4.

2
4.2 A 4.2 B 4.2 C 4.2 D 4.2 E 4.2 F 4.2 G 4.2 H 4.2 I 4.2 J

Contemporary Housing in Delhi
Introduction Colonial development Refugee Rehabilitation Housing Post Independence Plotted Husing Urban Villages Govt. Housing

DDA housing
Cooperative housing Builder Apartments Future of housing in Delhi

1 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2

4.2 A 4.2 B 4.2 C 4.2 D 4.2 E 4.2 F 4.2 G 4.2 H

4.2 A

Introduction
Until 1911, most of the city population was concentrated within the confines of THE WALLED CITY. The area consisted of narrow streets and bazaars and the chowks as major COMMUNITY SPACES. Therefore the character developed in the city promoted people to live in CLOSE ASSOCIATION. HAVELIS were the major residential units and had the COURTYARD in the middle. A total contrast to Shajanabaad, the city was laid on WESTERN PRINCIPLES with wide avenues marked by trees and BUNGALOW TYPOLOGY of construction with local climatic adaptations. Delhi is a city with different urban layers of planning, each having its own architectural character. There is a certain transition of urban forms and street scape as one walks by the congested organic developments of the walled city to the lavishly green modern imperial planning of New Delhi

Lutyyen‟s Delhi

1911

3

1

6

Independence The term URBAN VILLAGE was coined in 1962 and involved development of the peripheral villages by interventions of private developers and their INCLUSION INTO THE MAIN CITY infrastructure.

1947

The huge influx from Pakistan after independence forced the MINISTRY OF REHABILITATION to initiate huge REHABILITATION COLONIES.

9

3 42 4 54 4 6 98 7 5 5 6 71 6 0 8 2 82

11

5

9

3 1 3 6 18 7 1 0 1 1 2 1 1

1 0

9 1 7

25 83 4

1 7 11 2 9 1 3 2

Urban village

1962

2 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2

Govt. employee housing

1965

DDA came into power and developed various housing units to promote the development in accordance with the land use patterns of the various MASTER PLANS.

The city due e to over pressure of the increasing population and pressure on its resources has expanded and includes the suburbs and urban villages

` REFUGEE ` URBAN VILLAGE ` GOVERNMENT ` DDA ` COOPORATIVE

Self – financing scheme Co-op housing

1977

DDA gave land to cooperative societies which promoted various types of CO-OP SOCIETIES , generally 2-3 STOREY.

1980

Private builers

1992

The PRIVATE DEVELOPERS were majorly active in the NCR region outside the Delhi boundaries and developed high rise structures with MULTIPLE RESIDENTIAL UNITS. The se structures were interspersed by well PLANNED green spaces.

4.2 A 4.2 B 4.2 C 4.2 D 4.2 E 4.2 F 4.2 G 4.2 H

4.2 A

Introduction
NEW DELHI • Based upon bungalow typology, buildings were set amidst open land and gardens • The avenues are lined up by wide pavements and rows of trees • Was based on the „garden city‟ concept • Depended upon motor transport • Low density • Low rise housing typology • Medium density colonies & multi-storied tenements 1911 (built by DDA) • Planned development • Subsidized rental housing 1947 for government employees • Dedicated land use SHAHJAHANABAAD Housing Trends Post Independence FIRST MUNICIPAL COMMITTEE Bye laws enforced Sadar Bazaar, Subzi Mandi and suburbs NEW Delhi was built. Shifting of capital from Calcutta and Delhi Delhi IMPROVEMENT TRUST (1937) Rehabilitation – shift from slums and sub standard areas Post independence ministry of rehabilitation came into the housing scene, launched multi-storied house construction programs on a massive scale. 200% population increase- unplanned growth. TOWN PLANING ORGANIZATION Setup by Ministry Of Health, GOI 1957; DDA came into existence which assumed the responsibility for planned city development. MCD, NDMC , local bodies emerged to maintain the developed area During the 1950s and 1960s private developers and housing companies became active.. Social and physical infrastructure of a reasonably high level was provided in these privately developed colonies. Plotted development has been a special feature of housing activities in Delhi during post independence period. Prior to 1961; private developers built two dwelling units in a plot, ground floor and first floor. After 1962; private developers eliminated mostly, DDA became sole authority for development. 1st MASTER PLAN Published for 1961- 1981 DDA launched group housing program in 1966. 1960s to 70s; Multi-family housing units or flats in multi storied buildings became dominant 2ND MASTER PLAN Published for 1981-2001 Acquisition of 20,000 Ha and urban area increased During 1980s; cooperative sector gained importance.

1962

• Primarily composed of courtyard house typology • Even the widest of avenues in the old city were defined by building facades

2 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2

1965

1977

1980

1992

City was based on trade prospects where people lived in close association • Basically a pedestrianized city with narrow streets • Densely populated • Row and medium rise building • Narrow and congested streets • Organic development • Mixed income groups • Mixed land and building used

4.2 B

4.2 A 4.2 B 4.2 C 4.2 D 4.2 D 4.2 F 4.2 G

Lutyen‟s Delhi
ThE New Capital
•An abundance of open spaces, designated spaces for commercial, business, social and religious use. Gazetteer officers Bungalow Zone

Open spaces Well landscaped and maintained Unused and vacant following a regular geometric pattern hierarchy primary
Service spaces Dwellings

1533 1857 1911 1947 1962

New Delhi was built as the capital of British India. It was designed to reflect the grandeur of British empire over the Indian subcontinent. The new city was planned with reference to major old monuments. Axiality, symmetry, focus, true shapes, rhythm etc. were employed at city and building level. The site on the east bank of Yamuna was chosen for the new city. Population in walled city : 250-400 pph Population in Lutyen’s Delhi : <80 pph Key Features of Lutyen’s plan •Government complex at the centre. Around it the road networks and city structure was developed.

