITEDAWD
Leather, Backup Camera,
3rd Row Seat, Much, Much More,
3 To Choose From
Sale Price
$
33,988*
2011 MITSUBISHI
GALANT FE
#18627, Alloys, PW,
PL, CD, Auto
Sale Price
$
12,999*
SUMMER
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 7G
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY ‘08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
‘12 BRAND NEW
SCOOTER
All ready to ride,
automatic transmis-
sion, disk brakes,
rear luggage trunk,
around 100 mpg, no
motorcycle license
required, only
$1,595. Call
570-817-2952
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
HARLEY ‘10 DAVIDSON
SPORTSTER CUSTOM
Loud pipes.
Near Mint
174 miles - yes,
One hundred and
seventy four
miles on the
clock, original
owner. $8000.
570-876-2816
HARLEY DAVIDSON
‘03 DYNA WIDE GLIDE
Golden Anniversary.
Silver/Black. New
Tires. Extras. Excel-
lent Condition.
19,000 miles
$10,000.
570-639-2539
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
YAMAHA ‘97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
COLEMAN ‘02
POP UP
Like new. Stove,
lights, fans, sink,
sleeps 6.
$3,500
570-443-7202
EXPEDITION ‘03 37U
CUMMINS 300 DIESEL
PUSHER
19,000 miles,
2 slides, 8 kw Gen.
2 Air conditioners,
Microwave-Convect
Oven, 4 door ref-
with automatic ice
maker, heated hold-
ing tanks,
Corian counter
tops, 2 TV- sur-
round sound, cherry
cabinets, ice maker,
washer/dryer.
Sleeps 6. Queen
beds, back up
camera, recently
inspected, garaged
in winter. $64,500
570-288-2649
FOREST RIVER`08
5TH WHEEL
Model 8526RLS
Mountain Top,PA
$18,500
570-760-6341
PACE ARROW VISION
‘99 M-36 B (FORD)
Type A gas, 460
V10 Ford. Excellent
condition, 11,000
miles. I slide out, 2
awnings, 2 color
flat screen TV’s.
Generator, back up
camera, 2 air con-
ditioners, micro-
wave/convection
oven, side by side
refrigerator with ice
maker, washer/
dryer, queen size
bed, automatic
steps. $29,900.
570-288-4826 or
570-690-1464
442 RVs & Campers
SUNSEEKER ‘10 BY
FOREST RIVER
M3170DS
Ford V10, 32’,
2,500 miles. 4 1/2
year extended/
transferable war-
ranty on RV, tires &
truck. 2 slide outs,
4 KW Onan genera-
tor, power awning,
fiberglass roof.
5,000 lb. hitch,
heated holding
tanks, 2 house bat-
teries, 3 flat screen
TV’s, sleeps ten,
color back up
camera. REDUCED
to $60,000
570-655-1903
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
BUICK ‘05
RENDEZVOUS
4x4. Extra clean
SUV $5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
CHEVROLET `10
COLORADO
2wd, 4 cyl, A/C,
am/fm/CD, 10,600
miles, asking
$14,000
Call 570-696-1641
evenings after 5pm
or on weekends.
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
Sport utility, 4
door, four wheel
drive, ABS, new
inspection. $4200.
570-709-1467
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
CHEVY ‘99 BLAZER
4x4, Absolutely
Like new! $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
DODGE `94 RAM
Automatic, runs
well, good body.
163,000 miles.
$1,500
570-313-8085
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
DODGE ‘04
DURANGO
1 owner, leather
sunroof, 3rd row
seat $6,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD `98 F150
Lariat. Has 130,000
miles, 4x4, auto-
matic, leather interi-
or, power windows,
power seat, runs
great! $4,000 OBO
570-693-3147
FORD ‘02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘02 F150
Extra Cab. 6
Cylinder, 5 speed.
Air. 2WD. $3,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
FORD 04 F150
4x2. Nice Truck!
$11,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
FORD ‘73 F350
Stake Body Truck
55,000 Original
miles - garage
kept, only 2 own-
ers, hydraulic lift
gate, new tires,
battery and brakes.
Excellent condition.
No rust. Must see.
$6500 or best offer
Call 570-687-6177
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘00
EXPLORER XLT
eXTRA cLEAN!
4X4.
$3,995.
570-696-4377
GMC `92 VANDURA
Box Truck. Great
454ci engine,
250K. 2 year old
tranny, good rub-
ber. Hydraulic lift,
1600 lb. capacity.
Chassis needs
welding. $2,500.
570-650-6365
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘04 RANGER
Super Cab
One Owner, 4x4,
5 Speed,
Highway miles.
Sharp Truck!
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
FORD ‘05 ESCAPE
XLT
Front wheel drive,
sunroof, 1 owner,
like new.
$5,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
JEEP 02 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
6 cylinder 4 WD, air
conditioning power
windows, door
locks, cruise, dual
air bags, tilt wheel,
AM/FM/CD. keyless
remote. 130k miles.
$5400.
570-954-3390
JEEP 03 WRANGLER X
6 cylinder. Auto.
4x4.
$10,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
JEEP 04 WRANGLER
6 cylinder. 5 speed
4x4
$9,999
KELLY
875 W. Market St.
Kingston, PA.
570-287-2243
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
MAZDA ‘01
B3000
4x4, 5 speed,
extra clean truck
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
MERCURY `01
MOUNTAINEER
4wd. White with tan
leather seats. 75K
miles. $4,500. Call
570-313-8085
MITSUBISHI `11
OUTLANDER SPORT SE
AWD, Black interi-
or/exterior, start/
stop engine with
keyless entry, heat-
ed seats, 18” alloy
wheels, many extra
features. Only Low
Miles. 10 year,
100,000 mile war-
ranty. $22,500. Will-
ing to negotiate.
Serious inquires
only - must sell,
going to law school.
(570) 793-6844
NISSAN `04
PATHFINDER
ARMADA
Excellent condition.
Too many options to
list. Runs & looks
excellent. $10,995
570-655-6132 or
570-466-8824
1518 8th Street
Carverton, PA
Near Francis
Slocum St. Park
SATURN ‘06 ION-3
5 speed,sunroof, 1
owner, like new!
$4,995
Call For Details!
570-696-4377
SUZUKI `07 XL-7
56,000 miles,
automatic,
all-wheel drive,
4 door, air condi-
tioning, all power,
CD player, leather
interior, tinted
windows, custom
wheels, $13,000
Call 570-829-8753
Before 5:00 p.m.
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
BUSINESS FOR SALE
Quaint family
restaurant in New
Albany, PA, with 2
occupied upstairs
apartments. Turn
key operation. For
more info, call
570-637-4197
BUY A JOB,
CAREER &
BUSINESS
Retiring. Buy my
sales route, with
established, repeat
customers. Make
$35K now, $70K
when economy
improves. Includes
all equipment &
training needed.
$25,000
570-650-6365.
EXETER
Local well
established beer
distributor for sale,
Including property
and license. Call
570-430-0730 or
570-430-0727
JAN-PRO COMMERCIAL
CLEANING OF
NORTHEASTERN PA
Concerned about
your future?
BE YOUR OWN BOSS
Work Full or
Part time
Accounts available
NOW throughout
Luzerne &
Lackawanna,
Counties
We guarantee
$5,000.to $200,000
in annual billing.
Investment
Required
We’re ready –Are
you?
For more info call
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
NEPA FLORAL &
GIFT SHOP
Including delivery
van, coolers, all
inventory, displays,
computer system,
customer list, web-
site and much
more. Turn key
operation in prime
retail location. Seri-
ous inquiries please
call
570-592-3327
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
702 Air
Conditioners
AIR CONDITIONER
New $12,000 BTU
$225.570-740-1246
AIR CONDITIONER.
7,000 BTU asking
$75. 570-636-3151
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUE Cart
Railroad $800
Call 570-288-3671
ANTIQUE old fash-
ioned coal stove,
white Dickson with
warming closet, can
be used for heating
house, cooking
meals or just for
conversation $550.
570-735-2081
COINS Liberty v
nickels 1894-1909-
1911 $50. 287-4135
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ANTIQUES:
China Cabinet $300.
Desk $50. French
chandelier $600.
Sewing Machine
$50. 570-578-0728
GARAGE JACK,
1883 F. Kellogg,
buckboard, Exoel-
sior #1 $50. Hand
Saw, Keen Kutter
15” E.C.Simmons,
$50. 570-262-9989
LAWN ROLLER
water fill 1934
$50. 570-262-9989
LIONEL vintage train
transformer speck-
led case type
#4044, checked out
good $20.
570-735-6638
MOVING SALE.
Philadelphia Phillies
baseball cards 425
for 15. NY Mets
baseball cards 149
$6. College football
players on profes-
sional teams Penn
State 230 cards $9.
570-313-5214 or
570-313-3859
VACUUM TUBES
vintage electronic
vacuum tubes in
boxes total of 290
tubes all for $50.
570-735 6638
710 Appliances
Why Spend
Hundreds on
New or Used
Appliances?
Most problems
with your appli-
ances are usually
simple and
inexpensive to fix!
Save your hard
earned money,
Let us take a look
at it first!
30 years in
the business.
East Main
Appliances
570-735-8271
Nanticoke
AIR CONDITIONERS
2 older units
$25. 570-654-9109
A P P L I A N C E
PA R T S E T C .
Used appliances.
Parts for all brands.
223 George Ave.
Wilkes-Barre
570-820-8162
FREEZER UPRIGHT
$75.
570-654-9109
FREEZER Whirlpool,
upright, 4’ tall $50.
WASHER, Whirlpool,
5 cycle, heavy duty,
large capacity,
white $50. DRYER
Kenmore, heavy
duty, yellow $50.
REFRIGERATOR
Sears, self defrost,
2 door, freezer on
top $100. 654-1032
MICROWAVE Sharp
carousel, stainless
steel. Used only a
few months. $50.
570-430-6434
REFRIGERATOR
Frigidaire top mount
freezer model#FRT18
L4FW3white, 66â€H
30â€W, 30â€D.
$150. 594-4992.
WASHER GE front
load, GE electric
dryer, 3 years old,
paid $1400 for both
selling both for
$600. Still have
receipt. 709-8905
712 Baby Items
HIGH CHAIR Eddie
Bauer, wood, excel-
lent condition. $40.
570-631-6635
HIGH CHAIR Graco
biege & green col-
ors, locking wheels
very good condition.
$20. 570-735-6638
714 Bridal Items
WEDDING GOWN
WITH SLIP, VEIL,
$265. OBO.
570-655-1414
716 Building
Materials
LIGHT FIXTURES:
2 Quantity, Beautiful
hanging fixtures,
exclusive porcelain
flowered decoration
with 24k gold. Price
for 2, $200. 868-
6095
MORTAR thin set
mortar for tile 3/4 of
a 50lb. bag free.
570-779 4282
PORCH PILLARS (2)
aluminum 7.5’ tall,
8” diameter $20.
each. 823-7594
730 Computer
Equipment &
Software
PRINTER New Dell
color printer model
#720 carton never
opened $40.
570-675-1277.
744 Furniture &
Accessories
AIR MATTRESS new,
full size, with pump
$45. Mattress top-
per very thick, with
gel, full size $75.
Futon white oak,
Stickley Style heavy
duty cushion $300.
570-823-2709
CHINA CLOSET
walnut $200. OBO.
570-208-3685
CRIB SET, Classic
Winnie the Pooh,
curtains & acces-
sories $30.
570-239-5292
DINING TABLE, mar-
ble, 7’ long, 39”
wide, 1” thick, with
marble base. $400.
OBO. Singer peddle
sewing machine
$25. 570-823-1800
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER 56wx71h,
glass doors, 2
lights, $150.
GRANDFATHER
CLOCK curio, excel-
lent condition paid
$1800 sell for $700.
570-735-5482
744 Furniture &
Accessories
ENTERTAINMENT
center, light wood,
holds 27” TV, glass
doors, shelves
$100. OBO.
570-654-1032
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Antique sideboard
$250. Antique chair
$30. Antique settee
$125. Antique rock-
er $125. Sony Trini-
tron TV $45. RCA
color TV $30. Zenith
VCR $20. Boxes of
vhs tapes $1. each.
Blenko glass collec-
tion $150. Box of
dvds $3. each. 788-
0866
GARAGE SALE
LEFTOVERS
Oreck XL vacuum
bags $5. NOAT
shoes, new $3.
Copper jello molds
$1. each. 3M gel
writs rest $1. Hard-
cover books $1.
each. Ronan pruner
plus new $2. Ronan
multi cut $2. Star
wars keepsake
ornament $5. Mini
upright vacuum $5.
570-287-2299
GARBAGE DISPOS-
AL new Kenmore
$20. 2 pair yellow
antique satin JC
Penney lined drapes
48 x 84l like new $8
pair. 570-675-1277.
KITCHEN TABLE 6
chairs, hutch $400.
Sleeper sofa $300
2 10,000 btu air
conditioners $75
each all in excellent
condition. 825-2888
KITCHEN TABLE
with 4 captain
chairs, leaf, 3 new
tablecloths & pillows
included, heavy duty
set. Must see $200.
570-823-6885
KITTCHENETTE set
white metal $50.
Entertainment Shelf
stand $10. Treadmill
$65.Rider $25.
570-654-9109
LAMPS (2) parlor
stand up, grey metal
& black. $20 each.
570-740-1246
Mattress
A Queen Size
Pillow Top Set
Still in Plastic
Can Deliver
$150
570-280-9628
MATTRESS SALE
We Beat All
Competitors Prices!
Mattress Guy
Twin sets: $139
Full sets: $159
Queen sets: $199
All New
American Made
570-288-1898
OFFICE FURNITURE
Closing office,
selling desks, filing
cabinets, shelving,
TV & stand, etc.
570-262-0400
ROCKER,
wood/tapestry,
$75. RECLINER,
Burgundy velour
cloth, $125.
SOFA, CHAIR,
OTTOMAN, 3
TABLES, great
for den. Wood
and cloth, all in
excellent condi-
tion. $450.
Call after 6 PM
570-675-5046
SHELVES 5 glass
shelves in wood
casing, $60. 2 glass
/wood end tables,
$50. Glass/wood
coffee table $40.
570-885-4900
SOFA beautiful
camel back sofa,
excellent condition,
recovered in rose
stripe pattern $35.
570-287-2216
TABLE LAMP Orien-
tal Chinese woman
1960’s ceramic, pink
-white-gold. $35.
Collector spoons 17
different, must take
all $35. 696-1927
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
UTILITY CHAIR $10.
Ironing board, can
sit or stand $15.
Small tool box with
tools $50.
570-654-0507
WOODEN TEEPEE
southwest shelf
stand asking $30.
Metal daybed,
cream color asking
$50. Air condition-
ers 2, Panasonic
12,000 btu & Sharp
10,000 btu asking
$30. ea. 239-5292
EXETER
250 PEPE COURT
July 6th & 7th
9am - 2pm
(Off Memorial St.,
right on Pepe Ct.)
Vintage & Modern
Treasures.
Many Flea Items
$1.00 and Under!
EXETER
1950 Wyoming Ave
Sundays 8am-4pm
VENDORS
WANTED!
The Discount
Warehouse
Vendor Market.
Indoor spaces,
Outdoor spaces,
& Storefronts
available.
Call Chris at
570-709-1639
after 3:30pm.
FORTY FORT
1477 Wyoming Ave
Sun, July 8th, 9-3
Some antique furni-
ture, toys, baby
gear, decorative
household items.
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
705 Hazle St.
Saturday & Sunday
8 am to 2 pm
Everything under $5
SIDEWALK
SALE
HUNLOCK CREEK
1517 State Rte. 29
Fri, Sat, & Sun, 8-2
Furniture, lamps,
antiques, clothes,
Coach purses,
signed & numbered
artwork, toys, tod-
dler bed, drop leaf
dining room table,
Waterford, rugs,
antique oak
wash stand,
cash register.
Everything Must Go!
KINGSTON
BLOCK
John Street
Sat & Sun., 8-3
You Name It We
Have It!
LUZERNE
COUNTY FAIR
Is Hosting A
Community Yard
Sale On The Fair
Grounds
July 7, 14 & 21st.
$10 for 10ft.
No pre-registration
required. Parking
on grounds. Vendor
set up at 7am.
Refreshments will
be available Call
675-FAIR or email:
artsncraftslcf@
hotmail.com
MOUNTAINTOP
2106 Church Rd
Saturday, 8am-12
Rolling truck bed
cover, canoe,
skooter, toys, chil-
dren’s clothes &
much more!
MOUNTAINTOP
411 Ice Harvest Dr.
Sat & Sun., 8-2
Construction items,
tools, outdoor furni-
ture, couch, TV’s,
household items,
mountain bikes, 2
men’s large & 2
women’s small.
LG washer & dryer.
Cash register &
clothing ticket
maker.
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
PITTSTON TOWNSHIP
633 Suscon Road
Sat & Sun, 8-7
Fishing gear, tools,
aluminum brake,
Wii System,
sports cards &
collectibles,
Precious Moments
& NASCAR, house-
hold items & more.
PLAINS
109 Burke St.
Sat., 7/7 & Sun., 7/8
9a-3p
Everything must go!
Credit&Debit
accepted.
4+ vendors. Tables,
chairs, armoire,
beds, french provin-
cial couch & chair
frames, solid
mahogany buffet &
china cabinet, elec-
tronics, movies,
laptop, dvd/vcr,
child items B&G
baby-4T toys,
clothes, books,
gates, bassinett,
car seat, exercise
machine, Longaberger,
Home Interior,
Scentsy, jewelry,
women’s clothing,
amazing prom
gowns, collectibles,
fine china, kitchen &
housewares, crafts,
small tools, home
improvement, etc.
The list goes on...
SWOYERSVILLE
113 Noyes Avenue
570-687-5335
MERCHANDISE
SALE
Moving from PA to
Arizona.
Whirlpool side by
side black refrigera-
tor/freezer, also an
icemaker & water
dispenser.
Paid $850, asking
$650 OBO, 25
cubic feet. Have
original receipt and
is 10 months old.
Whirlpool white
washer
and dryer, both are
digital and large
capacity, paid
$1250, asking
$1000 OBO original
receipt and is
10 months
old. (Will separate
them.) Fridigaire
under the counter
black dishwasher,
paid $325.00, origi-
nal receipt, asking
$200.00
OBO. 10 piece din-
ing room set,
EFO furniture.
Includes table,
extra leaf, 4 chairs,
2 captain chairs,
top and bottom
matching hutch.
2 years old, original
receipt, paid
$2500, asking
$1800 OBO. More
EFO furniture, 8
piece king size
bedroom set,
includes bedframe,
top and bottom
headboard, 2
nightstands,
dresser with match-
ing mirror & extra
dresser chests.
Paid $2700, 2 years
old, original receipt,
asking $2000 OBO.
King sized mattress
and boxspring,
Prostere Premier.
Paid $825, 2 years
old, asking $475
OBO. 9 foot
Christmas tree,
lights already
attached, 2 years
old, paid $325,
original receipts,
asking $200 OBO. 3
piece maroon sec-
tional sofa (EFO)
4 reclining chairs, 1
part has cupholder,
sectional is 2 years
old, original receipt,
paid $2300, asking
$1500 OBO,
Glens Summit
water cooler, holds
5 gallons of water,
paid $80.00, origi-
nal receipt, 2 years
old, $50.00 OBO.
Air compresser, 60
gallon upright
Cobalt paid $500, 5
years old, asking
$250 OBO. Brown
Lazy Boy recliner, 5
years old,
paid $650.00, ask-
ing $250 OBO. 3
Hampton Bay ceil-
ing fans, 1 is 21”,
other 2 are 19”, 2
years old, paid
$75 for each,
original receipt,
each fan holds 3
lights. asking $40
OBO. 2 white
jewelry armoires,
each one has 7
drawers, 2 pull
out sides that
hangs necklaces. 2
years old, paid
$325.00 original
receipt, $75 each
OBO. Husband is
licensed mechanic,
there will be tons of
tools & auto parts.
YARD SALE TO
FOLLOW,
see this weekends
yard sale listing!. Or
call
570-687-5335 for
all details! -last ad
run had an error in
number., Please call
687-5335! Thank
you.
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
TRUCKSVILLE
201 Carverton Road
VINTAGE
YARD SALE
Sat 7/6 & Sun 7/7
from 8am -4pm.
HUGE collection of
jewelry, Depression
glass, Jadite, 50s
kitchen, antique
trunk, French wire
laundry hamper,
enamel-top table,
linens, vintage
purses, architec-
tural salvage man-
tel, 30s light fix-
tures & farmhouse
sink, TJMaxx & Tar-
get home décor,
Christmas, new-in-
box items &
furniture.
SWOYERSVILLE
113 Noyes Avenue
6th, 7th & 8th,
Moving from PA to
Arizona
CALL TO INQUIRE!
570-687-5335
Lots of different
power tools, lots of
mechanical tools,
car ramps, 8 foot
ladder, jackstand,
bottle jacks, garden
tools, chainsaws,
leafblower, wheel-
barrow, air tools,
ice cutters, ratchets
& much more! Wall
hanging, water
globes, curtain
rods, vacuum
cleaners, arts &
crafts supplies,
books, flashlights,
50” plasma flat
screen, 2 years old
with a 1 year war-
ranty left. Paid
$850, has original
receipt, asking
$500 OBO. Has a
wall mount. DVD
players, pots and
pans, Indian doll
collection, dolphin
lamps, dolphin
clocks, Star Wars
comforter set, A lit-
tle tykes wagon,
small kitchen appli-
ances, Bakers rack,
TV stand holds up
to 50” flatscreen.
Wall art, lots of
Wicker, and artificial
flowers. Sheets, pil-
lowcases, blankets,
lamps, humidifiers,
and vaporizers. Ugg
boots size 7.5,
Christmas decora-
tions & much more!
Everything must go!
Please call
570-687-5335 for
all details. Last ad
that ran had a
phone # error.
Please call asap as
everything must go!
Thanks.
TRUCKSVILLE
223 & 230
Cliffside Ave.
Sat., July 7th, 10-4
Something for
Everybody!
WEST WEST WYOMING WYOMING
6th Street
OPEN YEAR ROUND
SP SPACE ACE
A AV VAILABLE AILABLE
INSIDE & OUT INSIDE & OUT
Acres of Acres of
parking parking
OUTSIDE
SPACES
- $10
Saturday
10am-2pm
Sunday
8am-4pm
WILKES-BARRE/SOUTH
504. S. Main Street
Sat., July 7, 8-2
1940’s hand truck,
quilts, lots of deco-
rative, Christmas,
household, books &
women’s clothing.
WYOMING
153 9th Street
Sat. July 7th, 8-12
Women’s & junior’s
clothing, household,
books, DVD’s,
centerpiece vases
& more!
748 Good Things To
Eat
PICK YOUR OWN
BLUEBERRIES!
8am to 8pm
Closed Sundays
Sickler Blueberry
Farm - Vernon
570-333-5286
570-333-4944
NO PETS IN THE
FIELD!!
752 Landscaping &
Gardening
CUB CADET lawn
vacuum with chip-
per 6.5HP, excellent
condition $350.
570-823-8264 or
570-793-4130
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
756 Medical
Equipment
ACORN STAIR LIFT
570-262-7959
RAMPS adjustable
aluminum telescop-
ing wheel chair
track ramps $50.
570-690-5825
756 Medical
Equipment
MEDICAL
INSTRUMENTS
AND EQUIPMENT
for sale from small
family practice.
Items include:
Bausch & Lomb
Microscope Auto-
clave Fisher Centrifi
2 Physicians Clinical
Scales (350 pounds
/HealthOMeter/Dete
cto. 1 Baby Scale
built in drawers and
cabinets (Detecto)
Medical Instruments
Large white filing
cabinet. Metal filing
cabinet.
Examination table.
Phletbotomy Chair
Other Medical items
Medical Reference
Books. Medical
Equipment In Boxes,
new in boxes
Volumetric Infusion
Pum I.V. Controller
Dual I.V. Controller
Cardio Fax Metri-
Pro Stretcher
Oxygen Equipment
Location: White
Haven, PA. Please
email for details:
drsestate@
hotmail.com
758 Miscellaneous
AIR CONDITIONER,
Brand new, 8000
BTU Frigidaire
Energy Star $160.
570-288-3352
AIR PURIFIER. Oreck
XL Professional with
user manual. Was
$299. Asking $149.
570-636-3151
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BATHROOM STAND
with 2 shelves & 1
drawer @ bottom of
stand $20. Call
570-474-1648
BED queen tubular
steel $175. Vintage
vases 15 for $75.
Wedding white
bows $4. each.
Elastic 4 rolls 1/4”
$20. Vintage mink
hats 9 for $150.
