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1971: A year that changed food forever?: Dan Saladino asks if the year 1971 was a turning point for how the world eats?

1971: A year that changed food forever?: Dan Saladino asks if the year 1971 was a turning point for how the world eats?

FromThe Food Programme


1971: A year that changed food forever?: Dan Saladino asks if the year 1971 was a turning point for how the world eats?

FromThe Food Programme

ratings:
Length:
29 minutes
Released:
May 9, 2021
Format:
Podcast Episode

Description

Dan Saladino asks if the year 1971 was a turning point for how the world eats?

It was a year of contrasts: McDonalds increased the portion sizes of the beef burger it served with the launch of the Quarter Pounder, meanwhile one of the best selling books of 1971 was full of vegetarian recipes, 'Diet for a Small Planet' by Frances Moore Lappe, which argued hunger could be eliminated from the world if we stopped eating meat and embraced plant-based diets.

In the UK the food industry was innovating like never before and creating new types of processed foods and supermarkets were expanding across the country. Some embraced these changes, whereas others reacted to them, a split that was reflected in the publication of two important books that year. Delia Smith's 'How to Cheat at Cooking' offered tips on how tinned convenience foods could be used to create quick and delicious dishes, whereas, Jane Grigson's Good Things, was a celebration of slower, seasonal and more traditional cooking.

Senior staff writer at Bon Appetit magazine Alex Beggs argues 1971 was a turning point for food and explains how social changes and economic forces helped transform the way people ate in the United States (from the opening of the first branch of Starbucks to cups of instant noodles going on sale). Food historian Polly Russell explains how a similar process was also underway in the UK and how we can see the legacy of that transformation in our food today.

Dan also speaks to Professor Tim Lang about the importance of the Concert for Bangladesh, organised by George Harrison to fight famine in south Asia. He also catches up with Frances Moore Lappe to ask what 'Diet for a Small Planet' can tell us about food and our world fifty years on.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino
Released:
May 9, 2021
Format:
Podcast Episode