Areas subdivided into triangular sectors together forming a hexagon •Axial planning which led to hexagonal grids. •Buildings were placed in symmetry along the main vista. •The roads were broad and tree lined. The roads, nodes and residential spaces followed a strict hierarchy.
•Vista – road with unique landscape treatment •Janpath (formerly queensway)

Each sector has 15-18 bungalows Each bungalow is 2-4 acres with a density of 10-15 persons per acre 3-4 bedrooms and 4-5 verandahs

1965 1977 1980 1992 2011

•Ashoka road

•Roads in indian clerk area

- the bungalow: an object in a defined compound - a historical revolution in plan, form and structure of the dwelling unit - gradually more sophisticated and opulent, coming closer to the European villa - variations in size, style, variety and ornamentation - Segmental layout, following a regular grid - Staggered but symmetric form - Layout: • Living room in the center • Rooms around it • Surrounded by verandahs - single-storeyed or two-storied structure with a symmetrical layout, having a wide, multi- functional and extensive verandah around - the kitchen and servants‟ quarters located at the rear of the house - symmetrical layout - central hall and front verandah as the male domain - the inclusion of a designated “women‟s room” within the house – clear gender segregation in social interaction.

13 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2

2 F 4. JANGPURA 2.2 G 4.2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 4 3 5 Km 5 Km . RAMESH NAGAR 10.4. OLD RAJINDER NAGAR 6.2 E 4. NEW RAJINDER NAGAR 7. PATEL NAGAR 8.2 C Refugee Rehabilitation Colonies REFUGEE REHJABILITATION COLONIES 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1. TILAK NAGAR 11. MOTI NAGAR 9. KALKAJI 4.2 B 4.2 D 4.2 A 4.2 C 4. LAJPAT NAGAR 3. MALVIYA NAGAR 5. NIZAMUDDIN ` REFUGEE 10 8 9 7 5 6 1 2 11 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.

2 1977 1980 1992 2011 A typical government agency plan(1947-55) consisted of units built on a site of 60 to 70 square meters.2 E 4.2 D 4.2 H 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 DIT (1937) Failure OLD RAJINDER NAGAR •Housing for refugees of the partition •Lies in Karol Bagh zone. Land Use BUILT UP 20% Common gardens replaced personal front yards 45% 35% OPEN AREAS ROADS LAYOUT . Moti Nagar. and two Rajendra Nagars.2 A 4.2 G 4. south of Pusa road •Original construction type.masonry walls and asbestos cement sheet roofing OPEN SPACES Within the units–front yard and backyard rooftop Access lanes and back lanes Plots left unbuilt(136ft x 66ft) Market spine Sindhi park – largest green CHANGES IN BUILT FORM Expansion of residential accomodation Change in land use Change in typology MINISTRY OF REHABILITATION To accommodate huge influx from Pakistan Delhi – the capital city Commercial centre REHABILITATION COLONIES Nizamuddin. Brick masonry.Kalkaji and Malviya Nagar in the south. Lajpat Nagar.4. The layout of the newer housing schemes were much tighter than the Lodi colony but the rooms were the same size. The backyard was smaller and the units became part of a row or of larger blocks. To 64 sqm.2 F 4. threePatel Nagars. Ramesh Nagar and Tilak Nagar on the west of the city Plotted development Date Agency typology Density 1947 ministry of rehabilitation Plotted high density 60 du/acre TRNASFORMATION REQUIREMENTS Housing and economic need Definition of territory FAR height Plot sizes Construction Maintenance 225 G+3 44 sqm. RCC Individual residents AMENITIES 3 schools Women‟s college (Janaki Devi Mahavidyalya) Hospitall Market on the Bazaar Marg Aspirational expression of the residents 1965 4| Contemporary Delhi 4.2 B 4.2 C 4.

2 C 4.2 D 4.2 H 35 sq m Semi public areas 20 sq m Public area 38 sq m CIRCULATION Shankar road and Poorvi Marg at the periphery Unit covered area 35 sq m Promoter flat Living area Service area Open area 38sqm 10sqm 12sqm Bazaar Marg and Hemu Kalani Marg as primary streets 20 sq m Public area 13 sq m House with court Living area Service area Open area Secondary access streets and back lanes 30sqm 54sqm 29sqm 5 |Contemporary Delhi 4.2 G 30sqm 11sqm 24sqm 4.2 B LAYOUT •grid iron pattern •Variation in plot sizes •5000 plots – 1500 are 56 sq yards and rest are 86 sq yards •Small open central spaces where a part of the block is left un built •Change in construction height recently TYPES OF CLUSTERS 4.2 F House with shop Living area Service area Open area 4.2 E Unit covered area 4.4.2 A 4.2 Semi public areas .

