A DOWNLOADABLE E-MAGAZINE Vol V * JULY 2012 * Issue VII

Meditation leads to Ultimate Flowering

Introducing various Masters & Dimensions of Spiritual Sojourn

MEDITATION

MASTERS’ GRACE

TIMES
TM

Guru Purnima
www.taoshobuddhameditations.com

MEDITATION TIMES
A Downloadable Monthly E-Magazine
Click on image for website

A PRODUCTION OF www.taoshobuddhameditations.com Published by: www.taoshobuddhameditations.com Country of Origin: Trinidad & Tobago, West Indies. Chief Editor/Graphics Layout & Design: Swami AnandNeelambar
Editorial Team: Taoshobuddha, Swami AnandNeelambar International Contributors: HadhratMaulawiJalaluddin Ahmad Ar-Rowi, Lars Jensen

In This Issue
 Editorial  Ramakrishna and Vivekananda  Master and Disciple relationship  Inspirational Photos  Osho on Enlightened Masters

For Queries, Comments, and Suggestions and to submit Contributions, you can email the following persons:

Taoshobuddha: mailtaoshobuddha@gmail.com Swami AnandNeelambaravatar411@gmail.com

You can also visit our website: http://dhyan-samadhi.webs.com/ www.youtube.com\taoshobuddha9 www.scribd.com\taoshobuddhacyberlibrary www.scribd.com\avatar411
http://bodhidharmameditation.blogspot.com/ http://www.taoshobuddhameditations.myeweb.net/ http://meditationtimes.myeweb.net/

Masters’ Grace Guru Purnima
i Taoshobudhha Meditations Meditation Times

MEDITATION TIMES
Published by Taoshobuddha Meditations Trinidad, West indies

EDITORIAL
The word ‘guru’ is untranslatable. Neither does the word ‘teacher’ nor the word ‘Master’ have that beauty. In fact, the phenomenon of the guru is so deeply Indian that no other language of any country is capable of translating it. It is something intrinsically Eastern. The word ‘guru’ is made of two words, ‘gu’ and ‘ru’. ‘Gu’ means darkness, ‘ru’ means one who dispels it. Guru literally means ‘the light’. And you have the light within you, yes! If you come across a Buddha or a Jesus or a Krishna or a Mahavir, it will be of tremendous help to you in finding your inner guru, because seeing Buddha, suddenly a great enthusiasm and hope will arise in you: “If it can happen to Buddha” — who is just like you, the same body, the same blood, bone, marrow — “if it can happen to this man, why not to me?” The hope is the beginning. Meeting with the Master on the outside is the beginning of a great hope, a great aspiration. And this can happen only if you meet a living Master. It cannot happen just by reading about Buddha, because who knows whether this man was really historical or not? And the way the story is being; told is such that nobody can believe that he was historical. The followers always go on creating more and more unnecessary stories about their Masters. Maybe they do it with good intentions, but even good intentions coming out of unconscious people are of no use; they are harmful. Maybe they want to impress people so people can become more attracted, but what really happens is just the opposite. Now the Buddhist story is that when Buddha was born, the mother was standing, was walking in a garden. Buddha was born while the mother was walking. And not only that, the first thing that he did was that he himself walked seven steps. The first thing the child did — he walked seven steps! Not only that, the second thing that he did after the
ii Taoshobudhha Meditations Meditation Times

seventh step was that he declared, looking at the sky, “I am the awakened one, I am the great Buddha! Nobody has ever been like me and nobody will ever be like me.” Now these stupid stories naturally make intelligent people suspicious. And one thing is absolutely certain: that Buddha is not like us, so maybe, perhaps, he became enlightened, but he gives no hope to us. Jesus is born of a virgin mother — nonsense, patent nonsense! But how can you become enlightened? You are not born of a virgin mother. Krishna is born as God, he is an incarnation of God; YOU are not an incarnation of God. Rather than these stories creating a hope in you, they create a kind of hopelessness. You need living Masters who have not yet become myths. You need living Masters who are just like you and yet different, just like you but with something plus, something mysterious surrounding them in every other way the same as you, but only in one respect different: they have a certain understanding which is missing in you, they have a certain luminosity which is missing in you, they have a certain grace, a certain climate which is missing with you. But in every other way they are exactly like you: they fall ill, they need food, they become thirsty, they are tired, they have to go to sleep; they are just exactly like you in every possible way. Then great hope arises: maybe the ‘one plus’ thing that has happened to them is also latent in you and can become manifest. The outer Master is simply a mirror so that you can see your face, so that you can see that you also have-the same face, the same possibility, the same potential. And once this has settled in your heart, that “I have also the same potential, the same seed”, a great journey has started. You will never be the same again. Looking into the eyes of a living Master, something synchronizes in you, something is triggered in your being, a process has already started.