Baskets large 7 for
$20. 570-654-4440
BEDLINER: ‘89
Chevy S10 truck
bedliner, standard
6’ cab $15. Gong
Show movie DVD
$10. 5 storm win-
dows $10. each. V6
HEI distributor cap
from ‘80 Monte
Carlo, very good
$10. Uniroyal Tiger-
paw GTS tire
P215/60/14 $40.
firm. Two Doral SDL
60 tires, 65% tread
P205/60R15 $40
both. Chevy SSR
model, red with
opening doors, new
$20. Black & grey
bucket seat covers,
simulated leather
$35. both.740-1246
Line up a place to live
in classified!
BISTRO SET, table, 2
folding chairs, heavy
metal, like new. $70.
PATIO CART, green
metal, made in Italy,
18”x26” 2 tier with
wheels, like new
$20. WOOD CHEST
31”x12 1/2”x13”,
black with gold trim,
hand painted flow-
ers on top & front,
painted by FL artist
$75. 570-696-2008
BOOKS: complete
works W. Shake-
speare $15. Car
care manual $12.
Elvis & Me plus mus.
ent. $25. Bonzau
$12. Presidential
pins $25. 825-2494
BOOKS: Mary Hig-
gins Clark 23 hard-
cover & 3 paper-
backs. Paid over $
300. sell for $ 60.
570-474-6028
BUMPER JACK
automotive 2 ton
pneumatic bumper
jack $250. Half ton
engine stand. $35.
‘69 Yamaha 50cc
scooter with title.
needs some work.
$200. 65,000 BTU
natural gas/lp
ceramic heater with
electric blower fan.
$300. 466-7365
CANES made from
slippery maple
trees, all handles
different, many
shapes & heights,
only 16 left $5. each.
Over 200 Christmas
& household items
includes trees,
lights, ornaments,
figurines, vases,
flowers, knick-
knacks, luggage,
exercise machine &
more for $60. Elec-
tric sewing machine
$5. 570-735-2081
COUNTERTOP
WARMER commer-
cial size for popcorn
& nacho, dips etc. 2
racks, lighted inside
slide doors front &
back, very good
condition. Was
$1,700. asking
$675. 570-636-3151
DISHES service for
8 fruit pattern $25.
570-654-3755
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
PAGE 8G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2012 HONDA
ACCORD LX
4 dr, Auto Trans, AC, PW, PL, Cruise, ABS, 6 Air Bags, Tilt,
Keyless Entry, AM/FM/CD, Model #CP2F3CEW
*
MPG
34 HWY
$219 Lease Per Mo. For 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st Payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $13,149.90.
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualified
buyers for limited term.
2012 HONDA CIVIC LX SEDAN
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $11,952.95
Per Mo.
Lease
ease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo Per Mo.
LLease
* **
• Model #FB2F5CEW • 140-hp
16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® • 5-Speed
Automatic Transmission • Air Con-
ditioning with Air-Filtration System
• Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors
• Cruise Control • Remote Entry •
160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System
with 4 Speakers • ABS
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold
Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side Oc-
cupant Position Detection System
(OPDS) • Side Curtain Airbags
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA PILOT LX
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $17,388.00
Per Mo.
Lease
• 250-hp 24-Valve SOHC i-VTEC®
• 5-Speed Automatic Transmission
• 8 Passenger Seating • Variable
Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive
System (VTM-4®) • Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA®) with Traction Con-
trol • Power WIndows/Locks/Mirrors
• Front and Rear Air Conditioning with
Air-Filtration System • 229-Watt AM/
FM/CD Audio System with 7 Speakers
including Subwoofer • Remote Entry
• ABS • Dual-Stage, Multiple-Thresh-
old Front Airbags (SRS) • Front Side
Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection
System (OPDS)
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
2012 HONDA CR-V EX
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
• Model RM4H5CJW • 185-hp
• 2.4-Liter, 16-Valve SOHC i-VTEC® 4-Cylinder
Engine • Real Time AWD with Intelligent Control
System™ • Vehicle Stability Assist™ (VSA®) with
Traction Control • Automatic Transmission
• Cruise Control • A/C • One-Touch Power
Moonroof with Tilt Feature • Remote Entry
System • Bluetooth® HandsFreeLink®
• Multi-angle rearview camera with guidelines
• 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 6
Speakers • Bluetooth® Streaming Audio
• Pandora® Internet Radio compatibility
• SMS Text Message Function
• USB Audio Interface
• Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS)
• Dual-Stage, Multiple-Threshold Front Airbags
(SRS) • Front Side Airbags with Passenger-Side
Occupant Position Detection System (OPDS)
• Side Curtain Airbags with Rollover Sensor
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Pe Mo Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACUTAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE.
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
SILENT SALESMAN...
THIS WEEK
Rock Bottom Prices Clearly Marked!
What You See Is... What you pay!
2.
9%
On All Preowned
‘S
+
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
*2.9% on all Certifed Honda’s thru Am Honda Finance W.A.C. up to 60 mos. Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k Basic
Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
Gold, 71K, Was $6,950
Now $5,726
03 CHRYSLER
CONCORDE LXI SDN
Silver, 107K, Was $8,250
Now $6,960
02 HONDA ACCORD
LX SDN
Red, 80K, Was $9,750
Now $8,908
03 JEEP GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4
Black, 47K, Was $13,500
Now $12,117
07 JEEP LIBERTY
SPORT 4X4
Silver, 60K, Navi/R DVD, Was $13,750
Now $12,977
06 CHRYSLER TOWN
& COUNTRY LTD
Red, 58K, Was $14,750
Now $13,483
05 CADILLAC
CTS SEDAN
Gray, 63K, Was $14,750
Now $13,660
07 CHEVY
TRAILBLAZER LT 4X4
Black, 33K, Was $14,750
Now $13,731
09 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SDN
Blue, 69K, Was $17,950
Now $17,353
07 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER 4WD
Silver, 20K, Was $16,250
Now $14,779
09 SUBARU
IMPREZA SDN
Red, 83K, Was $9,950
Now $9,209
03 TOYOTA
CAMRY SDN
Silver, 104K, Was $7,995
Now $6,898
02 TOYOTA
SIENNA CE
Blue, 71K, Was $9,850
Now $8,874
07 CHRYSLER SEBRING
TOURING SDN
White, 33K, Was $13,250
Now $12,137
07 CHEVY IMPALA
LT SEDAN
Navy, 64K, Was $13,950
Now $12,784
08 SATURN VUE
XE-V6 AWD
Gray, 75K, Was $14,500
Now $13,638
06 HONDA ACCORD
EX V6 SDN
Navy, 15K, Was $14,950
Now $13,645
09 CHEVY IMPALA
LS SEDAN
Silver, 34K, Was $14,950
Now $13,894
09 HONDA CIVIC
LX CPE
White, 12K, Was $15,950
Now $14,636
10 FORD FOCUS
SE SEDAN
Blue, 34K, Was $19,950
Now $17,857
10 NISSAN ALTIMA
3.5 SR
Black, 24K, Was $21,500
Now $20,757
10 TOYOTA CAMRY
XLE SDN
Black, 16K, Navi, RDVD, Was $29,950
Now $28,238
10 GMC TERRAIN
SLE 4WD
YOUR
NICE
TRADE
HERE
YOUR
NICE
TRADE
HERE
‘S
1110 Wyoming Ave,
Scranton, PA
1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
ODYSSEY
10 Odyssey EX Slate, 24K, Was $25,950..NOW $25,327
10 Odyssey EXL DVD Slate, 24K, Was $27,500..NOW $26,985
CROSSTOUR
11 Crosstour EXL 4WD Green, 19K, Was $28,950..NOW $27,963
PILOT 4WD
07 PILOT EXL Black, 55K, Was $20,950.......................NOW $20,341
09 PILOT EX Silver, 34K, Was $24,950..........................NOW $23,468
10 PILOT LX Gray, 25K, Was $24,950...........................NOW $23,846
11 PILOT LX Gray, 37K, Was $24,950...........................NOW $23,968
09 PILOT EXL Cherry, 47K, Was $25,950 .....................NOW $24,565
11 PILOT EX Cherry, 15K, Was $29,500 ........................NOW $28,214
11 PILOT EX Silver, 8K, Was $29,500 ...........................NOW $28,608
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 21K, Was $30,500........................NOW $29,717
11 PILOT EXL-NAVI Black, 22K, Was $32,500..........NOW $30,866
CRV 4WD
07 CRV LX Navy, 47K, Was $15,950 ...............................NOW $14,931
08 CRV EX (2) White, 45K, Was $17,750.......................NOW $16,933
09 CRV LX White, 27K, Was $17,250...............................NOW $16,654
09 CRV EX Brown, 27K, Was $18,950 .............................NOW $18,371
10 CRV EXL Navy, 37K, Was $23,500............................NOW $21,898
11 CRV SE Silver, 8K, Was $21,950................................NOW $21,327
11 CRV EX Silver, 17K, Was $22,750 ..............................NOW $22,111
11 CRV EX Titanium, 5K, Was $22,950............................NOW $22,309
ACCORDS
08 ACCORD LX SDN Black, 25K, Was $15,950.........NOW $15,191
09 ACCORD LXP SDN Red, 34K, Was $16,250 .......NOW $15,674
08 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 25K, Was $17,250 ..........NOW $16,816
09 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 16K, Was 17,950........NOW $16,987
10 ACCORD LX SDN Gray, 9K, Was $18,500 ...........NOW $17,808
10 ACCORD EX SDN White, 44K, Was $17,950.........NOW $17,489
09 ACCORD EX SDN Beige, 31K, Was $18,500 ........NOW $17,617
11 ACCORD LX 5SPD SDN White, 16K, Was $18,750 NOW $17,968
09 ACCORD EX SDN White, 23K, Was $19,500 ........NOW $18,439
09 ACCORD EX SDN Silver, 25K, Was $18,950 ........NOW $18,527
10 ACCORD LXP SDN Silver, 28K, Was $18,950 .....NOW $18,544
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Black, 39K, Was $19,950 .....NOW $19,499
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Red, 30K, Was, $19,950 ......NOW $19,503
09 ACCORD EXL V6 SDN Silver, 37K, Was $20,500 .NOW $19,620
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Silver, 15K, Was $21,500 .....NOW $20,774
CIVICS
07 CIVIC LX SDN Gold, 32K, Was $13,950 ................NOW $13,629
07 CIVIC EX CPE Blue, 39K, Was $14,500.................NOW $13,894
09 CIVIC LX SDN Gray, 30K, Was $15,750.................NOW $15,183
09 CIVIC EX CPE Black, 40K, Was $15,950................NOW $14,888
10 CIVIC LX SDN Gray, 19K, Was $16,950.................NOW $15,868
09 CIVIC HYBRID SDN Black, 37K, Was $18,500 ...NOW $16,338
09 CIVIC EX SDN NAVI Titanium, 34K, Was $16,950..NOW $16,711
10 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 17K, Was $16,950................NOW $16,212
11 CIVIC LX SDN Navy, 13K, Was $17,500.................NOW $16,758
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 9G
INTERSTATE
ROUTE 315
KEN
POLLOCK
SUZUKI
81
ROUTE 315
EXIT 175
CLOSE TOEVERYWHERE!
WE’RE EASY TOFIND!
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
*Tax and tags additional. Buy now for sale price includes Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates of $1,000 on 2012 Suzuki SX4 AWD, and SX4 Sedan; $1,500 Suzuki Manufacturer Rebates on Suzuki
Grand Vitara and Kizashi. Buy now for sale price includes $500 Suzuki Owner Loyalty on 2012 Suzuki SX4 Sedan, SX4 Crossover, Kizashi and Grand Vitara. All Ken Pollock Suzuki discounts
applied. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. Based on 2010 and 2011 President’s Club Standings.
A TOP 10 IN THE NATION SUZUKI SALES VOLUME DEALER 2 YEARS RUNNING***
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
S AWD
Advanced Intelligent All-Wheel
Drive, 8 Standard Airbags, Dual
Zone Digital Climate Control,
Automatic CVT Transmission,
TouchFree Smart Key, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Molded
Mud flap package
Stk# S2205
$
19,799*
BUY NOW FOR:
3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel
Drive, 8 Standard Airbags,
Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, 6 Speed
Manual Transmission
2012 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER
AWD
$
14,899*
BUY NOW FOR:
Stk#S2016
MSRP
$
18,019*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,399*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
MSRP
$
23,669*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
21,799*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
NEW
2012 SUZUKI SX4 LE POPULAR
SEDAN
MSRP
$
18,419*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
16,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2082
LE Popular Package, 8 Standard
Airbags, Automatic Transmission,
Power Windows, Power Locks,
Power Mirrors, Alloy Wheels
$
15,499*
BUY NOW FOR:
$
16,999*
BUY NOW FOR:
8 Standard Airbags, Dual Digital
Climate Control, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Power
Mirrors, AM/FM/CD, 6 Speed
Manual Transmission
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
SE FWD
MSRP w/ Accessories
$
20,493*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
18,999*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2207
$
20,699*
BUY NOW FOR:
4 Wheel Drive, Voice Activated
Navigation w/ Blue Tooth,
Automatic Transmission, Power
Windows, Power Locks, Power
Mirrors, Electronic Stability Control
2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA
4WD
MSRP
$
24,284*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
22,699*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,500*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
Stk#S2132
I
L
o
v
e
M
y
S
u
z
u
k
i
C
a
r
C
lu
b
!
J
o
in
T
h
e
NEW
NEW
NEW
NEW
$
16,799*
BUY NOW FOR:
MSRP
$
19,995*
Ken Pollock Sale Price
$
18,299*
Manufacturer Rebate -
$
1,000*
Owner Loyalty Rebate -
$
500*
3-Mode Intelligent All-Wheel Drive,
8 Standard Airbags, Power Windows,
Power Locks, Power Mirrors, Automatic,
OVER 20 AVAILABLE
AT THIS PRICE!
Stk#S2061
NEW
is in PITTSTON
2012 SUZUKI SX4
CROSSOVER AUTO AWD
Ileana from Dunmore
Dennis & Susan from Wyoming
Richelle & Joe from Pittston
Rita & Renee from Miners Mills
PAGE 10G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
*Your membership covers the greens fees at
most of the participating golf courses.
Phone orders call 829-7101
or order online at timesleader.com
by clicking on
“Contact Us > Subscribe”
at the top right of our home page.
Join the Club Today!
For
Just
24
$35
Get
Rounds
of Golf
Join The Most Exclusive Club
In Northeastern Pennsylvania,
The Times Leader Golf Club!
Play at these courses
*
:
Arnold’s Golf Course
490B. West Third St., Nescopeck, PA (570) 752-7022
Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club
260 Country Club Dr., Mountain Top, PA (570) 868-4653
Briarwood “East” & “West” Golf Clubs
4775 West Market Street, York, PA (717) 792-9776
Emanon Country Club
Old State Road, RR#1 Box 78, Falls, PA (570) 388-6112
Fernwood Hotel Resort
Route 209, Bushkill, PA (888) 337-6966
Hollenback Golf Course
1050 N. Washington St., Wilkes Barre, PA (570) 821-1169
Lakeland Golf Club
Route 107, Fleetville, PA (570) 945-9983
Mill Race Golf Course
4584 Red Rock Road, Benton, PA (570) 925-2040
Mountain Laurel Golf Course
HC1, Box 9A1, White Haven (570) 443-7424
Mountain Valley Golf Course
1021 Brockton Mountain Dr., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2242
Sand Springs Country Club
1 Sand Springs Drive, Drums, PA (570) 788-5845
Shadowbrook Inn and Resort
Route 6E, East Tunkhannock, PA (800) 955-0295
Shawnee Inn & Golf Resort
1 River Rd., Shawnee On The Delaware, PA (800) 742-9633
Stone Hedge Golf Course
49 Bridge St., Tunkhannock, PA (570) 836-5108
Sugarloaf Golf Course
18 Golf Course Road, Sugarloaf, PA (570) 384-4097
Towanda Country Club
Box 6180, Towanda, PA (570) 265-6939
Traditions at the Glen
4301 Watson Blvd., Johnson City, NY (607) 797-2381
Twin Oaks Golf Course
RR3 Box 283, Dallas, PA (570) 333-4360
Villas Crossing Golf Course
521 Golf Road, Tamaqua, PA (570) 386-4515
White Birch Golf Course
660 Tuscarora Park Rd., Barnesville, PA (570) 467-2525
White Deer Golf Club
352 Allenwood Camp Ln., Montgomery, PA (570) 547-2186
Woodloch Springs
Woodloch Drive, Hawley, PA (570) 685-8102
Driving Ranges & Instruction
Academy of Golf Center
1333 N. River St., Plains, PA (570) 824-5813
International Golf School
Multiple course locations. Call (570) 752-7281 for information.
I want to join The Times Leader Golf Club. Cards are now available.
______ paid in full at $35 per membership (includes Pa. sales tax). Pickup at
The Times Leader.
______ membership(s) paid in full at $35 each (includes Pa. sales tax & shipping).
______ TOTAL ENCLOSED
Name___________________________________________________
Address_________________________________________________
Phone__________________________
City______________________________ State___ ZIP____________
Check one: ❒ MasterCard ❒ Visa ❒ Discover ❒ American Express
Charge to my credit card # ___________________________________
Exp. date_______ Security Code_____
Signature_____________________________________
Return form to: The Times Leader Golf Club, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
❏Yes!
timesleader.com
_
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 11G
PAGE 12G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
POLLOCK’S USED CARS
Ken Pollock AT
339 HWY 315, PITTSTON, PA
Hours
M-F 9-8pm
Sat 9-5pm
1-800-223-1111
www.kenpollocksuzuki.com
CLOSE TO EVERYWHERE
WE’RE EASY TO FIND
JUST OFF EXIT 175
RTE I-81 • PITTSTON
SCAN HERE FOR
MORE INFO
*All Prices Plus Tax, Tags, & Fees. Artwork for illustration purposes only. Dealer not responsible for typographical errors. All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars pass PA State Inspection.
See sales person for complete details. **1.99% on bank approved credit for 60 month term. Just Traded As Traded Vehicles are sold as is where is with no warranty.
GOLD CHECK CERTIFIED VEHICLES
JUST TRADED
AS TRADED!
• 3 Day or 150 Mile Money Back Guarantee**
• 30 Day/1000 Mile Limited Warranty**
• All Value Vehicle Outlet Cars Pass
PA State Inspection**
Value Vehicle Outlet
RATES AS LOW AS
1.99%
**
The Best Vehicle At The
Absolute Lowest Prices.
$
11,799
* 2008 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
Stk# S2112A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
GOLD CHECK CERTIFIED
MANAGER’S SPECIALS
$
12,499
* 2006 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ
Stk#P14671, Leather, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, PW, PL
$
11,999
* 2006 CHEVY EQUINOX AWD LT
Stk#P14663A, Sunroof, Power Windows & Locks, Rare Color!
2002 LEXUS RX300 AWD
Stk# S2074A, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, Only 71K Original Miles!
$
11,899
*
2003 ISUZU RODEO 4X4
Stk# P14669, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
1,699
*
2002 FORD TAURUS SEDAN
Stk# S2029A, Sunroof, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
1,899
*
2004 CHEVY CAVALIER COUPE
Stk# S2049A, Sunroof, Automatic, Alloys
$
3,999
*
1999 CHEVY BLAZER 4DR 4X4
Stk# P14678A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
1,999
*
PRICES FOR EVERY BUDGET!!!
OVER 50 USED VEHICLES IN STOCK UNDER $20,000!
Stk# S2027A, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks
2005 SUZUKI AERIO
WAGON
NOW
$
5,999
*
Stk# S1966A, Sunroof, Leather,
Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
2003 CHEVY MONTE
CARLO SS
NOW
$
7,999
*
Stk# S2123A, Power Windows
& Locks, CD, Automatic
2005 SUZUKI
FORENZA SEDAN
NOW
$
5,799
*
Stk# P14684A, Power Windows &
Locks, CD, Alloy Wheels, Auto
2005 PONTIAC VIBE
NOW
$
8,799
*
Stk# S1976A, Power Windows &
Locks, Automatic, Keyless Entry
2005 KIA SORENTO
AWD
NOW
$
9,799
*
Stk# P14674A, Automatic,
Power Windows & Locks, CD
2006 FORD FUSION
SEDAN
NOW
$
9,899
*
Stk# S2158B, Air Conditioning,
Power Windows & Locks
2001 SATURN SC2
COUPE
NOW
$
3,999
*
Stk# S2212A, Automatic, Air
Conditioning, Great On Gas!
2003 KIA SPECTRA
SEDAN
NOW
$
5,299
*
Stk# S2225A, Power Windows &
Locks, Alloy Wheels, Automatic
2008 JEEP PATRIOT
AWD
NOW
$
9,999
*
$
12,499
* 2010 NISSAN VERSA SEDAN
Stk#S2122A, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD
$
12,499
* 2010 HYUNDAI SONATA
Stk#S2050A, GLS Package, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
12,599
* 2008 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX SEDAN
Stk#P14691, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD
2006 HYUNDAI TUCSON AWD
Stk# S2098A, Sunroof, Low Miles, Automatic, 4 Cylinder, PW, PL
$
13,299
*
2009 SUBARU IMPREZA AWD
Stk# P14690, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, Power Windows & Locks
$
13,699
*
2007 JEEP COMPASS 4WD LIMITED
Stk# P14687, Leather, Sunroof, Automatic, Chrome Wheel Pkg
$
13,899
*
2010 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER AWD
Stk# S2072A, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks
$
13,899
*
$
13,999
* 2006 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT 4X4
Stk#P14694A, Leather, Sunroof, 3rd Row, Tow Pkg
2006 DODGE DAKOTA QUAD CAB 4X4
Stk# S2021A, Power Windows & Locks, Alloy Wheels, Auto, Tonneau Cover
$
14,499
*
2009 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE COUPE
Stk# S2179A, GS Package, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, CD, PW, PL
$
14,899
*
2011 SUZUKI SX4 CROSSOVER TECH AWD
Stk# S2140A, Custom Leather, Navigation, Auto, Alloy Wheels
$
15,299
*
2007 HYUNDAI SANTA FE 4WD
Stk# P14693, Sunroof, Automatic, CD, Alloy Wheels, Low Miles
$
15,799
*
2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO EXT CAB 4X4
Stk# S2005A, LT Package, Allloy Wheels, Z71 Package
$
16,599
*
2009 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY VAN
Stk# P14685, Leather, Stow N Go Seating, Rear DVD Player, Alloy Wheels
$
17,999
*
2009 VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT
Stk# S2120A, Automatic, Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, 1-Owner!
$
18,799
*
2009 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4X4
Stk# S2109A, Automatic, Air Conditioning, AM/FM/CD
$
18,999
*
2009 HONDA CRV EX-L
Stk# P14679, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Alloy Wheels, All Wheel Drive!
$
19,999
*
2012 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA LIMITED 4X4
Stk# S1854A, Sunroof, Heated Leather, 18” Alloys, Navigation w/ Bluetooth!
$
20,499
*
2008 NISSAN PATHFINDER SE 4X4
Stk# P14688, DVD, Leather, Sunroof, Alloy Wheels, 3rd Row Seats!!!
$
20,799
*
2009 SUBARU LEGACY LIMITED AWD
Stk# S2046A, Rare 3.0L V-6 R, Leather, Navigation, Alloys, PW, PL
$
20,999
*
2011 SUZUKI EQUATOR CREW CAB RMZ-4 4X4
Stk# S1996A, Navigation, Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Off Road Pkg
$
22,799
*
2011 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4
Stk# P14681, SLT Pkg, Chrome Pkg, Power Windows & Locks
$
23,499
*
2012 FORD MUSTANG CONVERTIBLE
Stk# P14659, Automatic, Power Windows & Locks, CD, Alloy Wheels
$
22,699
*
2011 HONDA PILOT 4X4
Stk# P14635, EX Package, 3rd Row Seating, Alloy Wheels, CD, Low Miles!
$
26,399
*
$
42,599
* 2011 CHEVY AVALANCHE LTZ 4X4
Stk# S2197A, Black on Black, Navigation, Leather, Sunroof, Low Miles!
$
29,999
* 2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LTZ AWD
Stk# S2206A, DVD Players, Navigation, Sunroof, Only 3K Miles!
1994 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
Stk# S2203B, Automatic, Alloy Wheels
$
1,399
*
1997 SUBARU IMPREZA WAGON
Stk# S2249A, All Wheel Drive! Great Runner
$
1,499
*
2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE SDN
Stk# S2078D, Leather, Alloy Wheels, Automatic
$
4,999
*
Stk#S1967A, Special Edition,
Alloy Wheels, Automatic, Low Miles!
