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STRENGHT EXERCSE FOR KNEE PAN

DENZ ERDEM
PHYSICAL MEDICINE & REHABILITATION IV.CLASS V.COURSE

Definition

Knee pain is a common complaint that affects people of all ages. Knee pain may be the result of an injury, such as a ruptured ligament or torn cartilage. Medical conditions including arthritis, gout and infections also can cause knee pain.

Symptoms
Swelling and stiffness Redness and warmth to the touch Weakness or instability Popping or crunching noises "Locking," or inability to fully straighten the knee

Causes
Knee pain can be caused by injuries, mechanical problems, types of arthritis and other problems. Injuries:ACL injury,Menscus,Knee bursitis,Patellar tendinitis Mechanical problems:Knee 'locking, dislocated kneecap Types of arthritis:Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Septic arthritis

Risk factors
Age Excess weight Mechanical problems Lack of muscle flexibility Certain sports Previous injury

Treatment

Rest. Taking a break from your normal activities reduces repetitive strain on your knee, gives the injury time to heal and helps prevent further damage. A day or two of rest may be all that's needed for minor injuries. More severe damage is likely to need a longer recovery time. Ice. A staple for most acute injuries, ice reduces both pain and inflammation. A bag of frozen peas works well because it covers your whole knee. You can also use an ice pack wrapped in a thin towel to protect your skin. Although ice therapy is generally safe and effective, don't use ice for longer than 20 minutes at a time because of the risk of damage to your nerves and skin.

Compression. This helps prevent fluid buildup in damaged tissues and maintains knee alignment and stability. Look for a compression bandage that's lightweight, breathable and self-adhesive. It should be tight enough to support your knee without interfering with circulation. Elevation. Because gravity drains away fluids that might otherwise accumulate after an injury, elevating your knee can help reduce swelling. Try propping your injured leg on pillows or sitting in a recliner

Strenght Exercises

Push Step

Stand with your left side to a step or platform and place the left foot on the step. Push into the step to lift up a few inches and lower back down. Continue with the push step, moving quickly, for 30-60 seconds on the left leg before switching to the right. Repeat for 1-3 sets.

Wall Sit Stand against a wall and slide down as low as you can (no lower than 90 degrees), making sure your knees stay behind your toes. Hold this position, keeping the weight in the heels for 15-30 seconds. Repeat for 1-3 sets.

Knee Lifts Loop a resistance band around your ankles (optional), leaving enough space so that the band is tight when feet are spread about a foot apart. Shift the band under the bottom of the standing foot and hold onto a wall or chair for balance if needed. Lift the right knee up until it's level with the hip (or as high as you can). Lower and repeat for 1-3 sets of 10 reps on each side.

Hamstring Curls Stand in front of a chair for balance and bend the right knee, bringing your foot up behind you (like you're kicking your own butt). Slowly lower and repeat for 1-3 sets of 10 reps on each leg. Add intensity by wrapping a resistance band around your ankles (as shown) or use ankle weights.

Side Leg Lifts

Stand sideways to a chair or wall for support and tie a resistance band around your ankles (optional). Lift the left leg out to the side, foot flexed and the hip, knee and foot in alignment. Try to lift the leg without tilting at the torso. Lower and repeat for 1-3 sets of 10 reps. You can also use an ankle weight.

Lunge Stretch Stand in a staggered stance, right foot forward and left foot back (you can hold onto a wall for balance if needed). Bend both knees and press the back hip forward until you feel a stretch in the front of the left thigh and hip flexor. Hold for 1530 seconds and repeat for 3 sets on each side.

Standing Calf Stretch Stand in a staggered stance, right foot forward and left foot back (you can hold onto a wall for balance if needed). Bend the front knee and lean forward until you feel a stretch in the calf of your left leg. Hold for 15-30 seconds and repeat for 3 sets on each side.

Straight Leg Raise Sit tall with the left leg bent and the right leg straight, foot flexed. Wrap your arms around the left leg for support and engage the abs. Lift the right leg off the floor, keeping the leg straight (but not locked). Avoid leaning back, but use your core and the left leg to stay upright. Lower the leg, lightly touching the floor and repeat for 1-3 sets of 10 reps and add ankle weights for added intensity if desired.