iii

Taoshobudhha Meditations

Meditation Times

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

Ramakrishna and Vivekananda
‘It was most unusual kind of meeting. I could not understand the peculiar behavior of that ‘mad, monomaniac Brahmin’. I was reluctant to visit him again, but his pure love, simplicity, genuine renunciation and love for God pulled me again and again to him, despite protests of logic and reason.’
Vivekananda – the recount of first meeting

Narendra had the deep urge to see God. Therefore he frequently visited the Brahmo Samaj. However, it was Professor W.W. Hastie’s words which drove him to Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa. It was in 1881 when Narendra was studying in the General Assembly Institution. One day Professor W.W. Hastie, the principle, while explaining the word ‘trance’ in Wordsworth’s ‘The Excursion’, said, “Such experience is the result of the purity of mind and concentration on some particular object, and it is rare indeed, particularly in these days. I have seen only one person who has experienced that blessed state of mind, and he is Ramakrishna Paramahamsa of Dakshineshwar. You can understand if you go there and see for yourself.”

Narendra Meets Sri Ramakrishna In the same year 1881 Narendra met Sri Ramakrishna for the first time. As it happened, Sri Ramakrishna had gone to Calcutta to one of his devotee’s house. It was near Narendra’s. Devotional songs were to be sung there; but the singer did not turn up for the program. Surendra and Ram, householder devotees of Sri Ramakrishna and friends of Swami Vivekananda, thought of inviting Narendra to fill up the gap, for they knew the capabilities of Narendra in singing and playing musical instruments. Thus came Narendra to the house of the devotee and treated the audience, especially Sri Ramakrishna, to many devotional songs. Sri Ramakrishna was highly impressed and invited young Narendra to Dakshineswar. Thus, the first meeting between Sri Ramakrishna and Swami Vivekananda ended in high note. Ramachandra, a relative of Narendra’s father also played a role in inducing Narendra to meet master. On learning that Narendra had declined to get married, He persuaded him to meet Sri Ramakrishna if he really wanted to see God, instead of visiting the Brahmo Samaj and other places. Sri Ramakrishna mentions about Naren’s first visit to Him delightfully: The master said, “Narendra entered the room by the western door. He seemed careless about his body and dress, and, unlike other people, unmindful of the external world. His eyes bespoke an introspective mind, as if some part of it were always concentrated upon something
July 2012

Page 1

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

within. I was surprised to find such a spiritual soul coming from the material atmosphere of Kolkata.” Sri Ramakrishna also told His disciples later that Naren had attained perfection even before his birth. Ramakrishna explained of His unusual experience while He was immersed in Samadhi. He saw seven saints meditating in a realm higher than that of Gods and Goddesses. An undifferentiated portion of the absolute took form of a divine child and climbed on to the lap of one of the saints and whispered something in his ears. When the saint opened his eyes the child said that it was going down to earth and beckoned him to accompany it. A tiny portion of the saint taking the form of a light descended and hit the house of Naren’s family in Kolkata. When the master first met Naren, He instantly recognized him to be the sage and Himself the divine child! The first visit to the master by Naren hardly made an impact on him. The master’s words and behavior hardly appealed to the skeptical mind set of Naren. The master however recognized him instantly. Naren’s voice broke into mellifluous, soul stirring songs. When the singing was over, Sri Ramakrishna took Naren aside and said ‘Ah! You have come so late. How unkind of you to keep me waiting so long! The master also said that Naren was none other than the sage Nara who has taken birth to wipe out the miseries of the world. This was too much for the rationalistic mind of Naren to accept. His disappointment reached the heights when the master fed him with His own hands. However Naren was amazed on hearing Sri Ramakrishna’s answer to the customary question that he normally put forward to the spiritual men he met, “Have you seen God?” Sri Ramakrishna answered, “Yes, I have seen God. I see Him as I see you here, only more intensely!” The events in subsequent meeting were carving the impressions on the heart of Naren through unaware. During the second visit to Sri Ramakrishna the master in an ecstatic state of meditation, touched Naren with His foot. He transmitted the spiritual state to Naren by making the walls, room, temple and garden to disappear in the void while he had his eyes open. Petrified, Naren thinking that he was going to die shouted out to stop it telling that he had his parents and siblings to take care of. Later when he was relieved he thought it to be a kind of hypnosis rather than a spiritual state. The third time when Naren met Sri Ramakrishna, the master touched him on his third eye which put him in a trance. In that state Sri Ramakrishna enquired of Naren’s purpose and mission and confirmed his convictions of him.