2012 SUZUKI GRAND
VITARA PREMIUM 4X4
NOW
$
19,499
*
Stk#S1806A, Only 3K Miles, Sunroof,
18” Wheels, All Wheel Drive
2012 SUZUKI KIZASHI
GTS AWD
NOW
$
21,499
*
HOURS: Monday Thru Thursday 8:00am - 7:00pm
Friday & Saturday 8:00am - 5:00pm
1-888-307-7077
*In stock vehicles only. Prices plus tax & tags. All rebates applied. See Salesperson for Details. Financing must be approve thru ally bank. See dealer for details.
We Service
ALL
Motor Vehicles
Just Ask
STAN!
Just Ask
STAN!
State Inspection
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 7/31/12 Av.
$.99
Lube Oil Filter
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 7/31/12 Av.
$24.95
Rotate & Balance
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 7/31/12 Av.
$24.95
Emissions Inspection
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 7/31/12 Av.
$24.95
Coolant System Services
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 7/31/12 Av.
$89.95
Automatic Transmission Service
Must Present Coupon Prior To Service. Expires 7/31/12 Av.
$124.95
Call today 876-2100
Some restrictions apply. See dealer for details.
Bad Credit - No Credit
We Make It Simple
2 WAYS TO PURCHASE
YOUR NEXT CAR
TOLL
FREE 1-855-313-LOAN (5626)
or
ONLINE @ www.ApproveMyCredit.com
An Eynon Buick GMC Dealership
NEW CARS
NEW 2012 BUICK VERANO
$
22,799
Preferred Equipment Pkg,
Remote Starter,
Satellite Radio
Save $671
NEW 2012 GMC ACADIA
DENALI AWD
$
43,635
Silver Beauty, “Too
Many Options To List”!
0% Financing
Available
Save $3,850
NEW 2012 BUICK ENCLAVE
AWD
$
36,250
Choose From 4, Preferred
Equipment Pkg,
Loaded with Luxury!
0% Financing
Available
Save $3,025
NEW 2012 BUICK LACROSSE
$
29,449
Crystal RedTint Coat, 4 Cyl.,
E-Assist, Preferred
Equipment Pkg
1.9% Financing
Available
Save $1,921
USED CARS
10 HYUNDAI ELANTRA Blue, 21K Miles .......
$
12,900
06 BUICK LUCERNE CX 16K Miles ...................
$
13,995
05 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4
$
13,995
08 CADILLAC SRX-4 AWD...............................
$
18,995
09 CHEVY SUBURBAN LT..................................
$
24,995
01 MITSUBISHI MONTERO SPORT 4X4
$
3,995
01 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER 4X4.................
$
7,995
08 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL AWD.................
$
26,995
02 CADILLAC DEVILLE..............................................
$
7,995
09 CHEVY MALIBU LT............................................
$
14,995
03 GMC YUKON DENALI AWD...............
$
10,900
12 FORD E-150 CARGO VAN...................
$
19,900
11 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB..
$
24,900
11 DODGE AVENGER SXT..............................
$
16,900
11 TOYOTA YARIS SEDAN’S.....................
$
14,900
12 FORD MUSTANG COUPE.......................
$
20,900
12 FORD FOCUS SDN’S...................... From
$
17,900
05 SUBARU FORRESTER XS.......................
$
12,995
11 CHEVY MALIBU LTZ........................................
$
18,900
10 DODGE CALIBER’S (2 Available) ........
$
14,995
10 VW BEETLE COUPE..........................................
$
15,900
10 CHRYSLER SEBRING (2 Available). From
$
14,995
11 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT AWD..................
$
26,995
11 CHRYSLER 200LX..............................................
$
16,995
12 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ........................................
$
23,995
11 HYUNDAI ACCENTS (4 Available) .......
$
13,995
11 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4...................
$
19,900
11 MAZDA CX-7 AWD..........................................
$
23,900
11 HYUNDAI SANTA FE AWD..................
$
20,900
10 DODGE CHARGER SXT.............................
$
16,900
11 NISSAN ROGUE AWD................................
$
19,900
11 DODGE CHALLENGER................................
$
22,900
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 13G
CALL AN EXPERT
CALL AN EXPERT
Professional Services Directory
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1006 A/C &
Refrigeration
Services
STRISH A/C
Ductless / Central
Air Conditioning
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
570-332-0715
1015 Appliance
Service
ECO-FRIENDLY
APPLIANCE TECH.
25 Years Experi-
ence fixing major
appliances: Washer,
Dryer, Refrigerator,
Dishwasher, Com-
pactors. Most
brands. Free phone
advice & all work
guaranteed. No
service charge for
visit. 570-706-6577
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
ALL OLDERHOMES
SPECIALIST
825-4268.
Remodel / repair,
Interior remodel
& additions
HUGHES
Construction
NEED A NEW
KITCHEN OR
BATH????
Seasonal Rooms
Roofing, Home
Renovating.
Garages,
Kitchens, Baths,
Siding and More!
Licensed and
Insured.
FREE
ESTIMATES!!
570-388-0149
PA040387
NICHOLS CONSTRUCTION
All Types Of Work
New or Remodeling
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-406-6044
PR BUILDERS
Any and all types of
remodeling from
windows to design
build renovations.
Handyman
Services also,
Electric, Plumbing,
Building.
PA license 048740
accepts Visa &
Mastercard
call 570-826-0919
QUALITY CONCRETE
WORK
BLOCKS, BRICKS
STONE WORK.
Any jobs, small or
big. Call Bahram
570-855-8405
ROOFING, SIDING,
DECKS, WINDOWS
For All of Your
Remodeling Needs.
Will Beat Any Price
25 Yrs. Experience
Ref. Ins. Free Est.
570-332-7023
Or 570-855-2506
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1024 Building &
Remodeling
SPRING
BUILDING/
REMODELING?
Call the
Building Industry
Association
for a list of
qualified members
call 287-3331
or go to
www.bianepa.com
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
CAVUTO
CHIMNEY
SERVICE
& Gutter Cleaning
Free Estimates
Insured
570-709-2479
CHIMNEY REPAIRS
Parging. Stucco.
Stainless Liners.
Cleanings. Custom
Sheet Metal Shop.
570-383-0644
1-800-943-1515
Call Now!
COZY HEARTH CHIMNEY
ALL CHIMNEY
REPAIR
Chimney Cleaning,
Rebuilding, Repair,
Stainless Steel
Lining, Parging,
Stucco, Caps, Etc.
Free Estimates
Senior Discounts
Licensed-Insured
1-888-680-7990
570-840-0873
1042 Cleaning &
Maintainence
Connie’s Cleaning
15 years experience
Bonded & Insured
Residential Cleaning
Connie Mastruzzo
Brutski - Owner
570-430-3743 570-430-3743
Connie does the
cleaning!
HOUSEKEEPING
Dependable &
professional. Flexible
rates and hours.
Supplies provided.
References Available
357-1951, after 6pm
Northeast Janitorial
Services, LLC
Commercial &
Residential
cleaning,
FREE ESTIMATES.
Call 570-237-2193
Northeast Janitorial
Services,LLC
Commercial and
Residential
Cleaning.
FREE ESTIMATES
570-237-2193
PARAGON
CLEANING
SERVICES
Residential/
Commercial
Tenant move out.
New construction
cleanups.
“Take a Rest,
Call the Best”
570-332-0324
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
A STEP-UP MASONRY
Brick, block, con-
crete, pavers. Spe-
cializing in stone.
Free Estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
Senior Discount. Call
570-702-3225
BGD CONCRETE
We Specialize in
All Phases of
Concrete Work
We Also Seal Coat
Asphalt Driveways
No Job Too Small!
570-239-9178
COVERT & SONS
CONCRETE CO.
Give us a call,
we’ll beat
them all!
570-696-3488 or
570-239-2780
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
D. Pugh
Concrete
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Licensed - Insured
Certified - Masonry
Concrete - Roofing
Quality
Craftsmanship
Guaranteed
Unbeatable Prices
Senior Citizen
Discounts
Free Estimates
570-574-4618 or
570-709-3577
Wi l l i ams & Franks I nc
Masonry - Concrete
Brick-Stonework.
Chimneys-Stucco”
“NO JOB TOO
SMALL”
“Damage repair
specialist”
570-466-2916
1057Construction &
Building
ALR
CONSTRUCTION
INC.
Additions, siding,
windows, kitchens,
bathrooms, new
homes & more! A
name you can trust.
Guaranteed quality
you can depend on!
570-606-3462
PA087364
DOUBLE D DOUBLE D
Construction Co Construction Co
General Contrac-
tors. We do all
types of work,
including concrete,
stucco, sidewalks,
patios, & all general
construction.
“We do it all”
Call anytime at
570-991-7670 or
570-690-2642 and
ask for Dave.
FATHER & SON
CONSTRUCTION
Interior & Exterior
Remodeling
Jobs of All Sizes
570-814-4578
570-709-8826
FS Construction
Specializing in all
types of home
improvements,
complete remodel-
ing from start to fin-
ish, additions, roof-
ing, siding, electrical
and plumbing, all
types of excavation
& demolition, side-
walks and concrete
work, new home
construction, A/C
work, Free esti-
mates, licensed,
insured. Call Frank
at 570-479-1203
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
1078 Dry Wall
MIRRA
DRYWALL
Hanging & Finishing
Textured Ceilings
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-675-3378
1084 Electrical
GRULA ELECTRIC LLC
Licensed, Insured,
No job too small.
570-829-4077
SLEBODA ELECTRIC
Master electrician
Licensed & Insured
Service Changes &
Replacements.
Generator Installs.
8 6 8 - 4 4 6 9
1093 Excavating
EXCAVATING/MODULAR HOMES
Foundations, land
clearing, driveways,
storm drainage,
blacktop repair, etc.
Free Estimates
570-332-0077
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
1099 Fencing &
Decks
ACTION FENCE
SUMMER SALE:
Discounts on pvc &
chain link fence!
New & Used.
Sales & Installation
FREE ESTIMATES!
1-888-FENCE-80
DECK BUILDERS
Of Northeast
Contracting Group.
We build any type,
size and design,
staining & power-
washing. If the deck
of your choice is not
completed within 5
days, then your
deck is free!
570-338-2269
1129 Gutter
Repair & Cleaning
GUTTER CLEANING
Window Cleaning
Pressure washing
Insured
570-288-6794
1132 Handyman
Services
All Your Home
Repair Needs,
licensed & Insured
Painting,
powerwashing,
carpentry & more,
No Job Too Small.
Free Estimates
Russell’s Property
Maintenance
570-406-3339
DO IT ALL HANDYMAN
Painting, drywall,
plumbing & all types
of interior & exterior
home repairs.
570-829-5318
VICTORY
HANDYMAN
SERVICE
You Name It, We
Can Do it.
Over 30 Years Expe-
rience in General
Construction
Licensed & Insured
570-313-2262
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A A C L E A N I N G
A1 Always hauling,
cleaning attics, cellar,
garage, one piece or
whole Estate, also
available 10 &20 yard
dumpsters.655-0695
592-1813or287-8302
AAA CLEANING
A1 GENERAL HAULING
Cleaning attics,
cellars, garages.
Demolitions, Roofing
&Tree Removal.
FreeEst. 779-0918or
542-5821; 814-8299
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-822-4582
ALL KINDS OF
HAULING & JUNK
REMOVAL
SPRING CLEAN UP!
TREE/SHRUB TREE/SHRUB
REMOV REMOVAL AL
DEMOLITION DEMOLITION
Estate Cleanout Estate Cleanout
Free Estimates
24 HOUR
SERVICE
SMALL AND
LARGE JOBS!
570-823-1811
570-239-0484
ALWAYS READY
HAULING
Moving, Deliver-
ies, Property &
Estate Cleanups,
Attics, Cellars,
Yards, Garages,
Construction
Sites, Flood
Damage & More.
CHEAPER THAN
A DUMPSTER!!
SAME DAY
SERVICE
Free Estimates
570-301-3754
C&M Property Man-
agement
Estate Cleanouts
Rubbish Removal
Grass Cutting
Hedge Trimming
Light Excavating
Stone & Dirt Deliv-
ery. Tree Trim-
ming/Removal
Driveway Sealing
Chris-570-574-5018
Matt-570-855-4840
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
FIVE STAR HAULING
Basements,
garages, yards,
houses, and also
roof shingles.
Same day service.
Licensed &Insured
570-952-4860
Mike’s $5-Up
Removal of Wood,
Trash and Debris.
Same Day Service.
826-1883 472-4321
S & S HAULING
& GARBAGE
REMOVAL
Free estimates.
Clean out attics,
basements, estates
& more.
570-472-2392
1156 Insurance
HEY HEY BOOMERS BOOMERS
CHECK CHECK THIS THIS
OUT!! OUT!!
Turning 65?
Going on
Medicare? Need
Medicare Supple-
ment Insurance?
We also offer
long/short term
care coverage,
life insurance,
and annuities for
nursing home
care that pay
6.7%
You have ques-
tions, we have
answers!
570-580-0797
www www.babyboom .babyboom
broker broker.com .com
1162 Landscaping/
Garden
ARE YOU TIRED
OF BEING
RAKED?
Specializing In
Trimming and
Shaping of Bush-
es, Shrubs, Trees.
Also, Bed
Cleanup, Edging,
Mulch and Stone.
Call Joe.
570-823-8465 570-823-8465
Meticulous and
Affordable.
F Free ree E Estimates stimates
BITTO
LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE
25 years
experience.
Landscape designs,
retaining walls,
pavers, patios,
decks, walkways,
ponds, lighting,
seeding, mulch, etc.
Free Estimates
570-288-5177
JAY’S LAWN SERVICE
Spring clean-ups,
mowing, mulching
and more!
Free Estimates
570-574-3406
LIVING PROOF
Landscaping/Lawn
Maintenance
Free estimates,
Reasonable rates,
Senior discounts,
No job to small, we
do it all!
570-831-5579
O’NEIL’S
Landscaping, Lawn
Maintenance,Clean-
ups, shrub trimming,
20 years experience.
Fully Insured
570-885-1918
TOUGH BRUSH
& TALL GRASS
Mowing, edging,
mulching, shrubs &
hedge shaping.
Tree pruning. Gar-
den tilling. Spring
Clean Ups. Weekly
& bi-weekly lawn
care.
Fully Insured.
20+ years experience
Free Estimates
570-829-3261
TREE REMOVAL
Stump grinding, Haz-
ard tree removal,
Grading, Drainage,
Lot clearing, Stone/
Soil delivery. Insured.
Reasonable Rates
570-574-1862
1183 Masonry
CONCRETE &
MASONRY
All Phases
570-283-5254
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
1183 Masonry
OLD TIME MASONRY
Voted #1
MasonryContractor
Let A Real
Mason Bid Your
Project!
Brick, Block,
Concrete, Stone,
Chimney &
Stucco Repair,
Retaining Walls,
Patio & Pavers,
Stamped &
Colored
Concrete, etc.
Fully Insured.
570-466-0879
oldtimemasonry.com
1189 Miscellaneous
Service
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
1195 Movers
BestDarnMovers
Moving Helpers
Call for Free Quote.
We make moving easy.
BestDarnMovers.com
570-852-9243
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
A.B.C. Professional
Painting
36 Yrs Experience
We Specialize In
New Construction
Residential
Repaints
Comm./Industrial
All Insurance
Claims
Apartments
Interior/Exterior
Spray,Brush, Rolls
WallpaperRemoval
Cabinet
Refinishing
Drywall/Finishing
Power Washing
Deck Specialist
Handy Man
FREE ESTIMATES
Larry Neer
570-606-9638
ALL PHASE
PAINT COMPANY
Aluminium Siding
Refinishing Experts
You Name It, We
Know How
to Paint It!
Over 30 Years
Experience
570-313-2262
AMERICA
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior.
20 years experi-
ence. Insured.
Senior Discount
570-855-0387
DAVID WAYNE
PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
QUALITY WORK AT
A FAIR PRICE
570-762-6889
Executive
Painting &
Remodeling.
Paint, drywall,
Drywall repair,
Flood and mold
damage and more.
Call about our
power washing
specials!
15 yrs. Exp.
Fully insured
570-215-0257
EXECUTIVEPAINTING.BIZ
**1 Year Anniversary
10% off**
JACOBOSKY JACOBOSKY
P PAINTING AINTING
Power Washing,
Quality Painting,
Affordable prices,
$50.00 off with
this ad.
Free Estimates.
570-328-5083
M. PARALI S PAI NTI NG
Int/ Ext. painting,
Power washing.
Professional work
at affordable rates.
Free estimates.
570-288-0733
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
Serra Painting
Book Now For
Summer & Save. All
Work Guaranteed
Satisfaction.
30 Yrs. Experience
Powerwash & Paint
Vinyl, Wood, Stucco
Aluminum.
Free Estimates
You Can’t Lose!
570-822-3943
WITKOSKY PAINTING
Interior
Exterior,
Free estimates,
30 yrs experience
570-826-1719,
570-288-4311 &
570-704-8530
1213 Paving &
Excavating
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
ROADWAYS
HOT TAR & CHIP
SEALCOATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
Mountain Top
PAVING & SEAL
COATING
Patching, Sealing,
Residential/Comm
Licensed & Insured
PA013253
570-868-8375
1234 Pressure
Washing
Russells Property
Maintenance
Professional
Powerwashing &
Painting, Licensed
and Insured
570-406-3339
1252 Roofing &
Siding
ABSOLUTELY FREE
ESTIMATES
E-STERN CO.
30 year architec
tural shingles. Do
Rip off & over the
top. Fully Insured
PA014370
570-760-7725 or
570-341-7411
EVERHART
CONSTRUCTION
Roofing, siding,
gutters, chimney
repairs & more.
Free Estimates,
Lowest Prices
570-855-5738
H O S CONSTRUCTION
Roofing specialist,
call today and
save$$$
570-574-4618
J & F
CONSTRUCTION
All types of roofing.
Repairs & Installation
25 Years Experience
Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
Reliable Service
570-855-4259
J.R.V. ROOFING
570-824-6381
Roof Repairs & New
Roofs. Shingle, Slate,
Hot Built Up, Rubber,
Gutters & Chimney
Repairs. Year Round.
Licensed/Insured
ŠFREE EstimatesŠ
*24 Hour
Emergency Calls*
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
SUMMER ROOFING
McManus
Construction
Licensed, Insured.
Everyday Low
Prices. 3,000
satisfied customers.
570-735-0846
1339 Window
Service
PJ’s Window
Cleaning &
Janitorial
Services
Windows, Gutters,
Carpets, Power
washing and more.
INSURED/BONDED.
570-283-9840
758 Miscellaneous
EXERCISE BALL/
PUMP new 26” $10.
7” Normon Rockwell
plates $45. 2 Nor-
mon Rockwell col-
lectible figurines
$40. each. Crystal
fruit bowl $20. New
Homedics Shiatsu
foot massager $25.
3 piece cloth lug-
gage set $20.
570-675-0062
FANS 4 box fans
20:x20: $3. each.
Treadmill $20. 2 old
antique irons $8,
each. 1 basket artifi-
cial flowers free. 2
vases artificial flow-
ers free, 2 wood
crutches free. 10
puzzles %$.50
each. 30 assorted
wheel wagon,
stroller, lawnmower
.50 each. 3- galva-
nized clamps .10
each. 1 metal ironing
board $4. 2 lamps -
no shades $3. each.
30 old bottles .50
each. 30 old beer &
soda cans .25 each.
570-823-6986
FREE AD POLICY
The Times Leader
will accept ads for
used private
party merchan-
dise only for items
totaling $1,000 or
less. All items must
be priced and state
how many of each
item. Your name
address, email and
phone number must
be included. No
ads for ticket
sales accepted.
Pet ads accept-
ed if FREE ad
must state FREE.
You may place your
ad online at
timesleader.com,
or email to
classifieds@
timesleader.com or
fax to 570-831-7312
or mail to Classified
Free Ads: 15 N.
Main Street, Wilkes-
Barre, PA. Sorry
no phone calls.
GUN SIGHTER
adjustable $20.
570-823-6885
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LUGGAGE 3 pieces
Atlantic carry on
21”wx15”h $10.
Atlantic Duffle bag
20”wx12”h $7.
Atlan-tic garment
bag 23”wx43”h $15.
Pierre Cardin 2
piece luggage 20”w
x91/2dx28h small
carry on 15 1/2w x
10hx7 $35. 2 folding
large director chairs
with insulated cup
holder & chair cush-
ion $12. 650-8710.
MARX dump trucks
13” 1940 $70 7 15”
1958 $45. HO steam
train set, 5 piece
$35. Marx 027
gauge train set, 5
piece $90.
570-574-0271
MERCHANTS
VILLAGE
MERCHANTSVILLAGE.COM
(Former Walmart
Building)
Oak St., Pittston
COME SHOP COME SHOP
WITH US! WITH US!
3 ACRES INSIDE
AIR CONDITIONED
Huge, Huge
Inventory
• FOOD ITEMS
Huge Selection
1/2 Price!
Gatorade
• BABY ITEMS
diapers by the
case
• BEAUTY ITEMS
Make-Up
• CLEANING ITEMS
• ELECTRONICS
• HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
• HEALTHCARE
• TOOLS
Food Court
570-891-1972
MILK CAN black
antique milk can.
$25. 570-829-4776
MUST SELL!
Hardwood enter-
tainment center.
Holds up to 24" tv.
5 shelves, 2 cabi-
nets with floral
designs. Great
condition. $50
(4) 205/75/15
studded snow
tires with rims.
Only used one
winter. Excellent
condition.
Asking $225
(570) 380-4385
SEWING MACHINE
Antique tredle
sewing machine by
Burdick. Good con-
dition. Used for dis-
play only. Includes
tin box of attach-
ments. $100 or best
offer. 570-696-1821
758 Miscellaneous
NAME BRAND
LI QUI DATI ONS
COMPRESSOR
Craftsman, 33
gallon. Retails for
$400. Our price
$200.
PATIO SET
7 piece La-Z-Boy.
Retails $1400. Our
price $700.
REFRIGERATOR
Brand New Ken-
more 2.4 cu ft com-
pact refrigerator.
Sells for $140. new,
our price $70!
MICROWAVE
Brand New Ken-
more 1.5 cu ft
microwave oven.
Sells new for $150.
our price $75!
PATIO SET
Wrought iron, table,
4 chairs. Sells for
$400. Our price$200.
VACUUM
Kenmore canister
retails for $380.
Our price $190.
TILLER CULTIVA-
TOR Brand New
Craftsman electric
mini tiller/cultivator.
Sells for $250. new,
our price $125!
TOOLBOXES
Brand New Crafts-
man Toolboxes. 3
bottoms, 3 tops sell
new for $160-$320,
our price $80-$160!
AIR CONDITIONER
Soleus portable,
10,000 BTU. Sells
for $426. Our price
$213.
GRILL gas brand
new Kenmore 4
burner 50,000 btu
sells new for $500.
asking $250!
Find us at
Merchants
Village in
Pittston call
570-592-3426
SEWING machine
Singer in cabinet,
attachments + 18
discs for various
patterns $50. Car
cargo carrier,
Sears, roof top,
$30. 570-474-6028
SHAMPOOER
Hoover steam vac
carpet shampooer,
Deluxe, like new
$75. 570-823-6885
TECHNICS receiver,
Dolby surround the-
ater sound, good
condition asking
$75. 150 ft + brown
coated vinyl fencing,
4 ft high, this is only
the fencing $150.
Rose color rug run-
ner 33”wx84”l $25.
Radio Flyer Liberty
spring horse with
sound option $100.
2 ready to hang
birch doors,
includes all your
hardware, both 30”
doors right & left
doors, excellent
condition, $25.
each. 288-8689
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
Trees, potted dwarf,
red maple $5.00
and up. 655-4815
TYPEWRITERS 1200
electric Royal &
case. Remington
manual & case $50.
each or $75. for
both. 570-654-1032
VACUUM Shark,
12 amp very good
condition $20.
570-287-0023
760 Monuments &
Lots
MEMORIAL SHRINE
Cemetery. 4 lots
available. Willing to
separate. In Crest
Lawn Section. $250
each.570-299-5940
762 Musical
Instruments
ACCORDIAN
George Riddle with
case, 45+ years old.
$200. neg.
570-654-1032
KEYBOARD Yamaha
Portatone PSR 340,
like new $200.
570-823-6885
MUSICAL GEAR vin-
tage Unicord/Univox
stage model 720 &
guitar/keyboard
amp $250. Johnson
by Axl 50s style
Fender Telecaster
37x3x12” natural
blonde wood white
pickguard electric
guitar with case
$100 Behringer
electric guitar
amplifier v-tone gm
108 15 watts, works
well & has built in
effects for analog
modeling of the gui-
tar $50. Eleca elec-
tric guitar strato-
caster profile body
red white pickguard
$50. Rok Axe Fend-
er Stratocaster style
body black white
pickguard electric
guitar wails $50.
