Understanding the Technology Component and Managing the Project

 Subrata

Sen Gupta; ID No: 40916030  Tarek Al Mahmud; ID No: 410170xx  Mudassar Mahmood Khan; ID No: 41018003  S.M. Jamshed Hasan; ID No: 41018043  Fuad Hasan; ID No: 41120021

 Even

though CRM stands for Customer relationship management, there is more to this system than the name suggests. CRM deals with the many interactions a company will have with their customers. The central goal of this system is to improve the relationship that a company has with its customers, and the goal of doing this is to increase profits and become more competitive.

 Customer

relationship management is a way to identify, acquire, and retain customers, a business' greatest asset. Research has shown that companies that create satisfied, loyal customers have more repeated business, lower customeracquisition costs, and stronger brand value - all of which translates into better financial performance.

 Sales

automation  Marketing automation  Customer service/ Call center  Analytics  Channel Management  Integration

 Almost

inevitably, newly defined CRM work processes require more structure and information management support than old ones.  CRM technology consists of the computer tools (hardwares, softwares and networks) employed to manage the information and process we use to deliver customer experiences.

 The

business functions add significantly to the general understanding of how the company operates geographically through their knowledge of what kind of work are done and what business connections are required to ensure a positive experience for the customer.

 Technology

models describe the major pieces of the technical infrastructure: hardware, software and network.  The business network shows the way work and information must flow to deliver the customer experience.

Business View
Owner’s Wants View

Technology View
Business Locations

Owner’s Needs View

Business Networks

 Using

Knowledge about what work needs to get done, where and by whom(how many), the IT team can plan where to locate computer servers that will optimize business and application performance.

 Current

application software and connections (interfaces) between them result from the system inventory.  The future system architecture will show the integration of new software (additions or replacements) and what new interfaces will be required.

 The

system architecture is often shown in stages such as the following:  Where we are today (created once during strategic planning)  What we will have after this project is completed  Where we plan to be when we are finished (created once during strategic planning, but updated as plans change).

 Information

Technology defines a network architecture showing all the network connections (including backup redundancy) that are required to support the system.  The important thing is that the IT team has an overall plan and architecture that is guiding the development of a company’s CRM solution.

 There

is another good way of describing the system architecture.

 The

view is organized around the company’s organizational structure.

This view is from the perspective of what kind of work needs to get done, operational or decision making activities.

 Most

of the responsibility for the technology component lies with the IT department. handoff between business and Information Technology happens very early, during the development of the owner’s view.

 The

 Few

people outside the IT profession have any confidence in their ability to make technology decisions.  Some elements of the IT solution require little, if any, perspective of the business, and others require a great deal.

 Application

software tells the computer what information is needed to make decision and how to perform activities based on that information.  Picking the right software to automate processes and capture and store business information requires functional knowledge and expertise from people who know the work that needs to get done.

 The

bottom line is this: the functional team needs the information about the business impact of the different options available for some of the key decisions. are many decision making tools in general use, and one of the simplest is the decision matrix.

 There

 The

decision matrix is a useful tool for comparing two or more alternatives across multiple factors.  A good way of getting started on a decision is to put a brief comment in each cell that describes the characteristics or impact of the alternative.

 One

of the first decisions that must be made is whether to buy a product of the shelf or build a customized solution. more options become available for business activities, the choices continue to grow.

 As

 This

is another tough decision, and it’s related to the “build or buy” choice. single, totally integrated solution helps to minimize the amount of customization that needs to be done. big problem is that most integrated software solutions are proprietary.

A

 The

 There

are several integration issues that must be faced if the organization opts for integrating best-in-class components.

 Both

the form of the data and the quality of the content can differ.  New processes must be integrated into the existing process environment. This involves all of the change management activities.

 The

new technology must be integrated into the existing technical environment. This is largely the responsibility of the IT organization, but some issues keep rising from time to time.

 Listing

names of applications and vendors is so time-sensitive that, in a year or two, it becomes meaningless. In addition, keeping up with all the changes in what they do or how well they do it simply becomes impossible.

 Different

people learn in different ways and need different types of information to make a good decision. are several places that’s helps a company make the decision that is best for the business: internet, consultants and books.

 There

 Steps

of application selection process:

 Identify

important technology architecture and business requirements.  List the activities that are identified as being part of the project.  Generate a list of the software applications that are to be evaluated.

 Deliver

a request for proposal(RFP) to vendors listing all the business functionality requirements.  Evaluate vendor responses, evaluate functionality and talk with current users of the software.  Score each application for the appropriateness of fit to every business activity.

 The

reason there’s a dilemma about where to start is that most companies even today get very little of their data from web sources.  The web sources provide only about 15% of new data captured.  Web capture data is likely to be pretty high quality because presumably the customer himself/herself has supplied the information directly to the website.

 Few

companies have enough web data to really answer the important questions they have about their customer relationships.  To get more information, we care forced to supplement web data with older (legacy) data.  The way to get around this problem is to begin integration efforts offline, using either web or non-web data as appropriate to the project.

 Customer

information is a company asset and must be treated as such.  The business functions are responsible for identifying what information is important to them.  Information Technology has an equally important role; they must capture the information the way the business users describe it – not because it’s easier to implement or something else.

 Steps

of application selection process:

 Identify

important technology architecture and business requirements.  List the activities that are identified as being part of the project.  Generate a list of the software applications that are to be evaluated.

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