July 2012

Page 2

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

The First Meeting
When Vivekananda came to Ramakrishna his name was still Narendranath - later on Ramakrishna named him Vivekananda. When he came to Ramakrishna he was extremely argumentative, an atheist, a rationalist. He wanted proof for everything. There are some things that have no proof because it cannot be helped by proof. There is no proof for godliness: it is, and yet there is no proof. There is no proof for love. It is, and yet there is no proof. There is no proof for beauty. It is, and yet there is no proof. If one wants to know love, one will need the heart of a lover. There is no other proof. And godliness is the collective name of all the beauty, all the love and all the truth of this universe. For it an unwavering consciousness is needed, a witnessing is needed where no word remains, no thought remains, no wave arises where no mental dust remains and the mirror of consciousness is perfectly pure. What proof? Vivekananda told Ramakrishna, ‘I want proof. If God exists then prove it!’ Ramakrishna looked at Vivekananda. This youth had great promise, great potential; much was ready to happen within him. There was a great treasure with which Vivekananda was unacquainted. Ramakrishna looked into, peered into, the past lives of this youth. Vivekananda had come carrying a great treasure, a great treasure of integrity, but it was suppressed under his logic. Seeing this, a cry of anguish and compassion must have risen from Ramakrishna’s heart. He said, ‘Forget all this. We will talk about proof and such things later on.

Vivekananda and Ashtavakra Gita
Vivekananda was asking many questions out of his rational mind. Ramakrishna set aside all questions and said, ‘I have become a little old, I have difficulty reading; you are young, you eyes are still strong - read from the book lying there.’ It was the ‘Ashtavakra Gita.’ ‘Read a little out loud to me.’ It is said that Vivekananda saw nothing wrong in this, this fellow was not requesting anything special. He read three or four sutras and every cell began trembling. He started to panic and he said, ‘I cannot continue.’ Ramakrishna insisted, ‘Go ahead and read. What harm can there be in it? How can this book hurt you? You are young, your eyes are still fresh, and I am old, it is hard for me to read. I must hear this book - read it out to me.’ It is said that Vivekananda kept on reading aloud from the book - and disappeared in meditation. Ramakrishna had seen great potential in this youth, a very promising potential, like that of a bodhisattva who one day or other is destined to become a buddha. Sooner or later, no matter how much he wanders, he is approaching buddhahood. When Vivekananda came to Ramakrishna his name was still Narendranath - later on Ramakrishna named him Vivekananda. When he came to Ramakrishna he was extremely argumentative, an atheist, a rationalist.
July 2012 Page 3