Lovely black & white
Esteban acoustic/
electric guitar, like
new. $85. Morris
Hurricane Equinox 2
UK made in the UK
1980s $200. Kent
Archtop hollow body
made in Japan
1960s, $175. Mike
570-646-9702 email
nukejack@ ptd.net
ORGAN HAMMOND
9000 series $25.
570-654-3755
PIANO beautiful
Baldwin console
with bench, tuned,
$600.570-220-7859
PIANO Kimball con-
sole with bench,
great condition
$400. 709-6664
768 Personal
Electronics
NOOK TABLET
barely used with
protective leather
case. $160.
570-239-0693
772 Pools & Spas
POOL 15’ x 52” with
filter & accessories.
$500. obo.
570-825-3534
Pool 30’ round X
52” deep aluminum
above ground pool,
approximate 12
years old, needs
liner, buyer respon-
sible for all disas-
sembly & removal,
Best offer takes it. *
All weather pool lad-
der for 4’ above
ground, used 1 year,
paid $120, will let go
at $60. 883-0961.
POOL SUPPLIES:
A/C filter cartridges
for pool. Fits all
pump models using
Size 8" by 4.25 fil-
ters, twin pack
never opened. Wal-
mart sells for $9. I
will sell for $4.50.
Wyoming, 693-1072
POOL: 21’ round
with Hayward sand
filter, solar cover, &
automatic cleaner.
Asking $900. OBO.
570-592-7723
776 Sporting Goods
CROQUET SET
Sportcraft with cart
and cover used 1x
$50. 570-574-2924
ELLIPTICAL
MachinePro-form
Cardio Cross Train-
er. Like New. Asking
$200. 287-2085
GOLF BALLS major
brands, excellent
condition $3. a
dozen. 735-5290
GOLF CLUBS ladies,
high end. #1,5 & 7
Lady XPC plus $60
OBO. Irons, Tigress,
Putter, & umbrella,
beautiful ladies bag,
almost new. $60
OBO call 570-655-
9474 ask for Jim.
GOLF CLUBS, ladies
with bag, $25, very
slightly used.
570-288-1157
POP-UP cloth paint-
ball bunker/wall-
new, red & black
$15. Bike, Next
Brand, wipe-out,
red, 20” $25. Ten-
eighty plastic bike
ramp 3 piece build
your own skate
park, new $70.
L.T. basketball hoop
$10. L.T. hockey
sticks & lacrosse
sticks $15. for all or
sold separately.
Pitching screen L
shape, Franklin 36”
x 72” frame, brand
new in box, $70.
Heelies black skate
shoes, young mens
size 7 & 10 good
condition $20. each
pair 570-239-5292
SHUFFLEBOARD
with an electric
scoreboard. 21’
long. Excellent
condition. Asking
$2450.
570-675-5046
778 Stereos/
Accessories
SPEAKERS 4 car
each in individual
speaker boxes. Two
8” & two 10” used,
but worked great
when I last used
them. $40. after
11:00 AM. 331-2176
780 Televisions/
Accessories
MUST SELL! 64"
HD projection tv
with remote. Less
than 2 years old.
Beautiful picture &
sound with many
c o m p a t i b i l i t y
options. Excellent
condition.
Asking $800 (570)
380-4385
TELEVISIONS One
26” G. E with
remote $20. 2 Cur-
tis Mathes 19”
with remote $ 15.
570-474-6028
TV 27” Sony excel-
lent condition $40.
570-474-1648
TVS 132” with stand
$55. 24” inch TV
with stand $40.
570-654-9109
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
784 Tools
SAW 10” Compound
Miter saw & table, in
Excellent condition
$90. 570-868-6095
SAW 10” compound
miter saw and table,
excellent condition
$90. 570-868-6095
SCAFFOLD. Rolling,
folding, aluminum .
8’ High 6’ long, 2’
wide. Excellent con-
dition. $300
570-735-5290
TAPS all sizes pipe 7
straight. All size drill
bits. $1. to $10.
570-735-5290
786 Toys & Games
LITTLE TIKES Spray
& Rescue fire truck
ages 1/12-5 $25.
570-696-0187
VANITY plastic girls
vanity, pink & white
$10. Washer & dryer
playset $10. Teeter
totter, red plastic,
seats up to 3 $10.
570-239-5292
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
GAMES 6 Nintendo
games $28. for all. ;
10 Playstation 2, 10
Playstation games, 1
new still in wrapper
$30. for all.1 new,
rest used. All play.
$25. 2 Saitek com-
puter game con-
trollers a flight joy-
stick ST50, other
P880 $20. Scott
570-331-2176
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
MUST SELL! Wii
system with
1 controller & 11
games. Excellent
condition. $150
Original clear
green Xbox (not
360) with 2 con-
trollers & 7 games.
Excellent condi-
tion. $60
(570) 380-4385
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
$ ANTIQUES BUYING $
Old Toys, model kits,
Bikes, dolls, guns,
Mining Items, trains
&Musical Instruments,
Hess. 474-9544
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
BUYING SPORT CARDS
Pay Cash for
baseball, football,
basketball, hockey
& non-sports. Sets,
singles & wax.
570-212-0398
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
We Need Your Help!
Anonymous Tip Line 1-888-796-5519
Luzerne County Sheriff’s Office
PAGE 14G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
V isitus24/ 7a twww.v a lleyc hev ro let.c o m
$
12,999
*
$
9,999
*
2006 CHRYSLER TOW N
& COUNTRY
#12581A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir,PW ,PD L,D eep
Tinted G lass,A M /FM /C D ,C ruise,Tilt,Low M iles
7
PASSENGER
ONE
OW NER
2005 CHEVY COBALT
4 DOOR
$
8,999
*
#12014A ,4 C yl.,A uto.,A ir,SteelW heels,PD L,
Tilt,A M /FM /C D ,Rear Spoiler,O nly 58K M iles
LOW
M ILES
$
29,999
*
2007 CHEVY AVALANCHE
4W D LTZ
#12519B,V8 A utom atic,A ir,A llPow er O ptions,Leather,
Rem ote Starter,A uto Ride Suspension,6 D isc C D ,Bose
Stereo,Pow er H eated Seats,O nly 48K M iles
SUNROOF
2005 CHEVROLET
TRAILBLAZER
LS 4W D
#12630A ,Vortec 4200 A uto.,A ir,Keyless D oor
Locks,D eep Tinted G lass,Bose Stereo,PW ,6 D isc C D
2010 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA
4DOOR
$
14,999
*
#12095A A ,4 C ylinder A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
A M /FM /C D ,XM Satellite Radio
ONE
OW NER
$
17,999
*
2011 DODGE AVENGER
#12036A ,2.4LdualVVT A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,PW ,
PD L,C ruise C ontrol,A lloy W heels,C ruise C ontrol,Red,Sunroof
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
10K
M ILES
SUNROOF
SUNROOF
$
13,999
*
2011 CHEVROLET AVEO LT
4 DOOR
#12233A ,4 C yl.,1.6LEcotec A utom atic,
A ir,PW ,PD L,Tinted G lass,FrontBucket
Seats,Pow er M irrors,Victory Red,15K M iles
ONE
OW NER
$
21,999
*
2009 DODGE RAM
1500 QUAD CAB SLT
#12242A ,V8,A T,A /C ,PW ,PD L,C ruise,
Tilt,Tow ing Pkg.,A lloys,Bedliner,Running
Boards,41K M iles
$
13,499
*
2005 CHEVROLET
EQUINOX LS AW D
#12657A ,6 C ylinder A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,Luggage Rack,PW ,PD L,
Tilt,A M /FM /C D ,Privacy G lass
ONLY
48K
M ILES
EXIT 1 70B OFF I- 81 TO EXIT 1 . BEAR RIGHT ON BUSINESS ROUTE 309 TO SIXTH L IGHT. JUST BEL OW W YOM ING V AL L EY M AL L .
*P r ices p lu s ta x & ta g s . P r io r u s e d a ily r en ta l o n s electvehicles . Selectp ictu r es f o r illu s tr a tio n p u r p o s es o n ly.
XM a n d On Sta r f ees a p p lica b le. Lo w AP R to w ell q u a lif ied b u yer s .N o tr es p o n s ib le f o r typ o g r a p hica l er r o r s .
M o n .- Thu rs .8:30- 8:00p m ; Frid a y 8:30- 7:00p m ; Sa tu rd a y 8:30- 5:00p m
821-2772•1-800-444-7172
601 Kid d er Street, W ilkes-Ba rre, PA
VA LLEY
CHEVROLET
KEN WA LLA CE’S
Sca n Fr om
M ob ile
D evice
For
M or e
Sp ecia ls
W E W E W E
W A N T W A N T W A N T
YOU R YOU R YOU R
TRA DE TRA DE TRA DE
TOP TOP TOP
DOLLA R DOLLA R DOLLA R
$$$ $$$ $$$
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
12K
M ILES
$
14,999
*
2010 FORD FOCUS SE
4DR
#Z2711,4 C yl.,A uto.,Traction C ontrol,A ir,PW ,PD L,
A lloys,Rear Spoiler,Fog Lam ps,Bluetooth
ONLY
22K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
$
9,999
*
2005 DODGE STRATUS
SXT 4DR
#Z2718,V6 A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
PW ,PD L,Pow er M irrors,C ruise C ontrol
ONLY 24K M ILES
$
14,999
*
2006 PONTIAC TORRENT
AW D
ONE
OW NER
#Z2323,3.4L6 C yl.,A utom atic,A ir,
PW ,PD L,A lloy W heels,RoofRack,
D eep Tinted G lass,C ruise
ONLY
49K
M ILES
2005 CHEVY COLORADO
CREW CAB
Z71
4X4
$
17,999
*
#12163A ,Vortec 3500 A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
Fog Lam ps,Side Steps,PW ,PD L,C hrom e G rille,
A lum inum W heels,D eluxe FrontBuckets,O nly 51K M iles
$
13,999
*
2008 KIA SORENTO LX
4W D
#12297A ,6 C yl.,A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,PW ,PD L,C ruise C ontrol,
A lloy W heels,RoofRack,58K M iles
$
15,499
*
2010 TOYOTA
COROLLA S
#12109A ,1.8L4 C yl.,A utom atic,A ir
C onditioning,PW ,PD L,Rear Spoiler,A lloy W heels,
C ruise C ontrol,Stability C ontrol,46K M iles
ONE
OW NER
$
20,987
*
2007 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE
OVERLAND AW D
HEM I
#12662B,5.7LV8 A utom atic H em i,A ir
C onditioning,D ualPow er Seats,PW ,PD L,
RoofRack,A lloy W heels,Leather & M ore
SUNROOF
ONLY
41K
M ILES
$
12,999
*
2007 CHEVROLET
IM PALA LS
#Z2714,3.5LA utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
PW ,PD L,C ruise C ontrol,A M /FM /C D ,
Pow er Seat,SteelW heels
ONLY
41K
M ILES
$
17,900
*
#12608A ,Turbo,2.0LVV D O H C M anual,A /C ,PW ,
PD L,Rear Spoiler,Sports M etallic Pedals,Fog Lam ps,
Leather,C ruise,A M /FM /C D /M P3,C hrom e W heels
2007 PONTIAC SOLSTICE GXP
CONVERTIBLE
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
26K
M ILES
1 .9% 1 .9% 1 .9%
A PR A PR A PR
A VA ILA BLE A VA ILA BLE A VA ILA BLE
ON ON ON
SELECT SELECT SELECT
CERTIFIED CERTIFIED CERTIFIED
PREOW N ED PREOW N ED PREOW N ED
$
14,888
* $
22,900
*
2008 CHEVY SILVERADO
1500 REG CAB 4X4 Z71
#12488A ,5.3LV8 A uto.,Rem ote Start,Locking
Rear D ifferential,A ir,Fog Lam ps,C D ,PW ,PD L,
18”A lum inum W heels,H D Trailering Equipm ent
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
19K
M ILES
$
16,999
*
2005 CHEVY COLORADO
EXTENDED CAB 4X4
#12188A ,Vortec 3500 A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
PW ,PD L,Fog Lam ps,D eep Tinted G lass,
Z71 O ffRoad Suspension Package,56K M iles
$
32,999
*
2005 CHEVY CORVETTE
COUPE
#13008A ,6.0L400H P 6 Speed M anual,Leather,6 D isc C D ,
A llPow er,Bose Stereo,D VD ,N avigation,H eads U p D isplay,
TransparentRem ovable RoofPanel,Z51 Perform ance Pkg.
ONE
OW NER
ONLY
8K
M ILES
$
22,999
*
2009 TOYOTA TACOM A
SR5 4X4
#12582A ,V6 A utom atic,A ir C onditioning,
Pow er W indow s,Pow er D oor Locks,
A M /FM /C D ,A lum inum W heels
ONLY
26K
M ILES
ONE
OW NER
ONE
OW NER
WVON¡MO VALLEV
ÐUV MEME º PAV MEME º ÐUV MEME
415 Kidder Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
570.822.8870
Reliable
Cars
Use your tax refund to buy.
(See sales representative for details)
steve@yourcarbank.com
www.wyomingvalleyautomart.com
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle
up to 36 months
(See sales representative for details)
FREE GAS when you finance a vehicle
up to 36 months
7
6
4
7
1
4
MOTORTWINS
2010 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
718-4050
CALL STEVE MORENKO
FREE INSPECTION &
OIL CHANGE FOR A YEAR
**
*All Prices Plus Tax & Tags. **See dealer for details.
$
3,695
*
1999 Ford Windstar
$
950
*
Nice Van for a Budget
1998 Ford Contour
$
3,495
*
Only 59K, Runs Great, Gas Saver
2000 GMC Jimmy
$
4,450
*
1999 Ford Escort
$
3,990
*
2002 Hyundai
Elantra
2000 Dodge
Stratus
$
5,295
*
4x4
2 Door Coupe Nice, Gas Saver
Clean Car
2003 Ford Taurus
SE
$
5,595
* $
5,995
*
Nice, Clean, Low Mileage Runs Great
2002 Ford Escape
1339N. River Street,
Plains, PA. 18702
829-2043
www.jo-danmotors.com
J
O
-
DAN
MOTORS
TAX AND TAGS ADDITIONAL We Now Offer Buy Here-Pay Here!
LOWDOWN PAYMENT CLEAN, INSPECTED VEHICLES
6 MO. WARRANTY ON ALL VEHICLES • FULL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
We Service ALL Makes & Models
Family Owned & Operated for over 40 years
‘ 08 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER LT
Maroon, 50K Miles, Sunroof, P. Seat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
17,995
‘ 08 MERCURY SABLE
Light Blue, Only 16K Miles! Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . .
$
15,995
‘ 08 DODGE MAGNUM
White, PDL, PWL, Cruise, CD . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. . . .
$
13,995
‘ 08 HYUNDAI ENTOURAGE
Gold, 7 Pass. , Rear A/C, Very Nice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
12,995
‘ 07 JEEP LIBERTY
Green, PW, PDL, Tilt, Cruise. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
12,995
‘ 07 DODGE CALIBER
Orange Met. , 4 Cyl. , Nicely Equipped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
10,495
‘ 03 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER LS
Pewter, 4 Dr. , Only 32K Miles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
‘ 08 PONTIAC G5
Red, Cpe. , 5-Speed, Spoiler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
9,995
‘ 04 FORD MUSTANG
Dark Red, 40th Anniversary, 5 Speed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$
7,995
‘ 90 CHRYSLER LEBARON CONV.
White, 1 Owner, V6, Only 29K Miles . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . ..
$
7,995
S
O
L
D
S
O
L
D
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
AS ALWAYS ***HIGHEST PRICES***
PAID FOR YOUR UNWANTED
VEHICLES!!!
DRIVE IN PRICES
Call for Details (570) 459-9901
Vehicles must be COMPLETE!!
PLUS ENTER TO WIN $500 CASH!!
DRAWINGTO BE HELD LAST DAY
OF EACH MONTH
www.wegotused.com
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Wanted:
ALL
JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE PICKUP
288-8995
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Mon- Sat
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Sundays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd
( Pl aza 315)
315N . 3 mi l es af t er
Mot orworl d
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
Visit us at
WilkesBarreGold.com
Or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
July 6th: $1,587.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
810 Cats
CATS & KI TTENS
12 weeks & up.
All shots, neutered,
tested,microchipped
VALLEY CAT RESCUE
824-4172, 9-9 only
KITTENS (2) free to
good home grey
tiger & orange tiger.
570-575-9984
KITTENS (4) free to
a good home.
570-709-4008
KITTENS
Cutest ever!! 2
orange, 2 black.
Free. 12 weeks old,
litter trained.
570-655-6246
815 Dogs
AKC Eng Bulldogs,
Males & Females.
shots & wormed.
CH bloodlines.
family raised.
$1800. 799-0192
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD
Pups, all colors and
also mini Australian
Shepherds. Ready
now. For more
information call
570-925-2951
BEAGLE PUPS AKC
Champion blood-
lines. 570-735-5541
SHIH-TZU PUPPIES
Males. 9 weeks old.
$550
570-250-9690
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
“The World of Pets
Unleashed”
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
CAVALIER KING
CHARLES SPANIEL
PUPPIES
Registration Avail-
able, Health Certi-
fied. From
$700 to $1,500
HAVANESE PUPPIES
All colors, both
genders available
$700 to $1,300
www.willowspring
cavaliers.com
215-538-2179
Found Basset
Hound mix.
Brown-ish red,
short legs, about 2
years old, tan collar.
Found in Parsons
about 2 weeks ago.
Free to a good
home.
570-823-9438
ITALIAN CANE CORSO
Mastiff Puppies
ICCF Registered &
ready to go! Par-
ents on premises.
Blue.Vet Checked
570-617-4880
POMERANIAN PUPS
Purebred Pups.
Not registered.
$350. Poochi Pups.
$250. All pups 8
weeks old, 1st
shots & worming.
570-280-9596.
Silky Terrier
Puppies,
AKC registered 9
weeks old, 1st
shots and wormed,
All set to go! Asking
$500 each. Call
570-333-1015
Poms, Husky, Labs,
Yorkies, Puggles,
Chihuahuas, Pugs
Dachshund, Goldens,
Shepherds, Dober-
mans, Shih-Tzus
570-453-6900
570-389-7877
YORKIE,
TEDDY BEAR TEACUP
Female,
1 1/2 years old.
$1,700
Call 570-328-1654
845 Pet Supplies
PET CARRIERS
1 small $5. 1 medium
$10. 1 large wire
holder for dogs $20.
570-474-6028
timesleader.com
SAVE
MORE
MONEY
WE’LL HELP YOU
TO SUBSCRIBE
CALL
829-5000
or visit us
online at
timesleader.com
In a matter of
weeks, you
can shave
hundreds
of dollars off
your grocery
bill just by
clipping
The Sunday
Times Leader
coupons.
Grab your
scissors
and join the
coupon craze!
Already a
subscriber?
Pick up EXTRA
COPIES of
The Sunday
Times Leader
at the newsstand
and multiply
your savings!
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MAY 20, 2012 PAGE 15G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012 PAGE 15G TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2012 PAGE 15G
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com PAGE 15G
House Hunting?We can help.
ATTENTION SMARTPHONE USERS:
Try our new QR Code
Kingston: 288.9371
Hazleton: 788.1999
Wilkes-Barre: 822.1160
Clarks Summit: 585.0600
Shavertown: 696.3801
Mountain Top: 474.9801
www.lewith-freeman.com
Lewith&Freeman
Real Estate, Inc.
ONE
SOURCE
REALTY
ERA1.com
Mountaintop Office
12 N Mountain Blvd.
(570) 403-3000
WE WILL SELL YOUR HOUSE
OR ERA WILL BUY IT!*
Watch this Community come to life by
becoming a Bell Weather Resident. Tere
has never been a better time to join us…
Prices Starting in the $140’s
Find us in our convenient Location:
Wyoming Avenue to Union Street. Turn
onto Mill Hollow in Luzerne.
Two-story
New Construction
Townhomes
• 1st floor master
• Formal Dining Room
• Eat-in Kitchen
• Loft
• Valuted Ceilings
• Front Porch
• Garage
• Garden Area
Pure Indulgence...
Luxury
Condominiums
nestled in a quiet
corner of Northeast
Pennsylvania
Waypoint
In Luzerne
Contact one of our
Luzerne County
Real Estate
Professionals at
570.403.3000
2
6
3
4
9
0
Se Habla
Espanol
~
64 E. LUZERNE AVE
EDWARDSVILLE
12-1229
Owners relocating.
Very nice 2 story
home, 3 Bedrooms,
1.5 baths. Many
upgrades including
partially finished
basement, fenced
yard & newer
replacement windows.
CALL JACK 878-6225 $89,000
DIR: From Main Street in Luzerne to left on Courtdale Ave.
Courtdale Avenue becomes Luzerne Avenue. Home on left.
Open House - Motivated Seller!
12:00-2:00
PM
39 ANTRIM RD, YATESVILLE
12-640
Comfort is paramount
in this bright and
airy 3 bedroom,
2.5 bath home with large
Great Room featuring
cathedral ceiling, gas
fireplace and tons of light
from skylights and
numerous windows. An
ideal lifestyle is continued
with large eat in kitchen, formal dining room with hardwood
floor, master bedroom with walk-in closet, french doors to
deck, two-car garage and so much more!
CALL MICHAEL 760-4961 $299,000
Home With Gracious Ambiance!
W
illo
w
v
ie
w
680 APPLE TREE
ROAD
HARDING 12-2500
This was a great
house for the
sellers until the
second baby, then
it shrunk too much.
Now it’s your turn
to enjoy the peace and tranquility of country
living (10) ten minutes from anything you need
to get to. CALL BOB 674-1711 139,900
New Listing!
H
a
r
d
in
g
Wilkes-Barre 570-825-2468 • Shavertown 570-696-2010
info@mksre.com
Darren G. Snyder
Broker/President
WILKES-BARRE
Elegant tudor with 4800 sq ft
in Downtown Wilkes-Barre’s
Historic District. Te 1st
floor office has 1860 sq ft w/
central air and 2 restrooms.
Te residence upstairs in-
cludes 5 bedrooms, 2 baths,
custom kitchen w/ an island
& sunny breakfast room, formal dinning room. Te formal living room has
a tray ceiling, picture windows and wet bar. Also, a cozy den. Private drive,
OSP for 5 cars. $325,000
Call Darren Snyder 570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
5 Unit property for sale on
the campus of Wilkes Uni-
versity with a Cap Rate of
8.14%. Annual Net Oper-
ating Income of $32,169.
100% occupancy over the
last 5 years.
$395,000
Call Darren Snyder
570-825-2468
KINGSTON
Nice money making prop-
erty with potential for more.
2 - 10,000 SF bldgs on 5.1
acres! Room for more bldgs.
16 units, each unit pays
most utilities (except sewer/
water). Also fenced area, was
car lot. Units occupied fully,
and are contractors, garages, etc. Little maintenance needed. Roof is 5 yrs old
. Great potential, makes good money. Flexible on price. $650,000
Call Earl Samuel 570-674-3120
KINGSTON
4 Bedroom 1 3/4 baths
with a modern kitchen,
generous room sizes and
ample closet space lo-
cated in Kingston. Natural
woodwork throughout.
Finished attic could make a
possible 5th bedroom.
$59,900
Atlas Realty, Inc.
829-6200 • www.atlasrealtyinc.com
We Sell Happiness!
VISIT OUR OPEN HOUSES TODAY
Charles A. Adonizio, III
Broker, GRI, SRES
12-1:30 1717 River Rd., Jenkins Twp ............$79,900
12-2 38 Johnson St., Pittston................. $129,900
12-2 238 S. Main St., Pittston ................ $129,900
2:30-4 2032 Rt. 92, Harding.........................$79,900
2:30-4 352 S. Highland Ave., Shavertown .$220,000
2-4 621 Donnely St., Duryea...................$24,900
For more information and photos visit
www.atlasrealtyinc.com
WWW.LEWITH-FREEMAN.COM
Two Ofces To Serve You Better:
1149 Wyoming Avenue, Forty Fort 570.283.9100
28 Carverton Road, Shavertown 570.696.2600
Visit our website: www.poggi-jones.com
!
#12-2542 $379,000
MaribethJones 696-6565
Te convenient locationwitha
beautiful yardmake this property
a rare find! 8rooms, living room,
formal dining room, eat-in
kitchen, 4bedrooms,1full bath,
family room, large 2-car
detachedgarage withworkshop.
#12-2525 $116,780
Chris Jones 696-6558
This is a unique home w/cedar
&stone exterior. Fabulous two
story great roomw/stone fire-
place &built-inbook shelves.
