Whitehall Football

Installing the Offensive Package:

Offensive Line

Offensive Philosophy
• Establish strong inside running game • Few plays from a variety of looks • Force defense to cover entire field

“I don’t believe God put us on this earth to be ordinary” Lou Holtz

“It is difficult for a team to have outstanding morale, confidence and enthusiasm when it cannot look to the offensive line to establish the tempo of the ball game”
• If the offensive line comes to the huddle with confidence in their eyes, the other offensive player’s confidence will rise

Offensive Line Techniques and Teaching Progressions
• Splits • Front Recognition • Stance • Blocks

Splits
• 2 feet (adjustable by game plan) • Depth: we will align off the ball as much as possible, with helmet at belt of center
– Defender has less contact time to shed block – Allows adjustment to defensive line movement – Provides separation from pass rush – Exception: we will crowd the LOS on the

Front Recognition
• Covered or Uncovered • Technique call if Covered. Ex. “5”, “3”, “9”. Many of our blocking schemes require combination blocking, and making a technique call helps teammates in determining what they will do.

Stance Stance
• 3-point stance, with 40% of weight on down hand • Flat back, with toes pointed straight ahead • Toe-to-heel stagger • Weight distribution should allow you to both run block and pass set effectively

Run Blocks
Basic Fundamentals (must occur on every block)
• 1st Step (Directional Step). Must be 6” or less, quick and decisive. Prepares blocker to engage defender. If step is too far, or too slow, he’ll never get second foot down before contact with defender. • 2nd Step (Attack Step). To cylinder of body of defender. The explosion of the block will take place with 2nd step firmly in ground.

Zone-Scheme Blocks
• • • • • • • • • • Base Block Stretch-Double Block Rip-Reach Block Overtake Block Base Block Down Block Reach Block Pull Block Trap Block Double Team Block

Man-Scheme Blocks

Base Block
Backside Shade or head-up: "Tough" step 4" directly forward, getting it down quickly so that the second step is right at the cylinder of the defender. Playside Shade: "Wedge" step at a 45 degree angle to gain playside leverage, getting it down quickly so that the second step is right at the cylinder of the defender.

The Base block will be used on an inside zone play (23/24 Slam) anytime a blocker is "covered"--mea he has a defender head-up, inside shade, or outside shade. The blocker will ALWAYS step with his playside foot. The type of step we will use is dependent on the shade of the defender:

24 Slam

24 Slam

B T T N

B T E

Both blockers need playside leverage, so take "Wedge" step at 45 degrees.

RT and TE both have playside leverage on their defenders, so they will "Tough" step. C has a playside shade, so he must "Wedge" step to gain leverage.

Stretch-Double Block
The Stretch-Double block will be used on an inside zone play (23/24 Slam) anytime a blocker is "uncovered"--meaning he does not have a down defender anywhere over him. The blocker will step laterally with his playside foot, looking to "double" the next down defender with his teammate. If the defender slants in, the blocker is in perfect position to assume the block, so his teammate can "one arm bench" him and move to the next level (LB). If the defender moves outside, the blocker will continue on his track to the next level (LB). If the down defender fights to maintain his position, the blocker and his teammate will stay on the double team, driving him backwards to the next level.

Stretch-Double Block
24 Slam 24 Slam

B N

B T

B N

B T

Both G's use stretch-double to create double teams, driving the down defenders backwards

Both G's step to stretch-double, and climb to LB when down defender goes away

24 Slam

B N

B T

24 Slam

B T

B T E

Both G's step to stretch-double, and assume base block on down defenders who step to them. C and RT will one-arm bench press and climb to LBs.

LG will stretch-double and assume base block, with C one-arm benching and climbing to LB. RT will stretch-base and climb to LB while RG bases the slant inside.