(1977-78) NEW FRIENDS COLONY 15. (1970-71) SHANTI NIKETAN 11. 2. JANGPURA. (1973-74) GULMOHAR PARK 13.4. (1965-65) VASANT VIHAR 10.2 9 2 7 14 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 13 5 Km 5 Km . (1957-58) DEFENCE COLONY 5. (1955-56) SOUTH EXTN 4. (1960-61) EAST NIZAMUDDIN 7.2 D Plotted Housing PLOTTED HOUSING 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1. (1952-53) SUNDER NAGAR (1953-54) LAJPAT NAGAR.2 C 4. AND HAUZ KHAS 3. (1972-73) GK-2 12.2 B 4. (1963-64) GK-1 9.2 F 4.2 E 4.2 D 4. (1959-60) MAHARANI BAGH 6.2 A 4. (1980-85) UDAY PARK MALVIYA NAGAR 1 6 10 2 3 13 12 4 2 8 11 5 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 G 4. (1962-63) SAFDARJUNG ENCLAVE 8. (1974-75) SARVODAYA ENCLAVE 14.

MUNIRKA 8. PITAMPURA 9. NIMRI 5. SEELAMPUR 6. MASJID MOTH 8 1 8 4 5 6 5 6 3 ` ` REFUGEE URBAN VILLAGE 9 10 7 2 1 2 7 11 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 5 Km 5 Km 9 4 3 5 Km 5 Km .4. MUNDKA 2. WAZIRPUR 4. DABRI 3.2 E Urban Villages URBAN VILLAGES 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1. KARKARDOOMA 7.

2 A 4. Munirka. LAL DORA Transformations in Urban Villages • Loss of cultivated land and adoption of urban occupations. residential to industrial and commercial also takes place.4. Mundka. different 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 What is it ? Urban villages are the old traditional settlements within the urbanisable limit of the city. Masjid Moth etc. 6 | Contemporary Delhi 4. ABADI AREA As urban limit expands it engulfs rural villages  Village showing commercial growth eg. poor infrastructure and public amenities. URBAN VILLAGE Components of urban village Urban development on acquired agricultural land As urban limit expands it engulfs rural villages .2 H 4.2 D 4. • Migration results in residential pockets of high density. system also weakens. caste AGRICULTURAL LAND Classification based on Transformation PHIRNI  Village showing industrial growth eg. There are two parts of a village – • Agricultural land • Abadi area It is the limit of inhabited area of the village abadi which is delineated at the time of settlement or at the time of land consolidation.e.2 G 4. etc.  Village residential growth eg. Karkarduma.2 F 4. These are originally rural villages which are later after the notification are termed as urban villages wherein regulation and norms are applicable as per the jurisdiction of the authority. Pitampura. there is an over spill of the population on available suitable land as an extension to the existing village Abadi.2 E 4. With growth in population . • Division and sub-division of property leading to more built up area and lesser open spaces • Literacy rate improves due to urban influence • Traditional ties of human association weaken. • Change in land use i. This extended Abadi limit is (PHIRNI) is not recognised as “Lal Dora” but the provisions of the Land Revenue Act apply to this extended Abadi Area.2 B 4.2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 The abadi area consists of a collection of number of houses at one place occupied by persons living under common constitution and sharing land attached to the village.2 C 4. The area within the Lal Dora in a rural situation is exempt from Municipal building bye-laws or zoning regulation. Dabri etc. Wazirpur.2 D Urban Villages The term “urban village” was first brought up in the Master Plan of Delhi (MPD) – 1962. Seelampur.

2 E 4.2 A 4. 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 Releasing population when land is acquired and there is no land for earning so people tend to migrate.2 H URBAN VILLAGES HAVE BECOME A NEED FOR PLANNED AREAS.2 G 4.2 F 4.2 . 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 Attracts people who migrate in and settle down because of cheap rentals.2 C 4.2 D 4. 7 | Contemporary Delhi 4. affordability and employment opportunities in terms of Business.4.2 B 4.

None of the factories are registered. Commercialized ‘Urban Village’ Areas located in close proximity to middle or upper income residential areas had turned into commercial areas with large shops for clothes. Effluent treatment or drainage is practically non existent. Water supply is often sourced by illegally tapping into municipal service mains or boring for ground water.2 C 4.2 F 4. • Exploitation of the „Lal Dora‟ status. are exorbitantly priced. furniture and building materials. Cows and farming for their livelihood. Population density is very high in these villages resulting in congestion and inadequacy of infrastructure. • The formal markets do not have space for unorganized sectors like fruits and vegetable sellers. Village Area : 74 Hec People & Population Within the few square kilometres that is its area. History Elder people of the Delhi region testify to Munirka being one of the most beautiful villages in the region till well into the 1970s.2 D 4. big show room for electronic goods. Hence.4.2 A 4. Tikhand. Dabri etc. KarkarDuma and Nimri are some of the villages which have shown abrupt residential growth. Most employ typically 5 to 15 workers and manufacture low cost products – furniture. and a bani (woods). jackal and nilgai on at least two sides. 8 | Contemporary Delhi 4. Nawada. plastic cases and bags. India earlier it was a village of farmers domesticating Buffalos. a jangal (forest) beyond that and a jhoad (pond) on the west. Mundka. Now a commercial market and a middleclass residential Village located in South West Delhi.2 B 4.2 G 4. or cheap accomodation at the very least. These industrialized areas are found in Shalimar village. beauty parlours or computer training institutes or medical clinics. Extensive industrial or commercial establishments are conspicuous by their absence. Reason • The planned commercial complexes in new sub-cities like Dwarka or Rohini. located on Aravali range of mountain.2 E 4. door window grills. being surrounded by forest with wolf. reside. at least a 100 thousand or 1 lakh people. Munirka Village – Case Study Munirka is an urban village. Munirka (Google Earth Image) . electrical spare parts.2 Industrialized ‘urban village’ in Dabri has turned into a slum Villages showing Residential Growth Kotla Mubarakpur. automobile repair shops. • The shop sizes are very small and nappropriate in design. Seelampur. Primarily it was home to the Jats and the Brahmans particularly of the Tokas clan.2 H Industrialized ‘Urban Village’ Land use in the „urban villages‟ located near industrial areas turn into a mix of small scale manufacturing and slum type residence for the labour population. weekly markets had come up to meet the demand. Inside the village are home to a vibrant multi-cultural cosmos – people from all over India have found a home here.

Puram.2 D 4.PURAM BUILDING HEIGHTS (2007) 4. Campus) SIZE OF COMMERCIAL UNITS in sqft (2007 survey) COMMUNITY FACILITIES PARKS & OPEN SPACES CIRCULATION < 90 90-225 225-450 450 < Munirka Figure Ground 9 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 C Land Use Analysis  Residential component is as low as 45% & rapid commercialization. G+1 G+2 G+3 Land Acquisition & Transformation Cultivation was the main occupation of the villagers of Munirka prior to the acquisition of land.2 A 4.  Prevalence of basement and mezzanine for commercial activity.2 H LAND USE DISTRIBUTION OF MUNIRKA VILLAGE ( 1961) G+4 To PALAM AIRPORT RESIDENTIAL Vasant Vihar Depot NON RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES PARKS & OPEN SPACES CIRCULATION SIZE OF HOUSEHOLD <3 3 TO 5 5< Vacant Land & Hilly Area DDA Flats DDA Flats RESIDENTIAL NON RESIDENTIAL DDA FLATS SFS To KATWARIA SARAI To VASANT KUNJ GODAVERI HOSTEL (J.  Land in bulk was acquired in 1957-1958 for the housing scheme of the DDA (R. Vasant Vihar.K.N.2 E 4. Land acquisition happened in two stages:  First acquired for the construction of outervring road in 1953-1954.4.U.PURAM R.K.2 G 4.2 F 4.2 LAND USE DISTRIBUTION OF MUNIRKA VILLAGE ( 2006) .K. JNU) To R.2 B 4.

 Lack of percentage of community facilities.  Traditional street pattern high residential density.  Residential tenants are up to 78 %.  Size of the commercial establishment goes up to more than 50 sqyrd.5 km 1-5 km 5 km < 10 | Contemporary Delhi 4.  A majority of commercial establishment are as old as 30 years. SERVICE SELF EMPLOYED DISTANCE OF WORKPLACE (2007 survey) <0.2 H  No.2 1965 1977  Illegal commercial activity in the extended abadi area. OCCUPATION PATTERN (2007) 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962  Shops are on all floor in some of the buildings. of floors per building are as high as 5 floors.  Tenants are attracted to this village mainly because of work proximity. YEAR OF SHOP ESTABLISHMENT (2007 survey) < 10 years 1980 1992 2011 10 to 20 20 to 30 30 years < .2 D 4.2 F 4.2 B 4.4.  Commercial tenants are as high as 22 %.2 E 4.  Indication of nuclear family system.2 A 4.2 C 4.2 G 4. infrastructure and proper access road to shops.Puram by acting as a commercial hub creating problems of parking. ISSUES  Munirka village act as service provider to nearby planned area such as R.K.

2 C 4.2 E 4.4.2 B 4.First Floor (2006) 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 11 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 G 4.2 D 4.2 A 4.2 F 4.2 H Building Use .2 .Ground Floor (2006) Building Use .

2 F Govt. 9. Housing GOVT. HOUSING 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1. 7. 5. 6.K PURAM SAROJINI NAGAR KIDWAI NAGAR MOTI BAGH LAXMI BAI NAGAR RAVINDAR NAGAR SEWA NAGAR NAUROJI NAGAR SHANTI NIKETAN 1 REFUGEE COLONIES 3 6 8 4 5 8 9 10 7 5 6 4 6 ` URBAN VILLAGE ` GOVERNMENT HOUSING ` 2 9 1 7 25 8 3 7 1 2 11 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 9 4 3 5 Km 5 Km . R.4. 3. 8. 4. 2.

4. JASOLA 13. KUNDLI 8. LOKNAYAK PURAM 4. SHIVAJI ENCLAVE 7. MOTIA KHAN 6. NASIRPUR DWARKA 10. MOLARBAND 12. ROHINI 2. MUKHERJEE NAGAR 3. VASANT KUNJ 11. DILSHAD GARDEN 1 3 6 1 3 6 10 9 8 7 5 6 7 5 8 4 5 4 6 4 2 13 ` ` ` ` REFUGEE URBAN VILLAGE GOVERNMENT DDA 9 2 8 9 1 7 25 8 3 7 1 2 11 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 10 9 4 3 12 11 5 Km 5 Km 5 Km 5 Km .2 G DDA Housing DDA HOUSING 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1. TRIILOKPURI 9. KALYAN VIHAR 5.

