UNIT 1

PROJECT RESOURCE BOOK 2008
BTEC First Diploma in Public Services
www.cvqo.org
STEP FORWARD STAND OUT
Make Your Future Count
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BTEC First Diploma
in Public Services
UNIT 1 Project Resource Book
Appeals Procedure
1. You are now at a crucial stage of achieving the BTEC First Diploma in Public
Services. You will be briefed by your instructors on how to answer the Unit 1
Project.
2. This Resource Book contains research material to complete Unit 1.
There is a separate Resource Book which contains research material
connected with the other Units of the award.
3. This book also contains details of the requirements for Unit 1 and the
criteria to Pass or gain a Merit or Distinction grade.
4. Once you have completed and signed off the Unit 1 Project, your Unit will send
it to the Cadet Vocational Qualification Organisation (CVQO) for marking. The
grades will then be sent back to you via your Unit HQ.
1. You have the right to appeal if you are dissatisfied with your grades.
2. You should put your case in writing to your Unit VQ Officer, who will submit it
to CVQO for adjudication by the Chief Executive.
3. Your Unit will be notified in writing of the result of your appeal.
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Contents
Unit 1 Project Resource Book ............................................................................................................................i
Appeals Procedure ................................................................................................................................................i
For more information ..........................................................................................................................................iii
Unit 1 - Uniformed Public Services Employment ..............................................................................................1
Grading Criteria ....................................................................................................................................................2
Role, Responsibilities & Tasks............................................................................................................................5
Task 1 Defence Mission ................................................................................................................5
Royal Navy ..........................................................................................................................7
Royal Marines Commandos ................................................................................................9
Army ..................................................................................................................................11
Royal Air Force ..................................................................................................................12
Royal Navy ........................................................................................................................................................14
Task 2 Some Jobs in the Royal Navy ..........................................................................................15
Royal Navy Conditions of Service ....................................................................................22
Task 3 Entry Requirements ..........................................................................................................24
Selection Process ..............................................................................................................26
Task 4 Short Term Planning / Initial Training ................................................................................28
Long Term Planning / Career Progression ......................................................................31
Royal Marines Commandos ..............................................................................................................................34
Task 2 Some Jobs in the Royal Marines Commandos ................................................................35
Royal Marines Commandos Conditions of Service ..........................................................40
Task 3 Entry Requirements ..........................................................................................................42
Selection Process ..............................................................................................................44
Task 4 Short Term Planning / Initial Training ................................................................................47
Long Term Planning / Career Progression ......................................................................49
Army ........................................................................................................................................................52
Task 2 Some Jobs in the Army......................................................................................................53
Army Conditions of Service ..............................................................................................61
Task 3 Entry Requirements ..........................................................................................................63
Selection Process ..............................................................................................................65
Task 4 Short Term Planning / Initial Training ................................................................................68
Long Term Planning / Career Progression ......................................................................72
Royal Air Force....................................................................................................................................................75
Task 2 Some Jobs in the Royal Air Force ....................................................................................76
Royal Air Force Conditions of Service ..............................................................................82
Task 3 Entry Requirements ..........................................................................................................84
Selection Process ..............................................................................................................87
Task 4 Short Term Planning / Initial Training ................................................................................90
Long Term Planning / Career Progression ......................................................................94
Job Applications ................................................................................................................................................98
Task 3 Know Yourself ..................................................................................................................100
Your CV............................................................................................................................104
Application Forms ............................................................................................................113
Application Letters............................................................................................................119
Glossary..............................................................................................................................................................127
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If you want more information:
The Royal Air Force
www.raf.mod.uk
The Army
www.army.mod.uk
The Royal Marines Commandos
www.royal-marines.mod.uk
The Royal Navy
www.royal-navy.mod.uk
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2008 1
Unit 1 -
Uniformed Public Services Employment
You will have a Unit 1 Project to complete which will be externally set and you will
have to produce your own work on the tasks that you are given. This will have to be
completed by the end of February 2009. Your Unit will inform you when to start and
when to complete the Unit 1 Project.
The Resource Book is broken down into the various compartments to suit each
Service and also includes advice on Application Forms, Curriculum Vitae (CVs) and
Career Planning.
The first part of this unit outlines The Defence Mission plus advice on how joint
activities are achieved. From this Mission all the Services base their activities.
In this unit you need to identify and explain the primary role, purpose and
responsibilities of at least two Public Services. In all cases this will be your own
Service i.e. Royal Navy, Royal Marines Commandos, Army or Royal Air Force and one
of the others just mentioned.
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UNIT 1 - Grading Criteria
The criteria you must meet to gain a Pass, Merit or Distinction Grade
are laid down in the boxes below.
To gain a Merit you must also achieve all the Pass criteria.
To gain a Distinction you must also achieve all the Pass and Merit criteria.
GRADING CRITERIA - PASS
To achieve a PASS grade the evidence
must show that you are able to:
What you need to do:
P1 Describe the roles, purpose and
responsibilities of two contrasting
uniformed public services.

Answer Task 1a correctly

Answer Task 1b correctly
P2 Describe the type of work done in
three different jobs within a named
uniformed public service.

Answer Task 2a correctly
P3 Describe the current conditions of
service for a given job within a
uniformed public service.

Answer Task 2c correctly
P4 Describe the current entry
requirements and the selection stages
for a given uniformed public service.

Answer Task 3a correctly

Answer Task 3b correctly
P5 Complete an application form and
curriculum vitae accurately for a given
job within a uniformed public service.

Answer Task 3d correctly

Answer Task 3e correctly
P6 Describe the initial training programme
for a given uniformed public service.

Answer Task 4a correctly
P7 Describe what opportunities are
available for career development within
a given public service.

Answer Task 4b correctly
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UNIT 1 - Grading Criteria
GRADING CRITERIA - MERIT
GRADING CRITERIA - DISTINCTION
To achieve a MERIT grade the evidence
must show that you are able to:
Answer correctly the pass questions
and also:
M1 Explain the role, purpose and
responsiblities of two contrasting
uniformed public services.

Answer Task 1c correctly
M2 Explain in detail the work of a job within
a uniformed public service.

Answer Task 2b correctly
M3 Explain the process of applying for a
given job within a uniformed public
service.

Complete Task 3c successfully
(The Interview)
M4 Comment on their own suitability to
complete basic training and for their
career development within a chosen
uniformed public service.

Answer Task 4c correctly
To achieve a DISTINCTION grade the
evidence must show that you are able to:
Answer correctly the pass and merit
questions and also:
D1 Evaluate the role, purpose and
responsiblities a uniformed public
service.

Answer Task 1d correctly
D2 Evaluate both the potential and the
limitations for their own career
development within their cosen
uniformed public service.