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

Swami Vivekananda Searching Job
There is a small memoir in the life of Vivekananda. When Vivekananda’s father died, there was so much poverty in his home that often there was not enough food for both mother and son. So, Vivekananda would tell his mother, ‘Today I am invited to a friend’s house, I will go there.’ In fact there was no invitation, no nothing, he would just roam around on the roads and later return home. Otherwise the food was so little that his mother would feed him and would remain hungry herself. So, he would return home with an empty stomach but happy and laughing saying loudly ‘It was a wonderful meal! Such delicious food dishes were cooked!’ He would enter the house talking of those food stuffs that were nowhere cooked for him, that he had not eaten anywhere. When Ramakrishna came to know of this, he said, ‘How mad you are! Why don’t you ask God and all will be taken care of.’ Vivekananda said that it will be too ordinary a thing to talk about eating and drinking with God. Still Ramakrishna asked him to ask at least once and see. He sent Vivekananda inside the temple. One hour passed, one and a half hours passed, Vivekananda came out from the temple and was very blissful and ecstatic. He came out dancing. Ramakrishna asked, ‘Did you get it? Did you ask for it?’ Vivekananda said, ‘Get what?’ Ramakrishna said, ‘I had told you to put forward your demand. What makes you return so blissful?’ Vivekananda replied, ‘I forgot that completely.’ This happened several times. Ramakrishna would send him in and when Vivekananda came out of the temple, he would inquire about it. Then Vivekananda would remember what he had been sent in for. Ramakrishna said, ‘Are you mad or something? Because while going inside, you promised me that you will ask.’ Vivekananda would say, ‘When I go in, there remains not even a faint memory that I have to ask God for something. On the contrary, a feeling of giving arises in me, that I should give myself to Him. And when I give myself, there is such bliss, so much of it that there is neither hunger, nor thirst, nor the need to ask’ Vivekananda could not ask. It was not possible for him. Until now no truly religious person has asked for anything from God. And those who have asked, it ought to be understood well that they have nothing to do with religion. The religious man has only given. Meanwhile, Vishwanath Dutta thought of arranging marriage of his son, but Narendra refused, for he wanted to pursue the path of spiritual enlightenment. Ram, a close relative and friend of Narendra, suggested him to meet Sri Ramakrishna to know more about religion and spirituality. Surendra, another friend, too suggested the same thing and the three friends one day went to Dakshineswar. Sri Ramakrishna asked him to sing a song. Narendra began to sing one of the most touching songs in Bengali. The first lines went like this: ‘O mind, come; let us go home. Why do you travel in the foreign land of the world in a foreigner’s garb?’ Sri Ramakrishna was visibly moved by the sincerity and quality of Narendra’s singing. Tears
July 2012

Page 4

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

welled up in the eyes of Sri Ramakrishna, and he thus lovingly got acquainted with Narendra. Sri Ramakrishna treated him with utmost love and familiarity, as if they knew each other intimately and was meeting not as strangers but as close old friends. Later Sri Ramakrishna got up and said, ‘O Narandra, why did you take such long to come here? I have been restlessly waiting for you since long.’ Saying this he escorted Narendra to inner room and fed him sweets and other edibles with his own hands. Naturally Swami Vivekananda was puzzled to receive this kind of treatment; this was not a natural reaction between two strangers. Sri Ramakrishna invited Narendra to visit Dakshineswar again at his earliest convenience. Moreover, once Narendra's English teacher in his lecture had told the students to visit Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa at Dakshineswar if they wanted to know the exact meaning of the word ‘trance’, for Sri Ramakrishna often experienced that superconscious state of samadhi. Accordingly, one month after his first visit, Narendra went to Dakshineswar again. The Teacher and the Disciple The great soul in Narendranath readily recognized the extraordinary greatness in Sri Ramakrishna in the form of true love for God and great renunciation. However, his skepticism and logical mind was not ready to accept the ‘powers’ manifested in Sri Ramakrishna. He thought that the ‘simple insane’ Brahmin might be playing tricks with others in the form of hypnotism or mesmerism. His trance and samadhi were thought to be the whims and play of mind rather than divine superconscious states. In fact Swami Vivekananda postponed his second visit to Dakshineswar for about one month, although he had promised Sri Ramakrishna to visit him soon. But at last the call of Divine was far too strong for Narendra to resist anymore. And one afternoon, alone on foot, he started for the second meeting with his mentor, and would be Guru. And what did he say? He asked, ‘Sir, have you seen God?’ Calmly Sri Ramakrishna replied, ‘Yes, I see Him as clearly as one sees an apple over the palm; nay, even more intently. And not only this, you can also see Him.’ This unusual and most confident answer turned Narendra to more perplexity and surprise. He had been asking the same question ‘Sir, have you seen God’ to many a great religious and noble person, but he never got such clear cut answer from any one of them. Many religious Pundits, Devendranath Tagore and scholars of Brahmo Movement were reluctant to answer his question with any authority or resoluteness. But that day he got the most emphatic answer in positive. Sri Ramakrishna was sitting all alone. He was very pleased to receive Narendranath and called him near his tiny bedstead. Sri Ramakrishna went into a divine mood and touched Narendra with his right foot. Immediately Narendra had a wonderful experience, which is given in his own words:
July 2012 Page 5

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

“I saw with my eyes open that all the things of the room together with the walls were rapidly whirling and receding into an unknown region, and my I-ness together with the whole universe was, as it were, going to vanish in an all devouring great void. I was then overwhelmed with terrible fear. I knew that the destruction of I-ness was death, so I thought that death was before me, very near at hand. Unable to control myself, I cried out loudly, saying, ‘ah.’ What is it you have done to me? I have my parents, you know.” Laughing loudly at his words, Sri Ramakrishna touched Narendra’s chest with his hand and said, ‘Let it then cease now. It need not be done all at once. It will come to pass in course of time.’ Swami Vivekananda was amazed to notice how that extraordinary experience vanished as quickly as it had come. He came to normal state and saw things inside and outside the room standing still as before.