But. 765 41.2 H 35% 65% DDA provided EWS Other •Janta / EWS Flats – annual income less than 6000/.m.000/. with corresponding category of dwelling unit (DU)sizes as permissible FAR. •It provides houses to households to whom soft loans are avilable •NRIs whop wish to come back.000/. Etc.2 E 4. Flats constructed till 1990 4.4.2 C 4. 045 44. 095 Category I(one Bedroom) – 55-75 sq. hampering them from displacing middle income groups. now high class could pay for their dwellings in stages. quarters after retirement can have an opportunity to readily own a house •Before SFS. Category III ( three bedroom) – 95-136 sq. DDA only catered to low or middle income groups. Source : DDA Admn.a. 780 Group Housing constructed by DDA (1962-1990).p. it had floated 17 separate registration schemes and allotted a total of over 2 lakh houses under these schemes. 656 76. 94. •MIG Flats – annual income b/w 12. 776 1. 825 59. employees residing in govt. Ctegory II (two Bedroom) – 75-110 sq. low cost housing Reducing financial burden on DDA which previously was constructing dwellings with its own finances. Scheme was a way to obtain financial participation during the period of construction by person who wished to own flats provided by Till 1990. Group Housing Total Registration Allotments Made SFS 74. Delhi Admn. 732 47.000 /.p. Housing types3.m. Some of the schemes provided by DDA •HUDCO Pattern Group Housing Scheme Low specification. 714 MIG 75.2 F DDA HOUSING 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 The DDA launched programme in 1966. TYPE OF FLATS LIG EWS Total Indicative distribution in332 91.2 B 4.2 G 4.a.m. 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 •Self-Financing Schemes In addition to initial deposit.to 8. allottees periodically finance the construction •Scheme for Retired persons – scheme to provide dwelling units to retired employees of central govt. are proposed Slum/EWS housing (upto 25sq. and thus. •LIG Flats – annual income b/w 6000/.70 sqm) 100 DUs/ Acre Category III (85sqm and above) 70 DUs/Acre SELF FINANCING SCHEME & ITS OBJECTIVES It was DDA Launched in 1977.p.2 A 4.40 sqm) 200DUs/ Acre Category II (50. its group housing Density norms.m) 240DUs/Acre Category I (25.2 . can own a readily built house in the near future.a. Report 1991-1992 17 | Contemporary Delhi 4. OBJECTIVES •Govt.. 18.to 24.2 D 4.

Block. The area caters to middle class and upper middle class. B . The most Well known housing Blocks are J&k . RCC RWA J & K BLOCK •The block follows a linear structure •Staggered built mass •Well defined housing clustered separated by 9m wide roads •Service roads lead into the inner areas CIRCULATION Grand Trunk Road at the periphery Main road Secondary access streets and serivce lanes . B .Block and R Block.Block. SG Pocket. Date Agency typology 1980 DDA Plotted high density Facilities •Markets at a walking distance from every block •Medical facilities like Teg Bahadur Hospital •Schools Density height Plot sizes Construction Maintenance 73 du/acre G+3 55 to 136 sqm Brick masonry. E . A .Pocket.Block.Dilshad Garden is a large housing colony situated in East Delhi that was primarily developed by DDA.Pocket. mostly traders and professionals. C . The area is divided into several Blocks and Pockets named from A through R and is well.

Streets across blocks P .Open spaces The clusters are designed such that there are individual open spaces for every 12 plots. • 2-3 bedroom flats Present It become cluttered over years due to rampant unauthorized construction by its residents. Interconnected open spaces They form the center of activity and interaction following a regular geometric pattern hierarchy Along the main road Between clusters Dwelling units •Each unit is repeated 4 times to form a block •Blocks are joined in a staggered form to allow light and ventilation. The open spaces are divided bringing them down to the human scale. I & L have become totally commercial with almost all road facing ground floor flats being turned into shops. This also allows for ample parking space for every unit. . O .

MAYUR VIHAR 11.2 B 4. CHILLA DALLUPURA 12. SOUTH WEST DELHI 9.2 D 4. GEETA COLONY 10.4. ROHINI 2.2 G 4.2 1 7 25 8 3 7 1 2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 9 10 4 3 12 12 11 5 Km 5 Km 5 Km 5 Km . ROTHAK ROAD 6.2 C 4. PITAMPURA 3. NAJAFGARH ROAD 8.2 E 4.2 H Cooperative Housing COOPERATIVE HOUSING 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 1. VIKASPURI 7. SHAHADRA 4. PASHCHIM VIHAR 5.2 F 4.2 A 4. SOUTH DELHI – ALAKNANDA & YAMUNA APARTMENTS 1 1 3 2 3 5 4 7 5 6 9 5 6 13 6 1 3 6 5 4 8 2 4 4 8 9 ` ` ` ` ` REFUGEE URBAN VILLAGE GOVERNMENT DDA COOPORATIVE 9 6 7 10 8 2 8 10 11 7 11 9 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.

2 G 4.90.4m (1991) (200.50.000 units alloted) 55% 1971 11% 8% 1% 0% 1981 17% 13% 6% 0% 17% 7% 1% 32% 6% 25% 1% 1991 14% Plotted development DDA Flats 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 C 4.2 H Planned Housing Production.000) 1976-81 (2.2 F 4. Housing Traditional housing Unauthorized and regularized housing ULCRA (dwelling units for the poor) 7% 2% 23% .000) 1966-71 (1.000) DDA (1961) housing 86% 68% 9% 7% 1% Green buffer 1962 STATUTORY MASTER PLAN Private developers eliminated Co-operative societies 66.2 D 4.2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 During 1950s and 1960s.50.2 A 4.000 flats from 1961 to 1980 SLUMS Poppulation– 1. private developers and housing companies also became active. Delhi (196181) Source : 1961 Master Plan Interim General plan (development of the city) 1951 5% 4% 5% 1961 8% 7% 1533 1857 1911 1947 27% 35% 17% 1961-66 (1.2 B 4.25. Occupied land Created housing (upper class) 47.8m (1961) Relocating the residents 8.000) 21% 1971-76 (1.2 E 4.000 acres of residential land SLUM CLEARANCE AND REHABILITATION Unwilling residents (away from workplaces) Failure of the scheme Improvement of slums 19% 16% Cooperative Group Housing 11% 8% Resettlement or Squatter units Slum Rehousing Govt.4.

2 G 4.2 B 4. of India.2 Housing Stock in 2001.000) 21% 1971-76 (1. To achieve maximum use of land within a time period. concept of group housing societies envisaged the construction of two-storeyed and multistoried buildings. as many as 1400 new societies were registered. Source : Census of India.4. OF SOCIETIES ALLOTED 3 37 72 79 330 530 Growth in the year wise allotment of land to the societies 90% 13 | Contemporary Delhi 4. The new cooperatives societies were permitted to register only as group housing societies.50. 416 new societies were registered. Planned Housing Production.000) 27% 5% 3%2% Pucca Semi .2 F COOPERATIVE HOUSING The concept of cooperative group housing societies was introduced in Delhi with the decision of the govt.2 C YEAR 1978 1980 1982 1984 Pucca Semi . Delhi (1961-81) Source : 1961 Master Plan 17% 35% 1961-66 (1. ALLOCATION OF LAND TO GROUP HOUSING SOCIETIES YEAR 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 NO. 161 societies were registered as group housing societies and by 1979.2 D 4. OF SOCIETIES COMPLETED 2 5 26 45 120 250 518 400 D. . Source : Census of India.2 A 4.25.2 H Growth in the year wise completion of the number of societies and dwelling units provided Source : Registrar of Cooperative Societies 89% Dwarka sub-city Group Housing required less land but would accommodate more number of families.000) 1966-71 (1.000) 1976-81 (2. 1000 2600 4500 16500 35250 73000 4. Housing Stock in 1981.pucca Servicable kutcha Unservicable kutcha 1986 1988 1990 NO.U. 2001 By 1973.pucca Servicable kutcha Unservicable kutcha By 1983. Ministry of works and Housing in February 1970.2 E 4.50. 1981 2% 2% 7% 4.90.

3 acres (195 units) Architects Group Housing Constructed By DDA 19621990 GROUP HOUSING SFS TOTAL REGISTRATION ALLOTMENTS MADE 74.714 MIG 75.2 G 4.2 C 4. Beams and Brickwork in cement mortar.780 LIG 91.776 Typology Area Density FAR height Construction 45 dwelling units per acre 175 G+3 RCC Columns.2 •Plot holders housing cooperative society: society develops residential area and sells plots to members •Tenant co. 12. The west façade is blank with external wall finished with stone aggregate applied insitu.2 E 4.000 dwelling units were built in 20 colonies for the displaced people. the government took up a large scale housing program for its growing number of employees. Between 1947 and 1962. Types of cooperative housing societies: •Tenant ownership cooperative housing society: land is held by the society and houses are owned by members.2 B 4.2 D 4.825 EWS 76. By society Cooperative Housing Societies Cooperative housing societies concept was introduced by the Ministry of Works and Housing in 1970 to achieve maximum land use. Ranjit Sabikhi And Ajoy Choudhary .2 H YAMUNA APARTMENTS About 65.732 47. •Housing finance cooperative society: raises funds and provides finance to its members for construction. . •Authorities concerned with cooperative housing: •Delhi Development Authority •The cooperative department and the Land and Building Department of Delhi Administration •Municipal Corporation of Delhi The units are oriented north-south with openings in north and balconies in the south. The Design Group Low rise medium density 4.partnership housing cooperative: society holds both land and buildings.000 units were constructed for government servants.2 A 4.4.656 41.332 59. Besides.045 44. Maintenance Land Use 25% 40% 35% BUILT UP OPEN AREAS ROADS 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 F 4. Date Clients 1981 (1962-80) The Yamuna Co-operative Group Housing Society Ltd.

partly open to the sky. 6. 4.2 H • A grassy common and hard-surfaced public area with a stage for outdoor performances.e.2 F 4. COST / SQ. i.2 B 4. A puja Room was established right next to the kitchen • To reduce the heating effect each unit is sheltered on the outside by either a balcony or terrace and also a shaft is provided in the internal area for the ventilation of internal spaces.000 70. 7. • The access staircase 15 | Contemporary Delhi 4. • Limited types of units.2 C 1. Living Dining Kitchen Bedroom Balcony Patio Shaft • Compact clustering • Each unit has a courtyard or terrace.00. 6. 80 80 80 TOTAL COST 1.2 A 4. people of south indian origin.4. 4. 5.2 D 4. 7. 5.000 1. FT.2 E 4. 3. leading to inevitable repetition of standard volumes • It was designed keeping in mind the people who were going to reside here. integrated into the scheme • Network of short and narrow pedestrian streets • Road network is peripheral TYPE A B C AREA (SQ.000 87. FT. 3.2 G 4. Living Dining Kitchen Bedroom Balcony Patio Shaft 4.) 1250 1090 875 CONST. 2.2 . 2.

