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The surfer who fought apartheid to become a world champion: Cass Collier learnt to surf on segregated beaches – now he's fighting apartheid's legacy

The surfer who fought apartheid to become a world champion: Cass Collier learnt to surf on segregated beaches – now he's fighting apartheid's legacy

FromOutlook


The surfer who fought apartheid to become a world champion: Cass Collier learnt to surf on segregated beaches – now he's fighting apartheid's legacy

FromOutlook

ratings:
Length:
23 minutes
Released:
May 5, 2021
Format:
Podcast Episode

Description

Cass Collier grew up surfing with his dad in apartheid South Africa, where signs designated the beaches as "whites-only", "blacks-only", or "coloureds-only" areas. The rules were enforced, often brutally, not only by the police but also by white surfers who would tell the Collier family to "go to your own beach" if they tried to surf in areas reserved for white people. But Cass's dad Ahmed, a pioneering South African surfer and member of the ANC, never backed down, teaching Cass that he had a right to be on the sand and in the water at any beach he chose. Cass eventually became a world-class surfer and went on to win the International Surfing Association Big Wave championships in Mexico in 1999, alongside his friend and fellow Rastafarian Ian Armstrong. He tells Anu Anand about the joy of big waves, and remembers the heartbreak and sacrifices he and his family faced en route to the world title.

Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com

Picture: Cass Collier surfs at Hout Bay, Cape Town, South Africa in June 2002
Credit: Grant Ellis/Getty Images
Released:
May 5, 2021
Format:
Podcast Episode