Pool, cabana, decks for entertain-
ing. Newstainless steel appliances,
breakfast area w/beamedceiling.
Walk to the Marina!
Newer ranchhome with2
separate yet attachedhomes a
“Mother/Daughter” set-up.
1side has 2rooms with1bed-
room, the other has 5rooms
with3bedrooms and3.5total
baths. Ample lot, in-ground
pool, central air, 2-car garage.
#12-2537 $179,000
Pat Silvi 283-9100 x21
#12-2545 $129,900
ChristinePieczynski 696-6569
Well maintainedhome with3
bedrooms and1.5baths. Home
has newlyremodeledkitchen
withBraziliancherryhardwood
floors. Livingroomwithpocket
doors, pantryoff kitchenthat
leads tonew1/2bath, in-ground
pool and2-car detachedgarage.
Wilkes-Barre-In-GroundPool Shavertown-Rare Find!
© 2012 BRERAfliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRERAfliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential
Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other afliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity.
DON’T MAKE A MOVE....Until You Call Us FIRST!
Edwardsville-HandicapAcces. Harveys Lake-Unique Home!
7
5
9
3
7
0
837 Wyoming Ave., Kingston
288-1401
2297 W. 8TH ST.,
FRANKLIN TWP. 18612
2 or 3 bedroom 2-story farmhouse
located in the Village of Orange. 1st
foor bedroom, living room with hard-
wood fooring, eat-in kitchen. 1st
foor laundry. garage & shed with
loft. Rear deck overlooking cleared
lot. New furnace, new kitchen foor
(October, 2011) MLS#11-3255
JOE MOORE $119,900
For Instant Pricing & More Info TEXT:
ML28 TO: 88000
50 SNOWDEN STREET,
FORTY FORT
Attractive, well-kept 4 bedroom,
2 bath colonial home on land-
scaped corner lot. Features: living
room; dining room; family room;
sun room; modern eat-in kitchen;
hardwood fooring. Lower level rec
room. Great rear yard.
MLS#12-1994
JOE MOORE $152,500
66 GOODWIN AVE N,
KINGSTON
2-story in good condition with fex-
ible foor plan. First foor living room;
dining room; kitchen; TV room; of-
fce; 3/4 bath-laundry. Second foor:
3 bedrooms,full bath. Lower level:
1/2 bath and rec room. Ductless
air-conditioning on frst foor. Private
driveway. MLS#12-2024
JOE MOORE $122,500
Story and Photos by
Marianne Tucker Puhalla
Advertising Projects Writer
It is freshly painted and ready for
you to move right in! Take the time to
visit 157 Carverton Rd, Trucksville, a
two-story find just minutes from the
Wyoming Valley. This four-bedroom,
three-bath home with modern kitchen is
set on an oversized 199-by-130, hillside
lot with views in nearly every direction of
the surrounding countryside.
Listed by Ann Marie Chopick of Bell
Real Estate for $195,000, this home
will be open for tours during an Open
House today from 1-3 p.m.
This property was built in 1988, and
offers taupe vinyl siding with plenty of
brick trim, black shutters and a bright
red door. The door leads into a foyer
where tan vinyl tiles cover the floor and
stairs on the left lead to the second floor.
A right off the foyer takes you into
the 19-by-12 living room, where brown
sculptured carpeting and white walls
are illuminated by the natural light that
comes in from a triple picture window
front. Mini-blinds provide sun protection
and privacy.
The 12-by-11 dining is set to the rear
and also features the sculptured carpet-
ing, a chandelier and a double window
rear.
To the left of the dining room is the
10-by-12 rear-facing kitchen. This room
has a single window and a tan vinyl floor
in a marbled pattern found throughout a
good portion of the first floor.
The kitchen is totally up-to-date thanks
to new black appliances, including a mi-
crowave, dishwasher, refrigerator and a
Jenn Air range. Striking oak cabinets are
topped by cream laminate countertops.
A double pantry offers plenty of storage
behind bi-fold doors. The breakfast area
is separated from the cooking area by
a bank of top and bottom cabinets that
open up both rooms to the light from the
rear-facing windows.
A half-wall provides another divider as
it delineates the kitchen from the adja-
cent 13-by-19 family room. This comfort-
able, curl-up-with-a-book space features
atrium doors that open rear to a large
deck. There are also two single windows
that overlook the side yard. A textured
ceiling offers a medallion design. The
gas fireplace is sure to please, particu-
larly on cold winter nights, with its raised
stone hearth and natural stone mantle.
For the summer, there is an air condi-
tioning wall unit in a nearby window.
The first-floor powder room has more
Ready to move in home in Trucksville
Continued
SUNDAYREAL ESTATE
THE TIMES LEADER SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012
OPEN HOUSE TODAY, 1-3PM
Smith Hourigan Group
SMARTER. BOLDER.
FASTER.
Century21SHGroup.com
Visit Our Website
GERALD L. BUSCH
REAL ESTATE, INC.
288-2514
EMAIL:
JERRYBUSCHJR@AOL.COM View Our Listings on Realtor.com
Pat Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Pat Today 885-4165
Jerry Busch, Jr. Is Ready
To Work For “You!”
Call Jerry Today 709-7798
FOR PROMPT REAL ESTATE APPRAISALS, CALL GERALD L. BUSCH APPRAISAL SERVICE 288-2514
PLAINS -
HUDSON GARDENS
Come Relax in the Gar-
dens! 9 spacious rooms,
4 bedrooms, 2 .5 baths,
fnished basement, gen-
erous room sizes, garage
and beautiful lot.
Call Pat Busch 885-4165
MLS#12-307 $149,900
NEW LISTING
LUZERNE
Beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 1/2
bath home, lving room with
bright windows and pretty
wood foors, dining room, mod-
ern eat-in kitchen, family room,
laundry,deck, fenced yard
above ground pool, comfort-
able gas heat and central air.
Call Jerry Busch Jr Today!
MLS#12-948 $129,900.
LARKSVILLE
AMAZING IS THE WORD!
This has a new roof, vinyl
siding, beautiful modern
kitchen with breakfast bar,
2 modern baths, deck and
plenty of off street parking.
Call Pat Busch Today!
MLS#12-2449 $109,900
53 West Vaughn Street, Kingston
Huge Rooms! Lots of Space
! This home has a huge living
room and dining room, den, 2
full baths, 3-4 bedrooms, a mas-
sive yard and a large garage with
a second foor for storage.Don’t
Wait ! MLS#11-3753
Call Jerry Busch Jr
New Price $119,900
DIR: Wyoming Ave Kingston to
West Vaughn Street
OPEN HOUSE TODAY
1-3PM
View Open Houses and Featured
Properties Online at
Click on “Homes”
timesleader.com
www.timesleader.com
Scan to View
Listings
PAGE 16G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
of the tan vinyl flooring and an oak vanity topped by a
cream cultured marble sink
Just off the kitchen, a side entry door opens to the at-
tached, two-car garage; a second door takes you to the
basement. The basement has an extra set of blocks in
the foundation so to provide a higher ceiling should the
basement ever be finished. It hosts washer and dryer
hook-ups and a built-in utility tub.
Upstairs, an octagon accent window provides extra
light in the hall.
The nearby master bedroom measures 14-by-10 and
offers brown wall-to-wall carpeting, white walls and
windows both side and rear, one with an air condition-
ing unit.
A large double closet has bi-fold doors. An oak vanity
can be found in the adjacent master bath that comes
complete with a cream cultured marble sink and walk-
in shower. A single window faces rear.
Bedrooms two, three and four range in size from
10-by-11 to 11-by-16 with large windows, plentiful closet
space and wall-to-wall carpeting.
Extra storage is found in a hall linen closet near to
the full bath. Here you find an oak vanity with cream
cultured marble sink and a one-piece tub and shower
surround.
There is pull-down access to attic storage.
This home has gas, hot water baseboard heat, public
sewer and water utilities and a number of window air
conditioning units.
To get to today’s Open House, take Route 309 north
from Wilkes-Barre. At the traffic light at Carverton Rd.,
make a right and go six-tenths of a mile to the property
on the right.
For more information, contact Ann Marie Chopick,
Bell Real Estate, (570) 288-6654; e-mail AnnMarie@
custom-computers.com.
SPECIFICATIONS
Two-story
2,030 square feet
BEDROOMS: 4
BATHS: 3
PRICE: $195,000
LOCATION: 157 Carverton Rd., Trucksville
AGENT: Ann Marie Chopick
REALTOR: Bell Real Estate, (570) 288-6654;
e-mail AnnMarie@custom-computers.com.
OPEN HOUSE: Today, 1-3 p.m.
Trucksville
Continued from front page
The Attorney To Call
When Buying A Home
• Complete Real Estate Legal
Services
• Title Insurance
• Rapid Title Search & Closing
• Evening & Weekend
Appointments
Angelo C. Terrana Jr.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Suite 117 Park Building,
400 Third Avenue, Kingston, PA
(570) 283-9500
7
5
4
2
7
2
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WE BUY
HOMES!
Any Situation
570-956-2385
ALDEN
Large home on a
huge lot. Needs
some care so come
put your personal
touch into this great
value. Off street
parking, 2 car
detached garage
and a large fenced
in yard. Did we men-
tioned 4 bedrooms.
MLS 12-1589
$64,900
Call/text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
ASHLEY
This charming 3
bedroom has a
modern eat in oak
kitchen, hardwood
floors in Living room
& Dining Room,
Modern bath,
enclosed rear porch
overlooking a deep
yard, with parking.
MLS 12-2305
Priced to Sell,
$55,000
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
ASHLEY
Very nice 2 story
with many updates
is in ''move-in''
condition with new
heating system,
central air, newer
roof, yard & 1 car
detached garage.
Directions: Main St.,
Nanticoke to
Market, 3 stop
signs to left on E.
Union, home on left
MLS# 12-2048
$70,000
Call Lynda
(570) 696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
AVOCA
1215 South St.
SpaPcious 4
bedroom home
with in law suite
with separate
entrance. Large
lot, large room
sizes. Split sys-
tem A/C in fami-
ly room. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-963
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
AVOCA
214 Gedding St.
Cozy Cape Cod
home with 2 bed-
rooms, 1st floor
laundry, nice yard
with deck. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-668
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
BEAR CREEK
6650 Bear
Creek Blvd
Well maintained
custom built 2 story
nestled on 2 private
acres with circular
driveway - Large
kitchen with center
island, master bed-
room with 2 walk-in
closets, family room
with fireplace, cus-
tom built wine cellar.
A MUST SEE!
MLS#11-4136
PRICE REDUCED
$285,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
906 Homes for Sale
BEAR CREEK
Meadow Run Road
ExcLusive privacy
with this 61 acre 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home with vaulted
ceilings and open
floor plan. Elegant
formal living room,
large airy family
room and dining
room. 322 sq. ft 3
season room open-
ing to large deck
with hot tub. Mod-
ern eat in kitchen
with island, gas fire-
place, living room,
and wood burning
stove basement.
Oversize 2 car
garage. This stun-
ning property
boasts a relaxing
pond and walking
trail. Sit back and
enjoy the view!
MLS 12-2085
$438,000
Sandy Rovinski
EXT 25
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
95 JACKSON ST.
Great Low Cost Util-
ities, Taxes and no
Water bill. Your own
fresh Water well.
Bath on each floor,
3 Good sized Bed-
rooms, Paved Drive
leading to an over-
sized Garage.
Owner Motivated.
MLS 12-2006
$179,000
570-675-4400
DALLAS
AS-IS, WHERE IS,
Owner says SELL!
No negotiations,
quickest sale.
Private 2 acre lot
with Bi-level in Dallas
School District. 1 car
garage. 3 bedrooms
and nice updates.
REDUCED PRICE
$150,000
Call Cindy King
570-690-2689
www.cindykingre.com
570-675-4400
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
DALLAS
Great Dallas Loca-
tion. Close to town
& library. 4 bedroom
ranch with lower
level family room,
replacement win-
dows, 16x32 deck,
garage, 100 x 150
lot. 12-1528
$180,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Haddonfield Hills
Corner Lot
4 bedroom, 2 ½
bath split level.
Hardwood floors.
Gas heat. 2 car
garage. 12-1942
$204,900
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
DALLAS
Huge Reduction
248 Overbrook Rd.
Lovely 4 bedroom
cape cod situated
in a private setting
on a large lot.
Vaulted ceiling in
dining room, large
walk in closet in 1
bedroom on 2nd
floor. Some
replacement win-
dows. Call Today!
MLS 11-2733
$99,900
Jay A. Crossin
Extension 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
DALLAS
Looking for a ranch
in the Back Moun-
tain? Come and
preview this remod-
eled two or three
bedroom, one bath
home. New Pergo
flooring, updated
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances, off street
parking. MLS #12-
1213 $109,900
Call Kathy Murray
570-696-6403
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
DALLAS
MANY POSSIBILI-
TIES! 4,000+ sq.ft.
well maintained
home with 4 Bed-
rooms, 2 Baths, 2
kitchens and 2 story
unfinished addition,
garage, on 2 lots.
Can be finished for
3 unit rental income
or country store.
$153,000.
Jeannie Brady
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
NEW LISTING
29 Jumper Road
*OPEN HOUSE
JULY 8th
12pm-2pm*
Gorgeous does not
begin to describe
this 3-4 bedroom
ranch home built
in 2008. Every
upgrade you could
think of- Hardwood
floors, 10' ceilings,
tile, granite, Ultra,
ultra, kitchen, Tiled
baths. Beautiful
3.86 acre lot in a
cul-de-sac with
magnificent vistas.
Walkout lower level
easily finished,
Superior Wall
System. MLS# 12-
2423 $389,900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
DALLAS
Private & beautiful
lovely brick chalet
on 11.85 acres.
Custom brick work,
tongue & groove
interior & oversized
3 car garage.
Features whirlpool
tub, heated sun-
room, kitchen island
& hickory cabinets,
laundry room. Base-
ment is plumbed &
ready to finish.
MLS# 12-817
$315,000
Call Ken Williams
Five Mountain
Realty
570-542-8800
DALLAS
The Greens at New-
berry Estates. Condo
with special view of
golf course & ponds.
3 bedrooms. Family
room. 5 1/2 baths on
2 floors. 4,000 sq. ft.
living area. 12-1480
$449,900
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
DALLAS
Two story home
with solar system,
2 car detached
garage. Private
driveway. Property
is also for lease.
MLS# 12-1822
$189,000
Michael Nocera
570-357-4300
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-5412
906 Homes for Sale
DALLAS
Upper Demunds
Road
All brick- split level.
3 bedrooms. Hard-
wood floors. Central
a/c. 2 car garage.
Extra 100 x 150 lot.
12-2004. $179,000
BESECKER REALTY
570-675-3611
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
DRUMS
Great value, great
location on a fabu-
lous lot. From your
hot tub you can
enjoy the view of the
almost full acre lot.
Year round sun
room, plus you have
a Lower Level that
adds more space to
this great home.
Dont miss out on
this incredible buy!!
$139,900. For more
information or to
schedule a showing
call or text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
ComeUpToQuailHill.
com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
DURYEA
$139,000
MOTIVATED
SELLERS!
Good visibility com-
mercial location.
Room for up to 3
businesses! Also
has 2 apartments.,
off-street parking
for 8 w/ possibility.
of much more in
rear. Great for
Beauty/Nail Salon,
Fitness Studio,
Shop, and Garage
type businesses.
Call
CHRISTINE KUTZ
for more
information.
570-332-8832
DURYEA
1107 Spring Street
Superb two story
with 3 bedrooms & 1
½ baths. Hardwood
floors, gas heat,
vinyl siding, large
yard with garage.
Call Jim for details.
Offered at $169,500
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
429 New St.
A marriage of old
world charm and
modern touches
blend together in
this home. Tasteful,
high level renova-
tions throughout.
Central air, finished
attic, possible 4th
bedroom. New
plumbing, electrical,
back deck. Lots of
storage. Lovely
neighborhood.
MLS 12-2087
$158,900
David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
DURYEA
548 ADAMS ST.
Charming, well
maintained 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
located on a quiet
street near Blue-
berry Hills develop-
ment. Features
modern kitchen
with breakfast bar,
formal dining room,
family room with
gas stove, hard-
wood floors in bed-
rooms, deck,
fenced yard and
shed. MLS#11-2947
$107,500
Karen Ryan
283-9100 x14
570-283-9100
DURYEA
89 Main St.
Recently remodeled
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths single. Mod-
ern kitchen with
new appliances,
open floor plan,
wood burning fire-
place, gas heat. 2
car detached
garage. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-895
Now Reduced
$105,000
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
DURYEA
NEW PRICE!!!!!
621 Donnelly St.
2 bedroom, 1 car
garage, gas heat.
Already furnished
with furniture. 1/2
double. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 12-1042
$24,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
906 Homes for Sale
DURYEA
REDUCED
619 Foote Ave.
Fabulous Ranch
home with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
ultra modern
kitchen with granite
counters, heated
tile floor and stain-
less appliances.
Dining room has
Brazilian cherry
floors, huge yard,
garage and large
yard. Partially fin-
ished lower level.
Built for handicap
accessibility with
exterior ramp, inte-
rior hallways and
doorways. If you’re
looking for a Ranch,
don’t miss this one.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4079
$149,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
DURYEA
REDUCED
97 Chittenden St.
Flood damaged
home with new fur-
nace, electric box,
water heater, out-
lets and switches.
1st floor gutted but
already insulated
and ready for
sheetrock. 2nd floor
has 4 bedrooms
and bath with dou-
ble sinks. Large
yard. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1225
$59,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA REDUCED!
38 Huckleberry Ln
Blueberry Hills
4 bedrooms, 2.5
baths, family room
with fireplace, 2 car
garage, large yard.
Master bath with
separate jetted tub,
kitchen with stain-
less steel appli-
ances and island,
lighted deck. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-3071
$309,860
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
EDWARDSVILLE
REDUCED
274 Hillside Ave.
PRICED TO SELL.
THIS HOME IS A
MUST SEE. Great
starter home in
move in condition.
Newer 1/2 bath off
kitchen & replace-
ment windows
installed.
MLS11-560.
$44,900
Roger Nenni
EXT. 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
EDWARDSVILLE
Very nice 2 Story
home,3 Bedrooms,
1.5 baths. Many
upgrades including
partially finished
basement, fenced
yard and newer
replacement win-
dows. Plenty of
storage in walk up
attic.
Call Jack
570-878-6225
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
EXETER
530 Cherry
Drive
Spacious 2 bed-
room townhome
with hardwood
floor, gas heat,
central air, end
unit with one
garage. All
appliances,
move in condi-
tion.
For more info
and
photos visit:
www. atlasreal-
tyinc.com
MLS 12-712
$169,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
Nice size 4 bed-
room home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$83,000
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
FAIRMOUNT TWP.
3 Bedroom, 2 bath
Doublewide with 2
car detached
garage in good
condition sitting in
the country.
$119,900
MLS#11-4501
Call
Kenneth Williams
570-542-2141
Five Mountains
Realty
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 17G
ERIC McCABE LISA PERTA SUSANHINES DANIELLE McCOY LENMUDLOCK DARRENLOWELL
Northeast PA’s #1 Mortgage Connection
570.714.4200 | www.McCabeMortgageGroup.com
400 Third Avenue, Suite 100 | Kingston, PA 18704
Licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Banking. Branch License #20371.021, Guaranteed Rate Inc.’s NMLS # 2611
First Time Buyer Programs
FHA & VA Loan Experts
Refinance – Low Fixed Rates for Home Improvements,
Consolidate Debt or Cash Out!
Fast, Free Pre-approval – Online, By Phone or In Person
USDA/Rural Housing Loans – Low Fixed Rates with No Money Down and No PMI
Construction Loans – Low Fixed Rates & Low Down Payment Options Available
Evening/Weekend Appointments
Friendly, Local Processing/Closing Staff!
More than 5,000 Northeastern Pa. Families Served
Level Building Lots .40 – 1.50 Acres
All Underground / Public Utilities
Gas, Sewer, Water, Phone, Electric, Cable, Street Lighting, Sidewalks
Rental / Lease Options Available
Convenient Location / Hanover Township / Close to Hanover Industrial Park
NEPA’s Leader in Energy Efficient Construction
Alternative Energy Solutions
Additional Warranty and Maintenance Services available
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40,000
LOTS READY FOR IMMEDIATE CONSTRUCTION
For Specifics Call Connie Yanoshak 829-0184
LOT PRICES STARTINGAT $40 000
EVERY NEWHOME CONTRACT INCLUDES
HEATINGANDCOOLINGBILLS FOR
10YEARS
COUNTRYWOOD
ESTATES
EILEEN R. MELONE
Real Estate 821-7022
EILEEN MELONE, Broker 821-7022
Visit us on the web at: www.NEPAHOMESETC.com OR www.realtor.com/wilkes-barre
Open House July 8th Open House July 8th Open House July 8th
KINGSTON CLARKS SUMMIT NORTH POCONO TUNKHANNOCK POCONO MOUNTAINS
*CLOSEDSALES BASEDONCOMPANYWIDE SALES FOR NORTHEASTERNPAFROM1/1/2011 to 12/31/2011
*Ranking as of Jan. 2012
NEPA’S #1 Real Estate Website!
Steve Farrell
Owner/Broker
OVER 880 SALES IN2011*
KINGSTON OFFICE (570) 718-4959 OR (570) 675-6700
Top 500 Largest
Brokers in the U.S.
570-718-4959
New Listing
WILKES-BARRE
Great starter! Well-maintained 3BR/1BA
home w/large yard
MLS#12-2390
$64,500
Call Darcy G570-262-0226
PITTSTON (SOMERSET PARK)
11 W. Sunrise Drive
DIR: River Rd N, R on Tompson, L on
Sunrise Dr
MLS#12-1430
$219,500
Hosted By:
Neal Forlenza 570-905-4257
WEST PITTSTON
717 Tunkhannock Avenue
DIR: Wyoming Ave (Rt 11), L on
Tunkhannock Ave
MLS#12-727
$159,000
Hosted by:
Eddie Heck 570-814-6129
NANTICOKE
102 WUnion Street
DIR: W Main St Nanticoke to Hanover
St to R on W Union St
MLS#12-1377
$68,000
Hosted by:
Steve Doroskewicz 570-885-8581
Open House July 8th Open House July 8th
WILKES-BARRE
15 Amherst Avenue
DIR: S on S River St, R on W River St,
1st R on Riverside Dr, L on Old River Rd,
R on Marlborough Ave, R on Locust St, R
on Amherst Ave MLS#12-216
$75,900
Hosted by:
Steve Shemo 570-793-9449
WILKES-BARRE
67 Grove Street
DIR: S on W-B Blvd, thru light on Hazle
St, 1st L onto Grove St
MLS#12-1820
$74,500
Hosted by:
Steve Shemo 570-793-9449
R
E
D
U
C
E
D
12:30-3:00
2:00-3:30
12:00-1:30
12:00-2:00 12:00-1:30
906 Homes for Sale
FORTY FORT
1908 Wyoming
Avenue
Plenty of TLC is
reflected in this
attractive 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home
in a convenient
location. Offers for-
mal living room/din-
ing room & family
room with sliding
doors to large rear
deck & a great level
lot. MLS# 11-2083
Only $99,000
Call Barbara Metcalf
570-696-0883
FORTY FORT
CHEAPER THAN
RENT!
38 Oak Street. Spa-
cious 1/2 double
block. Living room /
dining room combo.
3 bedrooms on sec-
ond floor, 3 on the
third. 1 1/2 baths. lst
floor laundry. 3
porches. Large yard
with loads of park-
ing. Aluminum sid-
ing. Concrete drive-
way. Many extras!
MLS # 12-711. Con-
ventional financing.
$2,750 down,
3.875% interest
$288 mo. $55,000
Bob Kopec
HUMFORD REALTY
570-822-5126
FORTY FORT
Grand Victorian
Well maintained on
a corner lot, with 4
bedrooms, modern
baths, modern
kitchen with
JennAire broiler, for-
mal dining room,
front porch &
screened side
porch, Gas heat,
gas fireplace in liv-
ing room, and pellet
stove in the family
room. Many touch-
es of yesteryear.
MLS# 12-1559
$214,900.
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
PAGE 18G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
F
C
C
arey
rank
onstruction, Inc.
Where High Quality
Is Te Standard
New Residential
Construction
Custom Remodeling
Kitchen and Baths
Land Development
www. f r a n k c a r e y c o n s t r u c t i o n . c o m
Office: 570-655-2374
Direct: 570-237-1444
371 Center Hill Road W,
Dallas
Well maintained 100+ farm house on
2 acres with a pond. Wonderful LR
w/ 11’ ceilings, stone fireplace with
pine accent trim, pegged hardwood
floors, wet bar opens to 50’ screened
patio plus courtyard, den, formal
Dining room, semi-modern kitchen
adjacent to large breakfast/family. 4
bedrooms, 3 full and two 1/2 baths, 3
car garage. Gas Heat/central a/c.