9.4 sq. 22.4 sq. m.6 sq.P.3 sq. m. m. Circulation 46. 9 sq.1 sq. m. SITE PLAN 17 | Contemporary Delhi 4.66 sq. 6. m.5 to 6.25 sq.2 G 4. HIGH RISE BLOCK Unit covered area Semi-public area Public area 114.2 A 4.25 acres 56 dwelling units per acre 175 G+7 RCC Columns. m. Circulation 4.2 D 4. Services Toilets 18.2 E 4. m. m. m.2 B 4. EXTENSION HIGH RISE HIGH DENSITY 4.4. Kitchen 8.2 F I.0 sq.2 H Maintenance Land Use By society Open Spaces •Central green around the blocks •Vehicular access street and car parking •Roof tops Main Highway Roads BUILT UP 26% 37% OPEN AREAS ROADS Locality Feeder (runs by the plot) 37% Vehicular Access Road (connects the block to the gate) (pedestrian activity zone) Living Bedroom Dining Drawing 40 sq. 22.2 C Date Agency typology Plot sizes Density FAR height Construction 1985-91 DDA/Co-op Society High rise High density 1. Beams and Brickwork in cement mortar.80 sq. m. 13. m. m.8 sq. WALKUP BLOCK 87.2 Circulation Network In The Blocks .

What stemmed out as a result of scarcity of land is now being opted by many through choice. that they are selling off their independent bungalows to buy space in such housings.2 E 4.2 B 4.2 F 4. The positive impact is that there is optimum utilization of space. Apartment blocks are better equipped and provide greater facilities and services to their tenants as opposed to villa homes.4.2 I Builder Apartments Over the past decade or so we can see a shift towards apartment buildings. so much so. The societies built by the private developers are well planned in terms of interspersing huge blocks of dwelling units with green spaces in the form of landscape gardens and recreational spaces. In addition to such developer done up apartment blocks we have a rise in the cooperative group societies in the city. 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 18 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 G 4.2 A 4.2 C 4.2 D 4.2 H 4. Moreover the developers have a lot to offer from in built gyms and swimming pools to community centres and 100% power back up for their clients.2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 . A sense of security which one gets in a well guarded society is the driving force for many individuals.

in close proximity to DLF Golf Links.2 B 4. Phase V.2 F 4. Construction Maintenance Flat sizes Entry to Towers IV Entry to Towers I. ft. II. New Delhi TOWERS TOWERS TOWERS IN CAMPUS ROADS BASEMENT ENTRY 11 M WIDE TOWERS . OPEN-LAYOUT WITH BUILDINGS BEING PLACED IN A MANNER THAT THERE IS NO OVERLOOKING AND MOST OF THE APARTMENTS (50% AT LEAST) ENJOY THE VIEWS OF STRUCTURED LANDSCAPING.2 I Builder Apartments DLF PARK PLACE. Brick masonry. DLF Park Place is located in DLF City. An area in the midst of one of the finest developments by DLF. GURGAON 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 Date Agency typology FAR 2012 DLF High rise low density 350 height Flats G + 29 3 to 4 bedroom apartments.2 G 4. RCC frame structures Society association 1975 – 2704 sq. through a 24 meter wide boulevard to avoid any congestion in the future •Located at a close proximity to DLF Golf and Country Club. it is only at a 14.4. III SUBSECTORI AL ROAD 24 M WIDE TOWERS BASEMENT ENTRY 18 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 D 4.2 E 4.2 A 4.2 C 4.2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 Green buffer spaces with a planned central open space and commercial sectors alongside at the periphery •An easy access from a 60 meter wide Sector Road – connecting Delhi and Faridabad on the one side and Sohna and Jaipur on the other.2 H 4.7 km drive from the Indira Gandhi International Airport.

92 CR 1.2 A 4.200 232. •A more user sensitive planning could have reduced circulation inside the livable units.000 600. DESIGN ANALYSIS •Since the building is planned to be fully air conditioned.41 CR 1.750 2704 6.750 4.2 D 4. .750 2677 6.2 C COSTING & SIZES 3 BR + 3 BR + 3 BR + 4 BR + 4 BR + UTILITY UTILITY UTILITY UTILITY UTILITY ROOM + ROOM + ROOM + ROOM + ROOM + 4T 4T 4T 5T 5T 2282 6.400 GROSS COST 1.000 900.62 CR 1.94 CR BKNG AMT 15 LACS 15 LACS 15 LACS 15 LACS 15 LACS AREA – 2329 SFT.2 G 4.2 B 4.900 267.750 2329 6. AREA – 2677 SFT.2 F 4.700 270.2 •All bedrooms with attached bath •Balconies with most of the living spaces and a utility balcony with kitchen •Air Conditioned Apartments – Controlled Environment •Two Passenger and one Service Elevator per core •Fitted Modular Kitchen •Great Aesthetics •Gated Community – Secure & Safe •Sprawling Greens – serenity all around •Adequate Parking •Structure designed for the highest seismic considerations for Zone V. therefore.4. natural ventialtion has not been incorporated in the design •No buffer space between the main entrance and the guest sitting are.500 228.000 600.2 H BEDROOMS SIZES .2 D 4. AREA – 1975 SFT. AREA – 2677 SFT.000 900. against Zone IV.750 600.SQ FT 1975 RATE PSF * PARKING IBMS @ 100 6.000 197. 19 | Contemporary Delhi 4.66 CR 1.

