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Michael A. Schoeppner, "Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America" (Cambridge UP, 2019): Between 1822 and 1857, eight Southern states barred the ingress of all free black maritime workers...

Michael A. Schoeppner, "Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America" (Cambridge UP, 2019): Between 1822 and 1857, eight Southern states barred the ingress of all free black maritime workers...

FromNew Books in History


Michael A. Schoeppner, "Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America" (Cambridge UP, 2019): Between 1822 and 1857, eight Southern states barred the ingress of all free black maritime workers...

FromNew Books in History

ratings:
Length:
54 minutes
Released:
Apr 4, 2019
Format:
Podcast Episode

Description

Between 1822 and 1857, eight Southern states barred the ingress of all free black maritime workers. According to lawmakers, they carried a 'moral contagion' of abolitionism and black autonomy that could be transmitted to local slaves. Those seamen who arrived in Southern ports in violation of the laws faced incarceration, corporal punishment, an incipient form of convict leasing, and even punitive enslavement. The sailors, their captains, abolitionists, and British diplomatic agents protested this treatment. They wrote letters, published tracts, cajoled elected officials, pleaded with Southern officials, and litigated in state and federal courts. By deploying a progressive and sweeping notion of national citizenship - one that guaranteed a number of rights against state regulation - they exposed the ambiguity and potential power of national citizenship as a legal category. Ultimately, the Fourteenth Amendment recognized the robust understanding of citizenship championed by Antebellum free people of color, by people afflicted with 'moral contagion’. In his new book Moral Contagion: Black Atlantic Sailors, Citizenship, and Diplomacy in Antebellum America(Cambridge University Press, 2019), Michael A. Schoeppner tells their story. Listen in.Adam McNeil is PhD student in History at the University of Delaware where he is an African American Public Humanities Initiative and Colored Conventions Project Scholar. He received his M.A. in History at Simmons College in 2018 and his B.S. in History at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University in 2015. Follow him @CulturedModesty on Twitter to learn more about upcoming interviews.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Released:
Apr 4, 2019
Format:
Podcast Episode