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THE ART OF PUBLIC SPEAKING

MR. ROWIN P. RIOS Director II (Resource Speaker Person)

Raw Hands On IMPROMPTU SPEAKING With Feedback.


Analyzing Delivery Composition of Ideas Message Call For Action

Lecture on IMPROMPTU SPEAKING Made Easy


PREP
Point Reason Example Point

SMG
Story Message Gain

PPF
Past Present Future

CONTRAST
- Before & After - Advantage & Disadvantage

SPEECH WRITING Made Easy


Audience Analysis Topic Importance of the Topic to the Audience Compelling Message Gain Call For Action

HOW TO ORGANIZE YOUR PRESENTATION


Step Step Step Step 1: 2: 3: 4: DEVELOP OBJECTIVE ANALYZE THE AUDIENCE BRAIN STORM MAIN IDEAS DEVELOP VISUALS, HANDOUTS & NOTES STATE THE BENEFITS STATE MAIN IDEA STRUCTURE INTRODUCTION AND CONCLUSION

Step 5: Step 6: Step 7:

HOW TO MAKE YOUR SPEECH SPARKLE


Rewrite & Redefine your Speech Add Suitable Humorous Stories, Epigrams and Amusing definitions Use Illustrations From Biographies, Plays or From Literature Repeat Some Words or Phrases

Interpret Short Sentences With Long Ones


Avoid Boring Repetitions

10 STEPS IN WRITING A SPEECH


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Choose Your Subject. Describe it in a Sentence. Know Your Purpose. Identify Your Audience. Know The Time Limits. Decide on The Types of Speech. Research Your Subject. Outline The Speech. Draft the Text. Rehearse The Speech. Pay Attention to the Audience Reaction

SPEECH DRAFT
1. 2. Did you begin with an attention getter? Is there a sentence in your introduction, which tells the audience exactly what your speech will be about? 3. Did you state the main points in your introduction? 4. Do your transition statements tie the speech together so that your speech naturally flows from one idea to the next? 5. Did you restate the main points in your conclusions? 6. Do your concluding lines directly relate to your introduction in some way? If you can answer YES to all these questions then begin polishing your speech and create your final draft.

PARTS OF COMMUNICATION
1. What to say 2.To whom to say 3.Whom to Say 4.How to say

INGREDIENTS OF COMMUNICATION
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Has to organize from a source Idea Channel Receiver Feedback

METHODS OF COMMUNICATION
1. Written 2. Oral 3. Non-Verbal

BEHAVIORAL SKILLS OF COMMUNICATION


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Eye Communication Posture Movement Gestures/Facial Expressions Dress/Appearance Voice/Vocal Variation Language/Non-Verbal Listeners Involvement Humor The Natural Self

HOW TO DELIVER
BE PREPARED USE:
Gestures Eye contact Descriptive Language Pauses Vocal Variation

KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE, PLACE, TOPIC, TIME, ETC.

TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR EFFECTIVE WRITING COMMUNICATION


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Keep your writing clear, concise & simple. Choose your words carefully. Be natural. Avoid fad words, jargon and clich. Use active verbs-avoid passive construction. Take a stand, make a commitment. Use familiar words-simple English. Be specific. Eliminate redundant expression. Keep your audience in mind.

SUBJECT AND VERB AGREEMENT


RULES: 1. The verb agrees with its subject in person and in number.

2. Intervening words between the subject and the verb like with, together with, along with, as well as, have no effect upon the number of the verb.

ex: One of the participants is not feeling well.

ex: The salad, with red and green peppers, is very spicy.

3. A compound subject joined by and requires a plural verb. When the two subjects or a single thought, a singular verb is used.
Ex: The house and lot is not for sale.

4. Singular words joined by or, nor, either or, neither nor, to form a compound subject are singular.

Ex: Either the chef or my friend is coming over to the party.

5. When a singular word and a plural word are joined by or, nor, either or, neither-nor, to form a compound subject, the verb agrees with the subject nearer it.
Ex: Neither the chef or my friends, are behind the big party.

6. If one subject is used affirmatively and the other negatively, the verb agrees with subject that is used affirmatively.
Ex: The appetizers, not the salad, are spicy.

7. Some indefinite pronouns are always used with the third person singular form of the verb; each, everybody, any, anybody, anyone, someone, nobody and another.
Ex: Everyone enjoys the brain teasers.
The following indefinite pronouns are ordinarily used with the third person plural form of the verb.
Ex: Many are called but few are chosen.

Some indefinite pronouns may be either singular or plural. Some, all and most are singular when they refer to quality. They are plural when they refer to number: all, any, most, none, some.
Ex: Most of the story was exaggerated. Some of the details were questioned.

8. Some nouns are plural in form but are regarded as singular in meaning. That is, they end in s, but they stand for one thing, as in measles, mumps, news.
Ex: The news now-a-days on kidnapping is too depressing.

9. The word people, meaning races, tribes or nations, is plural


The word person, meaning many persons, is considered plural and is ordinarily used with the third person plural form of verb.

Ex: People need people.

10. The title of a book, play, story or musical composition is used with a singular verb.
Ex: Les Miserables is a valuable masterpiece.

11. When the expression the number precedes a subject, a singular form of the verb is ordinarily used; when the expression a number precedes a subject, a plural verb is used.
Ex: The number of pro-impeachment congressmen belongs to the minority. A number of senators are antiimpeachment, too.

THANK YOU...!!!