Answer Task 4d correctly

Answer Task 4e correctly
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UNIT 1 - Grading Criteria
Summary
Unit 1 - Grading Criteria
1. You will be set a number of tasks that
will be based on the criteria. Your grade
will depend how you have covered
each area
2. Before starting the tasks make sure
that you read the criteria
3. You can achieve a good grade by using
the Resource Book
4. You can use other material such as the
web to help with your answers
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Ministry of Defence
The Defence Mission
The purpose of the Ministry of Defence, and the Armed Forces, is to:
• defend the United Kingdom, and Overseas Territories, our people and interests;
• act as a force for good by strengthening international peace and security.
To achieve this, we:
• make a vital contribution to Britain's security policy and its promotion at home
and abroad;
• direct and provide a defence effort that meets the needs of the present, prepares
for the future and insures against the unpredictable;
• generate modern, battle-winning forces and other defence capabilities to help:
- prevent conflicts and build stability;
- resolve crises and respond to emergencies;
- protect and further UK interests;
- meet our commitments and responsibilities;
- work with Allies and partners to strengthen international security
relationships.
Success depends, above all, on our people. We must:
• recruit and retain the best people for the job from a diverse society;
• train, motivate and equip them properly;
• manage with care, ensuring that the demands on individuals and their families
are reasonable;
• develop careers in defence and skills for life.
In all this we must:
• make every pound count for defence to ensure that the defence budget is used
to best effect;
• develop a joint approach, harnessing the three Armed Services, defence
civilians and all our resources to deliver the defence mission;
• be open, flexible and creative in the way we work;
• encourage British defence technology, science and industry;
• help protect the natural environment;
• be an active part of the wider community which we serve and in which we live.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Ministry of Defence
Joint Forces - Working Together
In the last 100 years, during times of real crisis the Armed Forces have worked
jointly together. The Falklands and two Gulf Wars being recent successful
examples.
Joint Forces are now more important than ever because in today’s world the traditional
distinctions between maritime, land and air theatres of operations have become less
relevant. Operating as a single, united force, the Royal Navy (including the Royal
Marines Commandos), Army and Royal Air Force can maximise operational effectiveness
and increase the chance of success.
Power projection from the sea can be a vital part of the land battle - through the use of
cruise missiles to attack targets on land, as we saw during the Kosovo campaign, or of
carrier borne aircraft and helicopters. Ships can also provide the platform from which
land forces go ashore. Ground troops depend on air forces to provide air cover, to help
their attack on enemy positions, and to provide mobility - both long-range (strategic) lift to
the theatre of operations, and shorter-range (tactical) mobility within the battlefield.
So to talk - or operate - in terms of the three distinct and separate environments of sea,
land and air is outdated. We must now think, and operate, in terms of a joint, multi-
dimensional “battlespace” and have forces structured for operations throughout this
“battlespace”.
Our forces now frequently operate closely together. Recent history confirms this trend.
The operation to regain the Falkland Islands was joint. Operations during the Gulf Wars
were joint and the integration of air power was especially effective. The Kosovo
campaign was joint. In Bosnia, RN and RAF helicopters have jointly provided support to
Army units.
As a result of the Strategic Defence Review significant improvements have been made in
the ability of the Services to operate together. For example the following have been created:
• The Joint Rapid Reaction Force, a pool of manpower and equipment which provides
a higher capability, more truly deployable and better supported joint force.
• The Joint Force Harrier, which brings together the operational capability of the RN
and RAF Harrier GR9 to allow force to be projected in support of British defence
objectives from both sea and land.
• The Joint Helicopter Command, which draws on the equipment, personnel and best
practices from the armed forces to provide joint task force commanders with packages
of helicopters tailored to meet the specific requirements of particular operations.
Other joint support structures include: A single organisation to perform all storage and
distribution tasks; a joint Defence Transport and Movements organisation to take
responsibility for the movement of all personnel and material; a single Defence Aircraft
Repair Agency, and a joint Helicopter Training School.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Royal Navy
Purpose of the Royal Navy
“The Royal Navy is the maritime power component of
the MOD which supports the United Kingdom’s foreign
and security policy by providing a capable presence
wherever in the world it is required.”
Role & Responsibilities -
Types of task carried out by the Royal Navy
The Royal Navy has eight mission objectives.
1. Contribute to the security of the UK
and its citizens world-wide in
peacetime, including providing military
aid to civil authorities.
2. Participate in the Defence Diplomacy
initiative through the building of
international trust.
3. Participate in Peace Support and
Humanitarian Operations.
4. Maintain capability to mount a
response to a regional conflict outside
NATO which could adversely affect
European Security or UK interests.
5. Contribute to the internal and external
security of the UK's Overseas
Territories, e.g. Bermuda, Gibraltar
and the Falklands.
6. Support British interests, influence and
standing abroad extending to the
support of defence exports.
7. Provide forces required to counter a
strategic attack on NATO.
8. Provide forces needed to respond to a
regional conflict inside NATO where
an Ally calls for assistance under
Article 5 of the Washington Treaty.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Royal Navy
Role & Responsibilities -
Examples of tasks given to the Royal Navy
The Royal Navy operates in many different areas as it carries out its
defence missions.
Humanitarian Aid - dealing with
accidents and emergencies.
Following the tsunami in Asia, HMS
Chatham carried out welcome relief work
in the town of Batticaloa on the eastern
coast of Sri Lanka in January 2005.
Members of the ship's company
surveyed and marked a safe passage
across a sand bar - dislodged by the
force of the tsunami - allowing local
fishermen to put to sea for the first time.
Anti Smuggling Tasks
HMS Southampton has been deployed in
the Caribbean with a primary mission to
maintain the security of British Overseas
Territories - including helping with
disaster relief - but anti-drugs work
formed a major part of their daily work. In
February 2006 HMS Southampton and
RFA Grey Rover carried out a high-
speed raid to intercept drug-runners
which resulted in the seizure of two
tonnes of cocaine with a street value
of £350m.
Diplomacy
Various courtesy visits are made by
warships to foreign ports from time to
time. eg HMS Nottingham recently
visited the Far East and Australasia.
These visits are carried out with a
view to developing friendly trade and
diplomatic links with other countries.
Fishery Protection
The task of fishery protection and
patrolling Britain’s offshore oilfield
installations are carried out by the
Fishery Protection squadron composed
of three Island class patrol vessels eg
HMS Anglesey.
Peace Keeping
HMS Bulwark, the Royal Navy’s most
modern and flexible warship, sailed in
January 2006 on a mission focused on
looking after UK interests across the Gulf
and Northern Indian Ocean and
supporting operations to increase global
security. She will be proving the ability
of the Royal Navy to react to a wide
range of demands, primarily in this case
to help secure legitimate international
trade routes worldwide. Operations will
also be aimed at bringing peace and
stability to a volatile and unstable region.
Participation in conflicts
Large task forces composed of many
types of RN ships have been deployed
to the Gulf in recent times in support of
land operations against Iraq.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Royal Marines Commandos
Purpose of the Royal Marines Commandos
“The Royal Marines Commandos are the Royal Navy’s
amphibious infantry
Role & Responsibilities -
Types of task carried out by the Royal Marines
Commandos
The Royal Marines Commandos share the same eight mission objectives.
1. Contribute to the security of the UK
and its citizens world-wide in
peacetime, including providing military
aid to civil authorities.
2. Participate in the Defence Diplomacy
initiative through the building of
international trust.
3. Participate in Peace Support and
Humanitarian Operations.
4. Maintain capability to mount a
response to a regional conflict outside
NATO which could adversely affect
European Security or UK interests.
5. Contribute to the internal and external
security of the UK's Overseas
Territories, e.g. Bermuda, Gibraltar
and the Falklands.
6. Support British interests, influence and
standing abroad extending to the
support of defence exports.
7. Provide forces required to counter a
strategic attack on NATO.
8. Provide forces needed to respond to a
regional conflict inside NATO where
an Ally calls for assistance under
Article 5 of the Washington Treaty.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Royal Marines Commandos
Boarding Parties
Elements of Royal Marines Commandos
are present on some warships and act
as boarding parties when required in the
international fight against drug trafficking
or smuggling.
Humanitarian Aid
Commando Engineers and Royal
Marines Commandos from 3 Commando
Brigade deployed in November 2005 to
provide emergency assistance following
the earthquake in Pakistan. Against the
challenges of the rocky terrain, weather
and the chaos caused by the
earthquake, they were able to distribute
food and clothing to remote areas, build
health centres and rescue an aid convoy
trapped in snow.
Peace Keeping
Operational RM units have seen service
in Northern Ireland and Kosovo.
Diplomacy
Operational RM units have worked with
units from other Nations as part of a
combined force to help generate
international cooperation and
understanding.
Participation in conflicts
In recent times Operational RM units
have seen active service in: Iraq, Bosnia,
The Congo, The Falklands and
Afghanistan.
Role & Responsibilities -
Examples of tasks given to the Royal Marines Commandos
The Royal Marines Commandos fulfil a wide range of tasks sometimes as part of a
larger force and sometimes as a small unit deployed for a specific purpose.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - Army
Purpose of the British Army
“The British Army exists to defend the nation and
its interests.”
Role & Responsibilities -
Types of task carried out by the British Army
The modern Army plays a vital role around the world. As well as being called upon
to protect the security of the UK, we're increasingly needed to act as an international
peacekeeper in today's volatile world.
Our officers and soldiers carry out important, often life-saving work in more than 30
countries and we currently undertake everything from supporting United Nations or
NATO operations in Iraq or Afghanistan to civil engineering projects in Kenya to
providing humanitarian aid to people trying to rebuild their lives in Bosnia.
Role & Responsibilities -
Examples of tasks given to the British Army
1. The British Army helped to build a
safer world in the Balkans, the Gulf,
East Timor and more recently,
Afghanistan and Iraq.
2. Significant numbers of troops are
deployed as part of the multi-national
forces in the Balkans, Afghanistan,
Sierra Leone, Iraq and with the UN in
Cyprus. Northern Ireland still remains
an operational commitment, albeit
much reduced.
3. The Army also has garrison forces in
Germany, Brunei, Cyprus, Gibraltar
and the Falkland Islands.
4. In addition the Army provides military
teams and advisers in up to 25
countries around the world.
5. The British Army is one of the few
armies that is capable of operating at
all these different levels, from
warfighting to helping our civilian
community to peace-keeping.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - RAF
Purpose of the Royal Air Force
“The Royal Air Force exists to generate air power to
meet the Defence Mission.”
Role & Responsibilities -
Types of task carried out by the Royal Air Force
Ever since the RAF was created in 1918 they have played a major part in protecting
the UK and its interests.
Their job is to provide air power whenever, wherever and in whatever form it is
needed. This can mean anything from helping the UN enforce a blockade on a
hostile power to airlifting an injured person off a trawler in an Atlantic gale, from
scrambling fighters to check out unidentified aircraft, to dropping food supplies in a
drought stricken area or supporting the ground forces in military action.
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Role, Responsibilities & Tasks - RAF
Role & Responsibilities -
Examples of tasks given to the Royal Air Force
Iraq
The RAF currently has the following
based in and around Iraq to provide
support to British forces involved in
peace-keeping and stabilisation duties in
Iraq:
• Tornado GR4 attack aircraft
• VC10 tanker aircraft
• Puma, Chinook and Merlin support
helicopters
• Hercules transport aircraft
• Nimrod maritime patrol aircraft
• A RAF Regiment squadron
• Tactical Communications and Supply
Wing personnel
• Plus other support personnel
including: bomb disposal, catering
and police.
Afghanistan
Nimrod aircraft are involved in monitoring
shipping in the Gulf whilst Hercules
transport aircraft support UK forces in
Afghanistan.
The Balkans
As part of the on-going United Nations-
led duties in Bosnia and Herzegovina
there are currently Merlin helicopters
based at Banja Luka airport.
Northern Ireland
Permanently based in Northern Ireland
to provide support to British troops in the
province are 230 Squadron with Puma
helicopters and one RAF Regiment field
squadron.
The Falkand Islands
Permanently based at Mount Pleasant
airfield in the Falkland Islands are
Tornado F3 fighters, Chinook and Sea
King helicopters, a VC10 tanker and
Hercules transport.
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UNIT 1 - Royal Navy
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Warfare Officer (WO)
A Warfare Officer (WO) is responsible for the safe execution of all Seamanship and
Navigational evolutions.
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
Common Fleet Training
At sea on board HM Ship for 4
months under the supervision of
one of the ship’s officers. During
this period a Task Book must be
completed in preparation for the
Fleet Board
Specialist Fleet Training
Warfare = ‘X’ course at sea
2-6 months
Initial Warfare Officers Course
At the Maritime Warfare School in
HMS Collingwood
4 months
First Appointment at Sea
18 months
Britannia Royal Naval College
Successful completion of the
Officers Initial Training Course at
Britannia Royal Naval College in
Dartmouth for 1 year
Fleet Board Interview
Success leads to confirmation of
formal commision as a Royal Naval
Officer
- Navigation
- Officer of the Watch
- Weapon types and applications
Brief Description
The WO is responsible to the Captain for all aspects of warfare, tactics, the threat
to the ship and the ability of the ship to meet that threat in times of conflict.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Warfare Specialist - (WS)
First compliment job as a warfare
specialist at sea
You will be considered for promotion
to Leading Hand as your skills,
knowledge and experience develop
Ratings
Basic training at HMS Raleigh
(9 weeks)
Professional Training
at HMS Collingwood
(12 weeks)
Set up and operate the systems
that give you the information
about what is on the surface and
air
Detect and report radar jamming
Use data links and voice radio
circuits to pass vital information
from your ship to others
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
Brief Description
The WS is the centre of operations and will 'fight the ship' by specialising in
running the computers and systems that build up the picture around the ship.
Closed up in the Operations Room, they man the consoles that track surface
ships, aircraft and submarines. This enables them to compile a report to the
Warfare Officer that enables them to make tactical decisions.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Communication and Information Systems
Submariner Specialist (CISSM)
Ratings
Basic training at HMS Raleigh
(9 weeks)
Professional training mainly at
HMS Collingwood
(16 weeks)
Submarine School at HMS Raleigh
(4 months Submariner training)
Skills Achieved
Able to transmit and receive
information, using all the specialist
communications equipment
Basic sea survival, fire fighting
and damage control
Training Sequence
First compliment job as a CISSM
at sea
You will be considered for promotion
to Leading Hand as your skills,
knowledge and experience develop
Brief Description
The CISSM plays a vital role in processing the huge amount of information that
comes in and goes out of a submarine in a 24 hour period. They have to compile
and transfer data via satellite and radio links.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Aircraft Handler
Professional Training mainly
At RNAS Culdrose
(6 months)
First compliment job as an Aircraft
Handler either on a ship or an
air station
You will be considered for promotion
to Leading Hand as your skills,
knowledge and experience develop
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
Learn to work as a member of a
firecrew, an aircraft hanger crew or
flight deck crew
Learn Firefighting skills:
Including the use of different
techniques and in particular how to
deal with aircraft fires
This qualifies you to serve ashore or at
sea as a Firesuitman
Learn about:
- Air Operations chain of command
- How to prepare a flight deck for flying
- Practise the physical movement
of aircraft
- Aircraft lift operation
- Aircraft deck restraints
Ratings
Basic training at HMS Raleigh
(9 weeks)
Brief Description
The job of an aircraft handler is to make certain that the preparations for flying run
as smoothly and safely as possible. Their tasks involve everything from preparing
the flight deck to moving the aircraft and firefighting to rescue work.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Steward
Ratings
Basic training at HMS Raleigh
(9 weeks)
You will be considered for promotion
to Leading Hand as your skills,
knowledge and experience develop
Professional training mainly at the
Defence Maritime Logistics School
(12 weeks)
First compliment job as a
Steward at sea
Further professional training
Study for public qualifications -
eg NVQ Level 2
Basic Food Hygiene Certificate
Health and Safety at
Work Certificate
Work within groups of up to
10 trainees learning:
• Bar work
To maintain and run a bar
Basic accounting
Managing cellars
• Accommodation and valeting
Running accommodation blocks
Looking after officers’ cabins
Caring for the different types
of uniform
The duties of a senior officer’s valet
• Tableware and service
Different types of crockery and cutlery
Preparation of all types of meals
Silver Service
• Cooking and serving food
Preparation of particular dishes
Kitchen hygiene
Kitchen safety and management
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
Brief Description
Stewards work in the Officers Mess which in the Royal Navy is called the
Wardroom. They undertake many roles such as Wardroom management, bar
management, fund accounting, food handling and health and safety. At sea,
stewards are also involved in non trade tasks such as: Firefighting, ships
helmsman, plus being a member of the ship’s First Aid team.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Engineering Technician (Marine Engineer) - ET (ME)
Ratings
Basic training at HMS Raleigh
(9 weeks)
You will be considered for promotion
to Leading Hand as your skills,
knowledge and experience develop
ET (ME)s Professional training
at HMS Sultan
(5 Months)
First compliment job on a ship at sea
• Machinery theory
• Machinery demonstrations
• Craft work in the workshop
• Knowledge of gas turbine engines,
diesel engines, generators and pumps,
all of which play key roles in the
functioning of a ship
• Practical maintenance skills
• Firefighting
• Use of life saving equipment
At the end of each of the above sections
is an examination which must be passed
before moving on to the next section
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
Brief Description
ET (ME)s are part of the team that looks after everything from the fuel, power and
propulsion systems that keep the ship going, to the water purification and air-
conditioning equipment critical to the wellbeing of the crew.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Navy
Engineering Technician
(Marine Engineer Submariner) - ET (MESM)
Ratings
Basic training at HMS Raleigh
(9 weeks)
You will be considered for promotion
to Leading Hand as your skills,
knowledge and experience develop
ET (MESM)s Professional training
at HMS Sultan
(4 Months)
First compliment job at sea in a
Submarine
• Machinery theory
• Machinery demonstrations
• Craft work in the workshop
• Knowledge of gas turbine engines,
diesel engines, generators and pumps,
all of which play key roles in the
functioning of a ship
• Practical maintenance skills
• Firefighting
• Use of life saving equipment
At the end of each of the above sections
is an examination which must be passed
before moving on to the next section
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
ET (MESM)s Submariners training
at HMS Raleigh
(4 Months)
Brief Description
ET (MESM)s are part of the team that looks after everything from the nuclear
power and propulsion systems that keep the submarines working, to the water and
air purification equipment critical to the safety of the crew.
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Royal Navy - Conditions of Service
The Royal Navy
Conditions of Service -
Summary of Benefits
Pay See Pay section overleaf
Pension Non-contributory pension on completion
of service
Leave 30 days annual paid holiday.
Sport Free sport and gymnasium facilities.
Food & Accommodation Subsidised food and accommodation.
Availability of service married quarters.
Advance of pay for buying a house.
Removals and relocation package.
Hours of Work When not at sea, most Royal Navy
personnel work Mondays to Fridays.
If you work shifts you will be given the
equivalent time off.
Medical Free medical and dental care.
Travel Discounted rail and coach travel.
Free rail warrants.
Education Annual education allowance. Boarding
school allowance for children. Civilian
accreditation (NVQs) for specialisations.
Allowances There are allowances available for being
overseas and separation.
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2008 23
Royal Navy - Conditions of Service
Pay (from 1 April 2008)
All Naval personnel are required to have a bank account and their salary is paid
directly into it at the end of each month.
Officers
Rank From To
Midshipman - Sub Lieutenant £14,852 per year £31,188 per year
Lieutenant £36,160 per year £43,002 per year
Ratings
Rank From To
On Entry £13,013 per year
Able Rating £16,227 per year £27,599 per year
Leading Rate £26,315 per year £31,645 per year
Petty Officer £31,239 per year £35,219 per year
Specialist Pay and Allowances
Certain specialists e.g. aircrew, submariners, divers and hydrographers receive
additional pay, as do personnel who serve at sea.
Personnel who are separated from their partners for long periods, due to operational
requirements, are eligible for additional allowances.
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Officers - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
To apply to the Royal Navy as an Officer
you must be no younger than 15 years,
9 months. On entry you must be no
younger than 17. The maximum age for
Officer entry varies according to
specialisation. Those under the age of
18 must have parental consent.
Nationality and Residency
Applicants must at all times since birth
have been a citizen of Britain, Ireland or
a Commonwealth country. Nationality
restrictions apply in certain branches.
Applicants must have been resident in
the UK for a minimum of 5 years
immediately prior to making an
application. In certain circumstances,
in particular if the candidate is of UK
origin, a shorter period of residency may
be accepted.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
To enter the Royal Navy as an Officer
you require a minimum of 5 GCSEs at
grades A* - C, including English and
Mathematics and 180 UCAS points.
To enter as a Graduate you need a BSc
or BA first degree.
Medical Standards
New entrants must be of a robust
constitution and free from disease or
pre-existing injury to meet the challenge
of intensive training which is physically
demanding and mentally taxing. You will
be required to pass a full medical
examination. Your application will be
rejected if you fail to meet the minimum
acceptable medical standard before
entry. Before a Medical Officer examines
you, you are asked to declare certain
information about your medical history to
identify obvious medical conditions for
which rejection is automatic.
The minimum height for service in the
Royal Navy is 151.5cm.
Selection
Applicants have to pass selection
assessments and interview at an Armed
Forces Careers Office (AFCO).
Royal Navy - Entry Requirements
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Royal Navy - Entry Requirements
Ratings - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
To apply to the Royal Navy you must be
no younger than 15 years, 9 months.
On entry you must be no younger than
16 and no older than 36 (you must enter
Service before your 37th birthday).
Those under the age of 18 must have
parental consent.
Nationality and Residency
Applicants must at all times since birth
have been a citizen of Britain, Ireland or
a Commonwealth country. Nationality
restrictions apply in certain branches.
Applicants must have been resident
in the UK for a minimum of 5 years
immediately prior to making an
application. In certain circumstances,
in particular if the candidate is of UK
origin, a shorter period of residency may
be accepted.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
For many jobs there are no formal entry