MLS#12-1439
$365,000
Smith Hourigan Group
Smarter. Bolder. Faster.
Shavertown 570-696-1195
Kevin Smith
Call Kevin Smith (570) 696-1195 • (570) 696-5420
Landlords
• Find Good Tenants
• Address ProblemTenants
• Supply Landlord Forms
• Free Rental Advertising
• Investing in Properties
• And more...
5 Free Landlord Forms with Coupon
Plus Free Rental Advertising
Coupon
Thurs &Fri.. 2 to 8pm Sat &Sun.. 1 to 5pm: (570) 829-1702
We Can Help...
Heritage Homes Promise:
Competitive Pricing • No Hidden Costs • No Hidden Upgrades
Heerriittaagggee HHooommmeeess PPrroommiise:
titiv ivee Pr Pr Pric ic cin in in nggggggg ••• NNo No No No HHHH Hid id id id id idddde de de dennnnn CCo Co Co Costt st stsss •• No No No N H HHid d idde de d nn Up
Te Somerville - 2,210 sq. ft.
2808 Scranton/Carbondale Highway
Blakely, PA 18447
570-383-2981 • www.heritagehomesltd.com
Featuring:
You’ve Got Dreams. We’ve Got Plans.
Scan Code and
Visit Our Website:
MODEL HOURS
Weekdays 12-7
Sat & Sun 12-5
Closed Fridays
HERITAGE HOMES INCLUDE:
• Gas Warm Air Heat
• Site Work Package
• Central Air Conditioning
• Concrete Front Porch
• Andersen Windows
• 1st Floor Laundry
• Master Bedroom 1st Floor
• Two Story Great Room
• 2 1/2 Tile Baths
• Front Vinyl Shakes
• Hardwood, Kitchen, Foyer
• Poured Concrete Foundation
906 Homes for Sale
FREELAND
Spacious 4 bed-
room, 1 3/4 bath
home. Gas Heat.
Deck. Fenced yard.
One car garage.
MLS 12-832
$62,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
GLEN SUMMIT
MOUNTAIN TOP
Beautifully appoint-
ed home on 2
acres. community
amenities include
private lake with
sandy beach, tennis
courts, trails for hik-
ing and biking. This
home boasts peren-
nial gardens and
mature landscaping,
fenced rear yard
enclosed 20x40
heated in-ground
pool, raised garden,
custom dog house
and run. Entertain
and dine on the
wrap-around porch
with mahogany
flooring and electric
hurricane shutters.
The residence fea-
tures hardwood
flooring, french
doors, cherry
kitchen, 3-4 bed-
rooms, updated
heat/air. Emergency
generator for
inclement weather.
MLS# 12-1647
Call Maribeth Jones,
direct number 696-
6565, office 696-
2600 ext. 210.
Priced to sell at
$535,000
696-2600
GLEN LYON
Fully rented 5 unit
apt building, new
siding, new roof and
nice updates inside,
off street parking &
near the college.
Call or text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
for more information
or to schedule your
showing. $117,000
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
HANOVER TWP
19 Garrahan Street
Very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 Bath single
with new modern
kitchen and bath.
Home features
ductless A/C, new
carpeting, fresh
paint, refinished
hardwood floors,
large bedroom clos-
ets, upstairs hall
built-ins, replace-
ment windows,
newer roof, walk up
attic, nice yard, full
basement.
MLS 12-2371
$69,900
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-735-7494
Ext. 304
Patricia Lunski
570-814-6671
HANOVER TWP
Cute as Grandma's
house with gracious
sized eat-in kitchen.
Updates including
many Pella win-
dows, doors and
furnace 2011. Walk
out basement to
great back yard. 2
car garage off rear
alley. Walk out
basement. Call
today for a private
showing. $59,900
MLS 12-1510
Tracy McDermott
570-696-2468
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP
Very well main-
tained 2-story home
with 6 rooms, 3
bedrooms, large
eat-in kitchen and
1.5 baths. This home
also has a first floor
laundry room, duct-
less air conditioner,
gas steam heat and
a fenced in yard
with a shed. This
home is in move-in
condition just wait-
ing for you to move
into. Make an
appointment today!
#11-4433 $79,900
Karen Altavilla
283-9100 x28
Prudential:
696-2600
HANOVER TWP.
10 Lyndwood Ave
Very nice brick and
vinyl ranch home
with 3 bedrooms
and 1.5 baths. This
home has hard-
wood floors, mod-
ern kitchen and
baths, finished
basement with a
separate workshop,
lots of storage, a 2-
car attached
garage, deck and
fenced-in yard.
Come see this
house now and you
can be enjoying the
summer in the
beautiful in-ground
pool. For more infor-
mation and to view
the photos, go to
www.prudential-
realestate.com and
enter PRU7W7A3 in
the “Home Search”.
PRICE
REDUCED!
$134,500.
MLS#12-1821.
Call today for an
appointment.
Mary Ellen Belchick
696-6566
Walter Belchick
696-2600 ext. 301
570-696-2600
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
2 Betsy Ross Drive
Warmly inviting 3
bedroom, 2.5 bath
Tudor. Striking high-
lights in this beauti-
ful home include
custom blinds, man-
icured lawn, deck,
patio and 3-season
porch. Entertain in
the finished walk-
out basement with
wet bar or relax by
the pool! Outstand-
ing quality!
Call Pat Guesto
570-793-4055
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
HANOVER TWP.
476 Wyoming St.
Nice 3 bedroom
single home. Gas
heat. Convenient
location. To settle
estate. Reduced to
$34,900
Call Jim for details
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932 or
570-542-5708
HANOVER TWP.
58 Simon Block
Nice home with
private driveway
features gas heat
with baseboard
heating, large room
sizes, LL with front
walk-out ideal for
finishing or extra
storage.
Directions: Sans
Souci Pkwy, turn
onto Main Rd, right
on Mary St. to left
onto Simon Block,
home on left.
MLS# 12-2157
$65,000
Call
Lynda Rowinski
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
906 Homes for Sale
HANOVER TWP.
78 Luzerne St.
Not a drive-by.
Move right into this
sparkling clean,
bright and cheery
1/2 double. All new
floor coverings and
freshly painted inte-
rior. 2 zone gas hot
water baseboard
heat. W/d hookups
in basement which
has a concrete
floor. All measure-
ments are
approximate.
MLS 12-1129
$45,000
Call Michelle T.
Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
HANOVER TWP.
A real beauty….with
a beautiful price!
Spacious with great
quality…hardwood
flooring, cherry
woodwork, stained
and leaded glass
windows, kitchen
with pantry, formal
fining room, living
room adjoining
a sun parlor.
Three bedrooms
with possible fourth
on third floor, tile
bath, gas heat,
fenced yard, four
car garage. MLS#
11-4133 How much?
$69,900!
Call Maribeth Jones
directly at
696-6565
696-2600
HANOVER TWP.
FAMILY
COMPOUND
Korn Krest
Includes 2 newly
renovated houses.
Great location. Park
across street.
$140,000.
Appointment only.
570-650-6365
HANOVER TWP.
NEW LISTING
3 Dexter St.
Why pay rent when
you can own your
own home!
Recently renovated
3 bedroom home
with 1 car garage &
fenced in yard. New
carpet, flooring &
counter tops. Roof
& windows just 2
years old. Call
Michele for your pri-
vate showing. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.Atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1354
Reduced
$57,500
Call Michele
570-905-2336
HANOVER TWP.
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY 12-2
New Construction.
Lot #2, Fairway
Estates. 2,700
square feet, tile &
hardwood on 1st
floor. Cherry cabi-
nets with center
island. $399,500.
For more details:
patrickdeats.com
(570)696-1041
HANOVER TWP.
This beautiful,
remodeled home
features three bed-
rooms, an eat-in
kitchen with new tile
floor and new appli-
ances. It also has a
new roof, newer fur-
nace, 100 amp serv-
ice, two-car garage
and wall to wall car-
peting. It is located
in a quiet neighbor-
hood and close to
schools and shop-
ping. This is definite-
ly not just a drive by,
but a must see for
anyone looking for a
home in this price
range. Call today to
set up a showing,
you won’t be disap-
pointed!
#12-2185 $69,000
Everett Davis
696-6560
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
105 Circle Drive
Well maintained
Bi-Level on nicely
landscaped corner
lot. Finished lower
level with gas
fireplace & sliding
doors to private
patio. Totally fenced
yard, 1 car garage.
3 bedrooms, 2
baths. $127,900
MLS# 11-1271
Call Cathy
(570) 696-5422
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
HARDING
1385 Mt. Zion Rd.
Great country set-
ting on 3.05 acres.
Move in condition
Ranch with 3 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
inground swimming
pool, hardwood
floors. Finished
basement with wet
bar. 2 car garage,
wrap around drive-
way. For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-2270
$249,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
HARDING
Charming home in
very good condition.
Nice woodworking,
replacement win-
dows, new vaulted
ceiling bedroom
overlooking amaz-
ing view of the river.
Vinyl siding, one car
garage, private set-
ting on a dead end
street, but not flood
zone.Reduced!
$89,900
MLS 12-990
Call Nancy Answini,
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
HARDING
PRICE REDUCED
2032 ROUTE 92
Great Ranch home
surrounded by
nature with view of
the river and extra
lot on the river.
Large living room
and kitchen remod-
eled and ready to
move in. Full unfin-
ished basement, off
street parking.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-79
$69,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
HARDING
This lovely home is
PRICED TO SELL.
Three bedrooms,
one with new vault-
ed ceilings. One
bath, replacement
windows, living
room, dining room,
modern kitchen and
functional base-
ment. The amazing
view of the moun-
tains and River from
the front of the
home is very desir-
able. Home is not in
flood zone and on a
dead end street and
waiting for new
buyer. Reduced!
$82,000
MLS 12-990
Call Nancy Answini,
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HARVEYS LAKE
AREA
SPRINGS ARTISTRY
Nestled on 3.86
acres. Will be yours
to enjoy in this 4
bedroom, with 1st
floor master suite,
with a jacuzzi type
tub. Separate show-
er, 2 walk-in clos-
ets, opens to deck
and in-ground pool,
2 story family room,
warmed by a gas
fireplace, & 2 sets
of french doors to
deck. Appealing
granite kitchen, and
natural wood cabi-
nets, bright break-
fast nook. Country
charm, halfway to
heaven! $269,000.
Call Tracy
McDermott
570-332-8764
570-696-2468
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEY’S LAKE
“ONE OF THE BEST
VALUES AT THE
LAKE”
Modern two story 4
Bedroom, 4 bath-
room home with 62'
lakefront & great
dock for entertain-
ing features cov-
ered pavilion with
bar, cable tv, shed,
boat slip, composite
decking, among
many other wonder-
ful features. Deep
water & sunset
view. Convenient
location near the
entry to the lake.
House features
modern kitchen and
baths, 2 car garage.
Built in mid 80's
gives you a
''newer'' construc-
tion and minimal
maintenance. Live
year round or just
enjoy the summers.
MLS# 12-2142
$665,000
Call Kevin Smith
570-696-5422
SMITH HOURIGAN
570-696-1195
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
OPEN HOUSE
SUN. JULY 1
12-2PM
NEW LISTING
21 Sunset Terrace
Beautifully
remodeled 2 story
perfect for either a
primary home or a
lake getaway.
Lake view from
porch and master
bedroom. New
kitchen and TWO
new baths.
MLS #12-2393
$139,900
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
HARVEYS LAKE
Richard Lane
2 story, 3 bedroom,
1 bath home at rear
of Lake Side Drive
between Pole #’s
125 and 126 on
Richard Lane. Lake
view, including front
wrap around porch
and 2 of the 3
upstairs bedrooms.
and rear yard.
Home in need of
updating and
repairs and is being
sold as is.
MLS 12-1607
$59,900
Michelle T. Boice
570-639-5393
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
HARVEYS LAKE
View this
beauty…cedar and
stone sided
contemporary
home on partially
wooded lot. Great
Room with floor
to ceiling fireplace,
built-in bookcases
adjoining the dining
room and entry to
the four season
porch. 2 year new
stainless steel
appliances and a
breakfast area with
beamed ceiling and
a wall of glass. First
floor den or bed-
room, tile and mar-
ble bath with walk-
in master bath with
lounge area and
a massive closet.
Pool
surrounded by
decking warrants
great entertain-
ing…cabana with
bath. Separate
building to pot your
plants. Walk to the
marina and slip into
your boat.
MLS# 12-2542
Call Maribeth Jones
directly at
696-6565, office
696-2600 ext. 210
$379,000
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
HARVEYS LAKE
WELL MAINTAINED
2 STORY - 4 Bed-
room, eat-in
kitchen, spacious
Living Room, family
room with original
woodwork, remod-
eled baths and nice
front porch on 1.58
partially wooded
acres near Harveys
Lake. $117,800
Jeannie Brady
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
HAZLETON
139 S. Laurel St
Spacious Brick
Ranch waiting for
your personal
touch. Hardwood
floors, well-thought
out storage in every
room. Quality work-
manship, well main-
tained. It's time to
enjoy this home with
it's large rooms,
greenhouse & nice
yard! Convenient
location. 12-2352
$124,900
Darcy J. Gollhardt
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
Find a
newcar
online
at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL NNL NNNL NNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LLE LEEE LE DER D .
timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
HUGHESTOWN
REDUCED
189 Rock St.
Spacious home
with 4 bed-
rooms and large
rooms. Nice old
woodwork,
staircase, etc.
Extra lot for
parking off Ken-
ley St.
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3404
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
906 Homes for Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
1594 MAIN ROAD
REDUCED
$98,500
Large 2 story home
in very good condi-
tion, features 3 bed-
rooms, 1 1/2 modern
bath rooms, large
eat in kitchen with
appliances. Dining
room with French
doors, large family
room has fireplace
large foyer, with
opened stairway
and stained glass
window. Home has
natural woodwork
thru-out, with plast-
er walls, CENTRAL
AIR thru out. Many
extras must see.
Level lot with a 3
bay garage in back.
Shown by appoint-
ment to qualified
buyers only. Home
has a "HOME WAR-
RANTY" paid by sell-
ers. Additional pho-
tos can be seen at
CAPITOL REAL
ESTATE WEB SITE,
www.capitol-real
estate.com
Call John Vacendak
823-4290
735-1810
Line up a place to live
in classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
PAGE 19G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
HUNLOCK CREEK
Beautifully main-
tained cape cod fea-
tures 3 bedrooms
and one and a half
baths. Hardwood
floors in living room,
dining room, foyer
and first floor bed-
room. Newly remod-
eled kitchen and
bathroom. Lots of
storage. New roof
installed in 2010.
Breakfast nook with
built-in table and
benches. Enclosed
porch, above ground
pool and deck.
11-2706. $149,900
Call Tracy
McDermott
Realty
570-696-2468
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
HUNLOCK CREEK
Lovely Ranch home
on 1.42 acres.
Features 3 bed-
rooms, full bath, 1/2
bath, kitchen, living
room with fireplace,
dining room, den &
laundry room on
Main floor. Kitchen,
family room with
fireplace, 3/4 bath &
storage room on
Lower Level. Newer
roof, siding, sofit &
gutters plus some
newer carpeting,
pergo flooring, cen-
tral air & whole
house fan, 2 car
garage & paved
driveway. 12-1010
$176,900
Ken Williams
570-542-8800
Five Mountains
Realty
JENKINS TWP.
$54,000 $54,000
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms
1 Bath.
Finished Walk-Out
Basement.
Single Car
Garage.
Call Vince
570-332-8792
JENKINS TWP.
1182 Main St.
Modern 3 bedroom,
2 full bath, single on
a double lot. Huge
family room, mod-
ern kitchen, 1st
floor laundry room,
additional room on
1st floor could be
used as 4th bed-
room. Landscaped
yard, shed, off
street parking
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1269
$129,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
JENKINS TWP.
1717 River Road
Completely remod-
eled home with new
siding, windows
and modern kitchen
& bath. New floor-
ing, walls, heat and
electric. Move right
in. Off street park-
ing in rear. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2232
$79,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
906 Homes for Sale
JENKINS TWP.
2 W. Sunrise
Drive
PRICED TO
SELL!
This 4 bedroom
has 2 car
garage with
extra driveway,
central air,
veranda over
garage, recre-
ation room with
fireplace and
wet bar. Sun-
room
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-296
$199,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
S
O
L
D
JENKINS TWP.
250 Susquehan-
nock Drive
Not your traditional
Cape Cod. Super
large bedrooms, 1st
floor master. 2 car
garage, lower level
family room. Gas
heat, Central air.
Bamboo floors,
above ground pool
with 2 tier deck.
For more info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-1093
$289,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
297 Susquehannock
Drive
Traditional 4 bed-
room home with 2.5
baths, 2 car
garage. Large ard
with deck and
retractable awning.
Above ground pool,
1st floor laundry. .
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-945
$254,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
JENKINS TWP.
4 Widener Drive
A must see home!
You absolutely must
see the interior of
this home. Start by
looking at the pho-
tos on line. Fantas-
tic kitchen with
hickory cabinets,
granite counters,
stainless steel
appliances and tile
floor. Fabulous
master bathroom
with champagne
tub and glass
shower, walk in
closet. 4 car
garage, upper
garage is partially
finished. The list
goes on and on. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-210
Price Reduced
$375,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
JENKINS TWP.
Highland Hills
8 Patrick Road
Magnificent custom
built tudor home
with quality
throughout. Spa-
cious 4 bedrooms,
3.5 baths, 2 story
living room with
fireplace and library
loft. Dining room,
family room and 3
season sunroom
which overlooks
professionally land-
scaped grounds
with gazebo and
tennis/basketball
court. Lower level
includes recreation
room, exercise
room and 3/4 bath.
Enjoy this serene
acre in a beautiful
setting in Highland
Hills Development.
Too many amenities
to mention.
Taxes appealed
and lowered con-
siderably for year
2013. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-723
$399,900
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
157 Division St.
OWNER SAYS SELL!
This property has
great positive cash
flow. 1st floor 2
bedroom and
upstairs is 2 floors
with 3 bedrooms
total. 1st floor has
new drywall & insu-
lation, gas heat,
new tile tub sur-
round, kitchen
counters and car-
pet. 2nd apt. has
newer kitchen & is
all electric. Sepa-
rate utilities and off
street parking in
rear. Taxes are
currently being
appealed.
MLS 12-1771
$89,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
171 Third Ave
So close to so
much, traditionally
appointed 3 bed-
room, 3 bath town-
home with warm
tones & wall to wall
cleanliness. Modern
kitchen with lots of
cabinets & plenty of
closet space thru-
out, enjoy the priva-
cy of deck & patio
with fenced yard.
MLS 11-2841
$123,000
Call Arlene Warunek
570-650-4169
Smith Hourigan
Group
(570) 696-1195
KINGSTON
299 Rutter Ave.
Large and well
maintained duplex
on corner lot in
Kingston. 2 bed-
rooms each unit,
separate gas heat
and off street park-
ing for multiple
cars. New roof,
water heater and
freshly painted
exterior. A really
nice property.
MLS 12-2447
$139,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
KINGSTON
38 W. Walnut St.
Charming 4/5 bed-
room with 1.5
baths. Beautifully
appointed kitchen
w/granite counter
tops, cherry cabi-
nets and hardwood
floors. Gas fireplace
in living room, lead-
ed glass windows
in living room and
dining room. Nice
back deck, 2 car
garage and 4 sea-
son front porch.
MLS 11-4103
$179,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
KINGSTON
431 Chestnut Ave.
Charming 2 story
single family home
with upgrades,
including new
kitchen cabinets,
furnace, hot water
heater, 200 amp
electric, 2 car
detached garage.
Walk up attic for
additional storage
space. MLS 11-4106
$129,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
KINGSTON
80 Bennett St.
Great Kingston
location on a dou-
ble lot. Close to
schools, shopping,
restaurants and
public transporta-
tion. Potential of 2
additional bed-
rooms on 3rd floor.
Partially finished
basement.
MLS 12-2346
$114,900
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
Beautiful well-main-
tained 3 level, 2.5
bath townhome in
very desirable loca-
tion. Many upgrades
include a spacious,
custom bathroom
with large closets,
custom window
treatments, built-in
wall microwave in
kitchen, new roof,
and new garage
door. Plenty of stor-
age, and a possible
3rd bedroom on 1st
level. MLS 12-175
$132,900
Call Mary Danelo
570-704-8000
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
KINGSTON
Great New Price!!
Motivated Seller
Come take a look
at this freshly
painted
Brick Cape Cod
w/over-sized
detached garage,
on a tree lined
street in the heart
of Kingston.
3-4 Bedrooms, 2
baths, dining room
& wood burning
fireplace in
living room.
Walking distance to
parks, library &
shopping. MLS #
11-4162
$169,900
Call Deb
Roccograndi at
570-696-6671
KINGSTON
Located within 1
block of elementary
school & neighbor-
hood park this spa-
cious 4 bedrooms
offers 1450 sq. ft of
living space with
1.75 baths, walk up
attic, and partially
finished basement.
Extras include gas
fireplace, an in-
ground pool with
fenced yard, new
gas furnace & more.
11-823
Reduced
$99,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
KINGSTON
MOTIVATED SELLER
REDUCED!
76 N. Dawes Ave.
Don’t miss this
great home with
updated kitchen
and granite coun-
ters, private yard
with enclosed sun
room. Garage and
off street parking. 2
large bedrooms.
PRICED TO SELL!
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-41
$109,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
KINGSTON
REDUCED
281 Reynolds St.
3 story single family
with 4 bedrooms,
2.5 baths and lots
of space! Lovely
entrance foyer, 3rd
floor with large
room, could be 5th
bedroom plus a full
tile bath. Fenced in
back yard and
much more.
MLS 12-1863
$119,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0776
906 Homes for Sale
KINGSTON
Spacious 4 Bed-
room single in good
location. 2 fireplace,
part finished base-
ment, nice yard with
One car garage.
Needs TLC. Priced
to sell at $82,000.
Call Kathie
570-288-6654
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
KINGSTON
“Why rent when you
can own”
Well kept, 3-4 Bed-
room Townhouse,
Dining Room,
Hardwood
Floors,Fenced yard,
Off Street Parking,
Low Taxes.
Call Jack
570-878-6225
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
KINGSTON
Great Location,
Huge rooms, Amaz-
ing kitchen with
granite countertops,
relax in the sunroom
or the partial fin-
ished lower level,
Hardwood under
carpets, off street
parking, plus a 1
year home warranty.
Call or text Donna
570-947-3824 or
Tony 570-855-2424
for more information
or to schedule your
showing. $169,999
KINGSTON
This 3 bedroom
home offers modern
kitchen, with Corian
counters accented
by marble back-
splash, central air,
fenced rear yard
with deck and patio.
Off street parking
for 2 to 4 cars. Cus-
tom shutters on the
first floor windows
along with natural
woodwork and
hardwood floors
give this home a
charm you are sure
to love!
#12-1997 $134,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
LAFLIN
13 Fordham Road
Totally remodeled
custom brick ranch
in Oakwood Park.
This home features
an open floor plan
with hardwood
floors, 2 fireplaces,
kitchen, formal living
& dining rooms,
family room, 4 bed-
rooms, 4 baths,
office with private
entrance, laundry
room on first floor,
tons of closets and
storage areas,
walk-up attic, great
finished basement
with fireplace, built-
in grill, in-ground
pool, cabana with
half bath, an over-
sized 2-car garage
& a security system.
Renovations include
new: windows, gas
furnace, central air,
electrical service,
hardwood floors,
Berber carpeting,
freshly painted,
updated bathrooms
& much, much,
more. Laflin Road to
Fordham Road, on
right. $399,700
Call Donna
570-613-9080
LAFLIN
LIBERTY HILLS
63 Betsy Ross Dr.
Very well cared for
2-story. 3 bed-
rooms, 2 1/2 baths.
Professionally land-
scaped, 2-car
garage. 12-2192
$205,000
EILEEN R.
MELONE REAL
ESTATE
570-821-7022
906 Homes for Sale
LARKSVILLE
467 E. State St.
Well kept home in a
nice neighborhood.
Close to new Ele-
mentary School and
bus stop. New roof
and off street
parking.
MLS 12-2342
$71,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
EXT. 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
LARKSVILLE
Great Double-Block,
Very well
maintained
and has separate
utilities, and a
rental income on
one side. Ready
for you to move in
on one side or to
rent out as an
investment.