affordability through the MPD vision of integrated sub cities. AK Jain Main vision of MPD 2021 : develop a world class city with multistory buildings.2 1965 1977 1980 1992 2011 •Quoted by DDA planning commissioner. WHERE WILL THE LAND COME FROM . The Delhi opportunity would bring back quality of life. 000 hectares of land to be released for development PUBLIC – PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP the new Plan seeks to focus on public-private partnerships and has a provision that provides for entry of private developers in the acquisition and development of New Delhi. The new Master Plan is likely to change all that.4. which is likelly to change GREAT OPPORTUNITIES Population to be expected around 230 lakh by 2021. But not much increase in the GC or FAR. This is because of favorable land pricing. with low infrastructure and transportation connect. Whereas. PVT.000 hectares to be unlocked in Delhi under the new Master Plan could help lakhs realize their dreams of owning homes in the Capital by 2021 “ The Gurgaon-Noida story was based on the premise of lack of availability of land in Delhi.2 E 4.2 A 4. considering the demand of housing and increase in population. encouraging acquiring and developing the land Delhi will compete with areas such as Gurgaon and Noida.2 D 4.2 F 4.and affordable housing segment. It was the absolute dearth of land in Delhi that forced people to look for options in the periphery. need 15 lakh* housing units for additional population PRIVATE BUILDERS Entry of private builders. NEW ZONES 90s saw NCR catering to spillover from Delhi. The surrounding markets are creating low-cost/affordable housing projects almost 60-80 kms away from. REVERSE EXODUS The 60.2 C 4. “The largest demand lies in the mid. When there are already numerous housing projects going on around NCR. is it justifiable to eleminate green cover for the sake of housiing. JUST TO AGAIN CONGEST THE CITY MORE. HIGHRISE HOUSING is the need of the times. ? But. 20 | Contemporary Delhi 4. . .2 H 4.2 G 4.2 J Future of Housing in Delhi (Master Plan 2021) “ 1533 1857 1911 1947 1962 UNLOCKING LAND Five new sub cities proposed in Delhi under MPD 2021 LAND BONANZA 60.2 B 4.

back lanes seem narrower due to encroachment. Urban structure : well planned. preet vihar being the main commercial area. but now has lead to omission of front and back yards. servants. Dwellings : dense built form due to small plot sizes and layout. Streets connect all plots but slow.4. Visual Character : presents as sense of high density housing with small pockets of green areas dispersed randomly.2 I.A. SOCIAL ASPECTS Evolution : encroachment was limited to shops for some time.R : 225 Site coverage : 45% Roads : 20% Open areas: 35% ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS Open and Built spaces : there is a little public open space occurring as cluster level open space.P.25 acres F. minor variation in plot size. Original structures of masonry walls and asbestos sheet roofing which upgraded gradually.2 H 4. everyday amenities in close proximity Human scale : due to no encroachment on front yard these lanes give a better perception of openness and is pleasing. Public circulation and street pattern : vehicular movement mainly on hemu kalani marg and bazaar marg.R : 175 Site coverage : 35% Open and built spaces : open area is central & public and common to all residents. Evolution : part of DDA / co-op society. EXTENSION (KALLOL APARTMENTS) Demographic & economic conditions : middle class & upper middle class.2 E 4. pollution rising due to arterial roads connecting shankar road to karol bagh. where a block or a part of it left unbuilt. Changes limited to individual housing projects Public Circulation and traffic pattern : Connection to city by wide primary roads.2 A 4.2 B 4. but starting to be chaotic due to insufficient width of roads and rampant encroachment.2 G 4. Visual character : open spaces have very imposing built mass around them .2 H Comparisons CASE STUDY RAJINDER NAGAR ECONOMIC ASPECTS Demographic & economic conditions : earlier. mostly traders and professionals Dwellings : DDA / Co-op societies. allotted to refugees from govt.5 to 6. 20 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 F 4.2 C 4. Well served by public transport system running through bazaar marg. Micro climate : cool due top narrow streets. With an increasing vehicular density and parking problems.A. high rise high density apartments Density : 56 du/acre Plot sizes : 1. Layout and street pattern : strongly grid iron. Density : 60 du/acre F.2 D 4. and abundant but under-utilised Layout and street pattern :plots laid out don‟t show any logical basis or system Human scale : due to high rise apartments human scale is dwarfed Micro-climate : shaded voids occurring b/w buildings facilitates airflow Urban structure : large circulation areas due to high rise housing lead to inadequate monitoring which makes them uneconomical in terms of use nor they have any public character. now it caters to middle class and upper middle class tenants. Monitoring of large circulation stretches is absent.

servants of South Indian origin.2 C 4. 4.2 H 21| Contemporary Delhi 4. but subdued due to chalky veneer of aggregate plaster.2 D 4. Network of short and narrow streets. Dwellings : compact clustering. Grassy common and hard surfaced public area. Area : 4.2 A 4.4. Micro climate : series of courtyard and terraces allow for movement of air leading to good ventilation and comfortable living.2 . Visual Character : Brutalism is visible in the expression of material and structure. Layout and street pattern : road network peripheral.2 F 4. Limited types of units leading to inevitable repetition.2 G 4.3 acres Density : 45 dwelling units per acre Open and Built spaces : each unit having a courtyard or terrace.2 E CASE STUDY ECONOMIC ASPECTS ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS SOCIAL ASPECTS YAMUNA APARTMENTS Demographic & economic conditions : allotted to Govt.2 B 4.

2 C 4.2 F 4.2 B 4.2 D 4.2 G 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 E 4.2 A 4.4.2 .

2 D 4.2 B 4.2 C 4.2 F 4.2 .4.2 A 4.2 G 13 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 D 4.

2 G 12 | Contemporary Delhi 4.2 C 4.2 A 4.2 B 4.2 .2 D 4.2 F 4.2 E 4.4.

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COLOR CODING FOR THE GROUPS Policies Issue Specific Technology and Climate City Specific Site Specific .

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