Rip-Reach Block

The Rip-Reach block will be used by all covered blockers on the outside zone play (27/28 Stretch), and by the back-side tackle (BST) on the inside zone play (23/24 Slam) vs. an inside shade. The purpose is to overtake a defender that is head-up or outside, gaining outside leverage. There is less emphasis with this block on driving the opponent back, and more on gaining outside position, to allow our back to get outside. The blocker will take a normal 6" lateral step playside, and then crossover on his second step. While making the second step, the blocker will dip his inside shoulder and rip his inside arm low across the body of the down defender, gaining outside position. He will then drive his outside hand into the defender's outside pec, and squeeze him back while swinging to the outside. The blocker's shoulders should now be somewhat square as he drives the defender upfield.

Rip-Reach Block
28 Stretch 24 Slam

B T N

B T E T

B N

B T E

All covered linemen execute Rip-Reach to gain outside leverage on play going outside.

BST executes Rip-Reach on inside shade defender to gain inside leverage. (vs. an outside shade, let him go and climb to LB)

Overtake Block

An Overtake block is used by uncovered linemen on the outside zone (27/28 Stretch). The purpose is to "overtake" the next down defender, and assume that block, freeing the next blocker over to climb to the LB level. The uncovered lineman will step laterally 6" and crossover, much like the Rip-Reach. He then tries to get "ahead" of the next down defender, in essence pushing his teammate off him so that he may climb to the next level.
a. If defender is going away, continue on a track up the field to the second level, finding a scraping LB with your eyes. If he gets ahead of you, you may have to "Rip-reach" him. Use inside arm to gain leverage, and control arm to square him up as you run him up field. b. If defender is coming towards you, you will assume the drive block from partner. Drive him upfield.

Overtake Block
28 Stretch 28 Stretch

B T N

B T E T

B N

B T E

Both G's attempt to Overtake the next down defender, pushing teammate off to climb to LB. The covered blockers will step upfield on the second step, and one-arm bench defender to uncovered partner.

Both G's attempt to Overtake the next down defender, and climb to LB when defender slants away.

Man Blocks
• These entail portions of blocks previously mentioned • Details needed??

Running Game
• 23/24 Slam • 27/28 Stretch • 17/18 Speed Option • 33/34 Iso • 25/26 Counter • 21/22 Trap

Pass Protection Concepts
• Must match-up with potential rushers • “Man-Zone” concept • “80” call: playside is to right (“180” call: playside is to left • C blocks to backside, unless adjustment • Base Call: allows us to block 3 playside, and 3 backside

180 Protection

B E T

B T E

Six potential rushers. Able to block 3 rushers playside, and 3 weakside.
80 Protection

B E T N

B E

Six potential rushers, but there are now FOUR weakside rushers.

1. 80/180 Protection Base Rules: block man across firmly on LOS, allowing no inside penetration. RBs have EMLOS. Adjustments: to allow better match-ups
BOB, Away, Name, Four, Lucky/Ringo
B N T E E B T B T E E T

B E T

B N T E

80 Protection

80 Protection

180 Protection

180 Protection

B E T

B T E

"Base" call. RB has EMLOS. Easily able to block 3 rushers playside, and 3 weakside.

80 Protection

B E T T

B E

"BOB" call by RT. Gives us better match-up in terms of size. Blocking 3 rushers each side.

180 Protection

B E T N

B T E

7 potential rushers, so QB makes "Y" call, keeping TE in. RB automatically blocks away, and get "Edge" call from RT. Now able to block FOUR weak
80 Protection

B N

B T E

E

T

7 potential rushers, so QB makes "Y" call, keeping TE in. RB will automatically block away, and gets "BOB" call from LT. Now able to block FOUR weakside rushers.

Pass Protection Fundamentals
PPP--Pass Protection Posture

The most important component in an offensive lineman's pass protection is his "set": getting his body in position to block the rusher. If a lineman has a good pass set, he has won 75% of the battle. He wants to get to a position where he has his nose on the rusher's inside armpit.

Two Pass Sets we will use:
• Lateral Set • Kick-Slide