Nice sized
lot with off-street
parking and a
detached
garage with plenty
of storage.
MLS# 12-1463
$119,900
Call:
Deb Roccograndi @
696-6671
LARKSVILLE
Lovely 2100 sq. ft.
remodeled home
with amazing views
and a quiet neigh-
borhood. Three
bedrooms and 2 full
baths on first floor
and two large bed-
rooms on second
floor. New kitchen
with center island
and wrap around
deck to enjoy the
scenery. Bedrooms
on first floor
presently used as
family room and
office. Many possi-
bilities. Out of Flood
Zone. Reduced!
$109,000
Call Nancy Answini
Gilroy Real Estate
570-288-1444
LUZERNE
109 Carpenter St.
Completely reno-
vated. New roof,
windows, kitchen
and bathroom.
Freshly painted
interior and exterior
with fabulous mod-
ern colors. Great
area and low,
low taxes!
MLS 12-2055
$109,500
Kelly Connolly-
Cuba
EXT. 37
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LUZERNE
146 Kelly St.
Well kept home
with garage in rear.
Move in condition.
New roof and hot
water heater. Easy
access to Cross
Valley and shop-
ping. Out of flood
zone. 200 amp
service.
MLS 12-1801
$119,900
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
MOUNTAIN TOP
46 Farmhouse Rd.
REDUCED!
MOTIVATED
SELLER
Lovely 10 room vinyl
sided ranch home,
with 2.5 modern
baths, formal dining
room, gas heat,
central air, 2 car
garage & large
deck. Lower level
consists of 2 large
recreation rooms.
Office, half bath and
workshop. Lower
level all ceramic
tiled floors. MLS#
12-1359
$289,500
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Beautiful 3 bed-
room, 2 3/4 bath,
with hardwood
floors under carpet
& 2nd kitchen in
lower level for
entertaining.
screened porch,
landscaped yard,
heated workshop &
much more!
$179,900
Call Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
MOUNTAIN TOP
BUTLER TWP
Hunter Highway,
Route 309
(Rear View)
4 bedrooms, 3
baths, living room,
dining room, new
kitchen, heated sun-
room, heated exer-
cise room. Brick
fireplace, large
patio. $195,000
MLS 12-1442
Call Vieve Zaroda
(570) 474-6307
Ext. 2772
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAIN TOP
Greystone Manor.
Ten year old home
with attached apart-
ment. 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths. Kitchen,
living room, dining
room & den. Apart-
ment has 1 bed-
room, bath, living
room, dining room,
private entrance. 3
car garage, front
porch, large decks.
Total 2,840 square
feet. On cul-de-sac.
Call BOB RUNDLE
for appointment.
COLDWELL BANKER
RUNDLE REAL ESTATE
570-474-2340,
Ext. 11
MOUNTAIN TOP
Move in ready 4
bedroom, 2.1 bath
ranch. Formal din-
ing room, eat-in
kitchen, 1st floor
laundry. Central
A/C. Walk out the
sliding door from
large family room to
yard. New roof,
patio/sliding door &
carpet in family
room. Most of
house recently
painted.
MLS# 12-876
PRICE REDUCED
$182,500
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
MOUNTAIN TOP
Nestled on just
under an acre just
minutes from 81S
this colonial offers
2194 sq. ft. of living
area plus a finished
basement. Enjoy
your summer
evenings on the
wrap around porch
or take a quick dip in
the above ground
pool with tier deck.
The covered pavil-
ion is ideal for pic-
nics or gatherings
And when the winter
winds blow cuddle
in front of the gas
fireplace and enjoy
a quiet night.
MLS 11-2260
Priced to Sell,
$179,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
906 Homes for Sale
MOUNTAIN TOP
Spacious 3 bed-
room, 1 3/4 bath
split level on a
beautifully land-
scaped 1 acre lot.
Large sunroom &
recreation room
with fireplace and
wet bar.
$205,000
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
MOUNTAIN TOP
Very nice, 3 bed-
room, 1.5 bath,
Ranch home with
formal dining room,
modern kitchen,
lower level knotty
pine family room &
laundry, has 2 car
garage, gas heat.
MLS# 12-1553
Reduced to
$134,900
Call Florence
570-715-7737
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-474-6307
MOUNTAINTOP
9 Anne Street
Modern bi-level, 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath,
remodeled kitchen
with all new appli-
ances. New gas hot
water furnace.
Hardwood floors.
Family room. 3 sea-
sons room & deck.
2 car garage. Large
wooded yard.
Excellent condition.
Convenient location.
Reduced to
$189,000 OBO
570-823-4282 or
570-823-7540
MOUNTAINTOP
Very nice Raised
Ranch with many
updates is in
''move-in'' condi-
tion. Home is heat-
ed with gas HWBB
has 200 amp elec-
tric. New sliders to
rear deck leading to
lovely kidney
shaped in-ground
pool. Must see!
Directions: S. Main
St. to Division to
Anne St., home on
left. MLS# 12-2252
$175,000
Call Lynda
(570) 696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
MOUNTAIN TOP
130 CHURCH ROAD
The feel of a true
colonial home with
double entry doors
off the foyer into the
living room and din-
ing room. Spacious
kitchen breakfast
area, family room
leading to a fenced
rear yard. 3-season
room with cathedral
ceiling. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
recently remodeled
2.5 bath and 2-car
garage. Located on
3.77 acres, all the
privacy of country
living yet conve-
niently located.
MLS#12-165
$183,900
Jill Jones 696-6550
Prudential:
696-2600
906 Homes for Sale
NANITCOKE
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Nice opportunity for
a starter home or
investment proper-
ty. Original columns,
moldings, and lead-
ed glass windows
are intact.
Reduced $40,000
CALL CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1/2 DOUBLE
Great starter home
in nice area. Close
to schools and
recreation. Large 3
season porch with
cabinetry, great for
entertaining. New
plumbing, lots of
light & huge walk
up attic for storage
or rec room.
$35,000
Call CHRISTINE
KUTZ
570-332-8832
NANTICOKE
114 W. Union St.
Large home with 3
bedrooms, 8
rooms, yard with
garage and off
street parking. 2
bathrooms. Nice
condition. Loads of
potential. For more
into and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-2096
$59,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
NANTICOKE
182 Robert Street
Nice single or
duplex. Gas heat.
Detached garage.
This home is “high
and dry”, and avail-
able for immediate
occupancy. Call
Jim for details.
Affordable @
$99,500
TOWNE &
COUNTRY R.E.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
NANTICOKE
23 W. Grand Street
Totally Remodeled 3
Bedroom home on
large lot on a well-
kept street in move-
in condition! Home
Includes 1 1/2 Mod-
ern Baths w/ stone
countertops, tile
floors, spacious
kitchen with all new
appliances & plenty
of countertop
space! New carpet
throughout!
MLS 11-3473
$57,900
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
NANTICOKE
25 W. Washington
Move right into this
very nice 3 bed-
room, 1 bath home.
Lots of natural
woodwork and a
beautiful stained
glass window.
Newer kitchen
appliances and w/w
carpeting. Supple-
ment your heating
with a recently
installed wood pel-
let stove. This home
also has a one car
detached garage.
MLS 12-2171
$76,000
John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
409 Union St.
This home has
good bones. New
windows, furnace,
newer addition,
tons of renovations.
Needs to be
cleaned out.
Bring it back!
MLS 12-2216
$92,500
David
Krolikowski
570-287-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-287-0770
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
415 Jones Street
Adorable home with
charm & character.
4 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, eat-in
kitchen, formal din-
ing room, family
room with gas fire-
place. 3 season
room, fenced in
yard with rear deck
& shed.
$109,900
MLS#12-498
Michael Nocera
570-357-4300
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-5412
NANTICOKE
418 Front St.
Check out this large
4 bedroom, 1.5 bath
home with a formal
dining room, living
room and family
room. This home is
located across the
street from a beau-
tiful park and recre-
ation area. Great
for people who like
the outdoors and
have kids.
MLS 12-1466
$50,000
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
FIVE MOUNTAINS
REALTY
570-542-2141
NANTICOKE
62 W. Church St
Very nice, well kept
and ready to move
into. This 3 Bed-
room 1/2 double has
a modern kitchen
with snack bar &
modern cabinets
and counter top. 3
Bedrooms with
large closets and
w/w. Full modern
bath on second
floor. Walk up attic,
yard and shed.
Home as newer
roof, furnace and
hot water heater,
replacement win-
dows and nice
woodwork.
MLS 12-2367
$49,900
ANTONIK &
ASSOCIATES,
INC.
570-735-7494
Ext. 304
Patricia Lunski
570-814-6671
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
NANTICOKE
715 Maple St.
Handyman’s dream.
NOT a nightmare. A
little paint, carpet-
ing and water lines
and this house is
good to go. Large
yard. 2 bedrooms.
For mor info and
photos visit: www.
atlasrealtyinc.com.
MLS 12-2332
$34,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
NANTICOKE
Motivated seller!
Affordable 3 bed-
room 2 story home.
Features a study on
1st floor, or could
be a 4th bedroom.
Semi modern
kitchen, includes
appliances "as is",
gas heat, full base-
ment. MLS#12-1107
Asking $42,500.
Call Pat at
715-9337.
Lewith & Freeman
Real Estate
570-474-9801
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 PAGE 20
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
NEW LISTING!
NANTICOKE-
WANAMIE
Very well main-
tained ranch home
with 8 rooms, 3
bedrooms (possible
5) 1.5 baths, central
air a 3-season
porch, 1-car built-in
garage and a nice
size fenced-in yard,
(lot size is 42x150).
This home has had a
lot of improvements
in the last 6 years
and has tons of
closet space. Set an
appointment to see
it today!
#12-2444 $99,500
Karen Altavilla
283-9100 x28
570-283-9100
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
NANTICOKE
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY 7/8
1PM TO 3 PM
136 East Ridge St.
A great home fea-
tures 3 bedrooms,
plenty of closet
space, modern eat
in kitchen with
great appliances,
living room with
wood pellet stove,
large family room, 1
1/2 modern bath-
rooms, washer/
dryer hook-up, sec-
ond floor has all new
replacement
windows, exterior
has aluminum sid-
ing, stain glass win-
dow on new front
porch, new above
ground pool, fenced
in level yard, Plenty
of off street parking,
A+ today. Never
worry about park-
ing, its always there.
Great location, best
price home in
today's market,
Shown by appoint-
ment only, to quali-
fied buyers.
REDUCED
$47,500
Call John Vacendak
570-735-1810
www.capitol-
realestate.com
for additional
photos
NANTICOKE
REDUCED!
143 W. Broad St.
Nice 2 story home
with 3 bedrooms
1.5 baths, fenced
yard, newer furnace
with 3 zones and
newer 200 amp
electrical service,
whole house water
filter and beautiful
hard wood floors.
This home has an
attached Mother in
Law suite with a
separate entrance.
This can easily be
converted to a 1st
floor master bed-
room with a
master bath.
MLS 12-1401
$64,900
John W. Polifka
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
570-704-6846
NEWPORT TWP.
4 Overlook Drive
Great split level
home in Whitney
Point development,
formerly Ridgeview.
This home has 3
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 2 car
garage, large deck,
and lower level
family room with a
bar and coal stove.
Heat your house all
winter long with
about $150 worth of
coal!
MLS# 12-2548
$175,000
Call John Polifka
570-704-6846
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
906 Homes for Sale
NORTH LAKE
Inviting home with
90’ of lakefront &
wonderful enclosed
dock. The huge
great room features
a vaulted ceiling,
hard wood floors,
handsome stone
fireplace, built-in
cabinets & long win-
dow seat with offer-
ing lake view. Mod-
ern kitchen with
large pantry for
entertaining, Master
suite opens to 3
season room, also
lakefront. 2nd floor
guest rooms are
oversized. MLS#
11-2954 $328,500
Call Rhea
570-696-6677
NOXEN
PRICED TO SELL -
Brick ranch with
large living room, 3
bedrooms, sun
room, deck, full
basement, sheds
and garage on 0.54
acres in Noxen.
$135,000.
Jeannie Brady
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
NUANGOLA LAKE
28 Lance Street
Very comfortable 2
bedroom home in
move in condition.
Great sun room,
large yard, 1 car
garage. Deeded
lake access.
Reduced $107,000
MLS # 11-2899
CALL KATHIE
(570) 288-6654
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PITTSTON
110 Union St.
Fixer upper with 3
bedrooms, new
roof, gas heat.
Great lot 50 x 173.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1513
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON
12 Laflin Road
Like new spacious
3 bedroom, 2.5
bath end unit town-
house, Sliding doors
to deck off of living
room/dining room.
Master suite with
vaulted ceiling,
modern kitchen,
laundry on 2nd
floor. Roof and
water heater are
new. Convenient
location and out of
flood zone
MLS 12-938
$169,900
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
PITTSTON
175 Oak Street
New furnace,
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, 1st floor
laundry room, 3
season porch,
fenced yard and off
street parking.
MLS#12-721
$84,900
Call Patti
570-328-1752
Liberty Realty
& Appraisal
Services LLC
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON
38 Johnson St.
Looking for a home
with 3 bedrooms,
1.5 baths, modern
kitchen, hardwood
floors? Also fea-
tures gas fireplace,
new gas furnace,
newer windows and
roof, deck, fenced
in yard. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-328
$129,900
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
PITTSTON
45-47 Swallow St.
3 units include dou-
ble block home
with additional sin-
gle family home in
rear. Double block
has 3 bedrooms
and 1 bath on each
side. Single home
has 1 bedroom and
1 bath. Vinyl siding
and off street park-
ing. All utilities paid
by tenants except
sewer. Great
income.
MLS 12-1989
$119,000
Call Terry
570-885-3041
Angie
570-885-4896
LivingInQuailHill.com
New Homes
From $275,000-
$595,000
570-474-5574
PITTSTON
REDUCED
238 S. Main St.
Ten room home
with 4 bedrooms, 2
baths, 2 car
garage, great drive-
way, central air,
large yard. A must
see home!
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-477
$129,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
PITTSTON REDUCED
31 Tedrick St.
Very nice 3 bed-
room with 1
bath. This house
was loved and
you can tell.
Come see for
yourself, super
clean home with
nice curb
appeal. For
more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 11-3544
Reduced to
$76,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
PITTSTON
REDUCED!
95 William St.
1/2 double home
with more
square footage
than most single
family homes. 4
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, ultra
modern kitchen
and remodeled
baths. Super
clean. For more
information and
photos visit
www.atlas
realtyinc. com
MLS 11-2120
$54,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
!
906 Homes for Sale
PITTSTON TWP.
110 Front St.
This well-maintained
3 bedroom, 1.5
baths bilevel home
is in move in condi-
tion. Spacious eat-in
kitchen with custom
cabinets, tile floor
and counters.
Unique lower level
family room with
wood burning fire-
place, office space.
laundry/bath combo.
Plenty of storage
including an 8X6
cedar closet. Out-
door space has
covered patio,
columned carport
and well manicured
partially fenced
yard. Detached
large garage.
For more info &
photos, go to
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
$205,000
MLS# 12-2053
Call Angie at
570-885-4896
Terry at
570-885-3041
PITTSTON TWP.
What a Wonderful
Home!! This home
is located on a
country sized lot in
a private setting
w/beautiful views
all around.
This split-level fea-
tures loads of living
space, including
3 bedrooms,
2 baths, eat-in
kitchen, living room
with wood stove
insert, large
family room, office
& sun room with
a propane heater.
Detached 2-car
garage, storage
shed & alarm
system.
Come take a look!!
MLS# 3733
$219,900
Call Deb
Roccograndi at
570-696-6671
PLAINS
137 Hollywood Ave.
Beautiful 2 bed-
room Townhouse in
the River Ridge
neighborhood.
Modern kitchen/din-
ing area with tile
flooring, laundry
area on main floor.
Living room with
gas fireplace and
French doors lead-
ing to back deck.
MLS 12-1109
$163,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
PLAINS
1610 Westmin-
ster Road.
DRASTIC PRICE
REDUCTION
Paradise found!
Your own per-
sonal retreat,
small pond in
front of yard,
private setting
only minutes
from everything.
Log cabin chalet
with 3 bed-
rooms, loft,
stone fireplace,
hardwood
floors. Detached
garage with
bonus room.
Lots to see.
Watch the snow
fall in your own
“cabin in the
woods.”
For more info
and photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-319
$279,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
S
O
L
D
!
906 Homes for Sale
PLAINS
70 Warner Street
2 bedrooms,
move-in ready
with appliances,
nice yard with
shed and deck,
Newer roof, and
furnace, gas
heat. Low taxes.
Asking $65,900.
Please Call
570-822-8708
PLAINS
OPEN HOUSE JULY
1ST
1:30-3:30pm
22 Penny Lane
Plenty of space for
everyone in this 4/5
bedroom 2 story.
Heated 4 season
sunroom; enjoy all
year! Large family
room opens to the
sunroom, spacious
u-shaped kitchen
offers roomy break-
fast area. Formal
living and dining
room. Second floor
has 4 bedrooms
and 2 full baths. 2
car garage. Above
ground pool/deck.
Unfinished base-
ment offers more
room for expansion.
Large mostly level
private yard. MLS#
12-1664
PRICE REDUCED
$259,900
Call Linda
(570) 956-0584
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
PLAINS
REDUCED
63 Clarks Lane
3 story Townhome
with 2 bedrooms, 3
baths, plenty of
storage with 2 car
built in garage.
Modern kitchen and
baths, large room
sizes and deck.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 11-4567
$139,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLYMOUTH
308 Stephanie
Drive
Attractive Brick
Front Ranch with 3
Bedrooms, gas
heat, Sunroom,
attached garage,
large yard, shed.
Hardwood floors
under rugs. Great
location. New win-
dows. Basement
can easily be fin-
ished. Well Main-
tained. MLS# 12-
1911
PRICE REDUCED
$139,900
Call Nancy Palumbo
570-714-9240
906 Homes for Sale
PLYMOUTH
Nice 2 story home
sits high & dry on
side of Plymouth
Mountain. Large eat
in kitchen, living
room, dining room,
oil hotwater base-
board heat. Nice
yard, wrap around
porch.
Directions: Main
Street, Plymouth to
Coal Street, over
small bridge to 1st
hard left onto Smith
Row-house on
right. MLS# 12-2256
$55,000
Call Lynda
(570) 696-5418
Smith Hourigan
Group
570-696-1195
PLYMOUTH
Roomy 2 bedroom
single with eat-in
kitchen, tile bath,
gas heat & 2 car
detached garage.
Priced to sell at
$33,000
MLS 11-2653
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
PLYMOUTH
This 4 bedroom 2
story has a full bath
on the 1st floor and
rough in for bath on
2nd floor. An
enclosed side patio
from the kitchen
dinette area & side
drive are a big plus.
MLS 12-553
Only $24,900
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
SHAVERTOWN
105 Summit Street
Fire damaged
home. Sold as is.
60’ x 235’ lot. Pub-
lic sewer,
water & gas.
$34,500, negotiable
Call 570-675-0446,
evenings.
SHAVERTOWN
57 Sara Drive
Bright & open
floor plan. This 7
year old home
offers
premium finishes
throughout,
beautiful kitchen
with granite tops,
walk-out lower level
finished with 3/4
bath - french doors
out to private 1.16
acre lot.
MLS# 12-1617
$432,000
Call Geri
570-696-0888
SHAVERTOWN
Dallas School
District.
Cape Cod home
with cherry kitchen,
stainless steel
appliances, tile and
Corian, family room
with pellet stove,
office on first floor,
2 bedrooms up and
one on first; deck,
in-ground pool with
heat pump, fenced
yard, 2-car
detached garage.
Solar credits on
electric costs. Call
my direct number
696-6565, office
number is 696-
2600 ext. 210.
Priced to sell at
$219.900. MLS# 12-
2267 Maribeth
Jones.
696-2600
SHAVERTOWN
Midway Manor
Ranch
3 bedrooms, 2 ½
baths, family room,
3 season porch, gas
heat, central a/c, 2
car garage. 12-1935
$177,000
Besecker Realty
570-675-3611
906 Homes for Sale
SHAVERTOWN
WB MLS 12-1904
$275,000
JUST REDUCED
**OPEN HOUSE**
Saturday,
June 30th &
Sunday, July 1st
1PM to 3 PM
112 Village Drive
Spacious & con-
venient 2 story
brick face Colonial
on corner of cul-
de-sac in Dallas
School District.
4/5 bedroom, 2.5
bath with 2nd
entrance to office
or potential in-law
suite. Contact
570-574-3751
SHAVERTOWN
Well maintained
raised ranch in
Midway Manor.
Good size level
yard with shed.
Large sunroom /
laundry addition.
Lower level family
room with wood
stove. $144,900
Call
Christine Kutz
570-332-8832
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
SHICKSHINNY
119 West Union
Street
Out of flood
zone!
Large, 2 story
frame with 2,
three bedroom
apartments. Off
street parking,
Large, dry base-
ment, oil heat,
large front porch
and yard, also 4
room cottage,
with garage in
the rear of the
same property.
$85,000. Great
home and/or
rental.
Please call
570-542-4489
SHICKSHINNY
130 Marvin Rd.
Fantastic LOG
HOME W/GREAT
VIEWS**from Rear
Deck, 4 Bedrooms 2
Bath on 1.55 Acres.
Beautiful Landscap-
ing. 12-1489
$199,000
570-675-4400
SHICKSHINNY
3 bedroom, 2.5
bath log sided
Ranch on almost 2
acres. Lower level
is 3/4 finished.
Reduced! $195,000
MLS-11-4038
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SHICKSHINNY LAKE
Lake Front Property
at Shickshinny
Lake!!! 4
Bedrooms, 2.75
baths, 2 kitchens,
living room, large
family room. 2 sun-
rooms, office &
laundry room. Plus
2 car attached gar-
age with paved
driveway, AG pool,
dock & 100' lake
frontage. $382,500.
MLS #12-860
Call Kenneth
Williams
570-542-2141
Five Mountains
Realty
SHICKSHINNY
LAKE
Price Reduced!
The best of both
worlds. If you crave
privacy, consider
this 4 bedroom, 3
bath raised ranch
on a 4.96 acre
wooded lot. A tree
lined driveway
leads to this spa-
cious 3,300 square
foot home. MLS#
12-1407 only
$185,000
Adjoining 1+ acre
with deeded lake
front available for
$50,000. Call
Barbara Metcalf
570-696-3801
906 Homes for Sale
SHICKSHINNY
REDUCED!!!!
408 Cragle Hill Rd.
This is a very well
kept Ranch home
on 6 acres, central
air, rear patio and 1
car garage. This is
a 3 parcel listing.
MLS 11-4273
$154,900
Jackie Roman
570-288-0770
Ext. 39
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
SHICKSHINNY
Very nice Ranch
home with 4 bed-
rooms, 2 full baths,
kitchen, dining room
& living room. Plus
propane fireplace in
living room, french
doors in dining room
and large deck with
a view. $159,900
MLS 12-287
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SWEET VALLEY
If you crave privacy,
consider this stun-
ning, 3 bedroom,
2.5 bath, 2 story
traditional cradled
on a 2 acre lot.
Ultra modern
kitchen with break-
fast area, great
room with cathedral
ceiling & fireplace,
formal dining room
& bonus room over
2 car garage. Only
$299,000.
MLS# 12-679
Call Barbara
Metcalf
570-696-0883
LEWITH &
FREEMAN
570-696-3801
SWEET VALLEY
REDUCED!
4 Oliver Road
Located in the back
part of Oliver Road
in a very private part
of North Lake in
Sweet Valley. Yearn-
ing to be restored,
lake front cape cod
in a very tranquil
setting was formerly
used as a summer
home. MLS 11-2113
$93,500
Jay Crossin
CROSSIN
REAL ESTATE
570-288-0770
ext. 23
SWEET VALLEY
Totally remodeled 3
bedroom, 2 bath
home on 1 acre with
large family room on
lower level. property
has small pond and
joins state game
lands. Reduced!
$129,900 Could be
FHA financed.
MLS# 11-4085
Five Mountains
Realty
570-542-2141
SWOYERSVILLE
187 Shoemaker St.
Adorable 3 bed-
room, 1 bath, Cape
Cod. Completely
remodeled inside
and out. Hardwood
floors throughout,
duct work in place
for central air instal-
lation. Back yard
deck for summer
cook outs and
much, much more.
Not a drive by!
MLS 12-1595
$142,500
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
SWOYERSVILLE
19 Bohac St.
2-3 bedroom. New
bath with laundry 1st
floor. Large living
room. Finished
lower level. Full walk
up attic. Air condi-
tioning. Nice yard, 1
car garage. Low
taxes. Gas heat. A
must see. $95,000
Call 570-760-1281
for appointment
906 Homes for Sale
SWOYERSVILLE
44 Bohac Street
Lovely Cape Cod
home, with vinyl
siding, totally
remodeled and
re-wired, 2
bedrooms, 1 on 1st
floor, off street
parking and huge
yard. Newer roof
& replacement
windows, includes
newer stainless
steel appliances.