Master disciple relationship
It is erroneous to say that there exists any kind of relation between master and disciple. Yet there is no other way to explain this with any other word. If one has to explain what happens between the master and disciple certainly one has to use a word. Indeed there is no word that can explain this more beautifully than RELATIONSHIP. Indeed it a communion between the form and formless. It is the subtlest of the known phenomenon. Through this communion the known is disappearing and the realm of the unknown you are entering. Therefore it is difficult to understand. Master is formless although he appears as form. The disciple on the other hand is full of form. Form implies body-mind and intellect realm. This is plagued with duality. The formless is the beyondness. This beyondness implies the realm of the non-dual – the consciousness. The relationship between the disciple and the master is the crescendo of love, the highest peak of love. Love cannot go higher than that. Sufi use the term ISHKEHAQUIQI – Love for Truth. This communion between the two is the ultimate in love. That is the highest relationship in the world and even greater than a love relationship, greater than any relationship. It is indeed greater because the process surrender has begun and it has to be total. The basic thing is to love yourself so totally that the love overflows you and reaches to others. This is the only criterion to be the sunshine of love and then love rain and its dew drop covers all flowers. In your so-called love relationship the surrender is not total, instead it is partial. With partial surrender divorce is possible. But in fact, if you have once become a disciple of a Master, if you have really become a disciple, if you have been accepted, if you have surrendered, there is no possibility of divorce. There is no going back certainly it is a point of no return. Then the two persons are no more there. They exist like one, two aspects of one reality, but they are not two. One birth happens through the parents.
July 2012

Page 6

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

This is biological. Then a second birth happens when you are in intimate relationship with a master, with a buddha. This is real birth. This is the birth of awakening. This is new beginning – a journey inward. The second birth happens in a buddhafield. For this the buddha becomes the womb. The master is the womb for the disciple. The disciple enters into the womb of the master, and then disappears into the master to be reborn afresh. The master-disciple relationship is a love affair, the greatest love affair possible in the entire existence. The disciple surrenders his ego to the master. He bows down to say: BUDDHAM SHARANAM GACHCHHAMI — I bow down to the buddha, I surrender to the buddha, I take shelter at your feet. The moment ego vanishes he becomes part of the being of the master. And the master is no more there as a person instead he is only a presence – a subtle presence. And when two presences meet and merge into one another, the ultimate orgasmic experience happens, and ecstasy overflows. That ecstasy is the ultimate flowering of the master-and-disciple relationship. That ecstasy has been happening for centuries in a very mysterious way: the master says nothing about it, the disciple hears nothing about it, but sitting by the side of the master, silently waiting, patiently, prayerfully, one day the synchronicity happens. Master is there like an unfathomable ocean and you are sitting silently by the side waiting and then suddenly ripples begin in your inner lake. One day, suddenly, the disciple starts breathing with the master. His heartbeat is no longer separate from the master’s heartbeat. They disappear as two and become one. That experience of oneness with the master is the opening of the door of the temple of God. There are relationships and relationships, but none is comparable to the relationship that exists between the master and the disciple. All other relationships are conditional, even the best. For example, a love relationship is still demanding. The only relationship which is unconditional, and undemanding, is that which exists between the master and the disciple not otherwise. A master is not a master if he is not a friend too. But vice versa is not true. A disciple is a disciple and cannot claim friendship to the master, for a simple reason: because the disciple has to rise to the heights only then he can embrace the master. Such is the unique relationship between Ramakrishna and Vivekananda.