qualifications. If you have GCSEs
(or equivalent) the range of opportunities
is wider still.
Medical Standards
New entrants must be of a robust
constitution and free from disease or
pre-existing injury to meet the challenge
of intensive training which is physically
demanding and mentally taxing. You will
be required to pass a full medical
examination. Your application will be
rejected if you fail to meet the minimum
acceptable medical standard before
entry. Before a Medical Officer examines
you, you are asked to declare certain
information about your medical history to
identify obvious medical conditions for
which rejection is automatic.
The minimum height for service in the
Royal Navy is 151.5cm.
Selection
Applicants have to pass selection
assessments and interview at an Armed
Forces Careers Office (AFCO).
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Royal Navy - Selection Process
Officers - Selection Process
Please note that selection is a
staged process.
Successful completion of one stage
is required before you pass on to the
next.
Your Liaison Officer will explain this
to you in more detail and at the end
of each stage, tell you whether or
not you have been successful.
Details of the Admiralty Interview Board
2
1
/
2 days- HMS Sultan
Day 1 Arrival (pm)
Administration
Complete questionnaire
Day 2 Written tests on: Verbal and non-verbal reasoning skills
Further tests on: Mental agility
Numerical fluency
Spatial orientation
Communication skills
Day 3 Practical leadership tasks
Discussion exercise
Formal Interview
Medical (if successful up to this point)
Initial interview and presentation
Recruiting questionnaire
Recruiting test (RT)
Selection interview
Medical and eye tests
Specialist branch
Interviews/auditions/test (if required)
Security and reference checks
Admiralty Interview Board
Start Initial Training
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Ratings - Selection Process
Pre-joining fitness test
All new potential Royal Navy Rating recruits are required to pass the Pre-Joining
Fitness Test (PJFT), prior to being accepted for training into the Royal Navy. This will
be a stamina, (aerobic), based fitness assessment, which will consist of a 2.4km (1.5
mile) run on a treadmill in a civilian fitness centre.
Royal Navy - Selection Process
Maximum acceptable time
Age Men Women
15 - 24 12 min 20 secs 14 min 35 secs
25 - 29 12 min 48 secs 15 min 13 secs
30 - 34 13 min 18 secs 15 min 55 secs
35 - 39 13 min 49 secs 16 min 40 secs
Initial interview and presentation
Recruiting questionnaire
Recruiting test (RT)
Selection interview
Medical and eye tests
Pre-joining fitness test
Specialist branch
Interviews/auditions/test (if required)
Security and reference checks
Start Initial Training
Selection takes place at your local
Armed Forces Careers Office.
Please note that selection is a staged
process.
Successful completion of one stage
is required before you pass on to the
next.
Your Careers Adviser will explain this
to you in more detail and at the end
of each stage, tell you whether or not
you have been successful.
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Royal Navy - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
Officers - Initial Training
Initial Officer Training at the Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC) is divided into 7 Week Phases.
Academic qualifications, RN or military experience of the branch you are joining, will determine
how many Phases you undertake at BRNC. It might be only 1 if you are a Doctor or it may be 6, if
you undertake the full training package of a Warfare Officer.
Phase One – Militarisation
Introduction to the RN and Navy Life. Development of the young officers, focusing on personal
administration, self discipline and most importantly, leadership.
Phase Three - Initial Sea Training
Go to sea on board a warship. The Officer Cadets live and work alongside Junior Rates so that
they can experience life with the very people they aspire to lead. They spend time in all of the
major departments onboard to gather a wide range of information and experience. They learn
about everything from preparing meals to taking part in Warfare exercises at sea, as well as what
the ship does in harbour. They will spend time Bridge watch-keeping, shadowing engineering
repair and maintenance activities, helping with seamanship activities and learning about logistics.
Accelerated and Diverse Training: Academic Phases 4-6
Many cadets arrive with previous military service. These cadets, if they exhibit early promise, will
have their existing skills acknowledged and may be accelerated through the training pipeline,
entering the Fleet some months earlier than their contemporaries and gaining a flying start to
their careers. Phases 4-6 contain a diverse and sometimes intensive package of academic
studies. Subjects include: Strategic Studies and International Affairs; Radar and
Telecommunications; Ship Technology; Marine Environment; Maths and Computing. Logistics
Officers will study Logistics, Accountancy and Finance and Stores Management. In addition
young officers may opt to further their language skills.
Throughout Phases 4-6 there runs a common thread of developing the Command, Leadership
and Management (CLM) skills of the young officers. Leadership assessments and exercises
become progressively more demanding. Cadets have their final assessment on the Maritime
Leadership Exercise, which is a 4 day Humanitarian Aid Operation. Training is completed in
Phase 6, which includes courses that will develop other professional skills in the Fleet, acquaint
young officers with other elements of the RN, RM and other services and culminates in the
Passing Out Parade. From this point young officers disperse in to the Fleet or for flying training or
other professional courses. They will return to BRNC later in their careers for further CLM training
or perhaps as a Staff Officer.
Phase Two – Naval General Training
Phase 2 is designed to deliver the underpinning knowledge of the Royal Navy and the maritime
environment and to instil the fundamental qualities required of an Officer; discipline, integrity and
physical and moral courage. Training includes a combination of practical boat-work, navigation,
warfare, staff skills, engineering, meteorology and oceanography. All of the above is intended to
prepare Cadets for Phase 3, training. Before embarking on their first warship for Initial Sea
Training during Phase 3 all cadets complete a course of basic sea survival including fire fighting,
damage control and life raft drills.
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Ratings - Initial Training
Royal Navy - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
Week One
Introduction to the RN and Navy Life. Complete an enrolment form – you must now
stay for at least 4 weeks. Fitness test, military swimming test, basic kit care.
Lectures on Navy life and team building exercises.
Ratings Initial training takes place at HMS Raleigh, Plymouth. It consists of nine weeks training.
Week Two
Parade and physical fitness training forms a large part of the week. There are
lessons in the Naval General Training syllabus covering subjects such as Health
and Safety, Security and Naval Law.
Week Three
Further parade drill including an examination. A visit to a live or de-commissioned
nuclear submarine and a 'live' warship. A 24 hour exercise to develop team
working and navigation skills. You may also be required to undertake a naval
Maths and English exam; this indicates academic potential for future promotion.
Week Four
Devoted to Naval Military Training. This includes weapons training and live firing on
the range. The weekend is spent playing recreational sport, preparing
presentations for the final military exercise and kit maintenance competition.
Week Five
Assistant Divisional Training Officer's kit muster will test your ability to maintain,
prepare and store your Royal Navy uniform. Successful completion will result in
you being awarded extra privileges. A physical training strength test is also carried
out and assessed individually; this has to be completed satisfactorily before you
can pass out of HMS Raleigh. Continue to improve your fitness and teamwork with
various PT lessons. However following a 'map and compass' lesson, most of the
weekend is taken up with team based adventurous activity on Dartmoor, involving
camp craft, route planning and navigating 30 km in total.
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Ratings - Initial Training (continued)
Royal Navy - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
Week Seven
You will complete a 1 day First Aid course, Divisional Training Officers kit muster
and the second physical training test. There is a Weapon Drill and Guard Trophy
competition determining the 'lead' guard platoon for the Ceremonial Divisions,
finally competing in the Obstacle Course competition.
Week Eight
Rising to the challenges of the teamwork exercises and problem solving, you will
also be required to pass a Naval General Training exam and the assault course
competition. During this week you will visit an Air Station. The weekend will see
your first shore leave.
Week Nine
The final week starts with the Best Mess Competition. This is followed by two days
of CBRNDC training (Chemical, Biological, Radiation, Nuclear, and Damage
Control). The Final Military Exercise takes place along with the delivery of a 10
minute presentation. The final two days are spent preparing for the Passing Out
Parade, prior to your entrance into the Fleet.
Professional training
As a Rating you will either serve on board ship, or at a shore base
supporting the sea-going Fleet. There are six major career directions
that can be followed:
1. Warfare
2. Submarines
3. Air
4. Engineering
5. Supply / Services
6. Medical
For each of these you will receive specialist training in shore bases
eg. HMS Collingwood or HMS Sultan with practical training on board
one or more HM ships.
Week Six
Week 6 develops your basic seamanship skills with a wide ranging syllabus
including bends and hitches (knots), berthing a ship, replenishment at sea, an
introduction to sea survival equipment and survival procedures. Following practical
and theory examinations, the weekend is spent overnight onboard one of the Fox
terrier sailing vessels putting into practice your new seamanship skills.
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Royal Navy - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
Long Term Planning - Royal Navy
As part of the criteria you have to produce an action plan for long term career
development. This is from the time you leave HMS Raleigh after Initial Training. You
need to do this in a series of stages.
Stage1:
• You must first examine what is called SWOT - your own Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats. This is best done as an individual profile using the
four headings. An example is outlined below:
Assume that James Bovary is 17
1
/2 and wishes to join the Royal Navy when he is 18.
He wants to reach the rank of Leading Seaman by the time he is 25.
Profile
James Bovary
Date 10 Dec 08
SWOT Analysis for career
Strengths
• Determined to be promoted
• Aim to pass Trade Course
• Have had experience of leadership in Cadets
• Have achieved good communication skills while in Cadets
• Am good with meeting people
• Have learned from my initial training the good and bad points of instruction
Weaknesses
• Am impatient with my superiors
• I think I know everything
• Can be lazy
• Avoid doing activities that I do not like
Opportunities
• Courses at HMS Collingwood and HMS Raleigh
• I am good enough to join a sports team
• Immediate posting to a frigate
• Develop my knowledge by passing trade tests and gaining NVQs
• Learn skills quickly to enhance potential
Threats
• Might upset my seniors with my attitude
• Not taking advantage of sport & educational development
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Stage 2:
You now need to work out an ACTION PLAN based on the following points:
• Do not look too far into the future
• Do not pretend to be able to do things that you cannot
• Be realistic
• Examine your SWOT
• Know the career structure of the Service you wish to join
• Understand the qualities needed for promotion
• Understand how jobs change and develop as you get promoted
• Say how your strengths and weaknesses might affect your career
• Indicate the possible limits to your ability or your ambition
In the case of James, he will chose to do activities that will help him get promoted.
Let’s look at his action plan:
By Age Action/Target Outcome
18 a. Passed initial training Attend Phase 2 courses
b. Attend Phase 2 courses Learn about seamanship
c. Acclimatise on board frigate Spend six months learning
the system
d. Be positive to my seniors Show potential
e. Work well as a member of Get noticed by my superiors
a team in the correct way
19 a. Join sports team Rugby hopefully
b. Get selected for trade course Get selected & pass!
c. Develop leadership & Help me prior to & during course
communication skills
from cadets
d. Maintain fitness Help with job
20 a. Become Warfare Specialist Develop better understanding
of ship life
b. Learn further skills Attend further courses
c. Have a better understanding Look for promotion to
of responsibility Leading Hand
This then helps you to focus on the requirements for the future. It does not always
fulfil the requirements but it will start to help you develop a career.
Remember for Task 4 you need to look at a 5 year period.
Royal Navy - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
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2008 33
You need to understand for your career
plan how to progress beyond the entry
level for commissioned or
non-commissioned service.
You should not plan further than
5 years after Initial Training.
Lastly you need to ensure you know the rank structure of the service that you wish
to join.
These are outlined below:
Note: The tables above give a general idea of timescales for career progression.
These time frames will vary depending on specialisation, prior qualifications
and ability.
Royal Navy - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
Rank Average Time Frame for promotion from
joining
Ordinary Rating
Able Rating
3 years
Leading Rating 7 Years
Petty Officer 12 Years
Rank Average Time Frame for promotion from
joining
Officer Cadet On Joining
Midshipman 1 Year
Sub Lieutenant 3 Years
Lieutenant 6 Years plus
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Royal Marines Commandos
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2008 35
Landing Craft Officer (LCO)
Successful completion of the
Officers Commando Course at
CTCRM Lympstone for 1 year
Drafted to CTCRM as an Instructor
responsible for training a Recruit
Troop for 1 Year
Landing Craft qualifying course (all small
boats). It will include an acquaintance with
Landing Craft Vehicles Personnel (LCVP)
and Landing Craft Utility (LCU)
Drafted to 539 Assault Squadron for
2 years or for service on HMS
Ocean - HMS Albion - HMS Bulwark
Drafted to a operational RM Unit as
a Company Commander or Training
Officer 1 Assault Group or an
Amphibious operations position
Junior Officers Course
at Staff College Shrivenham
Training Sequence
Skills Achieved
Drafted to an operational RM Unit
as a Troop Commander for
1 - 2 years
- Seamanship
- Navigation
- Amphibious operations
- Sea survival
- Boat handling qualifications
- Beach reconnaissance
- Command and Control
Management skills
- Communications
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Marines Comandos
Brief Description
The Landing Craft Officer (LCO) has control and responsibility for a wide range of
different types of vessels from small raiding craft to larger hovercraft. The LCO is
responsible for planning boat operations and advises at all levels of command on
amphibious operations.
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Mountain Leader (ML)
Successful completion of Royal
Marines Commandos Recruit
Training at CTCRM Lympstone
Drafted to an operational RM
Unit for 2 - 3 Years
Junior Command Course (JCC)
(11 wks) - success in this leads to
promotion to Corporal
Senior Command Course (SCC)
(9 weeks) - success leads to
promotion to Sergeant
ML 3 Course
Mountain Leader Acquaintance
based at RM Stonehouse (4 days)
ML 2 Course
Cliff assault rock climbing
Mountaineering techniques
Mountain operations and patrolling
Skiing
Arctic warfare
Snow and ice climbing
Desert Operations
ML 1 Course
Advanced mountain techniques
Planning and organisation
Management skills
Drafted to an operational RM Unit
for 3 - 4 years
Continued service as a Senior NCO
within an operational RM Unit
Training Sequence
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Marines Comandos
Brief Description
This specialisation provides team leaders for the Brigade Reconnaissance Force
which deploys long range reconnaissance patrols.
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Heavy Weapons - Mortarman
Successful completion of Royal
Marines Commandos Recruit
Training at CTCRM Lympstone
Further service within an operational
RM Unit for approximately 2 years.
Time to Junior Command Course
approximately 4 - 5 years
Drafted to an operational RM Unit
for 2 Years
Further service with an operational
RM Unit for 2 - 5 years
Junior Command Course (JCC) (11
weeks) - success leads to promotion to
Corporal
HW 2 Course at Netheravon
Mortars
Fire planning
Ground and Mechanised mortar
roles
Bravo Mortar Fire Controller -
Support
Company Operations
Mortar supervisor
Command Post Operator
Heavy Weapons 3 (HW3) Course at
CTCRM
Use of 81mm mortar
Types of ammunition and their
application
Fire discipline
C & E LGV driving qualifications
HW 1 Course at Netheravon
Management skills
Operational techniques
Alpha Mortar
Bravo Mortar Fire Controller
Sector Commander Mortar
Senior Command Course (SCC)
(9 weeks) - success leads to
promotion to Sergeant
Continued service as a Senior NCO
within an operational RM Unit
Training Sequence
Brief Description
The 81mm Mortar provides the only guaranteed indirect fire available to an
operational RM Unit. Mortars have the ability to engage targets up to 5665 metres.
They use high explosive, smoke and illuminating ammunition. Each operational
RM Unit has its own Mortar Troop.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Marines Comandos
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Driver
Successful completion of Royal
Marines Commandos Recruit Training
at CTCRM Lympstone
Further service within an
operational RM Unit for 2 - 5 years
Drafted to an operational RM Unit
for 2 Years
Further service with an operational
RM Unit for 2 - 5 years
Junior Command Course (JCC)
(11 weeks) - success leads to
promotion to Corporal
Driver 3 Course (D3)
Driver training course at the
Defence School of Transport
Leconfield
HAZMAT and Waterproofing at 11
Amphibious Test and Trials
Squadron - Instow
D2 Course
Intermediate driver training course at
the Defence School of Transport
Leconfield
Maintenance procedures
Documentation
Legislation
Vehicle control and equipment table
Plant equipment
D1 Course
at the Defence School of Transport
Leconfield
Transport management and logistics
Planning strategic vehicle operations
Land / Sea / Air
Waterproofing Supervisors Course at
11 Amphibious Test and Trials
Squadron - Instow
Senior Command Course (SCC)
(9 weeks) - success leads to
promotion to Sergeant
Continued service as a Senior NCO
within an operational RM Unit
Training Sequence
C & E LGV driving qualifications at
the Defence School of Transport
Leconfield
Brief Description
The wide range of Royal Marines Commandos vehicle fleet, some of which are only
used by an operational RM Unit, means that their drivers may be involved in duties
which range from taking charge of a staff car to using a large DROPS Vehicle. Vehicles
are an essential requirement in support of Royal Marines Commandos operations and
drivers need to be skilled in their use in support of land and amphibious operations.
They must also understand and comply with the associated transport legislation.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Marines Comandos
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2008 39
Chef
Successful completion of Royal
Marines Commandos Recruit
Training at CTCRM Lympstone
Further service with an operational
RM Unit for 2 - 5 years
Drafted to an operational RM Unit
for 2 Years
Further service within an
operational RM Unit
Junior Command Course (JCC)
(11 weeks) - success leads to
promotion to Corporal
Catering 3 Course (K3)
at HMS Raleigh for 12 weeks
Basic cooking skills and food hygiene
K2 Course
at HMS Raleigh for 8 weeks
Advanced cooking techniques and
catering
Food hygiene
K1 Course
at HMS Raleigh for 8 weeks
Catering systems and management
Food hygiene
Health and Safety legislation
Senior Command Course (SCC)
(9 weeks) - success leads to
promotion to Sergeant
Continued service as a Senior NCO
within an operational RM Unit
Training Sequence
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Royal Marines Comandos
Brief Description
Good food is vital to the fitness and efficiency of the Royal Marines Comandos.
The role of the Chef is to produce and prepare food for Royal Marines Comandos
serving anywhere in the world, be it in the jungle, the Arctic or in the desert.
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Pay See Pay section overleaf
Pension Non-contributory pension on completion
of service.
Leave 30 days annual paid holiday.
Sport Free sport and gymnasium facilities.
Food & Subsidised food and accommodation.
Accommodation Availability of service married quarters.
Advance of pay for buying a house.
Removals and relocation package.
Hours of Work When not on Operations or during
Training Exercises, most Royal Marines
Commandos personnel work Mondays
to Fridays. If you work shifts you will be
given the equivalent time off.
Medical Free medical and dental care.
Travel Discounted rail and coach travel.
Free rail warrants.
Education Annual education allowance. Boarding
school allowance for children. Civilian
accreditation (NVQs) for specialisations.
Allowances There are allowances available for being
overseas and separation.
Royal Marines Comandos - Conditions of Service
The Royal Marines Commandos
Conditions of Service -
Summary of Benefits
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2008 41
Pay (from 1 April 2008)
Officers
Rank From To
Officer Cadet - Lieutenant £14,352 per year £31,188 per year
Captain £36,160 per year £43,002 per year
Marines
Rank From To
On Entry £13,013 per year
Marine £16,227 per year £27,599 per year
Corporal £26,315 per year £31,645 per year
Sergeant £31,239 per year £35,219 per year
Specialist Pay and Allowances
Certain specialists (e.g. mountain leaders & parachutists) receive additional pay, as
do personnel who have served at sea for more than 18 months.
Personnel who are separated from their partners for long periods due to operational
requirements, are eligible for additional allowances.
Royal Marines Comandos - Conditions of Service
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Officers - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
To apply to the Royal Marines
Commandos as an Officer you must be
no younger than
15 years, 9 months. On entry you must
be no younger than 17. The maximum
age on entry for an Officer is 33. Those
under the age of 18 must have parental
consent.
Gender
With the exception of the RM Band
Service, careers in the Royal Marines
Commandos are only open to male
candidates.
Nationality and Residency
For entry into the Royal Marines
Commandos you must hold a British or
dual British nationality or be a citizen of
the Commonwealth/Irish Republic.
Applicants must have been resident in
the UK for a minimum of 5 years
immediately prior to making an
application. In certain circumstances, in
particular if the candidate is of UK origin,
a shorter period of residency may be
accepted.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
To enter the Royal Marines Commandos
as an Officer you require a minimum of
5 GCSEs at grades A* - C and 180
UCAS points.
Medical Standards
New entrants must be of a robust
constitution and free from disease or
pre-existing injury to meet the challenge
of intensive training which is physically
demanding and mentally taxing. You will
be required to pass a full medical
examination. Your application will be
rejected if you fail to meet the minimum
acceptable medical standard before
entry. Before a Medical Officer examines
you, you are asked to declare certain
information about your medical history to
identify obvious medical conditions for
which rejection is automatic.
The minimum height for service in the
Royal Marines is 151.5cm.
Selection
Applicants must pass the 3 day Potential
Officers Course at the Royal Marines
Commandos Training Centre, Lympstone
and the 2
1
/2 day Admiralty Interview Board
at HMS Sultan.
Royal Marines Comandos - Entry Requirements
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Marines - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
To apply to the Royal Marines
Commandos you must be no younger
than 15 years, 9 months.
On entry you must be no younger than
16. The maximum age on entry for an
Officer is 33. Those under the age of 18
must have parental consent.
Gender
With the exception of the RM Band
Service, careers in the Royal Marines
Commandos are only open to male
candidates.
Nationality and Residency
Applicants must at all times, since birth,
have been a citizen of Great Britain,
Ireland or a Commonwealth country.
Applicants must have been resident in
the UK for a minimum of 5 years
immediately prior to making an
application. In certain circumstances, in
particular if the candidate is of UK origin,
a shorter period of residency may be
accepted.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
There are no formal qualifications, but
you must sit and pass an entry test.
Medical Standards
New entrants must be of a robust
constitution and free from disease or
pre-existing injury to meet the challenge
of intensive training which is physically
demanding and mentally taxing. You will
be required to pass a full medical
examination. Your application will be
rejected if you fail to meet the minimum
acceptable medical standard before
entry. Before a Medical Officer examines
you, you are asked to declare certain
information about your medical history to
identify obvious medical conditions for
which rejection is automatic.
The minimum height for service in the
Royal Marines Commandos is 151.5cm.
Potential Royal Marines Commandos
Course (PRMC)
Applicants must pass the 3 day Potential
Royal Marines Commandos Course at
the Royal Marines Commandos Training
Centre, Lympstone.
Royal Marines Comandos - Entry Requirements
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There are 5 stages to the selection process:
Stage 1
Attend for interview at an Armed Forces Careers Office or with a RN/RM Careers
Officer in school.
Stage 2
Pass the Royal Marines Commandos Potential Officers Course (POC) at
CTCRM - 3 days
Day 2
Assault Course
Lecturettes
Endurance course - 6 miles
Discussion group
Day 3
Battle Swimming Test
Presentation on RM training scheme
Final interview with your POC result
Officers - Selection Process
Royal Marines Comandos - Selection Process
Details of the POC
Day 1
Meet Course Officer and Senior NCO
Presentation about the RM
Fitness test - You must pass it to continue
1. Sit ups Max. score for 80 sit ups = 100 pts
2. Press ups Max. score for 60 press ups = 100 pts
3. Pull ups Max. score for 16 pull ups = 100 pts
4. Shuttle runs Max. score for level 15.5 shuttle 5 = 100 pts
Pass mark = 160 pts
Essay and Interview
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Stage 3
• Pass the Medical Examination
Stage 4
• Pass the Admiralty Interview Board (AIB) held at HMS Sultan - 2
1
/2 days
Details of the Admiralty Interview Board
Day 1: Arrival (pm)
Administration
Complete questionnaire
Day 2: Written tests on: Verbal and non-verbal reasoning skills
Further tests on: Mental agility
Numerical fluency
Spatial orientation
Communication skills
Day 3: Practical leadership tasks
Discussion exercise
Formal Interview
Medical (if successful up to this point)
Stage 5:
• MOD Final Selection Board
Decision based on your performance in the above stages
Royal Marines Comandos - Selection Process
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Marines - Selection Process
4 stages
1. Attend an interview at an Armed Forces Careers Office.
2. Pass a medical examination.
3. Pass Literacy and Numeracy tests.
4. Pass the Potential Royal Marines Commandos Course held at The Royal Marines
Commandos Training Centre, Lympstone (RMCTC) - 3 days.
Details of Potential Royal Marines Commandos Course
Day 1
• Introductory address by the Course Officer
• Swimming ability assessment
• Gym test 1
• Parade drill
• Weapons acquaint
Day 2
• Pay and Conditions lecture
• High Obstacle Course
• Assault Course
• Interview with Section Commander
(Corporal level)
• Basic Fitness Test (12.5 minutes out
- 10.5 minutes in)
• Outline of the 32 week Royal Marines
Commandos Training Scheme
Day 3
• Fitness brief
• Publication of course results
Royal Marines Comandos - Selection Process
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Officers - Initial Training
Phase One - At The Royal Marines Commandos Training Centre - 15.5 Months
Royal Marines Comandos - Short Term Planning/Initial training
Phase Two - Drafted to First Troop Command
Introduction
to the
Royal Marines
Commandos
Month
1
Issuing, care & use of all kit and equipment
Briefings on Young Officers Course and general etiquette
Introduction to the gym, physical training, drill, SA80 A2 Rifle
& Map Reading
Overview of the Royal Marines Commandos
Basic Training
Months
2 - 5
Basic fieldcraft & section attacks
Navigation & moving at night
Signals training
Camouflage & concealment skills
Introduction to weapons & live firing on the ranges
First Aid training
Chemical, Biological, Radioactive and Nuclear training
Military studies
Leadership lessons
Offensive /
Defensive
Operations
Months
6 - 10
Introduction to Basic Tactics package - observation posts,
patrolling, battle drills
troop attacks and vehicle anti-ambush drills
Underwater and Helicopter escape drills
Introduction to mines and munitions
Fighting in Built Up Areas & Exercise; Artillery and mortar
live firing
Introduction to the endurance course and Tarzan assault
course
Lessons in Battlefield technologies
Three week exercise involving the use of amphibious assets,
helicopters & simulated attacks on Dartmoor & in Wales
Commando
Course
Month
11
Four Commando tests to be completed in consecutive order;
endurance course, nine mile speed march, Tarzan assault
course and the thirty mile run
Continuation of tactics and doctrine training; Anti-armour
training; Urban and rural patrolling
Advanced
Specialisation
Training
Months
12 - 15
Fighting in Built Up Areas exercise
Deployment for three weeks to the USA on exercise
Operational RM Unit - Introduction to life; lessons on
organisation & roles
Adventurous training
Further Military Studies & Battlefield Tour
Introduction to Military Staff Work
Final Exercise
Pass Out Month 15.5 Take part in the King’s Squad Pass Out Parade
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Marines - Initial Training
Phase One - At The Royal Marines Commandos Training Centre - 32 Weeks
Foundation
WEEKS
1 - 3
Joining routine
Assessments
Maths & English tests
Physical training
Drill
Weapons Training
Issuing, care & use of all kit and equipment
Individual
skills
WEEKS
4 - 10
Weapons training
Physical training
Drill
Map Reading / Navigation
Fieldcraft
First Aid
Survival
Corps History
NVQs & Key Skills
Advanced
Skills
WEEKS
11 - 15
Advanced training of Individual Skills
Live firing
Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) training
Physical training
Communication training
Radio training
Helicopter & underwater escape drills
Operations of
War
WEEKS
16 - 25
Studying all aspects of modern warfare
Battle physical training Pass Out
Adventure Training
VHF radio procedures
Fighting in Built Up Areas exercise
Amphibious training
A visit to the Royal Marines Commandos Museum
Commando
Course
WEEKS
26 – 31
Field Firing Exercises
Cliff assault and rope techniques
Water obstacle crossing
Commando Tests:
• Endurance course
• Nine mile speed march
• Tarzan assault course
• Thirty mile run
European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) training & test
Drill
King’s Squad
Pass Out
Week
WEEK
32
King’s Squad Pass Out Parade
Royal Marines Comandos - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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As part of the criteria you have to produce an action plan for long term career
development. You need to do this in a series of stages.
Stage1
• You must first examine what is called SWOT - your own Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats. This is best done as an individual profile using the
four headings. An example is outlined below:
Assume that Dan Foster is 17
1
/2 and wishes to join the Royal Marines Commandos
when he is 18. He wants to reach the rank of Sergeant by the time he is 25.
Profile
Dan Foster
Date 10 Dec 08
SWOT Analysis for career
Strengths
• Determined to be promoted
• Aim to pass Trade Course
• Have had experience of leadership in Cadets
• Have achieved good communication skills while in Cadets
• Am good with meeting people
• Have learned from my initial training the good and bad points of instruction
Weaknesses
• Am impatient with my superiors
• I think I know everything
• Can be lazy
• Avoid doing activities that I do not like
Opportunities
• Operational tour in 4 months time - must gain confidence of my superiors
• I am good enough to join RM Unit sports team
• Develop my skills by attending courses to enhance promotion prospects
Threats
• Might upset my seniors with my attitude
• Not taking advantage of sport and educational development
Royal Marines Comandos - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
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Stage 2:
• You now need to work out an ACTION PLAN based on the following points:
- Do not look too far into the future
- Do not pretend to be able to do things that you cannot
- Be realistic
- Examine your SWOT
- Know the career structure of the Service you wish to join
- Understand the qualities needed for promotion
- Understand how jobs differ the more senior one becomes
- Say how your strengths and weaknesses might affect your career
- Indicate the possible limits to your ability or your ambition
In the case of Dan, he will chose to do activities that will help him get promoted.
Let’s look at his action plan:
By Age Action/Target Outcome
18 a. Passed initial training Drafted to my RM Unit
b. Acclimatise in RM Unit Spend six months learning
the system
c. Be positive to my seniors Show potential
d. Do well on operational tour Get noticed by my superiors
in the correct way
19 a. Join sports team Rugby hopefully
b. Develop leadership & Help me prior to & during course
communication skills
from cadets
c. Maintain fitness Help with promotion course
d. Get selected for L/Cpl course Get selected & pass!
20 a. Be in charge of half a section Learn how to deal with their
individual concerns
b. Attend courses Learn new skills
c. Learn new skills Attend courses
d. Have a better understanding Look for promotion to Cpl
of responsibility
This then helps you to focus on the requirements for the future. It does not always
fulfil the requirements but it will start to help you develop a career.
Remember for Task 4 you need to look at a 5 years period.
Royal Marines Comandos - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
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Rank Expected Time
Frame for
promotion from
joining
Marine
Lance Corporal
1 - 3 years
Corporal 3 - 9 years
Sergeant 9 years +
Rank Expected Time
Frame for
promotion from
joining
2nd Lieutenant On Commissioning
Lieutenant 1 - 3 years
Captain 3 - 6 years
Further Professional Development
Marines
On completion of Royal Marines
Commandos Recruit training there
are 25 specialisations to choose from
but currently there are 5 that are
being actively recruited:
1. Combat Driver
2. Combat Signaller
3. Heavy Weapons Anti Tank
4. Heavy Weapons Mortar
5. Vehicle Mechanic
Officers
There are five specialisations:
1. Landing Craft Officer
2. Regimental Signals Officer
3. Special Boat Service Officer
4. Mountain Leader
5. Pilot (Fighter Aircraft or Helicopter)
Other employment areas:
1. Heavy Weapons Officer
2. Intelligence Officer
3. PT and Sports Officer
4. Weapon Training Officer
Royal Marines Comandos - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
Lastly you need to ensure you know the rank structure of the service that you wish
to join. These are outlined below:
Note: The tables above give a general idea of timescales for career progression.
These time frames will vary depending on specialisation, prior qualifications and ability
You need to understand for your career
plan how to progress beyond the entry
level for commissioned or
non-commissioned service.
You should not plan further than
5 years after Initial Training.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Infantry Platoon Commander
Arm/Corps: Combat Arms - The Infantry
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17 years 9 months
Gender: Male Minimum Service: 4 Years (including 1 year training)
Brief Description:
An Infantry Platoon Commander is responsible for the training, fitness,
operational effectiveness and welfare of a platoon of thirty men.
Job Description
You will be responsible for the training,
fitness, operational effectiveness and
welfare of a platoon of 30 men, ensuring
that they are fully prepared for
operations.
You will also be responsible for the
servicing and maintenance of your
platoon weapons, vehicles and
equipment.
On operations and exercises your
primary responsibility will be the
command and leadership of your
platoon, often in potentially dangerous,
fast-moving and confused situations.
Personal Qualities
Infantry officers must be intelligent, fit,
robust and responsible.
You must be able to get on with people
from all walks of life and possess the
ability to remain calm, confident and
clear-headed under pressure.
Determination, a sense of urgency and a
cheerful aspect are important qualities
that will greatly assist your ability to
command effectively.
You will be expected to maintain an
awareness of world affairs and an
interest in the professional development
of both your soldiers and yourself.
Training
You will undertake one year of initial
training at Sandhurst in leadership, Army
organisation and the skills required by all
officers.
Following Sandhurst you will attend
specialised Infantry training on the
Platoon Commanders Battle Course and,
if required, parachute training to equip
you to join your battalion. Further training
occurs throughout your career in order to
qualify and prepare you for your new
levels of command and responsibility.
Career Structure
Your initial appointment will be as a
Platoon Commander. Subsequent posts
may include: Training recruits,
commanding a specialist platoon,
preparing soldiers for their own
promotion, training Officer Cadets at
Sandhurst or working in a headquarters
as a staff officer.
Your qualifications and performance
should allow you to rise through the rank
of Lieutenant to Captain within
2 to 5 years.
Follow on Trades
Your qualifications and service may
ensure you are selected for full staff
training, a postgraduate degree or other
professional qualifications recognised by
a variety of civilian institutes.
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Job Description
The Royal Electrical and Mechanical
Engineers (REME) is the only all-professional
engineering corps in the Army.
Its role is to recover, repair and maintain
Army equipment including helicopters, tanks,
road vehicles and weapon systems.
REME officers command soldiers that are
highly qualified tradesmen and technicians
with specialist electronic, mechanical and
automotive skills.
The officers manage production, set
priorities and solve technical problems, both
in barracks and on operations. In addition
they are responsible for providing military
and adventurous training, career
management advice and welfare support for
their soldiers.
Above all they are leaders.
Personal Qualities
Strong management and leadership skills
are required in order to inspire our highly
qualified REME tradesmen.
You must also have a keen interest in a broad
spectrum of engineering disciplines.
An ability to remain cool and confident is
essential and an interest in outdoor pursuits
and sports is desirable.
Training
One year of military and leadership training
at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst,
followed by an eight week REME Platoon
Commanders' course, during which you will
learn the skills needed in your first posting.
Further courses follow to prepare you for each
appointment you undertake, including three
months working in civilian industry to broaden
your engineering experience.
Further courses follow to prepare you for
each appointment you undertake.
A six-month course is available to qualify
you as a military aircraft engineer, allowing
you to work with the Army's expanding
helicopter fleet.
Career Structure
Your initial postings are designed to broaden
your engineering and military experience.
Typically you will command 30 - 35 soldiers,
and will be employed as a Platoon
Commander in a workshop.
Depending on background, you can expect
to become a Captain within 2
1
/2 years of
leaving Sandhurst.
You will then have your first independent
command, responsible for up to 100 soldiers
and many million pounds worth of equipment.
Follow on Trades
The training you receive and the experience
you gain are accredited with the Engineering
Council.
REME officers are expected to become
chartered engineers as part of their normal
career path.
You will usually be selected for further
degree training to improve your technical
and managerial skills.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Platoon Commander - REME
Arm/Corps: REME
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17 years 9 months
Gender: Male/Female Minimum Service: 4 Years (including 1 year training)
Brief Description:
Commands soldiers who are qualified tradesmen and technicians and
ensures the management of production and prioritises work and solves
technical problems.
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2008 55
Job Description
As a typical first tour Troop Commander
you can expect to have 30-35 men under
your command who are all soldiers,
artisan tradesmen and combat engineers.
On the battlefield you work
independently, moving ahead of your
troop reconnoitring tasks to ensure that
the correct equipment, manpower and
resources are allocated.
On a construction site you assume the role
of project manager and are responsible for
the overall running of the site.
In barracks you are responsible for the
career management, administration,
welfare and training of your troop as well
as ensuring your equipment and vehicles
are regularly inspected and well
maintained.
The appointment is extremely busy, both
in barracks and on operations.
Personal Qualities
An ability to remain cool, confident and
clear headed under stress is required,
together with intelligence, determination,
responsibility and a sense of urgency.
An interest in and an ability to get on with
people, an awareness of the world around,
and cheerfulness, are also needed.
Training
You will undertake one year of initial
training at Sandhurst in leadership, Army
organisation and the skills required by
all officers.
Following Sandhurst there will be a
period of further special to Arm and
technical training to equip you with the
breadth of knowledge needed to become
an effective first tour engineer troop
commander.
On promotion you will be required to
attend various management and tactics
courses to qualify you for the new levels
of command.
At no stage will you be required to carry out
any task without the appropriate training.
Career Structure
Depending on qualifications, you can
expect to rise through the rank of
Lieutenant and Captain within 2 to 5 years.
Follow on Trades
Dependent on qualifications and service,
you can be selected for in-service degrees
in technical and managerial disciplines.
There are also opportunities to become
professionally qualified through the
institutions of Civil, Electrical and
Mechanical Engineers, the role of
which is hugely rewarding and
intellectually stimulating.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Troop Commander
Arm/Corps: Combat Support Arms - Royal Engineers
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17 years 9 months
Gender: Male/Female Minimum Service: 4 Years (including 1 year training)
Brief Description:
Commands thirty to thirty five soldiers who will be a mixture of tradesmen
and combat engineers and will be responsible for battlefield engineering
tasks or construction tasks.
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Job Description
After completing your training, you will
become an Infantryman in your
battalion.You will be in a team with seven
others, as part of a larger team of 28.
Your time will be divided between
operations, perfecting your military
skills, and improving your fitness
and confidence through sport and
adventurous training.
These activities take place in the UK
and abroad.
Your main job during wartime will be to
close with and defeat the enemy - you
will be in the thick of the action.
Personal Qualities
As an infantryman you need to be tough,
fit, reliable, adaptable and determined.
You must be able to fit into a team and
want to work for a common goal. Loyalty
and a sense of humour are valuable
assets, along with flexibility of mind to
cope with the many challenges.
Training
You will receive your basic military
training at an Army Training Regiment,
where you will learn how to operate
weapon systems, sustain yourself out of
doors, and become really fit.
You will do map reading, first aid,
marching and sport.
Specialist Infantry training follows at
Catterick, where you will be taught the
additional skills needed and develop
your fitness even further.
By the end of the course you will have
the self-confidence and knowledge to
take your place in your battalion on
operations.
Career Structure
A Private, if showing leadership potential
will attend a Lance Corporals’ cadre.
This can take place between 6 months
and 3 years.
Trades
There are a wide variety of trades that
an Infantryman can specialise: Driving,
Signallers, Heavy Weapons.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Infantry Soldier
Arm/Corps: Combat Arms - The Infantry
Status: Soldier Minimum Age: 16 years
Gender: Male Maximum Age: 32 years 11 Months
Minimum Service: 4 years
Brief Description:
On completion of training an Infanteer will be in a team with seven others
whose responsibility is to close with and defeat the enemy.
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2008 57
Job Description
The Gunner (Multiple Launch Rocket
System) works in a three strong
detachment: commander, driver and
operator, with interchangeable duties.
Their responsibilities include calibrating
and testing electronic equipment,
operating menu driven computers,
programming digital data devices,
preparing and handling high explosive
rocket pods and installing/operating
radios.
Personal Qualities
Applicants must be reliable, of good
character and stable personality, and be
able to work in small groups and in a
close confined environment.
They should be alert, versatile, self-
reliant, and prepared to accept
responsibility in any situation.
Training
You will receive basic military training at
the Army Training Regiment at Pirbright
in Surrey which will include drill, how to
handle and fire a weapon, field craft,
map reading, first aid and physical
fitness and stamina training.
This is followed by eight weeks training
at 14 Regiment RA, the Royal School of
Artillery, Larkhill, Wiltshire.
Initial training will include operating
radios and driving.
Some recruits will be trained to drive
trucks, with others being trained as Land
Rover drivers and signallers.
Career Structure
Service in Germany/UK and overseas.
There are opportunities to serve with
Special Forces 4/73 Special Observation
Post Battery, 7 Parachute Regiment
Royal Horse Artillery, 29 Commando
Regiment RA.
RA career structure allows for a change
of employment, making the best use of
your potential and qualifications.
Follow on Trades
All Royal Artillery trades are aligned
to NVQs.
Most are eligible for a NVQ Level 1
on completion of recruit training, with
higher levels obtained through
promotion, experience and satisfying
the requirements.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Gunner (Multiple Launch Rocket System)
Arm/Corps: Combat Support Arms - Royal Regiment of Artillery
Status: Soldier Minimum Age: 16 years
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 32 Years 11 Months
Minimum Service: 4 years
Brief Description:
The Gunner (Multiple Launch Rocket System) could be either a driver or
operator responsible for calibrating and testing electronic equipment and
preparation of high explosive rockets.
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Job Description
The Ammunition Technician carries out
the inspection, repair, proof testing
modification and disposal of all
ammunition, including Guided Missiles,
and may be employed on Explosive
Ordnance Disposal tasks for both military
and police authorities.
You’ll also investigate accidents, defects
and performance failures involving
ammunition and are the acknowledged
technical expert on all ammunition and
explosive matters.
Personal Qualities
You’ll need to display obvious potential
for promotion, with the stable qualities
necessary to fill a position of great trust
and responsibility.
You will also need to display good
manual dexterity and have a genuine
interest in weapons, ammunition and
explosives.
Training
Every RLC Soldier is first and foremost a
fighting soldier. You will be taught foot
drill, how to handle and fire weapon,
how to live and work in the open,
stamina and fitness and how to tackle
an assault course.
After basic training, Ammunition
Technicians are required to attend a
three-week Supply Specialist course.
Training in Large Goods Vehicle driving
is also required at this stage and you will
attend an eight to ten week course at the
Defence School of Transport.
Formal trade training consists of five
weeks at the Royal Military College of
Science where you’ll study basic
ballistics, electronics and the chemistry
of explosives.
This is followed by 20 weeks at the Army
School of Ammunition, to study the
technical subjects of your trade.
Career Structure
Minimum rank for Ammunition Technician
is Lance Corporal and promotion
thereafter is by merit, qualification and
recommendation.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Ammunition Technician
Arm/Corps: Royal Logistic Corps
Status: Soldier Minimum Age: 16 years 3 Months
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 32 Years 11 Months
Minimum Service: 4 Years
Brief Description:
The Ammunition Technician is responsible for the inspection, repair, proof
testing, modification and disposal of all ammunition.
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2008 59
Job Description
A Military Engineer (Draughtsman
Electrical and Mechanical) is also a
Military Engineer (Combat) employed on
a wide variety of engineering tasks in
support of the Army in peace and war.
These include: laying and clearing
mines, placing demolitions, constructing
bridges, crossing water obstacles, road
and airfield construction, temporary and
permanent camp construction.
Personal Qualities
With above average intelligence, you
should be alert, conscientious, studious,
methodical, inquisitive and dependable.
You will need a keen eye for detail
and should be able to work without
supervision.
Training
Starting at an Army Training Regiment,
you will be taught basic military skills.
Later, at the Royal School of Military
Engineering (RSME), you will complete
initial Combat and Draughtsman
Electrical and Mechanical training.
Combat skills include: mine laying and
mine clearance, demolitions, bridging
and use of hand and power tools.
Draughtsman training covers: preparing
and maintaining production drawings
from information supplied by an
engineer, basic design and drawing of
electrical circuits, water supply,
petroleum, heating, ventilation and air
conditioning in accordance with
regulations and codes of practice.
Career Structure
Soldiers who are competent tradesmen
and combat engineers and display good
leadership qualities will gain promotion
more quickly.
Opportunities also exist for attachments
to the SAS, Commandos, Parachute
Regiment and to foreign armies.
Other Royal Engineer trades are
also available.
Follow On Trades
Military Engineer (Draughtsman
Electrical and Mechanical) has been
matched where possible to its civilian
counterparts and aligned to NVQs.
A NVQ Level 2 is available for basic
trade training and Level 3 for higher
training, with Modern Apprenticeships
available for the most able.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Military Engineer (Draughtsman Electrical & Mechanical)
Arm/Corps: Combat Support Arms Royal Engineers
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17 Years
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 32 Years 11 Months
Minimum Service: 4 Years
Brief Description:
Produces detailed drawings for a variety of tasks including electrical and
mechanical components, assemblies for repair or manufacture, electrical
installations for new buildings, and restoration of essential services facilities.
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Job Description
As a Supply Controller you could be
employed in RLC Stores, Vehicle,
Ammunition, Food or Petroleum
Organisations and Units worldwide, in a
technical appointment within a branch of
the Ministry of Defence, or in a Command
or Formation Headquarters.
You will learn the technical clerical aspects
of obtaining, controlling and issuing the
vast range of items and commodities.
You'll also be taught to ensure that
whatever you are dealing with, it is in the
right place, in the right quantity, at the right
time.
You will learn how to forecast usage and
predict demand, using the advanced
computer systems which operate from
base to battlefield in various parts of the
world.
Personal Qualities
To become a Supply Controller in the RLC
you will need a quick and orderly mind
with a well-developed sense of
responsibility and trustworthiness.
You will also require a genuine interest
in clerical work and administration,
with qualities of initiative and attention
to detail.
Training
Every RLC Soldier is first and foremost a
fighting soldier.
You will be taught foot drill, how to handle
and fire weapon, how to live and work in
the open, stamina and fitness and how to
tackle an assault course.
Your Supply Controller training lasts five
weeks and takes place at the Logistic
Support Training Wing at Deepcut.
Successful completion of the course
qualifies you as a Supply Controller Class 3.
You will also be trained as a LGV driver at
the Defence School of Transport.
All Supply Controllers are encouraged to
reach the highest level of skill of which
they are capable.
Career Structure
Promotion prospects for Supply
Controllers are determined by merit,
recommendation and selection.
Follow On Trades
Lance Corporals and above can
qualify to be a computer operator.
There is always a need for physically
and medically fit Supply Controllers to
volunteer for both parachute and
commando training for service in RLC
specialist units.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the Army
Job: Supply Controller
Arm/Corps: The Royal Logistic Corps
Status: Soldier Minimum Age: 16 Years 6 Months
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 32 Years 11 Months
Minimum Service: 4 Years
Brief Description:
The Supply Controller would be employed in a variety of Royal Logistic Corps
vehicle, ammunition, food or petroleum stores.
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Army - Conditions of Service
The Army
Conditions of Service -
Summary of Benefits
Pay See Pay section overleaf
Pension Non-contributory pension on completion
of service.
Leave 30 days annual paid holiday.
Sport Free sport and gymnasium facilities.
Food & Subsidised food and accommodation
Accommodation whilst in barracks. Availability of service
married quarters. Advance of pay for
buying a house. Removals and
relocation package.
Hours of Work When not on Operations or during
Training Exercises, most Army
personnel work Mondays to Fridays. If
you work shifts you will be given the
equivalent time off.
Medical Free medical and dental care.
Travel Discounted rail and coach travel.
Free rail warrants.
Education Annual education allowance. Boarding
school allowance for children. Civilian
accreditation (NVQs) for
specialisations.
Allowances There are allowances available for
being overseas and separation.
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Pay (from 1 April 2008)
Officers
Rank From To
Officer Cadet - Lieutenant £14,852 per year £31,188 per year
Captain £36,160 per year £43,002 per year
* There is an annual incremental progression within each rank from Lieutenant to
Colonel.
Soldiers
Rank From To
On Entry £13,013 per year
Private £16,227 per year £21,323 per year
Lance Corporal £19,628 per year £27,599 per year
Corporal £25,182 per year £31,645 per year
Sergeant £28,623 per year £35,219 per year
Specialist Pay and Allowances
Certain specialists e.g. pilots, parachutists, divers and special forces receive
additional pay.
Personnel who are separated from their partners for long periods due to operational
requirements are eligible for additional allowances.
Army - Conditions of Service
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Officer - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
As a general rule, all civilian candidates
should be over 17 years 9 months and
under the age of 29 on entry to Sandhurst.
Nationality and Residency
All applicants joining the British Army
should hold UK, Commonwealth or Irish
citizenship. Candidates should have a
passport permitting them rights of
residence within the UK until the start of
the Commissioning Course.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
All candidates are required to hold a
minimum of 35 ALIS (Advanced Level
Information System) points for their best
7 subjects at GCSE, including grades A
– C in English and Maths and a science
subject or foreign language. In addition
they require 180 UCAS Tariff points
gained at AS and A level, which must
include at least 2 A Levels (grades A -
E).
The holding of a degree may negate the
requirement for UCAS Tariff points.
Some Corps require additional technical
and professional qualifications for
potential candidates.
Medical Standards
All candidates are required to complete a
health questionnaire for review by a
medical officer during the selection
process. The purpose of this is to screen
for a number of conditions which may
preclude entry into the Army. After being
cleared by the initial medical screen, all
candidates are required to pass a
military medical examination when
attending the Army Officer Selection
Board (AOSB) or Scholarship/Welbeck
selection boards.
Selection
Applicants must pass the 3
1
/
2 day
Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB)
or the 24 hr Scholarship or Welbeck
Selection Board (also at AOSB).
Army - Entry Requirements
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Soldier - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
Generally, to qualify for a full 22-year
career an applicant must be between 16
and 33 years on the day of enlistment.
Older applicants over the age of 33 may
be acceptable, but normally they will only
be offered shorter engagements. Those
under 18 must have parental consent.
Nationality and Residency
Applicants will be eligible if they are a
bona fide Citizen of the UK or Republic
of Ireland or one of the following:
• A Commonwealth Citizen. This
term includes a citizen of the British
Dependent Territories; a British
Overseas Citizen; a British Subject
under the British Nationality Act 1981;
a citizen of an independent
Commonwealth country
• A British Protected Person
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a Basic Security
check during your application process
and you may also be subject to a
detailed security clearance procedure
prior to joining. It will depend on your
choice of employment.
Educational Standards
Except those who wish to train in certain
technical employments, an applicant’s
eligibility for service and/or to qualify for
a particular form of training will be
determined by the results achieved on
the Army Entrance Test (known as
BARB). The test assesses an applicant’s
ability for training by using computer
touch screen question and answer
techniques.
Medical Standards
Applicants have to pass a medical
examination conducted at the Army
Development and Selection Centre and
a further medical examination at the
Army Training Regiment prior to final
acceptance for training.
Selection
Applicants must pass selection at an
Army Development and Selection
Centre.
Army - Entry Requirements
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Officers - Selection Process
There’s no such thing as a typical Officer - but one thing Officers do have in
common is an appetite for responsibility and ability to lead and motivate others.
With this in mind, the Army looks for leadership skills, confidence, maturity and
intellectual stamina in potential officers. Candidates will need to be healthy, robust
and physically fit enough to pass selection - though fitness levels will also increase
greatly during Officer training!
Stage 1 - Initial Advice
Candidates need to seek advice from an Army Careers Adviser.
They are able to arrange visits to Regiments or Corps for familiarisation trips and
initial interviews.
Stage 2 - Regiment or Corps Sponsorship
Potential Officer candidates normally need to be sponsored by a Regiment or
Corps.
Their choice is not critical at this stage and the Army Careers Adviser will help them.
They will not have to make a final decision about their Regiment or Corps until half
way through training at Sandhurst.
Similarly the Regiment or Corps will not necessarily offer a vacancy.
Any offer is subject to passing the Army Officer Selection Board and subsequent
acceptance at a special interview with the Regiment or Corps.
Stage 3 - Army Officer Selection Board Briefing
All applicants, including those who are professionally qualified (doctors,
physiotherapists, pharmacists, chaplains, vets, dentists, lawyers and nurses), have
to attend an AOSB.
Before attending the Board there is a briefing to familiarise them with the testing
procedures carried out during the actual board. This lasts one and a half days.
At the end of the briefing, applicants are advised whether they can go straight to
AOSB or need further preparation.
Stage 4 - Formal Application for a Commission
Once an applicant has a sponsor they will receive an application for a commission.
Two referees will be required.
Once the Army have received the application arrangements will be made for
attendance at the AOSB.
Army - Selection Process
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Army - Selection Process
Stage 5 - Medical Board
Whilst at AOSB all candidates have to pass a full military medical board.
Applicants have to demonstrate they have the potential to meet the demands of
the Army as an Officer.
Stage 6 - Army Officer Selection Board (AOSB)
The AOSB lasts three and a half days during which candidates will undergo a
series of tests which will asses intelligence, practical and leadership potential.
Your fitness will be tested and you should aim to achieve:
Males Females
Press Ups 44 in 2 minutes 21 in 2 minutes
Sit Ups 50 in 2 minutes 50 in 2 minutes
2.4 km run 10 min 30 secs 13 minutes
Results are posted to the applicant the day after completion of AOSB.
Stage 7 - Entry to Royal Military Academy Sandhurst (RMAS)
Once an applicant has passed AOSB the date for joining the Commissioning Course
at RMAS will be agreed.
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Army - Selection Process
Soldiers - Selection Process
Stage 1 - Initial Advice
There are a variety of places a potential applicant can receive advice about the
Army. This includes on-line at www.armyjobs.co.uk or visit an Armed Forces or
Army Careers Office.
They can attend an ‘Insight’ course, visit a Regiment or just talk to the recruiting
office.
Stage 2 - Application
Once an applicant has decided they wish to join they have to go to a recruiting office.
They will have an initial interview with a recruiting sergeant, which will include
filling in forms and discussions on job possibilities.
They will then have to complete the BARB test. This looks at an applicant in a
variety of ways. The results of the BARB test will decide the type of job an
applicant can apply for.
Stage 3 - Army Development and Selection Centre
An applicant, once they have been assessed at the recruiting office will be asked
to attend an Army Development and Selection Centre for 36 hours.
During this time they will receive a medical, talk to recruits, be tested on their
physical ability, have an in depth interview with an officer and be given a military
lesson.
The physical tests require applicants to do a 2.4 km run in a time which is set
dependent on the job they are going to do.
Males Females
Press Ups 50 in 2 minutes 22 in 2 minutes
Sit Ups 60 in 2 minutes 60 in 2 minutes
2.4 km run 12 minutes 12 minutes 45 seconds
They will also undergo some scientifically based tests of fitness which are looking
at overall body strength.
Stage 4 - Enlistment
Once the Army Development and Selection Centre has agreed to accept an
applicant then the recruiting office will call the applicant in for final paper work and
arrange the course dates and give them the joining instructions for attendance at
one of the Army Training Regiments or the Infantry Training Centre.
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Sandhurst - Training the officers of
the future
Training and career development will
take place at all stages of an officer's
career. It starts, however, at the Royal
Military Academy Sandhurst.
The goal
Sandhurst’s aim is to train the leaders of
the future. Most officers attend the
44-week Commissioning Course, which
provides a foundation of military
knowledge and skills with the emphasis
on leadership development.
Professionally qualified officers such as
doctors, physiotherapists, pharmacists,
dentists, nurses, vets, lawyers and
chaplains attend a 4-week induction
course.
The Commissioning Course
The Sandhurst course is physically and
mentally demanding, fast moving, varied
and offers a variety of real challenges.
It provides essential instruction in
leadership, tactics, map reading, skill at
arms, drill, communication skills,
administration, organisation and
academic professional studies.
There are three 14-week terms with
periods of 3 or 4 weeks leave between
each. During the first recess, cadets
attend adventurous training courses to
gain qualifications so that in their second
recess they can undertake a seven day
adventurous training expedition planned
and organised by themselves.
Military training
Every officer, of whatever Regiment or
Corps, is first and foremost a soldier, who
must be prepared to lead others in battle -
even though they may eventually be
employed on other tasks in support of the
fighting troops. The Infantry Platoon is
used as the model for all leadership
training, and exercises in the field,
including the use of infantry weapons,
form a substantial part of the programme.
The cadet also learns how the Army is
organised and administered. The
functions of the various parts of the Army
are explained, and this helps him or her
to decide into which of them he/she
wishes to be commissioned.
Instruction in administration emphasises
an officer's responsibilities towards the
men and women they will command, and
towards the equipment and public funds
with which they will be entrusted. The
basic principles of military law are
also taught so that the young officer will
understand the system of discipline
within the Army, and be able to apply
it impartially.
Leadership
Above all else, Sandhurst aims to
develop leadership qualities for each
individual. Cadets study leadership
theory and practise its application on
tactical exercises in the UK and
overseas - and during adventurous
training, games and other recreational
activities.
Officers - Commissioning Course
Army - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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Physical fitness
Aside from achieving a high standard of
personal physical fitness, the cadet also
learns how to organise and conduct
physical and recreational training. On the
obstacle course, a cadet acquires
confidence and self-reliance, while in the
swimming pool, life-saving and
swimming in combat clothing are taught.
In the gymnasium strength and agility
are developed, and endurance marches
increase the ability to resist fatigue. The
whole syllabus ensures that every cadet
leaves Sandhurst in top physical
condition and will be able to supervise
the fitness training of the soldiers placed
under their command.
Adventurous training
Adventurous training expeditions,
including: Climbing, sailing, caving,
kayaking, diving, trekking and many
other activities, are among the most
stimulating and popular activities at
Sandhurst. Advice is given during the
planning stages, but the success or
failure of each expedition depends
entirely upon the initiative,
resourcefulness and courage of
the Officer Cadets themselves.
Games, sport and recreational
activities
There is a vast range of activities that
can be done during both curricular and
extra-curricular time.
Academic instruction
Professional academic studies are
an indispensable part of the
Commissioning Course. They provide
the foundation for the study of the
profession of arms which continues
throughout an officer's career.
At Sandhurst, all academic work is
carried out in small groups and the
emphasis is on cadet participation and
debate. During the academic course,
cadets gain a thorough understanding of
the important issues relating to defence,
security and international relations. In
Defence and International Affairs, they
look at the political and strategic context
in which defence and security policy is
made. The focus here is on international
relations, the origins and nature of British
defence policy and the constitutional and
social dimensions of civil military
relations.
The Department of War Studies looks
at theories of war and analyses different
types of war through the study of modern
campaigns. Particular emphasis is given
to total and limited war, manoeuvre
warfare, insurgency, counter-insurgency
and peacekeeping.
The aim of the Communication Studies
Department is to ensure cadets have
the basic skills of communications, both
written and oral. To achieve this, use is
made of simulation, video-taped
exercises and role-playing. Cadets
learn how to conduct interviews, to
counsel and to negotiate. They also
develop an understanding of how the
media works. All this helps develop
the essential combination of knowledge
and confidence so necessary in the
young officer.
What's it really like?
There are opportunities to pursue a wide
variety of interests at Sandhurst, with
something for everyone. A spirit of
enthusiasm is at the heart of all activities.
By the time an Officer Cadet has
completed the course he or she will be
ready to command soldiers following a
Young Officers course.
Army - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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Soldiers - Phase One Training
Fieldcraft
How to look after yourself
and your equipment, live in
the field, and observe,
detect and report an enemy.
Map Reading,
First Aid
and defensive measures
against NBC (Nuclear,
Biological and Chemical)
warfare.
Weapon Training
How to use and fire the
SA80 rifle at distances of
up to 300 metres.
What Does
Basic
Training
Cover?
Military Education
Military history, welfare
and financial advice.
Recreation,
Adventurous and
Initiative Training:
Outdoor pursuits, including
team sports and 'Outward
Bound' activities aimed at
character development.
Drill
Foot and Arms Drill building
up to the Passing Out Parade
to which relatives and friends
will be invited to attend.
Administration
Your personal admin is an
important factor in ensuring
that you are well organised
and can concentrate on
military training without
distraction.
Physical Fitness and
Endurance Training
As well as organised sport
in the programme, there is
time to enjoy all the ATR’s
sports facilities.
Army - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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Week 1: Induction and Drill skills. Your new life starts here - and you'll begin by
learning drill skills and essentials like map reading, first aid and theory like
basic rank structure. You'll also take a fitness test, consisting of press-ups,
sit-ups and a 2.4 km run.
Week 2: Fieldcraft and night training. You'll be outdoors this week, learning
camouflage techniques, night training, building shelters, cooking rations
and team activities.
Week 3: Small Arms Trainer. This is when you'll get to fire a rifle - but in a
computer-generated environment.
Week 4: Live firing. Live-firing begins on a 25m firing range. Start by firing lying
down on your stomach, then in sitting, kneeling and standing positions.
Week 5: Get fit and pass off. Now your physical fitness will be tested - and you're
expected to improve on the test taken in Week 1. You'll also take a drill
test - pass and you'll no longer need to be marched everywhere by a
senior soldier.
Week 6: On leave. Your first leave period, so time to catch up with mates back home.
Week 7: Assault course. Prove what you're made of by tackling an assault
course, complete with river rope swing, scramble net, concrete pipes and
more. You'll also try the night firing range during the week. Get through it
all and you'll be rewarded with a well-deserved long weekend off!
Week 8: Further weapon training. Exercise number two - you'll be away for three
days putting what you've learned about live firing into practice. You'll also
take your Annual Personal Weapons Test, an intensive 30 minute firing at
various targets.
Week 9: Feeling fitter? As your training progresses, your fitness levels should rise
dramatically - you'll find out how far this week with a run against the clock.
Week 10: Adventurous Training. This week will see you hill-walking, orienteering,
canoeing, and abseiling somewhere in Wales, Scotland or along the
South Coast. You'll experience a range of emotions as you rise to each of
the challenges!
Week 11: Test Week. You'll need to show a further improvement in fitness this week
- and you'll also go on your final night exercise. In addition, your overall
performance on camouflage, firing and sentry duties will be evaluated.
Week 12: Passing Out. After some final admin - e.g. cleaning your block, mending
kit and getting a haircut - this is the moment you've been training for, as
your family witness the results of your hard work in a Passing Out parade.
Week 13: On leave. You'll be granted some leave after Passing Out, before starting
your specialist or more focused training.
Week 14: Reporting for duty. Now's the time you start your specialist training. This
can vary from a few weeks to two years (for apprenticeships). It will be
followed by your first posting, where you'll put all your training into
practice.
What next? On successful completion of initial training, recruits go on to complete
their military trade or employment training. This is known as Phase 2 Training.
Phase 1 Training Programme
Army - Phase One Training
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Long Term Planning - Army
As part of the criteria you have to produce an action plan for long term career
development. You need to do this in a series of stages.
Stage1:
• You must first examine what is called SWOT - your own Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats. This is best done as an individual profile using the
four headings. An example is outlined below:
Assume that Morgan Jones is 17
1
/2 and wishes to join the Army when he is 18. He
wants to reach the rank of Sergeant in the infantry by the time he is 25.
Profile
Morgan Jones
Date 10 Dec 08
SWOT Analysis for career
Strengths
• Determined to be promoted
• Aim to pass L/Cpl Promotion Course
• Have had experience of leadership in Cadets
• Have achieved good communication skills while in Cadets
• Good with meeting people
• Have learned from my initial training the good and bad points of instruction
Weaknesses
• Impatient with my superiors
• I think I know everything
• Can be lazy
• Avoid doing activities that I do not like
Opportunities
• Operational tour in 4 months time - must gain confidence of my superiors
• I am good enough to join a sports team
• Develop my NVQs
Threats
• Might upset my seniors with my attitude
• Not taking advantage of sport and educational development
Army - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
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Stage 2:
• You now need to work out an ACTION PLAN based on the following points:
- Do not look too far into the future
- Do not pretend to be able to do things that you cannot
- Be realistic
- Examine your SWOT
- Know the career structure of the part of the Army you wish to join
- Understand the qualities needed for promotion
- Understand how jobs change as you are promoted
- Say how your strengths and weaknesses might affect your career
- Indicate the possible limits to your ability or your ambition
In the case of Morgan he will chose to do activities that will help him get promoted.
Let’s look at his action plan:
By Age Action/Target Outcome
18 a. Passed initial training Join my Unit
b. Acclimatise in Unit Spend six months learning the
system
c. Be positive to my seniors Show potential
d. Do well on operational tour Be noticed by my superiors
in the correct way
19 a. Join sports team Rugby hopefully
b. Develop leadership & Help me prior to & during course
communication skills
from Cadets
c. Maintain fitness Help with promotion course
d. Be selected for L/Cpl course Be selected & pass!
20 a. Be in charge of half a section Learn how to deal with their
individual concerns
b. Learn new skills Attend courses
c. Have a better understanding of Look for promotion
responsibility
This then helps you to focus on the requirements for the future. It does not always
fulfil the requirements, but it will start to help you develop a career.
Remember for Task 4 you need to look at a 5 year period.
Army - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
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Lastly you need to ensure you know the rank structure of the part of the Army that
you wish to join. These are outlined below:
Note: The tables above give a general idea of timescales for career progression.
These time frames will vary depending on specialisation, prior qualifications and ability
Rank Expected Time Frame for
promotion from joining
Private On joining
Lance Corporal 1 - 3 years
Corporal 3 - 6 years
Sergeant 6 - 9 years +
Rank Expected Time Frame for
promotion from joining
Officer Cadet On Joining
2nd Lieutenant 18 months
Lieutenant 18 months - 6 years
Captain 6 years+
Army - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
You need to understand for your career
plan how to progress beyond the entry
level for commissioned or
non-commissioned service.
You should not plan further than
5 years after Initial Training.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the RAF
Job Description
The RAF's pilot roles are as varied as the
aircraft flown.
Once you've been through initial training,
you'll be selected for the 'fast jet',
'multi-engine' or 'rotary-wing' streams.
You'll then do further training on the aircraft
type you've been assigned to before
becoming combat ready.
As a pilot in a Tornado, your primary role will
be air-to-air combat or ground-attack.
In a Hercules Transporter, you could be sent
anywhere in the world on military support or
humanitarian aid missions.
As a helicopter pilot, your duties might
include anything from search-and-rescue
missions to ferrying troops and equipment
into combat zones.
Initial Officer Training
After Initial Officer Training at the RAF
College Cranwell in Lincolnshire, you will
follow a challenging 30 week course
designed to develop your leadership and
management skills. The course includes
fitness development, military training and
academic study as well as practical outdoor
leadership challenges.
Specialist Training
Your specialist training begins with 62 hours
flying time on the Tutor – this is your
Elementary Flying Training. You will also
have a one-week course at RAF Henlow in
Bedfordshire to learn how the human body
reacts to the airborne environment. At the
end of the course, you will be streamed to
fast jet, multi-engine or rotary; your training
then continues within your specialisation.
Fast Jet
Fast-jet training lasts 21 months and you’ll
train on the Tucano and Hawk. As well as
flying, the course covers the use of tactical
weapons.
Multi-engine
The training to fly multi-engine aircraft is 10
months long, during which you will fly both
the Firefly and the King Air B22.
Rotary
If you are streamed to rotary, your flying
training will be 18 months long, with flying
hours on both single-engine Squirrel
helicopters and multi-engine Griffin
helicopters.
After completing basic training you will be
awarded your Pilot Brevet. On successful
completion of the tactical weapons phase of
training, you will go on to an Operational
Conversion Unit, where you will train on the
specific aircraft you will be flying for your
next role.
Ongoing Development
As a Pilot, you will have extensive
opportunities for further professional
development throughout your career. As well
as training to fly different aircraft at
Operational Conversion Units, there are
opportunities for structured command and
staff training as your career progresses.
Job: Pilot
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 23
Brief Description:
A Pilot could be in three different roles: either a combat fast jet role,
multi-engine role or rotary wing role.
1
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Job Description
You’re the supervisor in the tower at a major
RAF station, in charge of 7 controllers and
10 assistants. Ten miles out, a Tornado
aircraft hits a flock of birds.
The canopy is shattered and the pilot diverts
to make an emergency landing on your
airfield. Taking command in situations like
this is what being an Air Traffic Controller
(ATC) is all about.
In a high-pressure environment where safety
is paramount, you’ll learn how to manage
people and use some of the world’s most
modern radar and communications
equipment.
Personal Qualities
Able to expect the unexpected. Able to
absorb a lot of information.
Flexible enough to keep updating plans as
things develop.
Initial Officer Training
After Initial Officer Training at the RAF
College Cranwell in Lincolnshire, you will
follow a challenging 30 week course
designed to develop your leadership and
management skills. The course includes
fitness development, military training and
academic study as well as practical outdoor
leadership challenges.
Specialist Training
After Initial Officer Training, you will follow a
6 month specialist Air Traffic Control training
course at RAF Shawbury in Shropshire. The
course covers theoretical and practical
training in:
• Aerodrome control
• Radar approach and directing
• Precision approach radar procedures
• Navigation
• Meteorology
• Airspace structure and management
On the job training continues during your
first tour and if all goes well you will gain
certificates of competency from the Air
Traffic Control Examining Board (ATCEB) to
operate in all the control positions at your
unit. Training does not finish there; no 2
units are the same and, on posting, you will
undergo further training to learn the local
skills at your new unit.
Ongoing Development
Before taking up a role in the joint air traffic
control centres, you will need to follow a 5
week course in area radar control at RAF
Shawbury. As with your tour at an airfield,
you will then need to have on-the-job
training in order to gain the certificate of
competency from the ATCEB. Once you
become more experienced, you will be
asked to undertake a training role within
your unit to pass on the local skills that you
have learnt to other new arrivals. Before
undertaking this role, you will follow a
training team course to furnish you with all
necessary skills and techniques.
Career Prospects
You will join the RAF on either a Short
Service Commission of up to 6 years, or on
a Permanent Commission that will normally
require a minimum of 18 years Service.
Promotion to the rank of Flight Lieutenant is
on a time served/satisfactory service basis.
Further promotion to Squadron Leader and
above is by competitive selection.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the RAF
Job: Air Traffic Controller
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 36
Brief Description:
An Air Traffic Controller is the supervisor of all aircraft traffic within a defined area.
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Job Description
Officers in the RAF Regiment are
responsible for the defence of the
airfields.
Regiment officers have the chance to
serve in Field Squadrons, in addition to
training non Regiment personnel in
defensive combat duties.
Officers can also be posted to the
Queen’s Colour Squadron for
Ceremonial Duties.
Personal Qualities
You must be able to get on with people
from all walks of life and possess the
ability to remain calm, confident and
clear-headed under pressure.
Able to communicate what is required.
Physically fit and mentally robust.
Able to command and to lead.
Initial Officer Training
After Initial Officer Training at the RAF
College Cranwell in Lincolnshire, you will
follow a challenging 30 week course
designed to develop your leadership and
management skills. The course includes
fitness development, military training and
academic study as well as practical
outdoor leadership challenges.
Specialist Training
Next you will undertake the arduous
Junior Regiment Officers’ Course
(JROC) which is 37 weeks of tough
infantry training. Your fitness will step up
a level while you are taught how to
soldier and then how to command and
lead your men. You will start with
leading a section of 8 men and end up
leading a full flight of some 30 airmen
(RAF Regiment Gunners).
RAF Regiment training is a real test of
character, determination and the will to
succeed. By the end of the course, you
will be at peak physical fitness and you
will have learned how to operate
effectively in different environments and
all kinds of conditions. The training
needs to be hard to give you the
confidence to overcome any situation
that you may find yourself in during
operations; with determination you can
do it.
Ongoing Development
Your JROC is only the beginning; as you
undertake new roles you will take
courses to help you to meet any
challenge, be it Forward Air Controlling,
Jungle or Arctic Warfare courses or
military parachuting. Life as an RAF
Regiment Officer is never predictable
and a new challenge is always round the
corner. Much will be demanded of you,
but in return you will go to places and
experience a world your civilian friends
can only dream of. The challenge is
there - the rest is up to you.
UNIT 1 - Jobs in the RAF
Job: RAF Regiment Officer
Status: Officer Minimum Age: 17
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 25
Brief Description:
An Officer in the RAF Regiment is responsible for between ten and one
hundred men in squadrons defending RAF bases.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the RAF
Job Description
There are two WSOps (Acoustic) in a Nimrod
crew known as “wet operators”. It’s their job to
use sonobuoys to locate and track surface and
underwater targets.
Using the information transmitted back to the
aircraft by the sonobuoys the team is able to
classify and track unseen targets. Each ship and
submarine has its own electronic signature which
you’re trained to recognise. Once you’ve
analysed a contact, you pass this information on
to the rest of the crew.
Training
Length of Training
Due of the technical complexity of the job, your
training as a WSOp will probably last between
one and 2 years, but may take longer.
Recruit Training
Your career will start with nine weeks of recruit
training at RAF Halton in Buckinghamshire. The
course is designed to help you adjust to a military
environment. As well as fitness and military
training, you will also learn about life in the RAF.
Leadership Training
You will then go to RAF Cranwell in Lincolnshire
for a 10 week leadership package suitable for
Sergeants, the rank at which WSOps start after
their specialist training.
Aircrew Training
The next step is a 6 month course designed to
give you an understanding of aircraft systems,
electrical theory, basic survival skills and
communications procedures. You will then be
streamed into one of the 4 specialisations
(Electronic Warfare, Acoustic, Linguist or
Crewman) and follow the relevant training. Your
specialisation will depend on the choices you
make, your aptitudes, personal qualities and RAF
requirements at the time.
On successful completion of this phase of training,
you will go on to an Operational Conversion Unit,
where you will train on the specific aircraft you will
be flying for your next role.
Ongoing Development
As your career progresses, we will continue to
train you in new skills. There are opportunities to
undertake management and leadership training
and you can also complete A-levels, BAs and
Masters degrees as your career develops.
Job: Weapons Systems Operator (WSOp) (Acoustic)
Status: Non Commissioned Aircrew Minimum Age: 17
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Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 32
Brief Description:
Weapons Systems operators (Acoustic) are responsible for locating and
tracking surface and underwater targets.
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the RAF
Job Description
Suppliers handle over a million and a quarter
items of varied equipment, using the very latest
storage methods, material handling equipment
and computerised accounting techniques.
They work in stock control, accounting units
and supply depots, as well as out of doors on
fuel installations, specialist storage sites and in
the delivery of priority spares to operational
units in the field.
Training
Recruit training
Your career will start with nine weeks of recruit
training at RAF Halton in Buckinghamshire.
The course is designed to help you adjust to a
military environment. As well as fitness and
military training, you will also learn about the
RAF lifestyle.
Specialist training
The next step is a specialist training course at
RAF Halton, which lasts about three months.
Here you will develop the skills and knowledge
you will need to do your job including:
• How the RAF supply chain works
• How to operate our computer systems
• How to receive, store and issue equipment
You will also go on a week-long expedition to
help develop your self-confidence, self-
discipline, initiative and teamwork.
During your specialist training you will be able
to enrol for an Apprenticeship, which can lead
to the award of an NVQ Level 2 in Distribution,
Warehousing and Storage Operations.
At the end of the training course you will get
your first posting.
Ongoing Development
As your career progresses, we will continue to
train you in the skills you will need to take on
new responsibilities:
• Information technology
• Fuels, lubricants and gases
• Tactical supply duties
• Explosives
• Dangerous Goods
• Mobility
You may also have the opportunity to study in
order to join professional organisations such as
the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and
Supply, the Institute of Logistics and Transport,
the Institute of Petroleum and the Institute of
Supervision and Management.
Your future
Prospects
You will initially join the RAF for a period of nine
years. After a year you will be eligible for
promotion to Senior Aircraftman/woman if you
pass a trade ability test. Further promotion to
the rank of Corporal and beyond is by
competitive selection.
Transferable skills
The Apprenticeship, NVQ and recognition from
a professional organisation that you can earn,
are as valuable in the civilian world as they are
in the RAF, which means that whenever you
decide to leave the RAF, you will be well placed
to find a new job such as:
• Supply chain accountant
• Warehouse stock controller
• Retail purchaser
Job: Supplier
Status: Support Trades Minimum Age: 17
Gender: Male/Female Maximum Age: 29
Brief Description:
Personnel could work in a variety of accounting or stock control accounting
units and supply depots as well as in fuel installations
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UNIT 1 - Jobs in the RAF
Job Description
Gunners are the ground fighting troops of
the RAF. Their job is worldwide, wherever
the RAF goes.
Part of the specialist elite force
defending the RAF’s personnel, aircraft,
buildings and vehicles.
Gunners also patrol bases, operate from
helicopters in special security operations,
form part of the Queens’ Colour
Squadron for ceremonial duties and
jump as a parachutist.
Training
Initial training
Like everyone in the RAF you will start
your career with a period of training.
The initial training for the RAF Regiment
Gunners course lasts 22 weeks at the
Regimental home, RAF Honington in
Suffolk. You will be taught how to handle
and fire weapons expertly and how to
survive and fight in all environmental
conditions. The course includes
navigation, infantry tactics, fieldcraft and
lots of physical training.
RAF Regiment training is a real test of
character, determination and the will to
succeed. By the end of the course, you
will be at peak physical fitness and you
will have learned how to operate
effectively whatever the environmental
conditions. The training needs to be
hard to give you the confidence to
overcome any situation that you find
yourself in on operations; with
determination you can do it. You will
also complete your Apprenticeship,
including an NVQ Level 2 in Policing and
Security Services as well as Key Skills
and be taught to drive. Once you have
completed your basic training you will
get your first posting.
Ongoing development
As your career progresses, we will
continue to train you in new skills,
particularly in new weapon systems.
There are opportunities to learn
specialist combat medical skills, to
undertake management and leadership
training and to complete GCSEs, A
Levels and more advanced NVQs as
your career develops. In addition you
will have the chance to gain
qualifications in adventurous sports such
as mountaineering, rock climbing, skiing
and canoeing and lead training as an
Enhanced Team Leader.
Your future
Prospects
You will initially join the RAF for a period
of 9 years. After a year, you will be
eligible for promotion to Senior
Aircraftman providing you pass your
Trade ability test. Further promotion to
the rank of Corporal and beyond is for
the taking; if you have what it takes, and
the determination to succeed, the sky’s
the limit.
Job: RAF Regiment Gunner
Status: Airman Minimum Age: 16
Gender: Male Maximum Age: 33
Brief Description:
The RAF Regiment Gunner is responsible for defending the RAF’s personnel,
aircraft, buildings and vehicles.
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Pay See Pay section overleaf
Pension Non-contributory pension on completion
of service
Leave All ranks are entitled to 30 days paid
holiday. However this always depends
upon the demands of the service.
Sport Free sport and gymnasium facilities.
Food & Subsidised food and accommodation.
Accommodation Availability of service married quarters.
Advance of pay for buying a house.
Removals and relocation package.
Hours of Work When not on Operations or during
Training Exercises, most RAF
personnel work Mondays to Fridays. If
you work shifts you will be given the
equivalent time off.
Medical Free medical and dental care.
Travel Discounted rail and coach travel.
Free rail warrants.
Education Annual education allowance.
Boarding school allowance for children.
Civilian accreditation (NVQs) for
specialisations.
Allowances There are allowances available for being
overseas and separation.
RAF - Conditions of Service
The Royal Air Force
Conditions of Service -
Summary of Benefits
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RAF - Conditions of Service
Pay (from 1 April 2008)
The Royal Air Force system of pay, allowances and benefits is based on a
comprehensive military salary structure designed to be comparable with civilian
emoluments for similar jobs. Rates are reviewed annually by the Armed Forces Pay
Review Body.
Officers
Rank From To
Officer Cadet £14,852 per year
Pilot Officer £23,475 per year
Flying Officer £14,825 per year £31,188 per year
Flight Lieutenant £36,160 per year £43,002 per year
Airmen
Rank From To
On Entry £13,013 per year
Leading/Senior
Aircraftmen £16,227 per year £27,599 per year
Corporal £25,182 per year £31,645 per year
Sergeant £28,623 per year £35,219 per year
Specialist Pay and Allowances
Certain specialists e.g. pilots and aircrew receive additional pay.
Personnel who are separated from their partners for long periods due to operational
requirements are eligible for additional allowances.
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Officers - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
You must be at least 17 years 6 months
old when you join. The upper age limit
varies according to branch or specialisation
you wish to join.
Nationality
You must be a Citizen of the UK, the
Commonwealth or the Republic of
Ireland since birth; or a naturalised
British citizen.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
The minimum requirement for
commissioned officers is 2 A levels or 3
Scottish Highers passes, plus 5
GCSEs/SCEs (Grade C/3), including
English Language and Maths. Graduates
or qualified entrants may be offered
enhanced promotion and starting pay. A
number of specialisations - Engineer
Officer, Physical Education Officer, Legal
Officer, Medical Officer, Dental Officer
and Chaplain - require more specialist
qualifications.
Medical Standards
You will be given an occupational health
assessment, which is designed to detect
any condition that might make you unfit
for military training. It also looks for any
issues that could have an impact on your
ability to carry out military or trade duties
later in your career. The health
assessment includes hearing and
eyesight tests. It also investigates any
illness you may have suffered in the
past, in case this could affect your ability
to serve in the RAF.
Selection
Applicants must pass selection at the
Officers and Aircrew Selection Centre
(OACS) at the RAF College Cranwell, in
Lincolnshire.
RAF - Entry Requirements
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Non Commissioned Aircrew (NCA) -
Entry Requirements
Age Limits
The age limits vary according to branch or
specialisation you wish to join. Those
under the age of 18 must have parental
consent.
Nationality
You must be a Citizen of the UK, the
Commonwealth or the Republic of
Ireland since birth; or a naturalised
British citizen.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
The minimum requirement for NCA is 3
GCSEs/SCEs (Grade C/3), including
English Language and Maths. An
elementary knowledge of science, in
some case physics, is also required.
Medical Standards
You will be given an occupational health
assessment, which is designed to detect
any condition that might make you unfit
for military training. It also looks for any
issues that could have an impact on your
ability to carry out military or trade duties
later in your career. The health
assessment includes hearing and
eyesight tests. It also investigates any
illness you may have suffered in the
past, in case this could affect your ability
to serve in the RAF.
Selection
Applicants must pass selection at the
Officers and Aircrew Selection Centre
(OACS) at the RAF College Cranwell, in
Lincolnshire
RAF - Entry Requirements
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Support Trades - Entry Requirements
Age Limits
For entry to most trades you need to be
at least 16 and under 30. A few require
you to be a bit older before you can
apply.
Nationality
You must be a Citizen of the UK, the
Commonwealth or the Republic of
Ireland since birth; or a naturalised
British citizen.
Security Clearance
You will be subject to a detailed security
clearance procedure prior to joining.
Educational Standards
For a few trades - such as Qualified
Chef, Physical Training Instructor,
Musician or Staff Nurse - you need to
have professional qualifications before
you join.
For some others, such as Intelligence
Analyst or Technician, entry in the
engineering trades, we require you to
have a certain number of GCSE or SCE
passes, or their equivalent.
For entry to most trades the most
important qualification is your attitude.
Pre Joining Fitness Test
You will be tested on you fitness before
acceptance into the RAF. The level of
fitness we require is very achievable:
• Men need to be able to run 1.5 miles
in 12 minutes 12 seconds
• Women need to be able to run 1.5
miles in 14 minutes 35 seconds
Medical Standards
You will be given an occupational health
assessment, which is designed to detect
any condition that might make you unfit
for military training. It also looks for any
issues that could have an impact on your
ability to carry out military or trade duties
later in your career. The health
assessment includes hearing and
eyesight tests. It also investigates any
illness you may have suffered in the
past, in case this could affect your ability
to serve in the RAF.
Selection
Applicants must pass selection
assessments and interviews at an Armed
Forces Careers Office (AFCO).
Depending on the job, applicants may
also have to pass further specialist
assessments which can last up to 3
days.
RAF - Entry Requirements
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Selection takes place at the Officers and Aircrew Selection Centre (OASC) at the
RAF College, Cranwell in Lincolnshire. The selection procedures are designed to
identify acceptability for specific branches and aircrew categories.
The Officers & Aircrew Selection Centre (OASC) is part of the Directorate of
Recruiting & Selection (RAF). It is commanded by a Group Captain who is the
Deputy Director responsible for all aspects of selection. A selection board, headed
by a senior Wing Commander acting as the President, is made up of several
boarding teams; each consisting of a Wing Commander and a Squadron Leader.
All the boarding officers have been specially trained in personnel selection. They are
perfectly well aware that good officers and airmen (aircrew) are not cut to a pattern -
there is room in the Service for men and women with a wide variety of backgrounds,
interests and temperaments. Nevertheless there are certain basic qualities, which
can be summed up as 'leadership potential'; board members must satisfy
themselves that you possess these.
Where candidates are applying for university sponsorship they will be interviewed by
an academic adviser, (a visiting headteacher or university lecturer), in addition to
undergoing the normal selection procedure.
There are 2 parts to the OASC selection process:
• Part 1
- Aptitude Tests
- Medical
- Interview
- Review
• Part 2
- Group Discussion
- Leaderless Exercise
- Group Planning Exercise
- Fitness Test
- Individual Problem Solving Exercise
- Command Situation Exercise
- Final Interview
You will only proceed to Part 2 if you have been successful in Part 1 of the selection
procedure. The whole process may last up to 4 days.
RAF - Selection Process
Selection - Officers & Non
Commissioned Aircrew (NCA)
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Selection - Support Trades
If you are considering a job in one of the RAF support trades the first thing you
should think about is your qualifications. For many trades you won't need any
special qualifications but for others you must have gained (or be expecting to gain)
a number of GCSEs or SCEs or even professional qualifications. Trades selection
takes place at any one of a number of Armed Forces Careers Offices (AFCO).
RAF - Selection Process
Stage 1
Application form
When you apply to join the RAF, we will first have to check that you are eligible –
for example, that you meet our age and nationality requirements. We will then
give you an application form which asks for your personal details and about any
qualifications or work experience you have.
Stage 2
Once you have filled in your application form, we will invite you to an Armed
Forces Careers Office (AFCO) for aptitude tests, a selection interview,
occupational health assessment and a fitness test. You will need to pass each of
these to join the RAF.
Aptitude test
There are seven aptitude tests which assess your verbal, numerical and reasoning
ability, short term memory, ability to perform tasks quickly and accurately and
understanding of basic electrical and mechanical principles. We will only take into
account the results of those tests that are relevant for the job you are applying for.
On the day, you will be asked to do each test in a set time. Altogether the tests
will last about 90 minutes. If you fail the aptitude tests first time, you may be
allowed to do them one more time, but not for at least six months.
You will get the results of your tests from a member of the AFCO staff who will
also advise you on the jobs you are able to do. We will explain what each job
involves and how quickly you could join.
Selection interview
The selection interview is a formal interview with an RAF Sergeant or Corporal.
They will ask you to talk about your family background, education and training,
previous jobs, interests, what sports you play and what you know about the RAF.
The interview takes between 30 and 45 minutes and there are no trick questions.
It’s a chance for us to get to know one another and to make sure you will fit in with
the RAF way of life. The best advice we can give you is ‘be yourself’ – tell the
interviewer what you honestly believe, not what you think he or she might want to
hear.
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RAF - Selection Process
Stage 2 continued
Occupational health assessment
If you have passed the aptitude tests and selection interview and there are
vacancies for your chosen job, you will need to do an occupational health
assessment. This is a check of your medical fitness.
The assessment is sometimes done at the AFCO, but you may have to go to a
local doctor’s surgery. The RAF demands a high level of medical fitness, so don’t
be surprised if the examination is very thorough. It is common for some people to
have more than one assessment.
Fitness test
To make sure you are fit enough to start RAF recruit training, you must also pass
a Pre-Joining Fitness Test. You will take this test at a local gym or sports centre
where you will need to run 1.5 miles (2.4km) within a specified time.
If you have been successful in all four parts of Stage 2, you will go on to Stage 3
or 4, depending on the job you have applied for.
Stage 3
For some jobs, you will also need to pass specialist tests and interviews. These
will assess the aptitudes and skills that you need for your chosen job. If
appropriate, you will be invited to complete Stage 3 at a military establishment –
which can last from one to three days, depending on the job
If you have been successful so far, we will try to find you a vacancy in your
chosen job and give you a provisional date for when you will be able to join the
RAF.
Stage 4
The last stage of the selection process is a final interview at the AFCO. This takes
place around six weeks before your provisional date of entry into the RAF. The
interview will be with a Commissioned Officer or a Flight Sergeant and if all goes
well, you will receive a formal offer of service and you will be ready to join the
RAF.
The whole process of joining the Royal Air Force can take a few months. That is
because it is important that we get to know you and you get to know us before you
join.
Remember, just because you have started the selection process does not mean
you are under an obligation to join the RAF: you can withdraw your application at
any time.
The information here should be treated as a guide only.
Armed Forces Careers Offices can provide up-to-date details.
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All potential officers attend an Initial
Officer Training for 30 weeks at RAF
Cranwell.
The Course is structured to reflect the
RAF philosophy that there are very few
born leaders but if there is potential they
can be trained.
The course is designed to develop your
leadership skills to the full.
If you have been selected for a specialist
branch to which you bring additional
professional skills, you undertake the
Specialist Entry and Re-Entry course.
This applies to Medical, Dental, Nursing
and Legal Officers and to RAF
Chaplains.
Initial Officer Training (IOT) Course is
divided into 3 ten week terms.
Cadets will be tested in Leadership
skills, Military skills, Physical Fitness and
Operational Studies at the end of Term
1. They must pass all tests at the end of
Term 1 to be able to progress to Term 2.
In Term 2 cadets will be tested in
Leadership skills, Physical Fitness,
Operational Studies, Written
Communication Skills and Essential
Service Knowledge. You must pass all
tests in Term 2 to be recommended for
graduation and to progress to Term 3.
Additionally, your behaviour and attitude
in respect of Ethos and Core Values will
be taken into consideration.
In Term 3 there are not to be any
pass/fail tests to undertake because all
training is developmental and
experiential, to aid the transition from
cadet to junior officer. At the end of Term
3, a final matrix will be held to confirm
your graduation, subject to behaviour
and attitude, in accordance with Ethos
and Core Values.
Then, if all’s gone well, you graduate as
an Officer in the RAF.
To foster the ethos and core values of
excellence, and to encourage and
recognise excellent performance, there
will be 3 levels of graduation.
• Distinction (majority of grade As in tests
and work course)
• Merit (majority of grade Bs in tests and
work course)
• Pass (majority of grade Cs in tests and
work course)
Once you have passed out you will then
be trained for your operational role.
Graduating from Initial Officer Training is
only the first step of your RAF career.
Whichever branch you enter, you’ll
receive continuous training throughout
the period of your commission
You may also have the opportunity to
gain further professional qualifications –
sponsored by the RAF - and invaluable
management experience.
Officers - Initial Training
RAF - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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Non Commissioned Aircrew (NCA) &
Support Trades - Initial Training
• Training begins with the 9-week Recruit
Training Course at RAF Halton in
Buckinghamshire or, for RAF Regiment
personnel, at RAF Honington in Suffolk.
On successful completion of recruit
training, you begin trade training - the
location depends on your trade.
Documents and Uniform
• There will be talks on pay and
allowances.
• Recruits will also be issued with their
Service number. Shortly afterwards kit
is issued.
• In addition to the initial medical
examination recruits received prior to
enlisting, they will undergo a more
thorough examination that will include
hearing tests and inoculations.
The Flight Staff
• From the time of arrival, recruits will be
placed into Flights and each Flight will
come under the care of Flight Staff - an
officer, who will be the Flight
Commander, a Sergeant and 2
Corporals - who could be male or
female.
• They will be responsible not only for all
training, but also for general welfare
and progress. It is their job to ensure
that recruits are kept up to the mark.
What Recruits learn
After the initial reception process
during the early days, the course falls
into 3 parts:
• General Service Knowledge and
Training
• Ground Defence Training
• Further General Service Training
General Service Knowledge and
Training.
• General Service Knowledge, or GSK in
RAF jargon, covers all the basic
information new airmen and airwomen
will need.
• How to identify the various RAF ranks,
the how, why, when and where of
saluting; the rules of dress and
behaviour when on an RAF station or
in the public eye.
• Security and Service discipline and
how it is enforced.
RAF - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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• Responsibilities to the Service and how
the RAF will look after not only career,
but also any personal problems that
may arise.
• The types of aircraft the RAF operates,
what they are used for and where they
might be expected to serve on current
or future operations.
• General Service Training is about how
to look after accommodation,
equipment and oneself.
• Recruits are taught drill and there are
regular inspections in each area.
Ground Defence Training
• All members of the RAF must be able
to defend their stations, their aircraft
and their equipment, and be trained to
deploy to any part of the world at a
moment’s notice. In order to achieve
this, every man and woman in the
Service is taught to handle a rifle safely.
• Training on how to indicate and
recognize a target, judge distances and
give fire control orders will also be
given.
• In addition, all recruits are taught the
duties of an armed sentry, as well as
how to challenge strangers, check
passes and permits, make arrests and
search people and vehicles.
• They will be taught first aid, the
techniques of firefighting and the
precautions to be taken and applied in
the event of nuclear, biological or
chemical warfare. They will be tested
on newly-acquired skills in various
practical and theoretical tests.
• Ground Defence Training will culminate
with an outdoor field exercise, during
which recruits will be expected to put
their new-found skills and knowledge
into practice.
Further General Service Training
• By this stage, many recruits feel that
they have passed their course and that
minimal effort is required to be on the
passing-out parade that is just over one
week away.
• Drill now requires even more effort
as the instructors introduce arms drill
and begin to train you for your passing-
out parade.
• Flight inspections continue to be held to
prove that you are capable of preparing
and maintaining your own kit, and that
you are all working together as a team.
• Lectures are given on organizations
within the Service to which you could
turn in times of need.
Standards, fitness and reflighting
Although your course will concentrate on
one specific subject at a time, there will
be daily inspections, much work on drill
and ceremonial, and plenty of physical
education (PEd) throughout your training
at RAF Halton.
Fitness will be monitored by the PEd staff
throughout the course and recruits
undertake the Recruit Training Fitness
Test towards the end of the PEd package.
This is similar to the RAF yearly fitness
test except it has a standard which is 10%
lower. The test consists of a multi stage
shuttle run (bleep test) over a 20 metre
course, timed according to age and
gender. It is followed by specific number
of press ups and sit ups to be completed
inside one minute.
RAF - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
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All NCA students first complete the 9 week recruit training course at RAF Halton
followed by the 10 week NCA Initial Training Course at the RAF College Cranwell.
The course aims to accustom direct entry recruits to Service life, to teach all aircrew
cadets the basic skills and knowledge, and provide general Service and character
development training, which will enable them to enter specialist training as smart,
well-disciplined and responsible SNCO NCA.
Subjects include:
• General Service Knowledge
• Drill and Ceremonial
• Ground Defence Training
• Leadership
• Oral and Written Communications
• General Service Training
• Teamwork and Crew Cooperation
• Physical Education
On completion of this course, the students are awarded the rank of acting Sergeant
and progress to specialist training.
RAF - Short Term Planning/Initial Training
Further Initial Training -
Non Commissioned Aircrew (NCA)
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Long Term Planning - RAF
As part of the criteria you have to produce an action plan for long term career
development. You need to do this in a series of stages.
Stage1:
• You must first examine what is called SWOT - your own Strengths,
Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. This is best done as an individual
profile using the four headings. An example is outlined below:
Assume that Paul Wing is 17
1
/2 and wishes to join the Royal Air Force when he
is 18. He wants to reach the rank of Corporal by the time he is 25.
Profile
Paul Wing
Date 10 Dec 08
SWOT Analysis for career
Strengths
• Determined to be promoted
• Aim to become SAC
• Have had experience of leadership in Cadets
• Have achieved good communication skills while in Cadets
• Am good with meeting people
• Have learned from my initial training the good and bad points of instruction
Weaknesses
• Am impatient with my superiors
• I think I know everything
• Can be lazy
• Avoid doing activities that I do not like
Opportunities
• Operational tour in 4 months time - must gain confidence of my superiors
• I am good enough to join unit sports team
• Develop my qualification skills and gain NVQs
Threats
• Might upset my seniors with my attitude
• Not taking advantage of sport & educational development
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Stage 2:
• You now need to work out an ACTION PLAN based on the following points:
- Do not look too far into the future
- Do not pretend to be able to do things that you cannot
- Be realistic
- Examine your SWOT
- Know the career structure of the Service you wish to join
- Understand the qualities needed for promotion
- Understand how jobs differ the more senior one becomes
- Say how your strengths and weaknesses might affect your career
- Indicate the possible limits to your ability or your ambition
In the case of Paul he will chose to do activities that will help him get promoted.
Let’s look at his action plan:
By Age Action/Target Outcome
18 a. Passed initial training Join my Unit
b. Acclimatise in Unit Spend six months learning the
system
c. Be positive to my seniors Show potential
d. Do well on operational tour Get noticed by my superiors
in the correct way
19 a. Join sports team Football hopefully
b. Develop leadership & Help me prior to & during course
communication skills
from Cadets
c. Maintain fitness Help with promotion course
d. Get selected for specialist Get selected & pass!
course
20 a. Be in charge of a small group Learn how to deal with their
individual concerns
b. Learn new skills Attend courses
c. Have a better understanding Look for promotion to Cpl
of responsibility
This then helps you to focus on the requirements for the future. It does not always
fulfil the requirements but it will start to help you develop a career.
Remember for Task 4 you need to look at a 5 year period.
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Lastly you need to ensure you know the rank structure of the service that you wish
to join. These are outlined below:
Note: The tables above give a general idea of timescales for career progression.
These time frames will vary depending on specialisation, prior qualifications and ability
RAF - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
You need to understand for your career
plan how to progress beyond the entry
level for commissioned or
non-commissioned service.
You should not plan further than
5 years after Initial Training.
Rank Expected Time Frame for promotion
from joining
Aircraftman On appointment
Leading Aircraftman On completion of basic training
Senior Aircraftman 1 year
Corporal
Sergeant
Competitive selection based on merit
Rank Expected Time Frame for promotion
from joining
Officer Cadet On appointment
Pilot Officer On commissioning
Flying Officer 2 years
Flight Lieutenant 6 years
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Officers
• Officers undertake the Initial Officer Training (IOT) course in the rank of
Officer Cadet.
• Normally, they graduate as Flying Officers or Pilot Officers, depending on their
personal circumstances, professional or academic qualifications.
• Once you have completed your professional training you can expect to spend up to
2 years in one post on your first tour before you move on to a second posting,
chosen to extend your working experience as much as possible within your
specialisation.
• As you progress within your branch or branch specialisation, so your
responsibilities grow and your horizons widen; staff jobs in one of our command
centres form part of most officers' career portfolios.
• In the majority of branches, promotion above the rank of Flight Lieutenant is by
competition against quotas; in other words, you compete for however many
vacancies there are within your branch at that time.
Non Commissioned Aircrew (NCA)
• NCA are promoted to acting Sergeants as soon as they pass their Airman Aircrew
Initial Training course.
• In each of the 3 NCA specialisations you undergo extensive professional training,
from which you emerge as a full Sergeant.
• Once this is completed you are awarded your flying brevet and posted to an
operational conversion unit for more training on your specific aircraft type or role.
• Many NCA go on to become commissioned officers
Support Trades
• Promotion to the rank of Corporal and beyond is on merit.
• In some trades, such as Physical Training Instructor and RAF Police, the job
requires you to hold the acting rank of Corporal when you have completed your
trade training.
• In the early stages of your career you'll be promoted on exam results and good
annual reports from your boss.
• As you rise through the ranks you'll be trained in the new skills required for each
step up, which could include leadership training for potential Senior NCOs.
• Provided you have gained the necessary qualifications - 5 GCSE/SCE passes
(Grade C/3) including English Language and Maths and the recommendation of
your seniors - you can apply for a commission.
RAF - Long Term Planning/Career Progression
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Job Applications
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UNIT 1 - Job Applications
Introduction
You have decided that the time is right for you to leave
the academic life behind you and set out in your working
career. It’s the road to independence.
This applies to any job that you wish to go for. However, for the purposes of the
Unit 1 Project, you must presume that you want to join the Service of your choice at
whatever level.
Always it will be the level of knowledge required
to do the job and a recognisable ‘potential’ that can
be developed.
You have the potential, there is no doubt about that. As we go step-by-step through
this section the answers to the following questions will become clearer:
• What kind of potential have I?
• How can I use it?
• How would I like to use it?
• How can I demonstrate it?
This is the beginning of a whole new lifestyle for you. To put yourself on the right
road there is a lot to think about, find out about and do - so let’s make a start.
Opportunities - Options - Hold on a bit!
First think about your life to date. The subjects in which you have achieved your
best results, the school/college activities that you have most enjoyed plus your
achievements and enjoyments outside your academic environment.
Ask yourself: What am I likely to be most qualified to do? Which are my most
marketable qualities? What kind of potential is it that I possess and how would I like
to use it?
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Take a Look at Yourself
Form a picture of yourself as a whole and quite individual person. To help you find
out about yourself try putting your ideas and conclusions down on paper. Let’s look
at four basic headings:
• My best subjects
• Things I know I like from experience
• What’s most important to me?
• How do I rate myself?
My Best Subjects
List examination results (best grades first)
List Examinations to be taken
Awards/Certificates for non-academic achievements
e.g.
Sports Trophies
Duke of Edinburgh’s Award
Cadet Service
Driving Licence
etc.
Exam Grade
UNIT 1 - Know Yourself
Exam Grade
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Here are some questions to ask yourself in the next two tables. Mark each with a
tick, cross or question mark and add to the list any statements about you relevant to
the heading. This will help you to prepare for the interview.
Things I know I like from experience
Taking responsibility
Using my organising ability
Being in a team
Working/competing against time
Being outside most of the time
Being inside most of the time
Learning new skills
Being in a large group or class
Being in a small group or class
Problem-solving activities or subjects
Creative subjects or activities
Practical/technical (‘hands on’) subject or activities
Helping older people
Helping younger people
Studying
Reading facts
Reading fiction
Being entertained
Entertaining others
Socialising with school/college friends
Meeting new people
Being with the family
Dancing
Listening to music
Playing an instrument
Singing
Debating current affairs
Reading national newspapers
Watching news on TV
Watching TV documentaries
Managing my money
Dressing smartly most of the time
Dressing smartly some of the time
Dressing smartly none of the time
Travelling
Driving
UNIT 1 - Know Yourself
?
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What’s Important to Me
How Do You Rate Yourself?
Try an honest personal rating of your abilities and score 0 - 10
0 = Poor or no experience
1 - 3 = Quite Good
4 - 6 = Good
7 - 9 = Very Good
10 = Excellent
Job Satisfaction
Job Security
A variety of duties
Routine
Opportunities for further training
Opportunities for promotion
Comfortable working environment
Travelling distance from work
Specific products/services that interest me
Good starting salary
A large company
A small company
Social club
Sports amenities
Working with mostly young people
Working with a mix of age groups
Practical/Technical (‘Hands on’) skills
Creative ability
Analytical ability
Organising ability
Communication ability (oral)
Communication ability (written)
Working within a team
Leading others
Organising myself
Adaptability
Concentration
Learning new skills
UNIT 1 - Know Yourself
?
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Review the Results
Now you have completed these exercises, take a sheet of paper and list:
1. My best subjects.
2. Things I know I like from experience - list the positives that you have ticked.
3. What’s important to me? - list the positives you have ticked.
4. How do I rate myself - list in order your Excellent, Very good and Good ratings.
Discuss this profile with people who know you well - your parents, your friends, your
career adviser.
From these results, you should now be forming a clear picture of your strengths,
interests and ambitions - with some interesting career ideas emerging in your mind.
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The C.V. (Curriculum Vitae - Career Details)
Do it next - Do it now - It is worth doing well. A good C.V. is important. It is the first
exhibit in your personal marketing campaign and whether the application lives on to
the next stage and to an interview can depend on it.
Your C.V. needs to give the facts about you in a clear and presentable way, so it
captures and holds the interest of the reader or employer and makes him want to
meet you.
Guidelines to Writing a C.V.
Divide it into sections under separate headings. Some are a must, whilst others are
only useful if they are relevant to you. Suggested headings are:
• Personal Details
• Education
• Qualifications (held or being studied for)
• Non-academic achievements
• Responsibilities and offices held at school, college, or youth organisations
• Leisure interests
• Work experience
• Career objectives
• Referees
It is better to type your C.V and keep it short – no more than two pages
if at all possible.
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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Suggested C.V. Layout
Personal Details
Name: Give your first names in front of your surnames,
e.g. Janet Amanda Jones.
Address: Give your full address and include postcode.
Tel No: If you have a telephone number give it and indicate if you
can be contacted during the day or evenings only;
e.g. 01-000-111 (evenings only).
Nationality: Give nationality, not country of birth; e.g. British
(not English, Irish or Scottish).
Marital Status: Give Single or Married, etc.
Health: If you are in good health give a full description; e.g.
Good - I have suffered no serious illness or injuries
and I am undergoing no medical treatment at this time.
If you are disabled or suffering from an illness requiring
long-term medication then give brief details.
It is not necessary to give details of past illnesses from
which you have completely recovered.
Driving Licence: Give type of licence, e.g. Full, Provisional, Motor Cycle.
If clean, state clean. If you own a vehicle, then say so
afterwards in brackets.
Education
Give dates, name of school, college, university and address. For example:
1997 - 2001 SOMETHING SECONDARY SCHOOL
High Street, Middlewitch, Nr. Sandwich, Surrey
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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2001 - 2003 SOMETHING SIXTH FORM COLLEGE
High Street, High Town, Surrey
2004 - 2006 NEWTOWN COLLEGE OF FURTHER EDUCATION
King Street, Newton, Kent
Qualifications
List examinations taken and passed and those where you are awaiting results.
Give highest grade first.
Subject: Grade
Subject: Estimated grade (Awaiting result)
Note: Do not supply some grades and not others. If the grades are not good,
leave them out in all cases and just give subjects passed.
Non-Academic Achievements
Give those where you have achieved a certificate, a trophy, or an award of
some kind.
For instance:
Sporting: Certificate for swimming, Green belt for judo
Dancing: Bronze/silver/gold medal
Other: Duke of Edinburgh bronze/silver/gold medal
Responsibilities/Offices Held at School College
Give those that show you have been put in a position of trust or responsibility.
For instance:
Captain of the First Eleven Cricket Team
Treasurer of the Chess Club
Cadet NCO
Remember: Avoid anything that shows a strong party political bias, unless of
course, you are looking for a career in politics.
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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Leisure Interests
List any hobbies. Strike a good balance between the physically active and more
intellectual pursuits. Do not bluff, however, and put something down that you know
little about - you could easily be caught out if asked to elaborate at an interview.
An example of a good mix would be:
Board Surfing
Cadets
Reading
Watching ‘Neighbours’
Work Experience
Give details of any work experience - when, where and what is was.
For instance:
2004 - Date McDonalds Assistant
2002 - 2004 JJ Newsagent Paper Round
Career Objectives
Go back to your self-assessment exercises in the ‘Know Yourself’ section and
look at ‘What’s Important to Me?’ If you have been quite specific about the type
of job environment you are looking for, then be precise in your given objectives.
If you want to keep your options open and apply for several different types of job,
then keep it vague or leave out this section.
Example of the specific. “I feel that I have the qualities to become a pilot, and
would love to have the opportunity to fly rotary wing aircraft”.
Example of the non-specific. “I am keen to find a progressive career in the
services and would like to work for an organisation that can give me the breadth
of opportunity to develop my potential”.
Referees
Give two referees. One could be the Head of your last school or college.
The other should be a personal referee - if possible someone who holds a position
of authority and status and who knows you quite well. Someone who
has employed you during weekend or holiday periods might be ideal.
Important: Do not forget to ask them first if they mind be given as a referee.
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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On the next 4 pages are examples of four C.V.s in which the applicants are
marketing themselves to take full advantage of their individual qualifications,
achievements and career objectives. These are the kinds of C.V. that will make
the reader want to meet you!
Curriculum Vitae: Example 1
PERSONAL DETAILS
Name: Matthew Gareth EVANS
Address: 1 Valley Way, Caernarfon, Gwynedd, GW2 5KB
Tel No: 0000-00000 (evenings)
Date of Birth: 12 May 1991 (age 17)
Nationality: British
Marital Status: Single
Health: Good. I have suffered no serious illness or injury and I am not receiving any medical
treatment at this time.
Driving Licence: Provisional Group E (Moped)
EDUCATION
2001 to date: SOMETHING SCHOOL, CAERNARFON
QUALIFICATIONS
Awaiting Results GCSE Estimated Grades
Sports Science (B)
Mathematics (C)
Biology (C)
Physics (C)
Art (C)
English Language (C/D)
NON-ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS
Played in school football team.
Have taken part in various fund raising charity walks and swims.
RESPONSIBILITIES/OFFICES HELD AT SCHOOL/COLLEGE
First-year Prefect
Flight Sergeant in the Air Training Corps
LEISURE INTERESTS
Car Mechanics, Playing Football, Design/Build Model Aeroplanes, Air Training Corps
WORK EXPERIENCE
Summer 2004 to date: Something Newsagents, Newspaper Round
CAREER OBJECTIVES
I am a practical person and would like to learn a trade. I would therefore like to become a Royal Air Force
Aircraft Technician.
REFEREES
Mr. J. King Mrs. S. Davies
Headmaster Manager
Something School Something Newsagent
Caernarfon Caernarfon
Gwynedd Gwynedd
GW16 9JU GW1 2JR
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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PERSONAL DETAILS
Name: Janet ROWLAND
Address: Field Gate, High View, Tipton, Sussex SS1 1SS
Tel No: 0000-00000 (evenings)
Date of Birth: 12 May 1990 (age 18)
Nationality: British
Marital Status: Single
Health: Good. I have suffered no serious illness or injury and I am not receiving any medical
treatment at this time.
Driving Licence: Full/clean (I intend to buy a car when I start work)
EDUCATION
1999 - 2004: TORINGTON SCHOOL, Torington, Sussex
2004 - 2006: SOMETHING COLLEGE, New Town, Sussex
QUALIFICATIONS
GCSEs: English Language (A), Biology (B), Geography (B), Art (B),
Mathematics (B), Chemistry (C), French (C), Sports Science (C), CDT (D)
‘AS’ Levels: English (B), Geography (C), Art (D)
‘A2’ Levels: Subjects taken with estimated grades: English (B), Geography (C)
NON-ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS
Current holder of the Something Show Jumping Championship
Duke of Edinburgh Bronze Award
LEISURE INTERESTS
Sea Cadet Corps (Cadet Petty Officer)
Swimming, Disco Dancing, Reading
WORK EXPERIENCE
2000 - 2003 Smiths Stables Stable Hand (weekends)
Torington, Sussex
2003 to date Boots Chemist Shop Assistant (part time)
Torington, Sussex
Summer 2005 Torington Horse Show Assistant to Show Organiser
CAREER OBJECTIVES
I am looking forward for an opportunity to work in a sales office where I would be trained in general office
procedure, come to understand the Company’s products and eventually be trained for a career in field sales.
REFEREES
Mr. C Penn Mr. B Thorpe
Headmaster Manager
Something College Smiths Stables
New Town Torington
Sussex Sussex
Curriculum Vitae: Example 2
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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PERSONAL DETAILS
Name: Jishno RAO
Address: 12 King Street, New Town, Lancs MK20 2JB
Tel No: 0000-00000 (evenings) 0700-11111 (mobile)
Date of Birth: 12 May 1988
Nationality: British
Marital Status: Single
Health: Good. I have suffered no serious illness or injury and I am not receiving any medical
treatment at this time.
EDUCATION
1999 - 2004: SOMETHING SCHOOL, New Town
2004 to date: SOMETHING COLLEGE, New Town
QUALIFICATIONS
GCSE - English Literature (B)
Geography (B)
English Language (C)
Mathematics (C)
Biology (C)
Chemistry (D)
Hotel & Catering Operations BTEC National Diploma
NON-ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS
Duke of Edinburgh Award (Bronze)
RESPONSIBILITIES/OFFICES HELD AT SCHOOL/COLLEGE
Captain First Eleven School Cricket Team
Cadet Sergeant in the Army Cadet Force
LEISURE INTERESTS
Playing Cricket, Reading, Chess
WORK EXPERIENCE
2004 to date The Bridge Hotel Variety of jobs within the hotel (evenings and weekends)
2003 - 2004 The Bridge Hotel Waiter (weekends)
CAREER OBJECTIVES
I have enjoyed my BTEC course and have done well. I want to further a career in catering and would like to
combine this with my interest in the Army.
REFEREES
Mr. S. Johnson Mr. C. Richards
Headmaster The Manager
Something College The Bridge Hotel
New Town New Town
Lancs Lancs
BL25 7ST BL20 5ET
Curriculum Vitae: Example 3
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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PERSONAL DETAILS
Name: Jonathon Peter KIRBY
Address: The Farm, River Lane, Switcham, Norfolk, IP23 6JD
Tel No: 0000-00000 (days/evenings)
Date of Birth: 12 May 1990
Nationality: British
Marital Status: Single
Health: Good. I have suffered no serious illness or injury and I am not receiving any medical
treatment at this time.
EDUCATION
2001 to date: SOMETHING SCHOOL, Switcham
QUALIFICATIONS
Predicted Grades GCSE: Biology (C)
English Language (C)
Mathematics (C)
NON-ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENTS
Have won a number of inter-school swimming championships
RESPONSIBILITIES/OFFICES HELD AT SCHOOL/COLLEGE
Junior NCO in the Army Cadet Force
LEISURE INTERESTS
Horses, hill walking
WORK EXPERIENCE
2005 to date Tescos - Assistant (weekends)
2003 - 2005 Something Newsagents Morning Paper Round
CAREER OBJECTIVES
I am competitive and mentally and physically strong. I want to join the army and also follow my interest in
riding so would like to join the Household Cavalry.
REFEREES
Mr. S. Thomas R. Wainwright
Something School Tesco
Switcham Switcham
Norfolk IP24 7LN Norfolk IP23 2NU
Curriculum Vitae: Example 4
UNIT 1 - Your C.V.
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Checklist on your C.V.
Look at your draft and compare it against the examples given here.
Does it contain the four essentials:
• PERSONAL DETAILS
• EDUCATION
• LEISURE INTERESTS
• REFEREES
Is it on A4 paper?
Is it the right length?
Are the dates you have given correct?
Have you asked your chosen referees if they are agreeable?
Have you checked the spelling?
If you are happy you could now get it typed - and do not forget to
ask someone else to check the final article.
Now you are all set to have it photocopied (or print a second copy)
Store your C.V. somewhere that it can be kept flat, crisp and clean
Look at your draft and compare it against the examples given here.
Does it contain the four essentials:
• Personal Details
• Education
• Leisure Interests
• 2 Referees
Is it on A4 paper?
Is it the right length?
Are the dates you have given correct?
Have you given details of 2 referees?
Have you asked your chosen referees if they are agreeable?
Have you checked the spelling?
If you are happy you could now get it typed - and do not forget to
ask someone else to check the final article.
Now you are all set to have it photocopied (or print a second copy).
Store your C.V. somewhere that it can be kept flat, crisp and clean.
UNIT 1 - Your C.V
Checklist on your C.V.
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Application Forms
• Most employers have application forms. On them, you sign a declaration that the
facts that you have given about yourself are correct and used in the early stages.
• The interview shortlist is usually decided from the information they provide.
• At whichever point you have to complete such a form, always tackle it carefully.
The degree of care you show in undertaking this sometimes tedious task tells the
reader much about you.
• Complete it in black ink (it reproduces better if it has to be photocopied) using a
good pen or ball pen and avoid crossings out or smudges.
• If you are doing it at home or off the employer’s premises, make sure you have a
flat clean surface on which to write.
• Read the form well first - as you would an exam paper - and think out your
answers before putting pen to paper.
• If you are instructed to use BLOCK CAPITALS - make sure you do and from
beginning to end.
• Care counts for a lot so … Get it right!
The form will usually ask you to give your SURNAME IN A SEPARATE BOX TO
YOUR FIRST NAMES.
The SURNAME more often than not comes first with Mr. Mrs. Ms. Miss printed
alongside - cross out whichever three are not applicable in your case.
It will look something like this:
SURNAME: Mr. Mrs. Ms. Miss FIRST NAMES:
Remember to have your C.V. with you at all times, especially when you might be
asked to complete an application form. It makes life a lot easier for you as
contained in it you will have the kind of detailed factual information you do not
necessarily carry in your head, all ready checked and correct, covering
qualifications, dates and grades.
Some application forms can be quite long and complicated. If there are questions
that you do not understand ask someone to explain after you have completed what
you can.
Do not leave questions unanswered if they do not apply to you. Simply state
N/A, this means ‘not applicable’. By doing this, the reader can see that you have
not left out anything by mistake.
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There are certain phrases that you could come across that could do
with clarifying. For instance:
FORENAMES: Same as first or given names
SURNAME: This is your last name or family name
SOURCE OF: They want to know where you heard about the
vacancy
APPLICATION: If it was a newspaper advert, state which paper
and the date the advert appeared
NEXT OF KIN: They want to know the names, and sometimes
the address as well, of the person most closely
related to you. If you are unmarried it is more
likely to be your father, mother or guardian. If
you are married, it will be your husband or wife
DEPENDANTS: They want to know if there are people that you
are responsible for, such as children
UNIT 1 - Application Forms
Terms
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2008 115
Completing an Application Form -
Right and Wrong
Following are a couple of examples of completed application forms.
Example 1 contains some basic and commonly made mistakes. Can you spot
them? There are 11 in all. You can check them with the answers provided below:
1. Under SURNAME: has not used BLOCK CAPITALS
2. Under FIRST NAME(S): has put FIRST NAMES IN SURNAME BOX
3. Under ADDRESS: has not put the postal code
4. Under DATE OF BIRTH: has put current year instead of year of birth
5. Under PLACE OF BIRTH: should be Gimchurch, Middlesex
6. Under NATIONALITY: should be BRITISH
7. Under DETAILS OF DISABILITIES OR SERIOUS ILLNESS: has left blank
8. Under LEISURE ACTIVITIES: Football spelt wrongly
9. Under NEXT OF KIN: relationship should be Father & his address & phone no
not given
10. Under QUALIFICATIONS: has omitted Biology grade
11. Under REFEREES: only one given, should be two
In example 2 however, James has made a good job of completing the form clearly
and fully
UNIT 1 - Application Forms
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116 CVQO - UNIT 1 PROJECT RESOURCE BOOK
Example 1: Completed Application - The Wrong Way
W
R
O
N
G
BLOGGS AND BLOGGS LIMITED
PLEASE RETURN THIS APPLICATION FORM TO: THE PERSONNEL DEPT
BLOGGS AND BLOGGS LTD
GIMCHURCH
MIDDLESEX
CONFIDENTIAL APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT
-Source of application Date of Application
T'· ':', .'··:'· ·s/:/:. :/:/:.
Post applied for:
T.·· ²::·.·'s .'·t
Surname: Mr.Mrs.Miss.Ms First Name(s):
T::·s ?:':·' l·:·
Address: - T'· ?·· Telephone Number(s):
i::'.:' :::: · ::::::
?!!'·s·v
Date of Birth: Place of Birth: Nationality:
· · :. ]·s·':' I·¡'s'
Marital Status: Age of Children:
:·¡'· h/²
Details of Disabilities or Serious Illness:
Do You Hold: A Current Driving Licence (Class): h` Details of any Endorsements: h/²
Do you own a House: h` A Car: h`
Leisure Activities:
7':,·¡ ¯··'':''
NEXT OF KIN
Surname: l·:· First Name(s): T·'· T::·s Relationship: i··!
Address: Telephone Number(s):
Education: Schools, Colleges, Polytechnics, Universities:
i::'.:' ::'··' i::'.:' ?!!'·s·v
l':·t .·''·¡· ·| ¯.''· I!.::'·· ¯·s'··· ?!!'·s·v
Qualifications:
i.:I I·¡'s' /:·¡ (²) ?:''s (²) i··¡:·', (l) ¯··:' (.) l·'·¡,
Referees: Give Names and Address
?¯ T ::''
l':·t .·''·¡· ·| ¯.''· I!.::'··
]¡'::, ¯·s'··· ?!!v
?T· s /T
UNIT 1 - Application Forms
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2008 117
Example 2: Completed Application - The Right Way
R
I
G
H
T
BLOGGS AND BLOGGS LIMITED
PLEASE RETURN THIS APPLICATION FORM TO: THE PERSONNEL DEPT
BLOGGS AND BLOGGS LTD
GIMCHURCH
MIDDLESEX
CONFIDENTIAL APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT
Source of application Date of Application
T]I '²//l .]¯`h/./I ·s/:/:. :/:/:.
Post applied for:
T/h/`¯ ²..`/hT: ./I¯¯ (¯I¯ ²/T/.)
Surname: Mr.Mrs.Miss.Ms First Name(s):
l¯`hh T²?I: ?/.]²I/
Address: - T'· ?·· Telephone Number(s):
i::'.:' :::: · :::::: :::::
?!!'·s·v ?T ·/I
Date of Birth: Place of Birth: Nationality:
· · ss ]²¯¯`h ?/''T l¯/T/:]
Marital Status: Age of Children:
:/hi/I h/²
Details of Disabilities or Serious Illness: h···
Do You Hold: A Current Driving Licence (Class): h` Details of any Endorsements: h/²
Do you own a House: h` A Car: h`
Leisure Activities:
7/²l/hi ¯``Tl²// `¯h/T]`/`il ./hI?²
NEXT OF KIN
Surname: l¯`hh First Name(s): T`]h Relationship: ¯²T]I¯
Address: - T]I ?``¯ Telephone Number(s):
/?.]/¯.] ?/''/I:IT ?T ·/I :::: · :::::: :::::
Education: Schools, Colleges, Polytechnics, Universities:
i::'.:' ::'··' i::'.:' ?!!'·s·v
l':·t .·''·¡· ·| ¯.''· I!.::'·· ¯·s'··· ?!!'·s·v
Qualifications: i.:I Ihi//:] /²hi(²) ?²T]:(²) iI`i¯²7]l(l) ¯¯Ih.](.) l/`/`il(.)
² /I|I/: T²¯Ih ²h' ²h²/T/hi ¯I://T: ?²T]: ²77//I' ?²T]: iI`i¯²7]l
Referees: Give Names and Address
?¯ T :?/T] ?¯: ¯ :T²h'/hi
l/²h¯ .`//IiI `¯ ¯/¯T]I¯ I'/.²T/`h - :`/T] |/Ih
]/i]h²l ¯/h:T`hI ?/''T i/?.]/¯.] ?/''T
?T· s/T ?T· 7T
UNIT 1 - Application Forms
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118 CVQO - UNIT 1 PROJECT RESOURCE BOOK
• Have you read the form carefully?
• Do you understand all the questions?
• Have you noted special instructions like using BLOCK CAPITALS?
• Have you noted which order to enter your names?
• Do you have a good black pen/biro?
• Are dates/grades given consistent with those on your C.V.?
• Have you thought out an answer to all questions?
• Have you answered all the questions?
UNIT 1 - Application Forms
Application Form Checklist
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Typical Application Letter Layout
12 The Avenue
New Town
Middlesex
MC2 1LX
Mr. L. C. Smith
The Personnel Manager
Wyvern Engineering Company Limited
Saxon Industrial Estate
New Town
Middlesex
MC1 2QY
Ref. AC/221/J
20th July 2008
Dear Mr. Smith,
Re: Accounts Clerk. Your Advertisement: The Chronicle 19.7.08.
Yours sincerely
²·!·: ¯'·':'·
ANDREW FLETCHER
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
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The Words That Get The Employer’s Message Across
Replying to an advertisement, the right words will not come until you have read and
re-read the advertisement and have broken down exactly what it is that has attracted
you to the vacancy. Try doing it this way:
Underline in red the words that caught your eye. They might have been:
EMPLOYER’S NAME It might be a company you know something about.
You might know people there or they might be
situated close to where you live.
THE TYPE OF BUSINESS Its products or services
THE JOB ITSELF It could be just what you have in mind for yourself
THE COMPANY LOCATION It might be situated close to you - or perhaps it offers
transport by a company bus.
Hopefully it will be a combination of several of these factors. Also,
descriptive phrases might be important to you, such as:
• An international company
• A multi-million pound turnover
• An expanding company
• Part of a major group of companies
• Offering excellent prospects
• Offering excellent training facilities
• Offering a clean working environment
• The UK market leader in…
Underline in blue or black the specified requirements they are asking for that
suit your abilities. They could be:
• Educated to…standard
• An analytical mind
• Good communication skills
• An interest in computers
• A bright young person willing to train in…
• Aged….years
• A smart appearance.
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
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The Words That Get Your Message Across
Now look back at your personal assessments and think about the job you are
applying for - if and how you fit the bill and whether it satisfies your requirements. If
you are clear on these points, this letter will not be a problem.
If all the signs are good, you will be feeling enthusiastic. So let’s start writing….
SPELLING OUT YOUR POTENTIAL
Be keen. Be clear. Be sincere.
The messages you need to get across are, ‘I am keen, I am clear and I am sincere’.
FIRST PARAGRAPH: I am keen
You are making a statement you are keen on the vacancy.
SECOND PARAGRAPH: I am clear and understand what I have read
Show that you have read the advertisement carefully and have a good
understanding of the job and company requirements. Say why you think you match
their requirements.
THIRD PARAGRAPH: I am clear and business like
Make it easier for the company by saying you are available for interview and when
you are able to start work. If you make these facts clear then it can save the
company a lot of time making and re-making appointments to suit a number of
people apart from yourself.
FOURTH PARAGRAPH: I am sincere
Round off the letter by leaving them in no doubt that you are sincerely interested in
the job.
Application Letter: Example A
A nice little advert that tells you all you need to know - the job, what it involves,
the type of company they are and the type of person they are looking for:
I have underlined the points that most suitable applicants will find relevant and
attractive. You could apply along the following lines (see next page).
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
JUNIOR ADMINISTRATOR
A smart, enthusiastic young person is
required to join our energetic sales
administration team. You will be
dealing with customer enquiries and
orders mostly taken by telephone.
BLANK store is one of a multi-branch
retail chain specialising in computers.
The prospects are excellent for an
ambitious young person with initiative
and an interest in computers. Age 17-20
preferred. Apply in writing to …
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12 Sun Hill
Uckthorpe
Middlesex
MM2 0LJ
16th June 2008
Miss. J. Smith
Blank Store
2, High Street
Uckthorpe
Middlesex
MM1 6QJ
Dear Miss Smith,
Re: Your vacancy for a Junior Administrator in The Daily Chronicle 15.6.08
I have read your advertisement for a Junior Administrator and I am keen to
apply. Please find my C.V. enclosed. This would seem an ideal opportunity to
combine my interest in computers and my interest in a retailing career and I
believe that I have what it takes to match your requirements.
I am 17 years old
I care about my appearance
I am enthusiastic
I work well in a team
I like using the telephone
I have a computer and have done some programming
I am ambitious
I like using my initiative
I leave school on 25th June and would be available to start work immediately
afterwards. If you wish to see me for an interview, I would be pleased to
attend any day after 4 pm or on a Saturday. After I have left school I could
come any time.
I hope that you will consider me a good candidate for this job.
Yours sincerely
7 7:¡·
PAUL PAGE
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
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Application Letter: Example B
This is a very short advert that tells you very little. Therefore there is little to pick up
from it to use in your letter. Again the points you might find attractive are underlined
but you will need to build on that information and add to it if you are to write a good
letter of application.
What is the employer looking for when they sift through the applications? They are a
hairdressing business looking for a junior urgently. These are things you know, but
what else? Try to look at the job through the employer’s eyes and make some
careful assumptions.
• They are likely to be looking for:
• Someone with an interest in hair styling
• A creative person
• Someone with a smart appearance
• A hard-working person
• Someone who gets on with people
You could apply along the following lines (see next page).
Key Words Used
Keen: A good positive word
Believe: Shows confidence in own judgement
Ideal: Shows you are attaching importance to finding the ‘right’ job and not
just any old job
Hope: Re-enforces keenness and is a polite, nice way to round off the letter.
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
BLANK HAIR SALON
JUNIOR
Required urgently to join
our team. Top wages paid.
Apply in writing to….
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124 CVQO - UNIT 1 PROJECT RESOURCE BOOK
10 Cedar Way
Upten
Gloucester
GL15 9JJ
13th June 2008
Mrs. J. Brown
Style Hair Salon
5, King Street
Upten
Gloucester
GL20 6SU
Dear Mrs. Brown,
Re: Your vacancy for a Junior, The Daily Chronicle 12.06.08.
I have read your advertisement for a Junior and I am keen to apply. Please
find my C.V. enclosed.
This vacancy seems an ideal opportunity to train with a local and well-
established hair salon and I believe I could make a success with the job.
I enjoy styling my own hair and other people’s
I care about my appearance
I get on well with people - all ages groups
I am hard working
I could start work immediately
Having left school on the 28th May and just come back from holiday, I am
hoping to find a job in hairdressing that I can start soon.
If you would like to interview me, I would be pleased to come and see you
anytime except next Tuesday. I hope that you will consider me for this vacancy.
Yours sincerely
: h:'s··
SHEILA WATSON
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
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Letter Asking for an Application Form
You will sometimes be invited to write off for an application form. In these cases, a
very brief letter is all that is needed - a longer letter should be sent when you return
the application form. You can write along these lines:
Letter to Accompany an Application Form
Let us go back to the letter in reply to our Example A advertisement and see
how this particular application letter can be easily changed to accompany an
application form. It is the first and last paragraphs that need altering - then it
does the job well. These could be written along the following lines:
22 Orchard Drive
Bedford
MK41 2JG
17th August 2008
Miss P.J. Jones
Personnel Manager
Blank Electronics Company
High View Estate
Bedford
MK25 6PL
Dear Miss Jones,
Re: Your vacancy for Trainee Electronics Engineer
Daily Chronicle 16.08.08.
I would like to apply for the vacancy of Trainee Electronics Engineer with your
company and I would be grateful if you would send me an application form.
Yours sincerely
K Brown
KATE BROWN
Thank you for sending me the application form, which I have completed and have
pleasure in returning to you together with my C.V. I leave school on the 29th June
and I could be available to start work immediately afterwards. If you wish to see
me for an interview, I would be pleased to attend any day after 4.00 pm or earlier
in the day if two days notice is given.
UNIT 1 - Application Letters
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UNIT 1 - Application Letters
A letter accompanying a C.V. can be brief but be ‘punchy’.
Think about it and draft it out until you have it right.
The main points to remember are:
• Use good quality plain A4 paper
• Use a good pen or ball point
• Use black ink
• Keep your lines straight
• Watch your writing
• Watch your grammar
• Watch your spelling
• Keep a copy
• Keep your application letters in a file clipped together
with the original advertisement
The other points that are easy to forget but worth remembering are:
• Your address should be written in full (remember the postcode) top
right of the paper, followed by the date written in full.
• Then at top left of the paper you should put the name or the title of
the person to whom you have been asked to send the application,
followed underneath by the name of the employer and the address
with below that any reference numbers given to you in the
advertisement.
• If you have been given the name of a person to whom the letter
and application should be sent, start the letter: “Dear Mr. Smith” or
whoever. If the recipient is a woman and it is not known whether
she is a Mrs. or a Miss, use Ms, e.g.
“Dear Ms Smith”. Sign off with “Yours sincerely”, and your signature.
• If the person who will receive the letter is not named, use “Dear Sir”
and sign the letter off “Yours faithfully” followed again by your
signature.
• Underneath your own signature it is a good idea to print your name.
Show them you have style…
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PASS COMMAND VERBS DESCRIPTION
DESCRIBE Give a clear description that includes all the relevant
features. Think of it as ‘painting a picture with words’.
DEFINE Clearly explain what a particular term means and give
an example, if appropriate, to show what you mean.
EXPLAIN Set out in detail the meaning of something, with
reasons. This is more difficult than describing or listing
so it can help to give an example to show what you
mean. Start by introducing the topic then give the
‘how’ or ‘why’.
IDENTIFY Point out (ie choose the right one) or give a list of the
main features.
LIST Provide the information in a list, rather than in
continuous writing.
OUTLINE Write a clear description but not a detailed one.
PLAN Work out and plan how you would carry out a task or
activity.
STATE Write a clear and full account.
SUMMARISE Write down the main points or essential features.
Glossary
MERIT COMMAND VERBS DESCRIPTION
ANALYSE Identify separate factors, say how they are related and
how each one contributes to the topic.
COMPARE/CONTRAST Identify the main factors that apply in two or more
situations and explain the similarities and differences
or advantages and disadvantages.
DEMONSTRATE Provide several relevant examples or related evidence
which clearly support the arguments you are making.
This may include showing practical skills.
DESIGN Create a plan, proposal or outline to illustrate a
relatively complex concept or idea.
EXPLAIN IN DETAIL Provide details and give reasons and/or evidence to
clearly support the argument you are making.
HOW / WHY JUSTIFY Give reasons or evidence to support your opinion or
view to show how you arrived at these conclusions.
Glossary
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DISTINCTION COMMAND
VERBS
DESCRIPTION
APPRAISE Consider the plus and minus points and give a
reasoned judgement.
ASSESS Must make a judgement on the importance of
something (similar to evaluate).
CRITICISE Review a topic or issue objectively and weigh up both
plus and minus points before making a decision.
DRAW CONCLUSIONS Use the evidence you have provided to reach a
reasoned judgement.
EVALUATE Review the information then bring it together to form a
conclusion. Give evidence for each of your views or
statements.
Glossary
Glossary
Cadet Vocational Qualification Organisation
3 ARCHIPELAGO,
LYON WAY, FRIMLEY,
CAMBERLEY, SURREY GU16 7ER
Tel: 01276 601718
www.cvqo.org
Acknowledgments
Defence images are provided courtesy of the MoD ©Crown Copyright,
images from www.defenceimages.mod.uk
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