This home is a gem,
is a must see!
$134,000
Also listed on
Craigslist and
Zillow.com
Call
570-299-7158
SWOYERSVILLE
62 Bohac Street
Charming brick
front ranch, in
a well kept
neighborhood, 2
bedrooms, large
eat-in kitchen, tile
bath, large closets,
hardwood floors,
1st floor laundry, full
basement, low
maintenance
aluminum siding,
shed, nice yard,
asking $105,000
Call
908-876-4108
or 908-797-6682
SWOYERSVILLE
689 Main Street
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, JULY 8
2PM TO 4PM
2 bedroom home on
large lot with bonus
efficiency apart-
ment. Large living
room, eat in kitchen,
screened porch.
Freshly painted and
new flooring.
$69,000. Call
570-696-3368
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
SWOYERSVILLE
Large yard, quiet
neighborhood. 2
bedrooms, dining &
living rooms, unfin-
ished basement, ,
$52,000. Call
(570)704-9446
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
July 8th, 1-3
129 Townsend St.
Wonderful home in
great neighbor-
hood. Relax in the
pool after a hard
day of work.
Property offers the
opportunity to have
your own Beauty
Shop (equipment
negotiable), or
expand your living
space. Buyer
responsible for con-
firming zoning for
business. All
measurements
approximate.
MLS# 12-833
$195,000
Jolyn Bartoli
570-696-5425
SWOYERSVILLE
REDUCED!!! REDUCED!!!
78 Maltby Ave.
Wonderful family
home in a great
neighborhood. A
large master suite
and family room
addition make this
home a must see!
There is an
inground pool and
attached in-law
suite.
MLS 11-4572
$195,000
Call Kelly
Connolly-Cuba
EXT. 37
Crossin Real
Estate
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
THORNHURST
1061 Fairway Lane
Low maintenance,
single story ranch
home located in a
private golf course
community in the
Poconos for week-
end or year round
enjoyment. Modern
kit with breakfast
bar, formal living
room and dinning
room. Family room
with gas Fireplace.
Walk-up master
bedroom with
bonus room ideal
for an office. New
front and rear decks
in a private setting
within 30 minutes to
W-B or Scranton.
MLS 12-453
$105,000
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
To place your
ad call...829-7130
TRUCKSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
157 Carverton Rd
SUNDAY, JULY 8
1:00 TO 3:00
Enjoy country living
with scenic views
just minutes from
309. This 2,030 sq
ft Colonial offers an
oak kitchen with
new Jennaire gas
range, family room
with fireplace lead-
ing to a spacious
rear deck, Formal
dining room, 4 bed-
rooms and 2/1/2
baths plus a 2 car
garage. The base-
ment has a work
shop area and can
easily be turned into
additional living
area. $195,000
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
(570) 288-6654
TRUCKSVILLE
REDUCED!!
221 Maple St.
Beautiful 4 bed-
room Back Mtn.
home with natural
woodwork, pocket-
doors, ceiling fans
& great light. Sit on
1 or 2 screened
rear porches and
enjoy awesome
views or sit on your
front porch in this
great neighbor-
hood! Don’t forget
the above ground
pool with deck.
MLS 12-1699
$149,900
John Shelley
570-702-4162
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
W. NANTICOKE
71 George Ave.
Nice house with
lots of potential.
Priced right. Great
for handy young
couple. Close to
just about every-
thing. Out of
flood zone.
MLS 12-195
REDUCED $69,900
Call Roger Nenni
EXT 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LE E LE LE LE E DER DDD .
timesleader.com
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNNNL L NNNL N YONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLE LLE LEE LE LE LLE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Purebred Animals?
Sell them here with a
classified ad!
570-829-7130
PAGE 21G SUNDAY, JULY 8, 2012 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
906 Homes for Sale
WAPWALLOPEN
18 Circle Ave.
Relax and enjoy the
beautiful view of Lily
Lake right from
your sunroom in
this quiet lake com-
munity. Entire home
redone In 2005,
beautiful hardwood
floors, central air,
skylights, coal
stove, small pond
and so much more.
Perfect for all year
round or a week-
end/summer get-
away. Off street
parking for
2 vehicles.
MLS 12-1892
$145,000
Shelby Watchilla
570-762-6969
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WAPWALLOPEN
Vinyl resided, new
shingles in 2008,
quiet location with
level, open ground.
Replacement
windows, new well
pump.
MLS #12-760
$52,900
Call Dale
570-256-3343
Five Mountains
Realty
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
WEST NANTICOKE
TILBURY TERRACE
Tilbury Avenue
Superb 3 bedroom
single. Hardwood
floors, fireplace,
garage. Well main-
tained. Great Neigh-
borhood. Affordable
at $209,500.
Towne & Country
Real Estate Co.
570-735-8932
570-542-5708
WEST PITTSTON
*NEW LISTING*
951 Wyoming
Avenue
OPEN HOUSE
JULY 15th
1pm-3pm
Bright and cheery,
well kept home.
Oak kitchen, hard-
wood floors, large
family room. One
year home trust
warranty.
MLS# 12-1858
NEW PRICE!
$139,925
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WEST PITTSTON
225-227 Boston Ave
Double block.
Wyoming Area
schools. Out of flood
zone. 1 side rented
to long term tenant
at $525 /month.
Other side remod-
eled - move in or
rent at $650/month.
3 bedrooms each
side, gas furnaces,
sunrooms, large
yard. $149,000. Call
570-357-0042
WEST PITTSTON
329 Wyoming Ave.
Flooded in Sept.
2011, being sold as
is. Great potential in
this 4 bedroom 2
3/4 bath house. Off
street parking. For
more info and pho-
tos visit:
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 12-716
$49,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
WEST PITTSTON
510 Fourth St.
A nice 2 story, 3
bedroom home in
the Wyoming Area
school district. Cor-
ner lot. Out of the
flood zone.
MLS 12-1616
$79,000
Jackie Roman
EXT 39
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
WEST PITTSTON
Great Rancher in
move-in condition, 3
bedroom, hardwood
floors, modern eat-
in kitchen, garage,
no flood. Asking
$162,500 MLS#12-
1399
Call Joe Gilroy Real
Estate.
570-288-1444
WEST PITTSTON
NEW LISTING!
951 Wyoming
Avenue
OPEN HOUSE
JULY 15th 1-3pm
Bright and cheery,
well kept home.
Oak kitchen, hard-
wood floors, large
family room. One
year home trust
warranty. MLS# 12-
1858 NEW PRICE
$139,925
Call Tracy Zarola
570-696-0723
WEST WYOMING
"New Price" Very
roomy 2-story, fea-
tures 2 full baths,
and charming
kitchen with built-
ins, on a deep lot
with a detached
2-car garage. Pre-
viously a duplex,
just needs your
finishing touches.
$86,000
MLS# 12-512
Please Call
Deb Roccograndi at
570-696-6671
WHITE HAVEN
Priced to sell in
Woodhaven
Estates! This well
maintained home
located in the Crest-
wood School District
offers features such
as, covered deck
and lower deck
leading to the pool,
ductless A/C, zoned
heating system,
oversized heated 2-
car garage in addi-
tion to the built-in
garage. Finished
lower level with
recreation room,
workshop and ½
bath laundry area.
The list goes on,
come and take a
look! Owners are
ready to move, are
you?
MLS#12-872
$199,900
Jill Jones direct:
696-6550
696-2600
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WHITE-HAVEN
501 Birch Lane
Beautiful 4 bed-
room, 3 bath. Enjoy
the amenities of a
private lake, boat-
ing, basketball
courts, etc. The
home has wood
floors and carpeting
throughout. French
doors in the kitchen
that lead you out to
the large rear deck
for entertaining. The
backyard has 2 utili-
ty sheds for storage
MLS 12-1695
$179,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES BARRE
840 Franklin Street
Duplex in good con-
dition. Nice neigh-
borhood. Could be
converted to a
single home. Rear
access to yard for
OSP. $31,900
Call Rae
570-714-9234
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
(Riverside Park)
Corner of Dagobert
and Gordon Ave.
2 bedroom modular
rancher (large mas-
ter BR) with a 20x
22 family room and
a woodburner. Pan-
elled interior. 10x12
three season porch.
Carport. 2 drive-
ways. Many extras.
MLS# 12-2092
Reduced $73,000
Ask for Bob Kopec.
Humford Realty, Inc.
570-822-5126
WILKES-BARRE
1 Cypress St.
Move in condition.
Large private yard,
off street parking
and a central
location.
MLS 12-2302
$67,000
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
WILKES-BARRE
Great Investment.
Quiet street close to
everything. Nice
size rooms. Both
sides currently rent-
ed. Off street park-
ing in back with a 1
car garage.
$79,900. MLS 11-
4207. Call Donna for
more information or
to schedule a show-
ing. 570-947-3824
WILKES-BARRE
15 Amherst Ave
PRICE REDUCED!
Own for less than
your apartment
rent! Freshly painted
4 Bedroom Dutch
Colonial sports a
brand new roof & is
handicap accessible
with wheelchair
ramp in rear. 1st
floor has Master
Bedroom & 3/4 bath
with walk-in shower,
modern kitchen with
breakfast bar, com-
puter room & 1st
floor laundry. Great
neighborhood walk-
ing distance to
schools, colleges &
bus rte. Come in &
see what this great
house has to offer.
MLS 12-216
REDUCED!
$75,900
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-793-9449
Call Steve Shemo
570-718-4959
WILKES-BARRE
16 Sullivan St.
Large 5 bedroom
home with a newer
roof, new gas fur-
nace, modern
kitchen and baths.
Close to
Central City.
MLS 12-1171
$60,000
Charles J.
Prohaska
Ext. 35
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
19 Lawrence St.
Very well kept 3
bedroom, 1.5 bath 2
story with family
room, enclosed
back porch and
fenced in back
yard. Nice layout
with lots of closet
space. Modern
kitchen, laundry 1st
floor. Replacement
windows and much
more!
MLS 12-1325
$77,000
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
2 Story, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 & 1/2 bath
single family. Large
eat-in kitchen, 1st
floor laundry, hard-
wood floors, newer
furnace & water
heater, 1 car
garage. Off street
parking. Quiet one
way street.
$49,900
MLS 11-4171
Call Jim Banos
Coldwell Banker
Rundle
570-991-1883
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
210 Academy St.
Large grand home.
Open concept
downstairs, 1 st
floor laundry, lots of
closet space,
fenced in back
yard, extra large
driveway. Garage
with floor pit, auto
garage door open-
er. 60 amp subpan-
el, walk up attic.
Loads of potential.
MLS 12-1268
$115,000
David
Krolikowski
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
216 Franklin St
Elegant tudor with
4800 sq ft in Down-
town Wilkes-Barre's
Historic District. The
1st floor office has
1860 sq ft with cen-
tral air and 2 rest-
rooms. The resi-
dence upstairs
includes 5 bed-
rooms, 2 baths,
custom kitchen with
an island & sunny
breakfast room, for-
mal dinning room.
The formal living
room has a tray ceil-
ing, picture win-
dows and wet bar.
Also, a cozy den.
Private drive, Off
street parking for 5
cars. MLS 12-1525
$325,000
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
220 Stanton St.
For Sale by Owner
Large home,
1 or 2 families.
Driveway &
garage, $70,500.
570-855-8405
WILKES-BARRE
240 Sheridan St.
Cute home just
waiting for your
personal touch.
Looking to down-
size? Well this is
the one for you.
2nd floor could be
finished, along with
the basement. If
you are a handy-
man you have to
see this home.
MLS 12-1481
$42,000
Roger Nenni
EXT 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
240 Sheridan St.
Cute home just
waiting for your
personal touch.
Looking to down-
size? Well, this is
the one for you.2nd
floor could be fin-
ished along with the
basement. If you
are a handyman
you have to
see this home.
MLS 12-1481
$42,000
Roger Nenni
EXT 32
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
254 Sheridan St
Nice Bright Tradi-
tional with modern
ceramic eat-in
kitchen & tiled bath,
most windows
replaced, built-in
garage &deep yard.
Very convenient to
schools, shopping
and highways. MLS
12-1512. $74,900.
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-793-9449
Call Steve Shemo
570-718-4959
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
285 Blackman St
Great property.
Priced to sell quickly
and in move-in con-
dition! Easy access
to Interstate 81 &
shopping! 11-3215
$36,500
570-675-4400
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
322 Academy St.
Charming 3 bed-
room Ranch with
unique upgrades
including polished
concrete counter-
tops in kitchen, and
a lovely built in gas
fireplace in living
room. Up to date
landscaping, fenced
in yard and above
ground pool
and hot tub.
MLS 12-2441
$102,900
Jay A. Crossin
EXT. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
35 Hillard St.
Hardwood floors,
fenced in yard,
large deck. Off
street parking. 3
bedroom home with
1st floor laundry.
Move in condition.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-1655
$76,500
Colleen Turant
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
45 Marlborough Ave
Nice brick front
Ranch on corner
lot. 3 bedrooms, 1
full and (2) 1/2
baths. Finished
basement, breeze-
way to 2 car
garage. Fenced
yard and central air.
MLS 12-1612
New price
$114,900
Mark R. Mason
570-331-0982
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
46 Bradford St.
Pride of ownership
everywhere. 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath, large
yard, off street
parking. Ready
to go!
MLS 12-1508
$69,900
Kevin Sobilo
570-817-0706
WILKES-BARRE
51 Flood Drive
Beautiful Town-
house in great con-
dition. Very spa-
cious with large
rooms, one car
garage and base-
ment storage. 3
bedrooms.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2292
$139,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
WILKES-BARRE
59-61 E. Thomas St
Fire damaged for-
mer multilevel
restaurant / tavern
with 2nd floor apart-
ment, two car
garage & parking
lot. Zoned R1; Buy-
ers must do their
own due diligence
and contact W-B
City as to proposed
use. This has poten-
tial! Please check
online photos
before scheduling a
showing. 12-2151
$39,500
Darcy J. Gollhardt
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
60 Saint Clair St
Great 4 bedroom
home with new
kitchen, furnace and
bath. Laundry room
off kitchen. Newer
windows and roof.
Hardwood on first
floor. Off street
parking. Older one
car garage. Walk up
attic. MLS 11-1478
$59,000
Call Nancy Answini
570-237-5999
JOSEPH P. GILROY
REAL ESTATE
570-288-1444
WILKES-BARRE
68-70 W. South St.
5 Unit property for
sale on the campus
of Wilkes University
with a Cap Rate of
8.67%. Annual Net
Operating Income of
$34,238. 100%
occupancy over the
last 5 years. 12-1522
$395,000
Call Darren Snyder
Marilyn K Snyder
Real Estate
570-825-2468
WILKES-BARRE
74 Frederick St
This very nice 2
story, 3 bedroom, 1
bath home has a
large eat in kitchen
for family gather-
ings. A great walk
up attic for storage
and the home is in
move-in condition.
MLS 11-1612
$63,900
Call Karen
Coldwell Banker
Rundle Real Estate
570-474-2340
WILKES-BARRE
77 Schuler St.
Newly renovated
with new windows,
door flooring, etc.
“Goose Island”
gem. Large home
with 3 bedrooms,
2.5 baths, screened
in porch overlook-
ing fenced in yard,
driveway, laminate
floors throughout.
Fresh paint, move
in condition. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-845
$99,900
Call Colleen
570-237-0415
WILKES-BARRE
89 Conwell Street
Well maintained 2
story home with a
finished lower level
and a gas fireplace.
New carpets and a
walk-up attic, great
for storage.
$60,000
MLS# 11-4529
Call Michael Nocera
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-696-5412
WILKES-BARRE
Beautifully main-
tained 3 story home,
features hardwood
floors, built-in cabi-
net, five plus bed-
rooms, office, 3
bathrooms and
stained glass win-
dows. All measure-
ments are approxi-
mate. 12-1081
$99,900
Call Tracy
McDermott
Realty
570-696-2468
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
WILKES-BARRE
For sale by owner
Located in Wilkes
Barre city.
65 Reno Lane
Currently rented
with a great tenant.
Entire home was
remodeled 10
years ago, including
new plumbing,
electric, drywall,
and is appraised
at $55,000.
Features 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
6 rooms total.
Partial unfinished
basement, with
gas heat, and yard
with wood deck.
All this for $40,000
Great investment
property.
owner will help with
closing!! Rent
income is $650.00
agents welcome.
Call 570-814-3666
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Great 3 Story
Home Completely
Remodeled. New
Kitchen and
Baths with Marble
Floors. Numerous
Upgrades including
New Electric,
Plumbing and
Privacy Fence just
to name a few.
MLS# 12-1848
$74,000
Call Jack at
570-878-6225
CENTURY 21
SIGNATURE
PROPERTIES
570-675-5100
WILKES-BARRE
Handyman Special
Extra large duplex
with 7 bedrooms, 2
baths, fireplace,
screened porch, full
basement and 2 car
garage on double
lot in Wilkes-Barre
City. $58,000.
ERA BRADY
ASSOCIATES
570-836-3848
WILKES-BARRE
Just on the market
this 2 story offers a
modern kitchen,
formal dining room,
1st floor laundry
plus 2/3 bedrooms
On 2nd floor.
Affordably priced at
$ 27,900
MLS 12-50
Ann Marie Chopick
570-760-6769
570-288-6654
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
Looking for a home
with 5 bedrooms or
mother in-law apart-
ment, this is the
home for you! This
property has many
amenities, a privacy
rear fence with a
concrete rear patio
(23’ x23’), large
storage building
(23’ x 18’). Off-
street parking for 2
vehicles, rear
porches on 2nd and
3rd floor. Home has
9 rooms, 2 modern
baths, 2 modern
kitchens with plenty
of cabinets.
Replacement win-
dows, newer roof,
natural woodwork in
living room and din-
ing room. Property
is close to all ameni-
ties including play-
ground across the
street, Dan Flood
School, Coughlin
High School, Gener-
al Hospital, Kings
College, churches
and shopping.
#12-1763 $69,900
Louise Laine
283-9100 x20
570-283-9100
WILKES-BARRE
Looking for a home
with 5 bedrooms or
mother in-law apart-
ment, this is the
home for you! This
property has many
amenities, a privacy
rear fence with a
concrete rear patio
(23’ x23’), large
storage building
(23’ x 18’). Off-
street parking for 2
vehicles, rear
porches on 2nd and
3rd floor. Home has
9 rooms, 2 modern
baths, 2 modern
kitchens with plenty
of cabinets.
Replacement win-
dows, newer roof,
natural woodwork in
living room and din-
ing room. Property
is close to all ameni-
ties including play-
ground across the
street, Dan Flood
School, Coughlin
High School, Gener-
al Hospital, Kings
College, churches
and shopping.
#12-1763 $69,900
Louise Laine 283-
9100 x20
570-283-9100
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Nice 3 bedroom, 1
bath home, with 3
season porch and
detached 1 car
garage. Good
starter home in
well established
neighborhood.
Family owned for
many years.
$59,900
CALL
CHRISTINE KUTZ
570-332-8832
WILKES-BARRE
Nicely remodeled
fully rented Duplex,
near schools, hospi-
tal, parks & bus
route. Separate utili-
ties and off street
parking. MLS 12-
599 $96,500.
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-793-9449
Call Steve Shemo
570-718-4959
WILKES-BARRE
NOW REDUCED!
191 Andover St.
Lovely single family
3 bedroom home
with lots of space.
Finished 3rd floor,
balcony porch off of
2nd floor bedroom,
gas hot air heat,
central air and
much more.
Must see!
MLS 11-59
$54,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
Parsons Section
5 bedroom, 1 bath.
Garage. Corner lot.
Nice location. Out of
flood zone. $30,000
negotiable. Call
570-814-7453
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
484 Madison St.
Well kept home
with finished base-
ment. Move in con-
dition with plenty of
rooms, new Pergo
floors on 2nd floor
and fenced in yard.
Newer roof and fur-
nace approximately
10 years old.
MLS 12-1291
$74,900
Donald Crossin
570-288-0770
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED
60 Kulp St.
3-4 bedroom, 2
story home with
well kept hardwood
floors throughout.
Private driveway
with parking for 2
cards and nearly all
replacement win-
dows. MLS 11-2897
$59,900
Jay A. Crossin
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
WILKES-BARRE
REDUCED!
39 W. Chestnut St.
Lots of room in this
single with 3 floors
of living space. 3
bedrooms, 1 bath
with hardwood
floors throughout,
natural woodwork,
all windows have
been replaced,
laundry/pantry off of
kitchen. 4x10 entry
foyer, space for 2
additional bed-
rooms on the 3rd
floor. Roof is new.
MLS 11-325
$59,900
Jay A. Crossin
570-288-0770
Ext. 23
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
906 Homes for Sale
WILKES-BARRE
Well - maintained
three bedroom
home with a large
yard. Great starter
home! 12-2390
$64,500
Darcy J. Gollhardt
Realtor
570-262-0226
CLASSIC
PROPERTIES
570-718-4959
Ext. 1352
WYOMING
20 Sharpe Street
A well-built, well-
kept brick front
ranch on a level
corner lot with
screened patio, big,
fully applianced
kitchen with many
cabinets, tiled bath,
hardwood floors,
roomy closets,
ductless air,
and spacious
semi-finished
2 room basement
– this charming
property should
definitely make your
short list -
MLS# 12-2081
$159,900.
Call PAT today!
SMITH
HOURIGAN
GROUP
570 287 1196
WYOMING
REDUCED 50K!!!
573 Coon Road
This 100+ year old
Victorian comes
with a lot of ameni-
ties inside and out
on 6 acres of Coun-
try living. Indoor
pool, wine cellar,
patio, 4 car garage
and much more.
Property is being
sold “as is”.
MLS 12-1676
$349,000
Shelby Watchilla
570-762-6969
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
YATESVILLE
10 Calvert St.
Pristine Bi-level,
3/4 be drooms,
modern kitchen
& 1 3/4 modern
baths. Heated
sunroom, hard-
wood floors, 1
car garage,
central air, land-
scaped yard.
For additional
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
MLS 12-1804
$183,500
Call Lu-Ann
570-602-9280
P
E
N
D
I
N
G
HOMES FOR SALE
5 Homes left. 3 in
Nanticoke, 2 in
Edwardsville. Price
ranging from
$20,000 to $37,000
Call 516-216-3539
Leave Message
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
ASHLEY
100 Ashley St.
Well maintained 3
unit building with
extra $50 per
month from garage
with electric. Off
street parking for 4
cars and fenced in
yard. Back porches
on both levels. Fully
rented. Let rental
income pay for this
property. Must see!
MLS 12-1746
$109,000
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
ASHLEY
110 Ashley St.
Very nice duplex
with off street park-
ing and nice yard.
Enclosed porch on
1st floor and 2 exits
on 2nd. Fully rent-
ed. Great return on
your investment.
Rent pays your
mortgage. Don’t
miss out
MLS 12-1745
$89,000
Debbie McGuire
570-332-4413
CROSSIN REAL
ESTATE
570-288-0770
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
AVOCA
129 Lampman St.
Side by side double
block home with 3
bedrooms each
side, separate utili-
ties. Includes 2
extra lots. For more
info and photos
visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2253
$79,900
Call Tom
570-262-7716
AVOCA
25 St. Mary’s St.
3,443 sq. ft.
masonry commer-
cial building with
warehouse/office
and 2 apartments
with separate elec-
tric and heat. Per-
fect for contractors
or anyone with stor-
age needs. For
more information
and photos log onto
www.atlas
realtyinc.com.
Reduced to
$89,000
MLS #10-3872
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
VM 101
BEAR CREEK
1255 Laurel Run Rd.
Bear Creek Twp.,
large commercial
garage/warehouse
on 1.214 acres with
additional 2 acre
parcel. 2 water
wells. 2 newer
underground fuel
tanks. May require
zoning approval.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-208
$167,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DUPONT
100 Lincoln St.
MULTI FAMILY
3 bedroom home
with attached
apartment and
beauty shop. Apart-
ment is rented. For
more info and pho-
tos visit: www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-941
$82,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
DUPONT
238 Main St.
Multi Family Invest-
ment Property
Great opportunity
for the experienced
investor. Property is
large with parking
for at least 9 cars.
Extra lot, one office
and 2 apartments.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2315
$89,900
Call Charlie
570-829-6200
DURYEA
93 Mail St.
Four units. 3 resi-
dential and one
storefront.Great
corner location,
flood damaged
home being sold as
is. For more info