July 2012

Page 7

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

July 2012

Page 8

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

July 2012

Page 9

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

July 2012

Page 10

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

July 2012

Page 11

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

July 2012

Page 12

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

July 2012

Page 13

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

New Publication from authorHouse UK

July 2012

Page 14

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

New Publication from authorHouse UK

July 2012

Page 15

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

Osho on Enlightened Masters
Question – Do all enlightened masters sound as egoistic as you do? Osho – It is bound to be so. They sound egoistic because they cannot be humble in the sense you understand humility. Try to understand. It is a delicate point. Whatsoever you call humbleness is a function of the ego. It is a modified ego. The enlightened person has no ego so he cannot have a modified ego. He cannot be humble. In the sense you can understand it, he cannot be humble. Otherwise Krishna would not be able to say to Arjuna: “Leave all, and come to my feet. I am the God who created the whole existence. SARVA DHARMAN PARITYAJYA MAMEKAM SHARANAM VRAJA. Come to my feet.” What egoism! Jesus would not be able to say: “I am the door, I am the way, I am the truth.” “I and my Father in heaven are one.” “Those who follow me will be saved… only those who follow me will be saved.” And when Buddha attained to Buddhahood, he declared to the skies, to the heavens: “I have attained the unattainable!” They sound very egoistic. First, they cannot be humble in the sense you understand humbleness. Your humbleness is a modified, polished, cultured ego. But then why do they sound egoistic? They are not humble and you know only two qualities, two ways of being: humble or egoistic. They are not humble — then they must be egoistic. You have only two categories. And egoism is easy for you to understand, it is your language. When you say 'I', you mean one thing; when I say 'I', I mean something else. But when I say’I', you will understand it in your way, not in my way. When Krishna said to Arjuna, “Come to my feet!” what did he mean? Of course you would understand your meaning if you said to somebody, “Come to my feet!” The same must be Krishna’s meaning. No, that is not his meaning. He has no 'I’ left, he has no 'my’ left. But he has to use your language. And you understand it in your own way. So all enlightened masters sound egoistic because you are egoistic. You will understand their humbleness only when your ego disappears. Otherwise it won’t allow you. The only way to understand those who have awakened is to become awake. Continuously I go on observing: I say something; you understand something else. But that’s natural. How can you understand my meaning? When I say something, the word
July 2012

Page 16

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

goes to you not my meaning. My meaning remains in my heart. Then the word goes within you and you color it, you give it a meaning. That meaning is yours. They sound egoistic, but they are not. Because if they are, then the enlightenment has not happened yet. The enlightenment happens only when the ego has disappeared. The ego is the darkness of the soul, the ego is the imprisonment of the soul, the 'I’ is the barrier to the ultimate. A Buddha is an emptiness and when he says, “I have attained to the unattainable,” he is simply saying that the emptiness has realized its emptiness, nothing else. But how to translate it into your terms? He is simply saying that the emptiness has realized its emptiness, but he has to say, “I have attained to the unattainable.” When Krishna says, “Come to my feet!” he is saying, “Here, look! The emptiness is standing before you. Dissolve into it!” But that won’t be direct. He has to use Arjuna’s language. He says, “Come to my feet.” If Arjuna is ready and willing to surrender, if he trusts and surrenders, when he touches the feet of Krishna he will touch emptiness. Only then will there be a realization of what Krishna was saying. There are no feet, no Krishna — just a tremendous quality of emptiness. The temple of God is emptiness. Touching Krishna’s feet he will bow down to emptiness and the emptiness will pour down into him. But that will be possible only when he trusts. Yes, many times I must be sounding very egoistic to you. But don’t be deceived, because if you cling to the idea that I am egoistic, you will never be able to let go, to surrender, and then your ego will go on. Then there is no need to be here with me because then the whole point is lost. You are wasting your time. There is only one way to be here with me: if you want to surrender. Otherwise go away, find somebody somewhere else to whom you find it easy to surrender, because unless you surrender you will not come to know who you are. And without knowing yourself, you will not be able to know what has happened to a man whom we called enlightened. Only through your own experience will things become clear to you. Yes, it sounds egoistic. Now there are two ways. If you think that it not only sounds egoistic, it is — then go away from me. The sooner you go the better, because all the time that you are here will be wasted. Or, if you think it simply sounds egoistic but it is not so, then surrender. Then don’t wait because sometimes waiting too long can become habitual, you can get addicted to it. Then you can go on waiting and waiting and waiting.
July 2012 Page 17

Meditation Times – Taoshobuddha Meditations

And I will not be waiting here for long. A little while more and I will be gone. Then you will repent, then you will suffer, then you will be sad, but then it will be of no use. It will be easy for you to touch my feet when I am gone because then there is no surrender. You can go and touch the feet of a statue: the statue is dead; there is no surrender. When you touch the feet of an alive man — alive just like you, in the body just like you — then the problem comes. The ego resists. So either believe in your ego or believe in me. These are the only two alternatives. Up to now you have believed in your ego. What have you attained? I open another alternative for you. Try it….

July 2012

Page 18

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful